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59931960 Guide to Rural Scotland Argyll

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1Guide to Rural Scotland ARGYLLSHIRE F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and faunaLooking for somewhere to stay, eat, drink or shop? www.findsomewhere.co.uk2Guide to Rural Scotland ARGYLLSHIRE F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and faunaLooking for somewhere to stay, eat, drink or shop? www.findsomewhere.co.ukRENFREWSHARGYLLAND BUTETurnberryAscogShandonGarelochheadCairndowWest KilbrideKilmacolmFairlieInnellanArdentinnyLussArrocharLochranzaPirnmillSouthendLaggSkipnessPortavadieKilfinanCorrieKilchattanKilmartin AchnamaraAchahoishRhubodachBlackwaterfootGlenbarrBellochantuyKilberryKilmoryTayvallichCrinanEllaryDippenArdminishSadellFurnaceArduaineArdfernKilmelfordArdluiBridge ofOrchyDalmallyTyndrumCladichStronmilchanKilninverKilchrenanBenderlochLochbuieLochdonlFishertonKirkoswaldCulroyMachariocKildalloigUgadaleKilkenzieMuasdaleWhitingBaySlidderyImacharCrossaig TarbertCrogganMayboleLargsMillportRothesayCampbeltownObanStrachurTarbetTighnabruaichKennacraigTarbertBrodickInverarayLochgilpheadTayinloanArdlussaCraignurePortnacroishBallachulishLochalineDunoonHelensburghAyrPrestwickIrvineTroonKilwinningArdrossanDuLOCATOR MAP Towns andVillagesArdanaiseig Garden pg 31Ardchattan pg 28Ardentinny pg 9Arduaine pg 31Arrochar pg 22Auchindrain pg 23Barcaldine pg 28Benmore pg 8Bute pg 4Cairndow pg 20Campbeltown pg 10Carradale pg 12Connel Bridge pg 27Crarae pg 23Dalavich pg 31Druimneil House Garden pg 29Dunadd pg 15Dunoon pg 6Dunstaffnage pg 27Glenbarr pg 12Inveraray pg 18Kilberry pg 18Kilmarie pg 18Kilmartin pg 16Kilmelford pg 31Kilmichael Glassary pg 16Kilmory pg 18Kilmun pg 7Kinlochlaich Gardens pg 28Loch Awe pg 29Lochgilphead pg 14Oban pg 23Saddell pg 11Southend pg 11Strachur pg 20Tarbert pg 12Taynuilt pg 29Toward pg 93Guide to Rural Scotland ARGYLLSHIRE F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and faunaLooking for somewhere to stay, eat, drink or shop? www.findsomewhere.co.ukArgyll (sometimes also called Argyllshire) isone of the most diverse and beautiful countiesin Scotland. It sits on the countrys westernseaboard, where long sea lochs penetrate deepinto the interior and mountains tumble downtowards fertile glens.The name Argyll comes from the GaelicEarraghaidheal, meaning the coastline of theGaels. It can truly claim to be the cradle ofScotland, for this was at one time the kingdomof Dalriada, founded by the Scotti whooriginally came from Ireland in the 6thcentury. Here, at the fortress of Dunadd, theyestablished their capital. From Dunadd, inAD843 Kenneth MacAlpin, King of Dalriada,set off towards Scone in Perthshire (taking theStone of Destiny with him) to claim thethrone of the Picts through his mothersfamily, thus uniting the two great northernkingdoms and creating an embryonic Scotland,at that time called Alba. In the11th century, the Lothians (centred onEdinburgh) and Strathclyde (centred onDumbarton) were absorbed, and Scotland aswe largely know it today was formed.The other great Dalriadan centre was atwhat is now Dunstaffnage, north of Oban.The site is nowadays occupied byDunstaffnage Castle, one of the mostspectacular fortifications on Scotlands westernseaboard. And the 12th-century Castle Sween,on the shores of Loch Sween, is reckoned tobe the oldest surviving stone built castle onthe Scottish mainland.Though it has attractive towns, such asOban, Lochgilphead, Inveraray andCampbeltown, Argyll is sparsely populated.There are few clogged highways (thoughOban can get very busy in the summerArgyllmonths), and driving is a pleasure. The climateis mild, thanks to the Gulf Stream, and theplace has many fine gardens to explore, suchas Ardkinglas, Crarae and Arduaine, some withpalm trees and other species you would notexpect to thrive so far north.Man has lived in Argyll for centuries.Around Kilmartin there are cairns andstanding stones built long before the ancientEgyptians built the pyramids. A museum inthe village of Kilmartin itself records thehistory of the area, and explains the manycairns, standing stones, stone circles, gravesand henges that abound in the area.The Argyll coastline is rugged and rocky,though there are some marvellous, glisteningbeaches, which are invariably empty. And, whilethe landscapes are rugged and romantic, thereare also lush meadows and farmlands whereheavily-horned Highland cattle can be seen.The island of Bute, in the Firth of Clyde,also forms part of Argyll. Along with Arranand the Cumbraes, it used to form the countyof Bute, but local government reorganisationin the 170s meant its demise as anadministrative unit, sharing out its islandsbetween Argyll and Ayrshire.That great peninsula known as the Mull ofKintyre, which hangs down into the Atlanticlike an arm, is also in Argyll. This is a remotepart of Scotland. It forms part of themainland yet is as isolated as any island.Though Glasgow is only 60 miles fromCampbeltown as the crow flies, it takes theaverage driver three or four hours overtwisting, loch-girt roads to reach it. This is thearea made famous by Sir Paul McCartneyssong Mull of Kintyre, where he sings of mistsrolling in from the sea.4Guide to Rural Scotland ARGYLLSHIRE F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and faunaLooking for somewhere to stay, eat, drink or shop? www.findsomewhere.co.ukButeE Ardencraig Gardens D Canada HillA Rothesay Castle B Bute MuseumA Church of St Mary C Dunagoil Vitrified FortB Isle of Bute Discovery Centre H Victorian ToiletsJ West Island Way A St Blanes ChapelA St Ninians Chapel A St Macailles ChapelA Mount Stuart HouseE Ascog Hall Fernery & GardenThe island of Bute is the second largest of theislands in the Firth of Clyde, and used to bepart of the small county of the same name,which also took in Arran and the Cumbraes. Itis about 15 miles long by five miles wide, andthough it now comes under Argyll, theHighland Boundary Fault passes right throughthe islands capital, Rothesay, and the 175-acreLoch Fad in the heart of the island. Thismeans that the larger northern part is in theHighlands while the smaller southern part is inthe Lowlands. The scenery reflects this, withthe north being rugged, while the south ispastoral, with many small farms andsettlements.There are two ferries connecting Bute to themainland. The main one is from Wemyss Bayin Renfrewshire to Rothesay, while another,smaller one, runs between Ardentraive on theCowal Peninsula and Rhubodach on the northeast tip of the island. The latter crossing takesonly about five minutes, with the distancebeing just a third of a mile. At one time cattle,instead of being transported between Buteand the mainland, were made to swim thecrossing.The main town Rothesay, is an ancient royalburgh that was given its charter in 1401. It isone of the most famous holiday resorts on theFirth of Clyde, and at one time attractedthousands of Glasgow tourists during theGlasgow Fair, which is always the last twoweeks in July. Fine Victorian mansions line thefront, built to take Glasgow merchants whowould descend on the town, along with familyand servants. There were also more modestB&Bs and guest houses that took in theworking classes for what was their one and onlyholiday of the year. It eventually earned thenickname of Scotlands Madeira, not justbecause it was on an island, but because palmtrees flourish here due to the influence of theGulf Stream.The gentleness of the climate can best beappreciated at Ardencraig Gardens inArdencraig Lane, which were bought byRothesay Town Council in 1970. They formedpart of the original gardens designed by PercyCane for the owners of Ardencraig House.Every summer it shimmers with colour, and isa popular spot with holidaymakers. Anotherpopular spot is Canada Hill, to the south ofthe town, where there are spectacular views ofthe Firth of Clyde. From here, people used towatch ships sailing down the Clyde takingScottish emigrants to a new life in NorthAmerica, hence its name. On the sea front is amemorial to people who left Rothesay butnever returned - the six hundred Butebowmen who fought alongside WilliamWallace at the Battle of Falkirk in 1298.Rothesay Castle (Historic Scotland) is oneof the oldest in Scotland. It is a royal castle withan unusual circular curtain wall and a water-filled moat, and was probably built in the 13thcentury by Walter, third steward of the royalhousehold. Not long after, the Vikings besiegedit. King Haakon of Norway took it in 1263, butwas later defeated at the Battle of Largs. TheTreaty of Perth, signed in 1266, gave Scotland5Guide to Rural Scotland ARGYLLSHIRE F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and faunaLooking for somewhere to stay, eat, drink or shop? www.findsomewhere.co.ukthe Inner Hebrides and the island of Bute, andit became a favourite residence of the firstStuart king, Robert II, and his son, Robert III,who may have died there. The courtyardcontains the remains of a royal chapel,dedicated to St Michael the Archangel.It was Robert III who created the dukedomof Rothesay (the first such dukedom inScotland), and conferred it on his eldest son.Ever since, all royal heirs bear the title, withPrince Charles being the present duke. Thewhole building was in a ruinous state until1816, when it was

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