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CPRIPerspective Plan

VISION - 2025

Central Potato Research Institute(Indian Council of Agricultural Research)

CPRIHkkd` vuqiICAR

Shimla 171 001, HP, IndiaHkkd` vuqiICAR

CPRI

Tel.: 0177-2625073 Fax: 0177-2624460 E-mail: [email protected] Website: http://cpri.ernet.in

INDIAN COUNCIL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH

CPRIPerspective Plan

VISION - 2025

Central Potato Research Institute(Indian Council of Agricultural Research)

Shimla 171 001, HP, IndiaTel.: 0177-2625073 Fax: 0177-2624460 E-mail: [email protected] Website: http://cpri.ernet.in

CPRIHkkd` vuqiICAR

INDIAN COUNCIL OF AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH

Central Potato Research InstituteShimla 171 001, HP, India Tel. : 0177-2625073 Fax : 0177-2624460 E-mail : [email protected] Website : http://cpri.ernet.in

Published by Dr. S.K. Pandey Director

Compiled and edited by S.K. Pandey, P.S. Naik, K.C. Sud, and S.K. Chakrabarti

Production Avnish Atrey

Correct Citation CPRI - Perspective Plan Vision 2025 Central Potato Research Institute Shimla 171 001, HP, India

July 2007

Printed at Nirmal Vijay Printers B 62/8, Naraina Industrial Area Phase II, New Delhi - 110028 Ph: 25891449, 9811053617

FOREWORD Indian agriculture must continuously evolve to remain ever responsive to manage the change and to meet the growing and diversified needs of different stakeholders in the entire production to consumption chain. In order to capitalize on the opportunities and to convert weaknesses into opportunities, we at the ICAR attempted to visualize an alternate agricultural scenario from present to twenty years hence. In this endeavour, an in-depth analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) was undertaken to place our research and technology development efforts in perspective so that we succeed in our pursuit of doing better than the best. Accordingly, the researchable issues are identified, strategies drawn and programmes indicated to have commensurate projects and relevant activities coinciding with the launch of the 11th Five Year Plan. The Central Potato Research Institute (CPRI), Shimla will undertake basic and strategic research aimed at the development of varieties and sustainable technologies for enhancing productivity and quality, diversification of processed products and minimizing post harvest losses of potato in the country. It has assigned priority for producing disease free breeders seed. Accordingly, the research programmes have been suggested on a time scale with proper prioritisation to carry out research effectively. Emphasis has been laid on proper exploitation of wide genetic material, development of parental lines and varieties resistant to late blight, viruses, bacterial wilt and other biotic/abiotic stresses through gene cloning and development of transgenics and marker assisted selection. Priority is also set for the development of IPM practices and technology assessment and refinement. The national and international linkages have been identified for proper scientific exchange. It is expected that realizing the Vision embodied in the document would further ensure that the CPRI, Shimla continues to fulfill its mandate to make Indian agriculture locally, regionally and globally competitive. The efforts and valuable inputs provided by my colleagues at the ICAR Headquarters and by the Director and his team at the Institute level for over an year to develop Vision 2025 deserve appreciation.

(MANGALA RAI) Secretary, Department of Agriculture Research & Education & Director General, Indian Council of Agricultural Research Dr. Rajendra Prasad Road, Krishi Bhawan, New Delhi-110 001, India March 2007

PREFACE Potato, a native crop of South America, was introduced in India from Europe in the beginning of 17th century. The crop has emerged as the fourth important food crop in India. Potato production increased at an annual compounded growth rate (ACGR) of around 5% during 1980 to 2000. Even during the current decade, potato production and yield registered 3.48 and 3.65% ACGR vis--vis negative trends for major cereals. As a consequence, India emerged as the third largest potato producer in the world after China and Russia. Despite that, per capita consumption of potato in India is much below the world average (33 kg/year). Potato provides carbohydrates, minerals, vitamin C, a number of B group vitamins, high quality proteins and dietary fiber. People of several European and Latin American countries consume potato as a staple food. The tremendous importance of potato as a source of income for poor farmers and of food for the rural and urban poor is often overlooked in the debate about improving food security and eradicating poverty in India. The country is now passing through a phase of yield stagnation in case of major food grains. High productive crop like potato should be encouraged now to counter the sagging growth in agricultural productivity. India Vision 2020 prepared by the Planning Commission, Govt. of India projected a scenario in which the future agricultural sector would be A vibrant, highly productive commercial farm sector that can ensure food & nutritional security, generate employment opportunities, stimulate industrialization, and produce renewable energy from biomass and fuel crops. The potato has all the virtues to meet those projected aspirations. It is a highly productive crop that can fit into the requirements of emerging farm sector. Potato processing sector is currently in a high growth path giving a fillip to agri-business. Potato waste can also be an alternative for producing bio-fuels. It is a labour-intensive crop and contributes significantly to employment generation in the rural economy. The IMPACT (International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade) model of International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) projected an annual production of 37.3 million metric tons of potato from 1.4 million ha by the year 2020 under baseline growth scenario, while 43.3 million metric tons from 1.6 million ha under high demand and production (HDP) growth scenario. Projected consumption by 2020 would be 43.20 million MT under baseline scenario and 44.6 million MT under HDP growth scenario. Keeping the same growth rate under HDP growth scenario, the projected potato production during 2025 would be 51.85 million MT from 1.74 million ha area with average productivity of 28.95 t/ha. This productivity has to be achieved from a 90 days crop, that would mean 322 kg/ha/day production. Currently we produce 224 kg/ha/day in the fertile northern plains. Therefore, meticulous planning and vigorous effort are needed in potato research and development to realize those challenging projections. This perspective plan presents the basic framework of the research strategies to achieve that target. The document has been divided into 21 sections. The first five sections describe the mandate, achievements and impact of research work done by the institute so far. The next two sections give description of the crop under global and national scenario. The section 8 presents the current strength, weakness, opportunities and threats of the crop in the country. The remaining sections elucidate the proposed strategies to achieve the goal. Hopefully, the strategies presented in this document will help give this crop appropriate consideration in future deliberations about the national food system and thereby improve efforts to ensure access to sufficient food and income for all people. We are thankful to all head of divisions and stations for the valuable guidance that they provided at all stages in the preparation of this document. We are also thankful to all scientific and other staff for their help in developing the draft manuscript. Shimla July 2007 SK Pandey Director

CONTENT Foreword Preface Executive Summary 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. Preamble Mandate Growth Research Achievements Impact Potato Production and Utilization: Global Scenario Potato Production and Utilization: Indian Scenario Swot Analysis Perspective Research Issues and Strategies Research Priorities Funding Needs Linkages Critical Inputs Revenue Generation during the period 2005-2025 HRD Plan of CPRI for the period 2005-2025 Risk Analysis Review Resource Generation Outputs Outcome 1 5 5 8 18 23 29 32 38 40 42 55 57 61 62 63 64 64 65 66 69

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Central Potato Research Institute (CPRI) was established in 1949. Since its inception CPRI has grown rapidly. Manpower has increased by 4.5 fold during the period of I to X plan and the planbudget by 163.3 folds during the period of II to X plan. Apart from the headquarters at Shimla, CPRI at present has 7 research stations including CPRI campus at Modipuram located between 11 and 32o N latitudes, 75 and 910 E longitudes, and 532501 m altitude, covering wide range of agro-climates in the country. The All India Coordinated Research Project on Potato (AICRP, Potato) was established in 1970. It presently has 22 centres located in different agro-climatic zones of the country. Manpower and budget of AICRP (Potato) has increased by 1.5 folds during the period of IV to X plan and 22.8 folds during V to X plan, respectively. The primary mandate of CPRI is to undertake basic and strategic research aimed at the development of varieties and sustainable technologies for enhancing productivity and utilization of potato in the country. It also has the responsibility of producing disease-free basic seed to meet the countrys requirement. Development and release of 42 high yielding cultivars, development of a Seed Plot Technique that made it possible to produce disease-free seed potatoes in the plains, establishment of a National Disease-Free Seed Production Programme, developm

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