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Aiding Algeria

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Aiding Algeria. By: Kristy Pauloski, CJ Koshivas , Oliver Arana, Nicodemo Camarda , Matt Lamendola. Kabylia / Kayblie. Today Kabylia is one of the most industrialized parts of Algeria. Kabylia produces 60% of Algerian GDP (excluding oil and gas). - PowerPoint PPT Presentation
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Aiding Algeria By: Kristy Pauloski, CJ Koshivas, Oliver Arana, Nicodemo Camarda, Matt Lamendola
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Aiding Algeria

Aiding AlgeriaBy: Kristy Pauloski, CJ Koshivas, Oliver Arana, Nicodemo Camarda, Matt Lamendola

Today Kabylia is one of the most industrialized parts of Algeria. Kabylia produces 60% of Algerian GDP (excluding oil and gas).The area is populated by the Kabyles, a Berber ethnic group.Three large chains of mountains occupy most of the area.Area is based on arboriculture and craft industry.Kabylia/Kayblie

"The mission of Aiding Algeria is to further educate, not only the young scholars the teachers. We aim to promote healthy habits in the school environment. By sponsoring innovative, intuitive workshops in addition to other programs we will provide the educators with fresh skills to strengthen their instruction methods."

Our Mission

Location: Kabylia(Kabylie), Algeria4 classroom building Volunteers integrated into a non-profit program that educate people from the ages of 10-18The program would consist of approximately 20 overall -10 volunteers and 10 native instructorsTwo instructors per class which consists of approximately 35 students

Description

Ages 10-14 separated into rooms according to age-Basic mathematics, sciences as well as English-3hr courses starting at 7amAges 15-18 targets business and economic courses-goal is trying to create incentive and innovation in young malleable people10:30am -1:30pmOlder Students work on one of two things: a business plan or a become a teacher where the program will aid in job placement.3pm-5

All courses would be 3 months in length Monday through Friday.Each student would be allowed to take one course per calendar year All volunteers are encouraged to stay the duration of the term and are welcome to donate their time to more then one term.Algerian instructors would be employed by Aiding Algeria and may become permanent fixtures within the program.

High Unemployment RatesHuman RightsWomen's RightsEducationHousing Crisis, Water ProblemsHealthhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8yWDY7QYbcReasons This Program is VitalLiteracy rate- 61.6% of the population over the age of 15 with women at 49%Primary and secondary education is compulsory and free from 6 to 15 years old.There is a huge decline when they reach secondary school. In Algeria only 6.6% of the population has received higher education at the university level. Illiteracy is high, 32% of the population, mostly women.Curriculum has been Arabiczed and the teaching of French has been restricted.In Algeria there are 43 universities, 10 colleges, and 7 institutes for higher learning.

Education

Despite government allocation of substantial educational resources, population pressures and a serious shortage of teachers have severely strained the system.

Literacy Rate:- 61.6% of total population, (males:73.9%, females:49%) over the age of 15The population of Algeria is 34,895,000 (January 2010 est.), with 99% classified ethnically as Arab or BerberIslam is the predominant religion.In Algeria there are 43 universities, 10 colleges, and 7 institutes for higher learning.In Algeria only 6.6% of the population has received higher education at the university level. Illiteracy is high, 32% of the population, mostly women and people living in rural areas. Primary and secondary education is compulsory and free from 6 to 15 years old.Progress in literacy has been noteworthy. About 42 percent of the population was literate in 1977. By 1990 adult literacy had reached 57.4 percent, according to estimates by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); 69.8 percent of Algerian men and 45.5 percent of Algerian women were literate. Because, however, priority has been given to the education of youth, adult illiteracy has not yet received the attention it needs.Education in Algeria is free and officially compulsory for Algerians up to age 17, but actual enrollment falls far short of 100 percent.[1] Enrollment drops off sharply from primary to secondary school.[1] In fact, only about half the eligible population is enrolled in secondary school, which consists of two three-year cycles beginning at age 12.[1] In addition, Algeria has: 34 Universities 13 University Centers 21 National Superior Institute 8 Preparatory Institutes[1]Primary school 3309212 Medium school 3052953 Secondary school 1170645Since 1973, the curriculum has been Arabicized and the teaching of French has been restricted. Though the use of Arabic is enforced in public life, Tamazight was allowed in schools from 2003.Today Kabylie is one of the most industrialised parts of Algeria[3]. Kabylia product 60% of Algerian GDP (excluding oil and gas).The area is populated by the Kabyles, a Berber ethnic group

Algerians do not leave room for personal space between each other.Preserving honor and reputation is important.No formal rituals surrounding business cards.Appointments are necessary and should be made way in advance.Arrive on time and be prepared to wait. Algerians have an open-door policy, even during meetings.

Business Etiquette

Algerian FoodFoods are packed with flavorful seasoningsCouscous is a national dish No meal would be complete without a long loaf of French breadMechoui, roasted lamb cooked on an outdoor spit for large groups of peopleMint tea is also a favorite of the Algerians

Do not bring alcohol.Remove shoes at the door.Men and women will be seated separately.Always greet the eldest first.Dining Customs

Wash your hands before and after a meal.Food is usually eaten by hand.Only use the right hand for eating and passing dishes.Leave food on your plate or it will be filled up again.

Table Manners

Meeting and GreetingAlgerians greet each other with lengthy affairs.Friends and family exchange kisses.Men may not shake a womans hand. Avoid prolonged eye contact.

Current Events & News HighlightsUnderstanding the past2008 tsunami-Overcrowded classrooms-Inexperienced teachersNo government regulation-Shortened school daysPrivate Tutors

American Involvement in AlgeriaCompeting foreign policiesHostile Relations-late 60s-70sImproved relations-80s to present-U.S increases involvement, wants oil

Obstacles to SuccessCustomsBusiness EtiquetteCommunication BarriersLack of Govt involvementNo foreign teachers

Technology Dos & DontsAlgeria spent heavily on telecommunication infrastructure when oil revenues were at their highest in the 1970s and early 1980s. The network is in a relatively good condition despite the need to expand in response to additional demands and traffic on the network.

Algeria is now facing economic as well as political difficulties which make it difficult to upgrade the existing telecommunication network.

Technology Dos & Donts (Contd.)YEARUsersPopulation200050,00031,795,50020051,920,00033,033,54620072,460,00033,506,56720083,500,00033,769,66920094,100,00034,178,18820104,700,00034,586,184Algerian Internet Usage Mobile Cellular Subscribers: 25 million. (2007)Television per 100 inhabitants: 10 (2000)Home satellite dishes/antennas: 3,500,000 (2000)Cable TV subscribers: cable TV service is currently not availableFacebook Users: 1,086,580 as of August 31, 2010, according toFacebook.

Technology Dos & Donts (Contd.)

SWOT Analysis Strengths: Giving Algerian scholars the ability to further their education, assisting Algerian professorsWeakness: Safety, enough qualified workers, sustainability, lack of resources, culture differences Opportunities: Offering a unique experience for college graduates to travel and change the lives of students in need which will also let Americans learn more about AlgeriaThreats: local militia, volunteers, culture barriers, T.I.A.

Building GoodwillWe plan to educate the local teachers which in return will strengthen their ability to teach the youth.Our goal is to flourish in Kabylia in hopes of gaining the trust of local officials so that all Algerians can gain the advantage of a superb education.

Sustainabilityhttps://www.cia.gov/library/publications/theworldfactbook/geos/ag.htmlhttp://www.algeria.com/blog/social-and-business-etiquette-in-algeriahttp://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/algeria.htmlhttp://www.teachforamerica.org/donors/index.htm?gclid=CNPW_LbYzaQCFQI_gwodrAahFAhttp://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/VolunteerOpportunity/128748-4http://education.stateuniversity.com/pages/28/Algeria-SUMMARY.htmlhttp://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travel-and-living-abroad/travel-advice-by-country/middle-east-north-africa/algeriahttp://countrystudies.us/algeria/67.html

Sources


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