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AOPi Sadie Hawkins THE Exponent

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udent Senate shop-Sportsm an ge - Ennis, Mont. istration begins THE Exponent of montana state college AOPi Sadie Hawkins Day Dance Tomorrow Night- SUB Ballroom $I.SO Per Couple i:>rrow at IO a.m. I No. 22 THE MONTANA EXPONENT JAY" was the title of the first place rodeo float built by the Sigma Chi 's for the k. Chi Omega won the sororit y division with their depiction of "Saturday Nig ht." rs MSC Contest Plans nplete; Begins May 24 By JUDY THOMPSON future Miss America could be on MSC's campus. The t Senate in cooperation with Bozeman merchants are ting the 1962 Miss MSC contest. The girl selected · the title will compete this summer to be Miss Mon- rho is the state representative in the Miss America . Faye Emrick, Conrad, _ k ~1 ill er, Bozeman 1 co- - , have begun the search ng each fraternity choose di dates and the men's dor - iv e candidates who they vould represent MSC well. inals will be held in two select the finalists. . who possesses personal- r,t, beauty and the follow- tities is considered a good . e. ing to make the event a success. Steve Holt, Broadus, and Gleanne Foster, Dillon 1 are in charge of judges. Publicity - John Layne, Bozeman, and Bruce Whi thorn, Livingston. Entries - Don Wei- bert, Garry Owen, and Donna Luebbe, Bozeman. Awards - Jim Robertson, Great Falls, and Helen Kramer, Helena. Staging - Dave Seible, Bozeman, and J eanette Boyd, Wolf Point. Committee Heads Chosen for REW Plans are being made for next year's Religious Emphasis Week. General REW co-chairmen Lynn Ellinghouse and Gary Tavenner annoulll:ed the following commit- tee-head appointments : Art Dis- play-.Joan Keene, Assemblies - Gloria Boe, Book Display-Alvin Ya tes, Classrooms-Kellt Conrad, Faculty-Dr . John Rumely, Hos- pitality-Jo Ann Heitzman, Hou e Discussions--Bob Stephens, Pub- licity-Jack She,;ck, Reception- Myrna Lu tes, Seminars-Chuck Everts, Worship - Wes Nordine, Secretaries - Lynda Braml ette, Marilyn Lyall, Janneth John son, and Bobbye Wilson. Anyone wishing to be a member of a REW Committee for next year is asked to apply in room 316 SUB by May 4 . should be interested fur- her chosen career through ~ucation. e should be a leader in Naval Aviation Information Teams From Seattle to Interview Here ,e should r~cognize the as an educational pro- should be proud to repre- r school as the "Ideal n Girl". e should appreciate the a scholarship. e should be willing to 1 •r talents with her school. I I wa rds are numerous too. ;:. RC will receive a. lovely e, a trophy and gift cer- 1 are many students work- t S chool Activity I to MSC Students 'Iigh School Week Dance h,•J d this year in the Stu- ion Ballroom, and will be all students on the MSC this year. The entire £a. of the Ballroom will be us eliminating the use of .udent..~ wishing to attend ' • properly dressed in suit " coat and slacks as well as repared to show their ac- ckets. College men interested in ob- taining commissions in the field of Naval Aviation will have an opportunity to talk \\~th members of the Naval Aviation Informa- tion T eam from Seattle's Naval Air Station at Montana State College on April 30, May 1 and 2. Th e team members ,viii tell students how they may gain com- missions as N av a I Aviators through the Naval Aviation Cadet (NAVCAD) and the Aviation Of- ficer Candidate (AOC, pilot and non-pilot, tr a i n i n g programs.) They will also counsel young men on other military programs and service obligations . The Naval Aviation Cadet pro- gram is open to young men 18 to 25 years of age who have at least 90 quarter-hours or 60 semester- hours of college work. The Avia- tion Officer Candidate program is open to college graduates between 19 and 26 years of age. This pro- gram covers pilot training, non- pilot training, (Navigator, Bom- bardier, Radar Interpreter), avia- tion ground officer and air-intel- ligence. Cadets are commissioned after successfully completing 18 months of flight training at Pensacola, Florida. College graduates re - ceive their commissions after fOur months of pre-flight training. Strothers, ADC, local Navy Re- cruiter, said the team will be (Continued on page 3) Psychology Club Plans Meeting Tu esday, May 1st, marks the next meeting of the Psychology Club. The club ,viii meet at 12 nooni if weather permits, in Cooper Park at the corner of 8th and Story. In case of rain, snow, sleet, hail, or atomic attack, the meeting will be held in Room 124, Reid Hall. The main topic ,viii be discus- sions of "Fields of Psychology" and "Graduate Schools and Stu- dent Assistance". These subjects should be of specia l interest to students planning a future in psychology. Friday, April 27 , 1962 Ennis Host to Student Senate Training Camp Larry Ropes, Student Senate Leadership Workshop chairman, explained to Senate on Monday the purpose, pro- gram, and schedule for the Workshop which is being held this weekend at Ennis. Student leaders will be informed on the operation of student government, the financial set-up, and proposed activities program. Seminars will be held to discuss the organization, financing and purpose of the activi- t ies program. ASMSC Pres ident, Tom Rich- ardson, welcomed newly-elected officers to their first Senate meet- ing and thanked Jim Hunt for the efficient organization of both the primary and general election. Richardson a 1 so congratulated Paul Skabo and his committee for a very successful blood drive . Honors Day has been scheduled for May 22 and the "Miss MSC Contest" date has been changed to May 24. Several discussion topics have been suggested by Steering Com- nfittee for comment by President Renne at the Roundtable which ,viii be held May 21. Bob Morgan suggested that any other topics of interest to students be turned in so a program may be set up. Senior class president Ed Har- 'T' Board to Sponsor "Hello Walk Week" age acceptance of this tradition. probably be changed to May 31. Ja ck Dunn, reporting on the ( Continued on page 6) LaBrant Completes Publications Slate As Commissioner Th e election of Harlan La Brant of Kalispell to the post of Commissioner of Publications at Montana State College, completed the slate of officials who will di- rect and publish student publica- tions for next year. La Brant is the only official elected by the MSC student body. The editors and business man- agers of the six student publica- tions are selected by the Board of Publications, over which La Brant will preside. According to the official tradi- Those named by the Board of tions of MSC, "Hello Walk" is to Publications are: Montana-Ste- be observed by greeting " every- ven Hadnagy, Bow Island, Alta., one with 'hello' on the walk from Canada, editor, and Walt Mans, the front steps of the SUB to the Great Falls, business manager; main sidewalk which runs parallel Exponent-Fred Turner, Butte, to Garfield Street." In order to editor, and John Cannici, Passaic, increase student interest in this N. J., business manager; Prospect tradition, Septemviri in coopera- -Norman Strung, Queens, N. Y., tion with Traditions Board is editor, and Tony Talor, Whitehall, sponsoring "Hello Walk Week", business manager; College Farm- which will be observed May 7-11. er-Warren E. Meyer, Wibaux, A sign will be painted in front of editor, and Gibson P. Van Alstyne, the SUB to encourage students to Billings, business manager; Stu- say "hello" to whomever they dent Handbook-Clyta M. Dillon, meet while on this small walk. On , volf Point, editor, and Rilla Ann May 11 Tom Richardson will dedi- Cole, Belgrad e, business managerj cate "hello walk" officially. Dur- Montana Engineer - Robert H. ing that day a loudspeaker will Bryant, Helena, editor, and Gerald be used during the ten-minute J. eely, Helena, business man- breakl between classes to encour- ager. Ci rcl ed about a table filled with victory trophi es are the members of the Montana State Coll ege Vars ity Rifle team . The award s are the result of action at the Nevada Invitational Meet in Reno, Nevada last month , and the South Dakota State Coll ege Invitational at Brookings, Sout h Dakota on 6-7 April. From le ft to right ar e: Richard Schendel, Curti s Beswick, Gene Kol s tad , "' illinm Kude, Colonel George A. Clay- ton, professor of Military Science, Lt. Colonel George H. Carlton, a ss is tant professor of Air Science, Sergea nt Robert E. Booe, tennt coach, dar l Burkland, Gordon McDonald, and Ralph Saunders. Sergeant Booe says the team ha s had one of its most successful seasons in rece nt years.
Transcript
THE Exponent of montana state college
AOPi Sadie Hawkins Day Dance
Tomorrow Night­ SUB Ballroom
I No. 22 THE MONTANA EXPONENT
JAY" was the title of the first place rodeo float built by the Sigma Chi 's for the k. Chi Omega won the sorority division with their depiction of "Saturday Night ."
rs MSC Contest Plans nplete; Begins May 24
By JUDY THOMPSON future Miss America could be on MSC's campus. The t Senate in cooperation with Bozeman merchants are ting the 1962 Miss MSC contest. The girl selected · the title will compete this summer to be Miss Mon­ rho is the state representative in the Miss America . Faye Emrick, Conrad,
_ k ~1 ill er, Bozeman1 co­ - , have begun the search
ng each fraternity choose didates and the men's dor­
ive candidates who they vould represent MSC well. inals will be held in two select the finalists.
. who possesses personal­ r,t, beauty and the follow­ tities is considered a good . e.
ing to make the event a success. Steve Holt, Broadus, and Gleanne Foster, Dillon1 are in charge of judges. Publicity - John Layne, Bozeman, and Bruce Whithorn, Livingston. Entries - Don Wei­ bert, Garry Owen, and Donna Luebbe, Bozeman. Awards - Jim Robertson, Great Falls, and Helen Kramer, Helena. Staging - Dave Seible, Bozeman, and J eanette Boyd, Wolf Point.
Committee Heads Chosen for REW
Plans are being made for next year's Religious Emphasis Week. General REW co-chairmen Lynn Ellinghouse and Gary Tavenner annoulll:ed the following commit­ tee-head appointments : Art Dis­ play-.Joan Keene, Assemblies - Gloria Boe, Book Display-Alvin Yates, Classrooms-Kellt Conrad, Faculty-Dr. John Rumely, Hos­ pitality-Jo Ann Heitzman, Hou e Discussions--Bob Stephens, Pub­ licity-Jack She,;ck, Reception­ Myrna Lutes, Seminars-Chuck Everts, Worship - Wes Nordine, Secretaries - Lynda Bramlette, Marilyn Lyall, Janneth Johnson, and Bobbye Wilson.
Anyone wishing to be a member of a REW Committee for next year is asked to apply in room 316 SUB by May 4 .
should be interested fur­ her chosen career through ~ucation. e should be a leader in
Naval Aviation Information Teams From Seattle to Interview Here
,e should r~cognize the as an educational pro-
should be proud to repre­ r school as the "Ideal n Girl". e should appreciate the a scholarship. e should be willing to
1 •r talents with her school.
I I wards are numerous too. :;:. RC will receive a. lovely
e, a trophy and gift cer-
1 are many students work-
t School Activity I to MSC Students 'Iigh School Week Dance h,•Jd this year in the Stu­ ion Ballroom, and will be all students on the MSC this year. The entire £a.
of the Ballroom will be us eliminating the use of
.udent..~ wishing to attend ' • properly dressed in suit
" coat and slacks as well as repared to show their ac- ckets.
College men interested in ob­ taining commissions in the field of Naval Aviation will have an opportunity to talk \\~th members of the Naval Aviation Informa­ tion Team from Seattle's Naval Air Station at Montana State College on April 30, May 1 and 2.
The team members ,viii tell students how they may gain com­ missions as N av a I Aviators through the Naval Aviation Cadet (NAVCAD) and the Aviation Of­ ficer Candidate (AOC, pilot and non-pilot, tr a i n i n g programs.) They will also counsel young men on other military programs and service obligations.
The Naval Aviation Cadet pro­ gram is open to young men 18 to 25 years of age who have at least 90 quarter-hours or 60 semester­ hours of college work. The Avia­ tion Officer Candidate program is open to college graduates between 19 and 26 years of age. This pro­ gram covers pilot training, non­ pilot training, (Navigator, Bom­ bardier, Radar Interpreter), avia­ tion ground officer and air-intel­ ligence.
Cadets are commissioned after successfully completing 18 months of flight training at Pensacola, Florida. College graduates re­ ceive their commissions after fOur months of pre-flight training.
Strothers, ADC, local Navy Re­ cruiter, said the team will be
(Continued on page 3)
Psychology Club Plans Meeting
Tuesday, May 1st, marks the next meeting of the Psychology Club. The club ,viii meet at 12 nooni if weather permits, in Cooper Park at the corner of 8th and Story.
In case of rain, snow, sleet, hail , or atomic attack, the meeting will be held in Room 124, Reid Hall.
The main topic ,viii be discus­ sions of "Fields of Psychology" and "Graduate Schools and Stu­ dent Assistance". These subjects should be of special interest to students planning a future in psychology.
Friday, April 27, 1962
Ennis Host to Student Senate Training Camp
Larry Ropes, Student Senate Leadership Workshop chairman, explained to Senate on Monday the purpose, pro­ gram, and schedule for the Workshop which is being held this weekend at Ennis. Student leaders will be informed on t he operation of student government, the financial set-up, and proposed activities program. Seminars will be held to discuss the organization, financing and purpose of the activi­ t ies program.
ASMSC Pres ident, Tom Rich­ ardson, welcomed newly-elected officers to their first Senate meet­ ing and thanked Jim Hunt for the efficient organization of both the primary and general election. Richardson a 1 so congratulated Paul Skabo and his committee for a very successful blood drive. Honors Day has been scheduled for May 22 and the "Miss MSC Contest" date has been changed to May 24.
Several discussion topics have been suggested by Steering Com­ nfittee for comment by President Renne at the Roundtable which ,viii be held May 21. Bob Morgan suggested that any other topics of interest to students be turned in so a program may be set up.
Senior class president Ed Har-
'T' Board to Sponsor "Hello Walk Week"
age acceptance of this tradition. probably be changed to May 31.
Jack Dunn, reporting on the ( Continued on page 6)
LaBrant Completes Publications Slate As Commissioner
The election of Harlan La Brant of Kalispell to the post of Commissioner of Publications at Montana State College, completed the slate of officials who will di­ rect and publish student publica­ tions for next year.
La Brant is the only official elected by the MSC student body. The editors and business man­ agers of the six student publica­ tions are selected by the Board of Publications, over which La Brant will preside.
According to the official tradi- Those named by the Board of tions of MSC, "Hello Walk" is to Publications are: Montana-Ste­ be observed by greeting " every- ven Hadnagy, Bow Island, Alta., one with 'hello' on the walk from Canada, editor, and Walt Mans, the front steps of the SUB to the Great Falls, business manager; main sidewalk which runs parallel Exponent-Fred Turner, Butte, to Garfield Street." In order to editor, and John Cannici, Passaic, increase student interest in this N . J., business manager; Prospect tradition, Septemviri in coopera- -Norman Strung, Queens, N. Y., tion with Traditions Board is editor, and Tony Talor, Whitehall, sponsoring "Hello Walk Week", business manager; College Farm­ which will be observed May 7-11. er-Warren E. Meyer, Wibaux, A sign will be painted in front of editor, and Gibson P. Van Alstyne, the SUB to encourage students to Billings, business manager; Stu­ say "hello" to whomever they dent Handbook-Clyta M. Dillon, meet while on this small walk. On ,volf Point, editor, and Rilla Ann May 11 Tom Richardson will dedi- Cole, Belgrade, business managerj cate "hello walk" officially. Dur- Montana Engineer - Robert H. ing that day a loudspeaker will Bryant, Helena, editor, and Gerald be used during the ten-minute J. eely, Helena, business man­ breakl between classes to encour- ager.
Circled about a table filled with victory trophies are the members of the Montana State College Vars ity Rifle team. The awards are the result of action at the Nevada Invitational Meet in Reno, Nevada last month , and the South Dakota State College Invitational at Brookings, South Dakota on 6-7 April. From left to right are: Richard Schendel, Curtis Beswick, Gene Kols tad , " ' illinm Kude, Colonel George A. Clay­ ton, professor of Military Science, Lt. Colonel George H. Carlton, assistant professor of Air Science, Sergeant Robert E. Booe, tennt coach, dar l Burkland, Gordon McDonald, and Ralph Saunders. Sergeant Booe says the team has had one of its mos t successful seasons in recent years.
Page Two
Editorially Speaking
"Strips" Are Disgrace The married housing here at MSC is a problem which
we hould all take to heart. A quick trip th.rough the well­ known " trips" would disillusion the average outsider into believing he was in one of the poorer tenament districts of a large city. Crowded living conditions, unpaved streets, shabby buildings - these are all a part of our campus, whether we want to admit it or not.
To be more specific, fir t let's look at the streets. For the past five years nothing has been done to improve them, except for the annual grading, whether they needed it or not. How about the parking problem? Any night one drives through he would think it was another parking lot for the fieldhouse from the way the cars are jammed in. A fence was recently built to keep children away from the i1Tigation ditches nearby. Thi is in sad need of r epair now, and prac­ tically useless. Animals, mostly wild from abuse, run ram­ pant and are a constant danger to youngsters. In one in­ stance, a family of kunks has happily burrowed in under one apartment, much to the dismay of the tenants involved.
The married student population at MSC is a very sig­ nificant on-.approximately 17 ',, of the student body. They should have equal living conditions available to them, and the same repair possibilities.
The EXP01 ENT would like to pose a few questions to tho e of the admini, tration in the "know." What becomes of the money received from married students---does it all go back into maintainence of the housing? What is the ad­ minisb"ation 's policy concerning this money-is it just for maintainance. or is a long-term improvement plan involved? Is there any idea to improve or eventually pave the treets? How about playground equipment for the children, or pos­ sibly even a central playground (completely equipped) being in~talled in the future? Is there ever a chance of razinl!' the unsightly "strips" and building modern housing in their place The parking- problem? These are but a few of the inconveniences facing the married students in the college housing. What is going to be done?
The EXPONENT does not wish to condemn the admin­ istration concerning the housing situation, but only to bring this situat ion into the open. The college has only recently put in new water lines. and there is talk of an improved sewer system. The service shoo is noted for their rapid repairs in the housing and is to be commended.
The thought occurs that a great deal of these questions en11ld he answered in the upcoming President's Roundtable !\fay 21.
THE MONTANA EXPONENT
Drama Students Tackle Saroyan's "Cave Dwellers"
,villiam Saroyan's The Cave Dwellers is scheduled as the A - scx:.iated Students' major produc­ tion of this quarter. The Cave Dwellers will play in the Student Union Theatre May 16, 17, 18 and 19.
The Cave Dwellers might be properly termed a fairy-story as
it records the adventures of some penniless people who are camping out on the stage of an abandoned theatre that is about to be pulled down for a housing project on the East Side of New York. One who calls herself "the Queen" (Ellen Missall) is the ruin of a former actress. "The King" (Lee Wood­ riff) used to be a celebrated clown. "The Duke" ( Gene Beek­ man) was once a prizefight cham­ pion. uThe Girl" (Ria ickerson), too young to have Deen famous at anything, is a homeless, fright­ ened ,vretch who comes in off the streets.
Other supporting members of the cast are Norm Strung as "the Father" and Susan Oliver as "the Mother." Dave Swingle portrays "the Silent Boy'\ with Don Ja­ cobs as 11the Boss", John Grnesser as Jamie and Mark Monson as Gorky. Completing the east are Pat Goering and Ann Dunbar.
Brooks Atkinson, in his r eview of The Cave Dwellers for the New Yor Times, had this to say. ''Don't expect a plot or a conclusion from Mr. Saroyan. He is not the man to '"Tite with a slide-rule. But expect more humor, grace, inno­ eence and improvisation than he has put in one piece since the haJcyon das of "The Time of Your Life". Although food is scarce and the cold is congealing, Mr. Saroyan's characters have glowing spirits and wonderful memories of their triumphant days.
Friday, April 27,
''Jawin It' ' By JACK WEYLAND
lt has become almost traditional for cr,itics of student government to attack athletics. It seems that people who in the past ha,·e had little or no interest in student gov­ ernment--when they gain an in­ t.erest--immediately scream about the athletic budget. These critics imply that because the athletic budget is big it must be corrupt.
I must confess that I do not share this opinion. I have seen the athletic budget and it is extremely complex; for the most part we must depend upon the integrity and experience of the finance board to detect excessive spend­ ing. There/ore I must refrain from criticism of the athletic program until I ha,·e had the ex­ perience of the members of the finance board.
However I do have some ques­ tions about the athletic budget. These questions are not intended as criticism but merely as an at­ tempt to understand.
The budget for spring qu, of this year includ1._•s 275 .O the baseball program. How baseball games have you at this year? How many other pie were there besides vot seems to me that altho~gl college baseball team does n student financial support it not receh·e student interest. activity sponsored by the stu is not wanted by the studer seems to me to be a waste.
The yearly expenditure c rifle team is ~2100. Althougl not doubt considerable inter, the ROTC department, I do many other students beside members and their imm family care much about th, come of a "small bore" mat
Again I must emphasize am not "down··· on eithe baseball program or the team. I am merelv curiou: lhis money is spent with su tie student interesL
KRUB Radio Station Includes Request Time, Market listings
By JIM GOETZ early at 9:30. KRUB sig How many of us really appre­
ciate the radio co\'ernge of the Gallatin area? I think it's about time we stop and pay tribute to the Bozeman radio stations. You may not know the names of these stations, but I'm sure it.'s not be­ cause vou don't listen to them. I believe that these Gallatin sta­ tions (unlike most other common radio stations) are modest about mentioning their names too often.
Since I, myself, hate to mention any names, let us assume a name for a typical Bozeman radio sta­ tion. I think KRUB is suitable.
Let's run down a typical pro­ gram schedule for KRUB radio. Six mornings a week bright and
with the National Antherr only exception is Thursday they sign on with the 0Iin1 Fight Song.
A..fter a short series of co• cials, KRUB then predic weather for vesterdav. A!f weather, KRUB fe~tures stock ,larket pricing. If yo to find out what hogs are. for in Ekalaka, here is th, to find ouL Usually af stock ,Iarket pricing KRUi lights the late new . Th, usually two editions of th, One comes out on Tuesd: another on Friday. Aft news. KRUB features qui riety of music which may from Johnni- Cash to Tex For those whose taste
Students Advocate True Representation less classical lines, the­ manr other musical pn One particular one which in mind is "Lucky Bub Request Time." On this prt not only can you call and By GARY GRAHAM
JACK DU N BOB MORGAN
Feeling that misinterpretation, de.structh·e criticism, and mythical editorializing should be rebuked, we offer the following letter in reply to a one-page mimeographed handbill put out by the MSC' Veteran's Association.
We feel that there is always room for independent expression on campus, but that such expres­ sion from an organization, sup­ posedly representing the Veterans, should use decorum in their pres­ entation. Is the purpose of your handbill to inform students aad to offer· constructive criticism, or simply to condemn and destroy'!
Let's review the last two hand­ bills to analyze the methods used. In Volume one, the statement made was: "This quarter the Stu­ dent Senate voted away our money again." This implies that the Senate acted without purpose or method and simply sought to dispose of our funds. This implica­ tion completely ignores the fact that all budgets, after being pre­ pared by the Commissioners, must be reviewed by the Finance Board which devotes eight to ten hours on each quarter's budgets. Con­ ferences are he]d with those per­ !,i·Jns whose budgets are in ques­ tion or uout of line" with l'eports submitted during the many pre­ vious years of budgeting. Anr new or additional funds are based
on reasonable increases for higher operating costs.
Summaries of each budget are presented to the Student Senate one week before the final approval of budgets. The next Senate meet­ ing is then spent on discussing and approving or disapproving of budgeLs. The original budgets are obtainable in the Senate office and may be studied by any student re­ qut'sting them.
The majority of the student body has indicated that the above channels are those through which they wou]d like their money to flow, and this is how they would like to have it spent. The ·budget­ ing procedure is not nece arily t.he ideal process, but it has been the Senate which has offered cor­ rective measures. For example, budget summaries, which are re­ viewed by Senate. have been in­ stituted in to the budgeting proc­ ess. This change was brought about by "constructive criticism" rather than merely by a condem­ nation of existing m ethods. Only the organizations authorized bv the ASMSC onstitution may r.;­ ceive student funds. Only recently an organization was denied use of student funds by an all school vote. This emphasizes that the Senate is not free to arbitrarily distribute funds to whom it chooses.
Considering the hours of study­ ing, reviewing, and comparing done by the Finance Board, the Commissioners, and finally, Stu­ dent Senate, perhaps a more
meaningful sentence could have been composed other than "This quarter Student Senate voted away our money again."
Of the many unsubstantiated statements contained in the last two mimeogJ;S phed sheets, we wish to comment on the following: "'Ve wonder who the Associated Students are, since they r eceived all of $50.00. This must be the organization that offers free dances, free dance lessons, and sports equipment to student use."
As explained in the ASMSC Constitution, the ASMSC is com­ ,iosed of students of MSC organ­ ized eo uphold the rights and pro­ mote interests both for themselves and this institution. Student Sen­ ate is the elective body which has been established for carrying out the aims of the Associated Stu­ dents.
To maintain office operations, to pro,~de ballots for elections. to pay the ASMSC President's sal­ ary, to provide training for a11 new officers at a leadership workshop, to send officers to a national workshop, the ASMSC President submits a budget which flows through the regular "budg­ eting" channels. This is termed the Associated Students Budget. The Associated Students is not the organization which "offers free dance lessons and sports equipment for st.udenb use."
In the second mimeograph, the assertion was made that "the Senat.e has tentatively set a salarv of $250.00 for the ASMSC vice-
president and $100.00 for the Secretary. The only other action taken by Senate Monday evening was to decide not to hold an all­ school dance."
Perhaps the Veteran's handbill was limited in space and couldn't handle the full story. The follow­ ing is the full story: ennte rec­ ommended that the proposal con­ cerning a salary for the ASMSC vice-president and Secretarv be presented to an all-school · vote next fall. At no time did Senate tentatively set a salary f or these people.
An all-school dance has been sponsored by the ASMSC for the last two years as a "free" activ­ ity for the students. A great deal of time, work, and money has gone into this function; however, student participation wns nil. Aft­ er considerable discussion, it ,vas felt that the mone,· used for this dance might be be'tter used to im­ prove the Lectures and Concerts program. To suggest that this was the only other action t.nken by Student Senate is indeed mislead­ ing. Looking over the minutes of the Senate meeting we find six other major items of discussion­ including the Roger " rilliams show and the Fullmer - Pender fight. Since the Associated Stu­ dents had to pay $10,000 out of the reserve fund to make up n deficit bond pa:.•ment !or the Fieldhouse. the report on these activi ties might have interested some students. Another Senate re-
( Continued on page 4)
a song lif they ha,·e it). ~ even sentimentally dedi h someone.
Another startling foct , KRUB radio is that it is t station west of the Rhine broadcasts "Radio Free E
Hats off. to the radio c in the Gallatin valle,·. I 1
of you to phone in ~ext · "Lucky Bubblegum Requ - and ask them to dedicate to themselves. It is a ti tribute.
"X"h..e ~<>:n.t E :::S::: :E"'<>:iw-E :I'
Acceptan<'e 'or at s1lec:ial ra te •tte rop,'lded f<
G lion l IOS. Act
?i tbr~r!-9~/-i. f tinuanc:f' or W opnent and Moltt POnent foundfti f j
Published e,·ery l-'riday or U )'C:ar by the: Asaodated Student, tana tale Collqe, Bouman, Subscription mte by mail to withh1 the United Statf:s and -,ion!II it< $2 rer collc~.e year. FLINT TAYLOR DAVE HARMON Ilnsineu .\h1i rs:.e Matt..-on _ ··- __Assod1 Marion Wylie... N1 Flo>·d Johnson ____ La.r Frc:d Turner -·· .Spo- MArllyn Hagen _____ __ C.. Stephen T. Cox ___ Pbolo,:nit Muy Bennl'tt ·--- Sod Claudia Ht\Sklns _____ Fear Nancy Bt'nk(' Ofric~ ~ NEWS WRJTERS : Bill Wal
Ma-rtin, Bruct> \Vhitohrn ,, Hun~lk-rn. Jo,· Jac:\.~or,. J 1.er. Mid,"'- Dui:an. Ha.Jl.-,c• PC1n \\''lltt1n. C'll\udia Rll Goct..z, J&l'k Wt"l·land, Roh W)·Hc: Coyote
AA.T(RAFT P'l."11
y, April 27, 1962
WS Plans "'Hawaiian Luau; 63 Slant to Be Announced Hawaiian Luau theme will pe the SUB Ballroom for ring Big-Little Sister party,
ay, April 30, at 8:00 p.m. arty, sponsored by the A.s­ d Women Students, will
e Hav.--aiian music, enter­ ent, and refreshments. The
t wearing apparel for the ·on is muu muus.
a Lutes and Mary Ellen , co-chairman of the Big­ Sister Program, announced
II women students are invit­ gardless of whether or not have a little sister.
Beginning next week, Gerry Blach."lllan and Betty Bruckner, president and president-elect of AWS respectively, and Nancy Benke, corresponding secretary, will st.art living group visitations at which time they will give the regional convention report and present the A WS program for the 1962-1963 school year. Women students will also be requested to fill out evaluation sheets of this year's AWS program as they have in the past.
AWS scholarship applications are due Sunday, May 13.
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T HE MONTANA EXPONENT Pa,;e Three ------
More Letters
Student's Letter Prompts · Replies With respect to last week's let­
ter of Mr. Jagadish Desai I would 1ike to comment that Mr. Desai went too far in his generalization in accusing all the American youth of having "double-stand­ ards."
From his observation he gave us this example and I quote, " ... he ( American) has lived in a fraternity which would not have an orient.al or negroid to join that group," and he went on to give us another example with regard to Peace Corp and I quote, "And now all of a sudden he is ready to work for and live with the same people who, if they come to this country would not be 'accept.able' to live in his 'House.'" He went further to make this conclusion and I quote, " ... I feel it my duty to bring such 'double-standards' to your attention ... " ·
Here I feel it is my duty also as a foreign student on this cam­ pus .. that such generalization are far from the truth and extremely unjust.
If some individuals or groups such as fraternities hold some views, this does not mean that all American people share with them these views. Moreover, those who participate in Peace Corp are not necessarily fraternity members; in addition, not all the fraternities or all their members share the same sentiments. I can name three cases where orientals Rive been aceepted.
I would like to repeat that gen­ erailization from certain, specific and unrelated events that Ameri-
can youth are two-faced is unjust. This is the same as if I say that all Indians are equalitarian and humanitarian as my friend, Mr. Desai, while the fact Indian peo­ ple religously believe in Caste system. Today there are fifty million Indians literally 'untouch­ able.' Even the shadow of a mem­ ber of one of these 'unclean' caste is defiling if it falls on the member of a 'clean' caste. This is despite the fact of recent legisla­ tive acts to reduce this religious prescription.
Will your objectivity provide a remedy to wipe out such misjudg­ ments.
Dear Editor,
Sincerely yours, Muksen Al Hussaini
The letter last week concerning discrimination throws light on a real problem - a problem that fraternities are beginning to rec­ ognize and are taking steps lo solve. Many of us in fraternities have been bothered by the racial clauses, written or unwritten, in our national or chapter laws. We have felt the injustice of these clauses and have said so. But to overcome the deeply-seated feel­ ings to the contrary of some of our southern chapters and some of our close friends is a challeng­ ing undertaking, one that must be done carefully and with a deep regard for the feelings of all con­ cerned.
I am confident tltat ultimately a clear understanding of the uni­ versality of human brotherhood
Ken's BARBER SHOP 3 SOUTH BLACK "We Specialize in Flattops"
will prevail in whatever institu­ tions are of enduring worth. If we in the fraten1ities fail to see the ambiguity of our situation and to make a concerted effort to re­ evaluate our present policies, we are going to find ours Ives in an untenable position before too long. ln California, for example1 no fraternity with a racial clause is permitted.
However, some progress has been made--our score card is not blank. National laws have been re­ written in accordance with a court ruling making racial clauses un­ lawful. The sharp lines of distinc­ tion have been broken in some cases at MSC. More and more fraternity men are coming to realize the worth of getting well­ acquainted with people of differ­ ent backgrounds. Many have in­ dicated a willingness to do so de­ spite pressure from other nation­ ally-affiliated chapters.
Where progress in understand­ ing has been hindered, it has been largely due to a failure on the part of all concerned to really think through their attitudes. As a fraternity member, I appeal to all my fellow men, fraternity and otherwise, to re-examine the atti­ tudes that prevent us from enjoy­ ing the rich friendships of many of our brothers in the common family of humanity.
Bob Eagle
Naval Aviation- <Continued from page 1)
available in the Student Union from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m . each day. Flight aptitude tests will be given during the day or in the evening by appointment. There is no obli­ gation in taking these tests. Those who qualify may take the physi­ cal examination in Seattle at a later date. Transportation is fur­ nished by the Navy.
SIC FLICS
"If it's all right with you Captain, I think I'll drop R.O. T.C."
21 GREAT TOBACCOS MAKE 20 WONDERFUL .. SMOKES ' AGED MILD, BLENDED MILD - NOT FI LTERED MILD - THEY SATISFY
G
Page Four THE MONTANA EXPONENT F r iday, April 27,
Students to Build Playground In Costa Rica Next Summer
Spring Registration Shows 8°/o Ris,e
This coming June ,dll see twenty college students. rc-pn~­ sentin.g t.hree i\iontana colleg-es, embark for Costa Rica . These students are members of the Mon­ tana ~lethodist Student l\1ovc­ ment. The purpose of the tTip will be the consln1ction of a play­ ground and other facilities at a )Iethodist Training Camp in Ala­ jewln, Costa. Rica.
Thl' inspiration of a st..1.te-or­ ganized missionary undertaking waR providl'd in an address given by Re,·erend Spotswood at an an­ nual conference t·wo years ago. From there the idcn was discu~ed and thought about and last spring applications were made a,·nilablc to interested students. Aftl'r the deadline, a board of Montana min­ ist<'rs evaluated the applications
Students Advocate­ (Continued from pa~e 2)
port involved the Honor System proposed for ~I SC.
·with i·ems such as the:--e ex­ cluded from this one-page shert, we do not feel that you arc justi­ fit.•<l in asserting that the "only" Senate action taken was to abol­ ish the all-school dance.
Again in the sN:ond handbill, refer('nCe was made to President Renne's authority to ,·eto any nc­ tion taken bv SLUlh:mt Senntc. \\'ith referenc; to past action by President Renne, we feel thnt any imdnuations concerning his dicta­ torial powers over student actions are complett'ly unfounded. The ambassador program proposed this spring is a good example of President Renne's executive pow­ er. He pointed out the potential dangers to himself and to th1..• col­ lege if accused of recruiting stu­ dents. After bein~ assured that it was a student projr-ct, he offered several constn1ctive suggestions. T hese suggestions improved the organization of the program. rath­ er than limiting the student's choice of action.
As the political groups within the state tend to hold Presideat Renne personally responsible for all of MSC activities, it is natural that some final :my must be gin..'n on some actions. However, let's judge the chief administrator on his past record, not on an unfore­ seen future record.
In the first mimeograph, alle­ gations were made as to the eco­ nomic expansions a£ the l\lontnn­ nn. Contrary to t.hc figure testi­ fied to in this paper-''$10,000 in increased student funds"-the fig­ ure is $2,376. (This fig-ure may be checked with the Commissioner of Finance.) The paper also implied that the total cost of the Montnn­ an comes from !-.t'udent fees. Ac­ tually, $6,409 of the total cost comes from advertising and sub­ scriptions. A third accusation was that all of the increase in funds would be used for a. geometric growth. This overlooks the fact that $1100 of th,• $2,376 increase was needed to r('plac'e equipm€.'nt that had been personal property of a graduating staff membt.\r. The writer of the handbill article speaks of a "geometric growth." We feel that he should review his mathematics.
Any· group that is interested in campus affairs can do an im­ measurable amount of good. Con­ structive criticism followe,d by a positive action is always desirable. Convrrsely, a. group can "tear down" n commendable institution that took years to build. Truth!ul ­ nrss and accuracy should be the bywords qf any newspaper!
on the basis of work experience, language background, nnd overall interest and ability. The twenty students chosen for the trip repre­ sent 1JSC. MSU, and Roeky oloun­ tain College. The nine l\J SC mem­ bc,rs participating in the project are: Orrin Ferris, student chair­ man, Robert Eagle, Helen Kram­ er. Bill ,vestrc, Neva Westre, Russ Doty, Betty Blenkarn, Caro­ lyn Spangler, and Leslie Ann Broderson.
The project hns b<' n planned to be both educational and cultural. The members will lea,·e by Volks­ wagen buses stopping to tour cer­ t.ain parLc;; of Mo:ico before pro­ ceeding on to the training camp. \Yhile in Costa Rica they ,di! have an opportunity to tour San Jose, the capital loeatcd fifty milC"$ from Alajewla, and the vol­ canic regions in the vicinity of the training camp.
It is hoped that this •mdertak­ inj?;' will lead the way for future state missionary projecL;;; and especially n work and stud)- trip to Europe or the PhilippinPS.
Those students, who are able. will pay their o,vn expenses while the other,; will take advanta~e of scholarships offered by the '\'\'om­ en's Society of Christian en;ce and financial R$Sist.ance provided by Wesley Chapters and other church organizations.
The Rcwrend Bill Kliner and Orrin Ferris wm be in charge of the project and in general ' ";ll guide its activities.
The members will star at the work camp durin,!?' the two-month project. They will return to the States in the latter part of Au~ust after a short trip to Panama.
Technical W rifer Contest Winner To Receive Trip
The joint AJE E-IRE technical paper presentation "~II be held May 3 at 7 :30 p.m. in 105 Reid Hall .
The orally presented papers will be the result of t lje AJEE­ IRE contest begun earlier this year to promote excellence in the presentation of technical material. The winner of the contest will receive an all-expense trip to '\"ancou\'er, B. C., to compete in the district duel.
Subjeets of general interest will be presented and all engineers are urged to attend. Refreshments will be served.
The double E's have sbL1ck again . The MSC league bowling trophy went to J ohn McNeil, Bob PetL~rson, Frank Echard nnd J ohn Lucke of the A I EE-IRE.
Set your alarms early! E IT's are tomorrow at 8:00.
Engineers '1.ri ll be having n High School Weck open house t his evening from 6:45-9:00 in Ryon Lab. ome see how the other half liV('S.
Spring quarter registration fig­ ures indicate an increased enroll­ ment of about 8 percent over last spring quarter at :\Iontmm State College, according to l\ lartha :\1awks,vorth, l\ISC registrar.
Spring registration in 1961 was 3,4 6, as compared to 3/i53 this year, showing an increase of 267 students.
Tht: number cf m<'n enrolled jumped from 2,411 in 1961 to 2,586 in 1962, and there was a similar increase in women's en­ rollment, from 1,074 to 1,167.
Of thC' five divisions at )1SC, engineering was the onlr one that
took n drop in 1·egistration-from 12 to 800.
The other four divisions in­ creased as follows: agriculture, 325 to 347; education, 54 to 601; letters and science, 78 to 1,005: and professional schools, 923 to 1.000.
The popularity of the Continu­ ing Education Progrant, off-cam­ pus adult education at MSC, is sho\\,i by an increased spring quarter registration of 79 in 1961 to l,l in 1962. In addition to the non-credit courses now being of­ fered locally, three- and !our­ ~redit courses are being complet­ ed this spring in Warm Springs, Big Timber, Livingston and Har­ lem. The enrollment in the Con­ tinuing Education program is not
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y, April 27, 1962 THE MONTANA EXPONENT Page Five
\ASC Tops Red Cross Need • Blood Drawing termination of the blood
g last Thursday evidenced er MSC victorJ over !IISU.
a record 649 pints MSC
easily exce<'Cled the 555 pint quota. MSU contributed 522 pints. A travelling trophy to be kept by the first school to ,vin it three
times and sponsored jointly by the Missoula Red Cross and the Boze­ man Red Cross will be awarded to J\ISC.
--- -------------------------
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Product of Jg JtntlUUV/1, J'~7:r-'J"'~ is our middlt name•
Tuesday and 170 on Thursday. If the Red Cross had been able to accommodate more blood it is an­ ticipated that MSC may well have exceeded 700 pints. The 185th per­ son filled the quota fo1· each day. Lois Stellar, a freshman from Great Falls majoring in Elemen­ tary Education and who was do­ nating fo1· the first time filled the quota for Tuesday, and Donna Anders, a member of Kappa Delta sorority and also an Elementary Education major from Helena, filled the quota for Wednesday while donating for the third time.
The IFC trophy for the frater­ nity with the g1·eatcst percentage of its members contributing was a warded to Sigma Phi Epsilon ,vith 94.6%. The Sig Eps have been the winners for four years. Kappa Sigma was second with 87.2%. Sigma Alpha Epsilon has 63.77'7c; Alpha Gamm a Rho, 60.0%; Delta Sigma Phi, 50.0,;,; Pi Kappa Alpha, 43.2%; Sigma Chi, 42.77%; Lambda Chi Alpha, 40.4%; Phi Sigma Kappa, 32.5%; and Sigma Nu 28.5%.
Kappa Delta won the sorority competition "~th 35.3%. Alpha Omicron Pi was second with 34.6%. Delta Gamma had 29.2%; Alpha Gamma Delta, 22.1%; Chi Omega, 20.3%; and Pi Beta Phi, 17.3%.
Air Force ROTC had 42% con­ tributing compared to Army's 33%.
The winning floors of the men's and women's dorm itories won a t,vist party slated for April 21. This party has been rescheduled for May 5, and the winners are W ing A of Hapner Hall and Pryor Hall 1st, and Colter 3rd.
Committee ch airmen were: General Comm i l tee Chairmen were Paul Ekabo of Minot, North Dakota and Jack Miller from Great Falls. Publicity chairman was Bruce Whithorn from Living­ ston. Equipment Chairmen were Kent Norby from Sidney and Gloria Boe from McLeod. Recruit­ ing Chairmen were Roy Stanley from Great Falls and Maxine Manning from Kalispell.
F ROSHPO ENT NOTICE The F ROSHPONENT will be
coming out next week and all Freshmen "ho would like to work on t he pa per should report to the E XPONENT offi ce at 7:00 p.m. nex t Wednesday even ing. All stories arc due at 1 p.m. on '.l'u es­ day, May 1.
~.-'.\\~~~~-~1 \ :~ togetherl And they 're ' "'~
. 1inging ond dancing yeti 1
Saturday, April 28
"Ivan the Terrible"
historical chronicle." -N.Y. Herald Tribune
SUB Theatre
Pnge Six
MUN Delegation Reports on Trip
The Model UN Group would like to thank all of the people who helped Semi our delegation to San Diego during the week of April 11-14. T he de.legation members will giYe their report on the trip nt thl:' meeting to be held Monday April 30 in the SUB. The individ­ ua1 members have already given some unofficial reports.
Any student interested in going to New York the 16 of June is invited to come lo the meeting. Applications are being a ccepted for students who wanL to att.end the National Collegiate Council for the UN being held from June rn to 23. ·
Anothc.r major portion of busi­ ness for t.be coming meeting will he the elect.ion of officers for next year's organization. Nominations wi1l be open during the meeting before the elections take place. Nominations were held last Mon­ day nnd nominated for President wen• Ken Bodner an<l Larry Mar­ t•oLt, Se<:J·etarial nomination went to Margaret Voermans and Gail Graham was 11ominntPJ for Tl'ens­ urer.
Thl' ro1ui11g meeting will be vel'y enjoyable and infol'mative. The dub members would like t.o sec nll inlerested persons atLend lhe meet.ing. Remember the dnte, Monday, April :10 nt 7:30 in the SUB.
Ennis Host- < Continued from page 1)
activities of the foTensics team, said that the kam <:oach, Mr. per a1111ounced t.hat, because of n conflict With the Juniol' Prom, the dale of the Senior Picnic will Lawrence, ha$ been invited to be a judge at the West Point Debate meet but has turned it do\\'ll to travel wilh the team to the 'I'au Knppn Alpha dl-'bnt.e meet in Mis­ soula this weekend.
'
MSC will probably be represented by an engineer on this show which has been planned for tht:' last part of May.
Gary Neeley, High School Week co-chairman, gave a review of some of the activitil•S higl1 school student:;, a1·e taking part in during lhe p!'ogram. College students will bf.• ad111itted to the dance tonight afh.·1· 10 if they are approp1·iatcly (l1·essed.
JnJependenl Stud~ntsJ president, Rm1 Walton announce<l that Presi­ dent Renne would be speaking at thefr Tuesday tn(>l'ling on th fu­ tur,, of MSC.
Senate approvcJ presidentia.l np­ po-inLmenL~ to the Finance Board as follo,vs: Jim Brown, Barr) N, .. u, Chuck Sumner, and ldl'll \Veydemeyer.
John Holden iutroduced Stan Smit.h, new Tnterfrat.ernily Coun­ cil PrPsident. an<l 1·epresentaliVt' tu St.udcut Scnatt·.
Hair Cut by Appointment
I st Nat ional Bank Building
PHONE JU 6-5544 FOR APPOINTMENT
THE MONTANA EXPONENT
MILITARY BALL QUEEN for 1962 is Ma rsha Thompson, a j unior from St. Louis, l\Io. Miss Thompson r eceived her crown a t th e Mil itary Ball, h,eld on Apri l 14, in l he SUB ballroom.
Friday, April 27, :
Two Home Ee Majors Receive Pfister 4-H Scholarship Awards
Belty Medvit of Butte and Jean Club, the State Home Econo Stephens of Great Falls, both lub, and the Montana Sta>. juniors in home economic at Education Association. Montana State College, are each A 4 H I b · 1 f • the recipient of a 1962 Pfize1· 4-Il . - cu g,r o, 11 Y
1 1 h · d Miss Stephens has made ove sc ;h:rs sifit''::~rds were nn- garments in compl_etin~ d th· k t th l ments for her maJor mterr
nowlce. lS ~v~e 3 e annu~ the clothing project. In 196 Ex~ns1on Trarnmg Conference, i.n attended the National, We sesswn at Oklahoma State Um- 4 H Cl b R d · D versity by Herbert L Schaller of - u oun -up m enve h ' · uJ n· ·. . her demonstration achieveJ
t e Agr1c tural l\'lSJOn, Chas. Th· , th h tte d th Pfizer & Co., Inc. . lS mon s e a n s e
Active in 4-H work for nine ;na~ 4-H CD1ub Conferenc venrs, i\I.iss Medvit considered her ~ ngton, · C., because o ~1ajor interest the clothing proj- achievement record. ect. She has been 11 delegate to At Montana State, Miss Si the State 4-H Club Congress and ens is active in College 4-H National 4-H Club Congress in Home Economics Club, St.i Chicago. Education Association, and
Miss Medvit participates in a Beta Beta, 4-H honorary. S number of organizations on cam- a membet· of Alpha Gamma ] pus, including the College 4-H social sorority.
THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES SALUTE: DON DRENNAN Just one )"ear ago Don Drennan graduated from college "ilh n business degree. Today, as a Telephone Company traffic man, he is responsible [or introducing new telephone mt.>lhods nd nd\'ancecl communications services to San Francisco·s civic and business leaders.
Don Drennan of Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company, and the other young men like him in Bell Telephone Companies throughout the-country, help bring the finest communications service in t.he world to the homes and businesses of a growing America.
@ BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES
y, April 27, 1962 THE MONTANA EXPONENT Page Seven
.l / l l:11, l l' ll •I l il l ll l lllli l ll l ll l ll l ll l ll l ll l ll l ll l ll l lt l ll l ll l ll l lllll l ll l tl l ll l !II Ul ll l 11 1111UI II IIII UI IIIIIIHl ll l ll l ll l 11~
Exnonent~ i Bobcats Win Annual Rodeo ~ ~ ~
~ ~ orts i 1111 111 1 11 1 11111:11 11 ,1111 111 1111n111 111 1n111 1111111111111111111111u1u111111111 111111 111 111111 111111111111111 111 1u1u111 111 ~
beat Lifters Win 1tercollegiate Meet 3y BRUCE WHITHORN
C won team honors at the est Intercollegiate Weight­
g Meet held in the SUB thea- t Friday.
'C lifters swept the 165-lb. · on with Jack Jamieson and 1 Hocevar taking first and d respectively. Bill Sikonia the 181-lb. contest in this which is one of three NCAA
nal meets. The man lifting 1nost weight in his division in ume of the three meets is the nal champion.
II Sarkonia, Jack Jamieson , Eugene R-Obinson each came gh with their personal highs
ive the MSC team a great
-cently Jack Jamieson won - 1 Saskatchewan Provincials in
• na. He is also t he current west champion in the 165-lb. t class.
1 SC's next meet will be when hosts the Montana Open on 26. The Open will be big as
ill draw lifters from Canada all over the U. S. This meet , be under AA U regulations
and will be held in the SUB thea­ ter from 12:30 to 6 on May 26.
Weightlifting coach William J amieson expressed a desire to see a good turnout of MSC 'stu­ dents for the Montana Open. He added that persons who attended the April 20 meet enjoyed it. "Team members are hardworking and spend 2 to 3 hours a day, 4 to 7 days a week for the entire y~r. They certainly would appre­ ~iate student support," Jamieson stated.
Results of the Far West Inter­ collegiate :
132-lb.-1. Roger Phillips, Car­ roll; 2. Captain Turner, MSC.
148-lb.-1. Peter Carlton, U of Cal at Berkeley ; 2. Jack Fiji, U of Cal at Berkeley; 3. Eugene Robinson, MSC.
165-lb. - 1. Jack Jamieson, MSC; 2. J erry Hocevar, MSC.
181-lb.-l. Bill Sikortla, MSC; 2. Keith Taft, Carroll.
198-lb.-1. Carl Miller, U of Cal at Berkeley ; 2. Sandy Burns, Carroll.
Heavyweight - Dave Miller, Carroll.
Montana State College cowboys won their own rodeo Saturday as they edged Rocky Mountain Col­ lege of Billings for first place honors, 337 to 327. Western Mon­ tana College of Education placed third in the 16th Annual MSC Rodeo.
John Wrzesinski of Rocky Mountain College was named the rodeo's all-round cowboy, and Dale Little Soldier of RMC was runner-up.
MSC also won the cowgirls' di­ vision with 230 points. Northern Montana tallied 120 for second place, and College of Great Falls finished third with 80. One hun­ dred and forty performers from 12 western colleges showed up for the three day rodeo in the MSC field house.
Barbara Crowe, Livingston, who was elected queen of the rodeo by an all-school vote on Thursday, reigned over the sessions and also participated in the events. About 3000 persons watched the finals on Saturday.
Barbara Smyth, Lethbridge, Al­ berta, was the only MSC student to win a first place. Miss Smyth won the goat-tieing event, and was runner-up to Lorraine Taylor of Northern Montana for all ­ round cowgirl.
The r esults: Calf-roping (two calves-Dale
Little Soldier (RMC), 35.6; Myrl Goodwin (ISC), 37.9; Sandy Gag­ non (MSC), 41.2; Mike McCo} (MSC), 47.5.
Bareback riding-Shawn Davis (WMC), 167 points; Bill Fraser
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MSC's MISS RODEO, Barbara Crowe, cuts her cowpony around a barrel in the girls barrel racing event during the annual MSC Rodeo. Miss Crowe, who was elected Queen of the Rodeo in an all-school election, helped the Bobcat cowgirls win a first place in the women's division. -EXPONENT PHOTO BY RON ROE
(CGF), 157; John Wrzesinski (RMC), 156; George Hamil ton (UI), 155; Mike McCoy (MSC), 154; tie for sixth place between Bill Brown (NM) and Darrel Short (USU), 151.
Ribbon roping-Kent Schiozawa (ISC), 24.5; Myrl Goodwin (I SC), 26.9; Barry Williams ( USU). 30.5; Dick Rai,:land (MSC), 32.1.
Saddle bronc 1·iding - John Wrzesinski (RMC); Dane! Short (USU); Duck Rhea (MSC); Shawn Davis (WMC) .
Bulldogging-Dale Little Sol­ dier (RMC), 17.6; Larry Caldwell (BYU), 18.0; Gary Murphy (MSC); Buz Cowdrey (W1'IC); Robert Kyle (MSU); and Sandy Gagnon (MSC).
Girls barrel racing - Lorraine Taylor (NM). 32.2; Barbara Dear (CGF), 33; Elaine Evans (MSC) 33.6; Sandy Carpenter (WMC). 34.3.
Girls goat tieing - Barbara Smyt h (MSC), 32.5; Sharon Mehling (MSC), 34.3; Joanne Goodwin (ISC), 36.7; F ern Hughes (WMC), 37.3.
PHILCO SIX-TRANSISTOR
I 04 W. M•in Phone 587-7007
BOZEMAN, MONTANA
HANG TOUGH was the action insisted upon during the Annual MSC Rodeo. Uncatered stock from t he Oral Zumwalt corrals made this year's rodeo a complete spec­ tators sport. Rocky Mountain Col­ lege of Billings placed second to the favored cowbovs of J\fSC.
-EXPO, EN.T PHOTO BY RON ROE
Boost the
THE MONTANA EXPONENT Friday, April 27,
Tom Richardson Issues a Challenge
Tennis Match Accepted by Faculty Delega · THE CHALLENGE
TO: Faculty, Montana State College
FROM: Associated Students, Montana SLate College W H ERE A S, the Associated
Students of Montana State Col­ lege benevolently recognize the a,ll-too-human frailties of the fac­ ulty o.f the aforementioned insti­ tution, and
W H ERE AS, such weakness may be expected to succwnb to the temptation to "quit while you're ahead",
ALL-AROU D COWBOY. J ohn Wrzesinski of R~ky Mountain C?l­ lege receive his winnfog saddle and the congratu latI~ns ~f J ae~ wam­ Son, Rodeo Club President. \\" rzesins~i de(ealed . his s ide kick cow­ puncher from Rocky, Dale Little Soldier by 5 pomts.
BE IT UNDERSTOOD, that the intrepid and dauntless forces of the Associated Students, long champions of truth and justice, do hereby challenge said timorous faculty to once and for all settle accounts on the field of play­ nameJy the tennis court.
BE JT UNDERSTOOD, that the unfortunate outcome of last year's unrepresentative contest shall not go unavenged by our robunt and spirited undergrad­ uates-should the flabby fathers of learning condescend to risk their feebly-held title by accept­ ing this challenge.
-EXPONENT PHOTO BY RON ROE
Intramural Week
The scene is set for Intramural Swimming in the gym pool. In­ tramural director Bob Best has scheduled the swimming competi­ tion for May 23 thru May 24. The swim meet. is open to all students and active pa1-ti9'ipation is urged. .Practice for all fraternities and independents will start on l\Iay 9. Practice hours ·will be between the hours of 7 to 9 p.m. and \\ill be open on Monday, Tuesday, Wed­ nesday1 and Friday.
Mav is the month for all the rcsult"ing intramm·al sports. Ten­ nis has been scheduled for early May. The tennis competition \\~11 consist of doubles and singles and wil1 be based on a single elimina­ tion tournament.
Softball began last Monday with a full slate of softball games in the intramural league. Word of mouth has it that the Kappa Sigs and the Phi Sigs are dark horse runners in the intramural softball league. Any new inde­ pendent softball teams may still enter competition by submitting a full roster to director Bob Best at phone number 586-6767.
Intramural track participation has been scheduled for Memorial Day, May 30. Through the help of Coach Ralph Steben, a full series of events have been set up.
Intramural schedule for the week beginning April 30 is as follows: Monday, April 30
Field I-Sigma Chi vs. Pi Kappa Alpha
Field II-Sigma Nu vs. Phi Sigma Kappa
Field III-Sigma Phi Epsilon YS. M n's Co-op
Field IV-Alpha Gamma Rho vs. Lambda Chi
Field V-Delta Sig vs. Kappa Sig
Wednesday, Ma y 2 Field I-Kappa Sig vs. Alpha
Gamma Rho Field II-Lambda Chi vs. Sig
Ep Field III-Men's Co-op vs.
Sigma Nu Field IV-Phi Sig vs. Sigma
Chi Field V-Pi Kap vs. SAE
Thursda y, May 3 Field I-SAE vs. Phi Sig Field II-Sigma Chi vs. Men's
Co-op Field III-Sigma Nu vs.
Lambda Chi Field IV-Sig Ep vs. Kappa
Sig Field V-Alpha Gamma Rho
vs. Delta Sig
By HERB WRIGHT
This past Saturday the Bobcat nine were put through a game simulated scrimmage. Coach l\·Iar­ inkovich J)Ut his boys through the paces as he tried to work some of the rough spots such as base run­ ning which has been a weak spot in the Bobcat's attack. This prac­ tice was also used to give some new pitcbars a workout and to see how they looked against the varsity batters.
The scrimmage Saturday was a prelude to a big week for the Bobcats. The Cats travel to Hel­ ena Wednesday to play a double­ header "~th Carroll College. Car­ roll should prove to be tough sleding for the Cats. Howeve1· lhe B,obcats will have their four top pitchers ready for anything that Carroll can brew up. Coach Mar­ inkovich is hoping his boys aren't looking past the Carroll game and setting their sights on the Grizzly game Saturday.
Here is the probable MSC line­ up with individual batting aver­ ages: c, Merle Young, .094; lb, Herb Wright, .164; 2b, Erv Win­ slow, .333; ss, either Don Stew­ art, .063, or Bob Allen, .227; 3b, Jack McLeod, .267; lf,• Terry Mero, .333; cf, Gary Lambert, . 320; rf, either John Hutchins, .583, or Jim Strouse, .167.
Lambert and Mero lead the club in extra base hits. Lambert has hit three doubles and Mero has two triples. McLeod leads the club in RBI's with 10. Winslow leads the club in total hits with 14.
The Grizzlies will invade Bobcat land Saturday afternoon at 1 :00 p.m. at Dyche Field. The Cats loSt two games to l\iissoula this year and beat thern once in the Banana Belt Tournament.
BE IT UNDERSTOOD, that said lithe and supple students will meet these sedentary searchers of truth at any place and at any time they shall proclaim_ (in an earnest, fo1·thright counter to any cowardly attempt to escape giv­ ing satisfaction to this debt of honor).
Thomas E. Richardson~ repre­ sentative for the fearless and con­ fident Associated Students of l\ISC.
THE ACCEPTANCE TO: President Tom Richardson,
and All Montana State Col­ lege Students of Good Will
WHEREAS, a challenge has been issued by rou, concen1ing the prowess and reput.ation of the racket swinging segment of the faculty of this institution, and
WHEREAS, the contests of 1961 did indeed resttlt in much wholesome and friendly inter­ change among students and fac­ ulty, and
WHEREAS, the J)l"Oud record of this faculty in the friendly competition of tennis now st.ands at one win and no losses, and
NOTWITHSTA DING, that the fit faculty of this institution is admittedly one year older than the date upon which it previously contested and defeated its racket swinging counterparts among ye students, and
Barbering With or Without
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Send Them fo Us for
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Phone 586-5339 for Pickup and Delivery
THEREFORE, that the age margin separating us is now ad­ vanced by another single and total twelve-month period, and
THEREFORE, that to meet your friendly challenge does in­ deed ta.., us to our greater limlts
1
but
EVERTHELESS, your cour­ tesy in responding to our chal­ lenge of one year ago, and
FURTHERMORE, your exub­ erance and confidence in issuing Lo us a challenge for 1962,
DOES INDEED, accord us the
privilege and pleasure 6! ma known th.is
PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE, fore and in the presence o·f the students and faculty of I tana State College,
TO CONTEST WITH YOI opposite ends of the beautiful attractive te.rmis courts of l tana State College at 10 a.n· the forenoon of Tuesday, Ma· 1962.
Keith Bowen, of, by a FOR THE FACULTY'
( to be followed by more de EXPONENT, May 11, 196
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You'll find the extra measure of beauty and value that you want in a diamond ring at your Artcarved jeweler, listed below. Ask him to show you the designs chosen by America ·s College Queens.
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Bozeman
ohcat Cindermen Second at Ricks By BILL WALTER
Christison and Dick Schul­ et meet marks and Steve tied two records as the Bob­ finished second to Idaho at the Ricks College lnvita­ track meet last week. The
ts amassed 80 points in fin­ ! second to ISC's 109 1 6. ~ had its share of record ers as Bill Matson estab­ t new marks in the high ow hurdles to lead the Ben-
sten1 Montana finished third e meet with 49 1 6 followed icks 18 1~, Weber College of , Utah 14, and !\orthern na 13.
_ Bobcats were handicapped 1 ankle injury prevented Al Icy from competing for the d meet in a row. Consequent­
"" Ca ts had no entry in the jump or the broad jump.
ky a lso runs the hurdles. ,ri.stison tossed the javelin 1n io set a record and Schul- 49'5'h" in the shot put also lished a record for that
MSC'S S )10 KY OLSEN come down on his s teer during the annual rodeo held in the fi eldhouse last weekend. Olsen aided the Bobcat cowboys in "~inning the rodeo by a score of 337 .. Rocky .Mountain College placed second with 327.
. -EXPONENT PHOTO BY RON ROE
ran the 100-yard dash in o,conds and the 220 in 21.6 to
both records. chough he finished second in ,220-yard low hurdles, Bob
of MSC set an all-time MSC ; of 24.6 in the event. Matson
C won the race in record
Illlcfil
time of 24.0 seconds. Bobcat Coach Ralph Steben said
that if the Bobcats had been a lit­ tle sharper, they might have won the meet. The Bobcats ,vill get a chance for revenge later this spring when they meet Idaho State in a dual match on Gatton Field.
The next meet for the Cats " ~ll be this Saturday when they meet
Brotherhood
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Eastern Montana in a dual meet on Gatton Field at 10 a .m .
The resulm: 120-yard high hurdle - Matson, ISC
16.2 ; Lu.sh, MSC; Nigbors, W'M. 100-yard da.ah-Good, MSC, 9.8: La. n·
Quc in, ISC: Arty, NM. Mile run-Furne.II, ISO, 4 :29.2; Pat.­
terson, MSC: Lucky, ISC. 880-yard relay-Idaho State, l :31.7
?tf ont3na State, W e.her. ' 440-yard dtlsh-Thom&s, ISC, 51.8
second place unlisted: Keel , Ricks. Low hurdle-Mat.son, ISC, 24 ; Lund
MSC; Gomarfo, !SC. 880-yard run-Scott. ISC, 1 :59.1: W i!,
Iiams, ISC: Kifea.r, :MSC. 220-:vard dash-Good. MSC. 21.6: Pan
QlWsol\, ISO; Lewis, WM. Two-mile run-f'urnell , ISC, 9 :48.6
Scott. ISC: P atterson. 1tlSC. Mile relay - Montana Slate, 3 :30.6
ISC: WM. Shot put.--Schul.le.r, MSC, 49 ft. 4 % in.
(ntw record ) ; Hornhurst, ISC; Wright WM.
H igh jump-Miller, WM, 6 f t. 4 in. Na.her, WM; Orne, Ricks; Mataon. ISC (tied for second). ·
Drond jumJ>-Shivers, ISC, 20 f t. Il;.1 in. ; Artz, N M : Gibbons, Ricks.
Discus-De Vries, W eber, 135 !L 6 1 ~
in. : Musgrove. WM ; Carlson . MSC. Pole vnult - Fortner, ISO, 13 ft.;
Anderson, ISC; Sawye.r, MSC (tie for gecond).
J avelin-Chris tison , MSC. 20J ft. 8 in .. new record : J ieckbush, M : Gillespie, WM.
In exclll11gE11,l111V1 COLOR A COLUMBIA PICTURES RELEASE
-plus-
A PI-IIL! P BAB~Y PR9DUC110N
Friday, Saturday, Sunday April 27, 28, 29
TWILIGHT DRIVE-IN LIVINGSTON
By FRED TURNER
VERSATILITY IS THE WORD for the Bobcat track team! A number of prominent Bobcat athletes make their showing week after week in competition against other thin­ clads from other colleges. Bobcat dash man, Steve Good, appears in two speedy dashes. Steve is the top MSC com­ petition in the 100 yard and 220 yard dash. Steve is also a Bobcat football star and has a berth at the right halfback position. Another thinclad speedster is Gary Alley. Gary, another Bobcat halfback, competes along with Steve Good in the 100 yard and 220 yard dashes and both men compete in the 880 yard relay. Gary Keifer, a flashy Bobcat skier, competes in the 440 and the 880 and holds down a spot on the mile relay team. Ken Christienson, a quarterback on the Bobcat foo tball team, heaves the javelin and in last week's competition in Rexburg, Idaho, Ken broke the. exist­ ing school r ecord with a toss of 204'11". The only other football player who has a berth on Coach Stebens thinclad squad, is tackle Gene Carlson. All-round athlete, Tom Saw­ yer a ids the Bobcats in the pole vault.
ANOTHER SESSION OF SPRING FOOTBALL has ended and Coach Herb Agocs and taff seem to have a high spirited, hustling ball club to look forward to next season. During spring football , fundamentals wer e the basis for all drills and all candidates gained valuable experience from their coaches. Line Coach Jim Sweeney led his rough and tumble boys through an exciting three weeks. Hustle upon the line was better this year, and I think it will make up for the lack of experienced lettermen. Practice sessions for the line were plenty rough with a Jot of personal contact result­ ing in many black and blue spots. Coach Sweeney's favorite drills as in the past were his famous "Bull-in-the-Ring" and one of his newest invent ions, which he terms "Sparticus." Coach Sweeney along with youthful prodigies Bob Durado and Jack Cameron, coached the ill-fated Gold squad. Coach Tom Parac again had a number of backfield men to pick from and stressed the fundamentals of running and hitting the hole. I think Tom's favorite drill turned out to be an agility drill for the backs. Tom terms the exhau ting drill "Go-for-the-Ball". Being a bit more carefully protected than the linemen, the backs received very few bruises or scratche unless they participated in scrimmage or ran tackling drills with the linemen. Coach Parac along with assistant fresh­ man coach Dan Costello and professional football draftee, Bob Biastoch led the successful Blue team to a 42-24 tri­ umph over the unexperienced Gold team. I think Coach Agocs should have his eyes to the future with the hustling ball club that participated in Spring Football.
WOULD YOU ENJOY BEING A COACH? Well now is the time to come off of the spectator bench and get the advan tage of coaching your own baseball team. Each year during the summer months, the city of Bozeman has an at tractive Babe Ru th League Baseball program. Participa­ tion in the league is enjoyed by advanced Little Leaguers from the ages of 13 to 15. The boys compete in much the same manner as the big leagues and the top teams enter the regional finals which usually are held in Miles City. Excellent teams enjoy the advantage of competing in Babe Ruth League World Series. If you feel that you always had the ambition of becoming a coach why not contact Mr. John Parker in Room 302 of Montana Hall and let him fill you in on more of the details of an exciting program.
I
TWO OF A KIND-Promoted from Major to Lieutenant Colonel were Earle M. Cole, right, a nd George H. Carlton, left, of the Air Force ROTC Detachment. IlapJ>Y smiles were in order when the duo ex­ changed the gold leaves for silver ones.
rHE MONTANA EXPONENT
"Guys and Gals" Twenty Policemen Receive Diplomas At MSC School
By MARY BENNET!' ~ Twenty city, county. and state
police officers received eertiiicates of achievements on Thursday niter completing the .Montana Law Enforcement Academy Lead­ ership School at Montana State College. How many times haYe you
heard '1To thine o",1 seli be true"? How many times have you cheated in solitaire? This is hard­ Iv a true example of the more c
0
omplex concept of self-deception, but perhaps not so untrue in terms of frequency.
Self deceplion can sometimes be quite desirable, however if car- 1ied lhrough along certain lines and to the degree that it does not become unreasonable. And this is all related to the proverbial ques­ tion of the chicken and the egg when it comas to whether trying to fool others leads to self-decc])­ tion or whether self-deception leads to deceh·ing others. If one succeeds, the othe1· is quite likely to follow.
Actually, it is my firm belief that a little wholesome deception makes life more interesting. And to be really ruthless, it's easier to get you own way - if you like such things!
RETRACTION Due to no erroT on the part of
the society editor, the announce­ mPnt of R. F. Taylor's pinning- to Sharon Kent was announced. Rod­ ney Flint Taylor ls happily mar· ried, and Sharon is ha]Jpily inde­ pendent of any such affiJiation. FIVE POUNDS PASSED AROUND
John Mann, AGR, help pay for a five pound box of can<ly when he decided to bang his pi11 011 Fran Sinkovitz. Arnie Anderson . Kappa Sig, found himself in the same situation when he annotinced his pinning to Janice Knthary. AGD.
Ot.to Preikeszas passed out cigars (or suckers, which is il?) at the Lambda Chi house to an­ nounce his pinning to .Mary Red­ dick. And there was candle smoke at tl\l, Chi O house when Bobbi Clark announced that she now has the SAE pin of Larry Komlofske. Duncan MacNab has announced his recent pinning to Donna Kalberg. Russ Powers, SAE, has recently announced his engagement to Sarah Lindsy, Chi o. NEW AGR ACTIVES
Don Bacon, Doug Len.ington, Ron Benson., Glenn Ledgerwood, Jim Willoughby, Dale Notting­ ham, Larry Passage, Mike Horn, John Green, and Grant Knowlen are all new AGRs. PLEDGE R.APPENJNGS
Scott Allen. Ken Kenney, Ace Brown; Mike McCoy, Jay Kassner, and George St. Andrassy are all new Delta Sig pledges. •
New broom pushers at the Kappa Sig house include Don J{ing, and Dick Sammons.
Recent Lambda Chi ])ledges are Ted Doney, Barry l\lcKenzie, ..Art Linden. and Dan Gobow.
llar-ry Ar m strong and Pat Campbell are now pledges of Phi Sigma Kappa. And Don Norwood
A NEW BARBER SHOP
VANCE PEARSON, Barber Phone 586-2351
is presently pledged to Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
Results of the recent pledge election at the Lambda. Chi house axe Max Tow11sencl, President; Jim \Vhite, \pice-President; ,ves Perkins, Secretary; and .Mike Klos, Treasurer.
HONORARIES ELECT At the election of Phi Sigma
held this week, the familiar face of the ..t\natomy Lab, AI Fox. ,vas elected President. He will be as­ sisted by Richard Lehfeldt, Vice President; Sharon Smith, Secre­ tary; Ray Hodge. Treasurer; Pat­ ty Jo Davis, Editor: Dr. Newman, Advisor; and Dr. Rumely, Coun­ cilor.
New Ag Club officers include the following people: PTesident1 Don Anderson; Vice President, Evert Lovec; Secretary, Bob Sage; Treasurer. Gary Thompson; and Herald, P. J. Rill. MISCELLANEOUS
Dennis Jurica was voted the most colorful AGR active! And P. J. Hill has lost his pin to whereabout unlrno·wn. Any infor­ mation regarding it will be appre­ ciated.
Judge John C. Harrison of the state supreme court wa.s the prin­ cipal speaker at the awards cere­ mony. Dr. R. R. Renne, pl'esident of 1ISC, presented the certificates.
Officers from city police depart­ ments completing the course were: Laurence A. Drew, Kalispell; Raymond Laven de r 1 Bozeman; Vernon E. Maddock, Butte; Gary L. Olson, Glendive; W. W. Peter­ son, Livingston; and Charles Pas. senti, Ha\-rre.
11en from the Sheriif's Offices were: Leslie D. W. Anderson, Gal­ latin; Everett Burt. Powell; Eddy A. Hakola, Cascade; Philip C, Desarmo, Missoula; F. F. (Cap) Griffin, Yello,vstone; Laurence Lytle, Lewis and Clark; W. E. Woodcock, Custer; and Billy C. Pierce, Dawson.
State Department officers were: Ernest A. DeDycker, Montana Highway Patral; Jim Ford 1 Fish and Game Depai·tment: Peter Gaasch. MHP; Robert J. Griffith. Jl!HP; Robert L. Payne, MRP; and Donald W. Wright, Fish and Game Department.
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CRAM COURSE NO. 2: BIOLOGY The grisly shadow of final exams looms over us, so today in this column instead of merry quips and homely saws, vou will find hnrd facts-quick cram courses to help you through the ' ordeal ahead.
Last week I gave you a rapid survey of Modern European History. Kow let us turn to Biology.
Biology is cli,;ded into several phyla, or classes. First is the protozoa, or one-celled animal. All life terns from the on,;. celled animal. Over a space of millions of years, life slowly evolved until today we hn.ve animals with as many as 12 cells. Some larger mammals claim they have H to 16 cells, but you know how larger mammals lie. ·
The second class of animals is the periphera-a shadowy • category that borders often on the vegetable. Take, for example, , the sponge. The sponge is definitely ru, animal, The washcloth, on the other band, is definitely not.
K ext we come to the arthropoda, or insects. Most people, of course, find insects fairly repulsive-and yet, if one will but look, there is exquisite beauty in the insect world. Who does not remember the lovely insect poems of William Cullen Sigafoos-such enchanting lyrics as Tumbling Along wiih the Tumbling Tumhlebug, Fly Gently, Sweet Aphid, and Gnats My Mother Taught Me, Mr. Sigafoos has been inactive since the , inrnntion of DDT.
Our ne:\-t category is the mollusca-lobsters, shrimp, ru,d the like. Lobsters are generally found under rocl,.-y projections on the ocean bottom. Shrimp are generally found in a circle around a small bowl containing cocl,.-tail sauce. Marlboro Cig­ arettes are generally found at any tobacco counter or vending machine.
What have Marlboro Cigarettes got to do with biology? Well, actually, not very much. It must be remembered, how: • ever, that the makers of Marlboro pay me for writing this column, and they are inclined to get surly if I fail to mention their product.
''·
/bert i~ W Gtetl &f fcu/fy Ji,tffr;gfLt5ktrl& fftt !tkJ "Yes, Alexander, there is such a joy, but, alas, the time is no; yet. I refer to Marlboro Cigarettes which will not be invented for another 2500 years." Whereupon Ale.xonder fell into a sulk from which he never recovered ... Well sir, there is no quest.ion I sold a lot of cigarettes -.~th this ingenious commercial, but the gang domi at the American Academy of Art and Letrers gave me a mighty good razzing, you may be stue.
But I digress. Back to biology, ru,d the most advanced phylum of all-the chordata, or Yertebrates, There are two kinds of vertebrates-those whose backbones run horizontally and those whose backbones run vertically. Generally, there is no great difficulty in distinguishing the two varieties. A fish, for instance, has a horizontal backbone, ru,d a man has a vertical backbone. Occasions.lly, howeYer, you run into a ]Jroblem-like a fish who swims upright and a man who pends most of his time in the sack. How, in such a case, do you tell one from another? Scienco struggled with this stir.ky question for cen­ turies, but finally Sigafoos of J\LI.T. came up with a brilliantly sim]Jle answer. Offer the croaturea l\Iarlboro. If it is a fish, it will refuse. If it is Homo sapiens, it will accept. In fact, the more sapient, the quicker the acceptance. 106:! Mn Sbtdm••
* • * T he makers of M arlboro, up rig h t vertebrates a ll, remind you t hat their fine ciga rettes are ai,ailable in pack or bo.x wherever cigarettes arc so ld in 11ny of th e 50 sta t es. ----
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