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ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available. Contenu archivé L’information dont il est indiqué qu’elle est archivée est fournie à des fins de référence, de recherche ou de tenue de documents. Elle n’est pas assujettie aux normes Web du gouvernement du Canada et elle n’a pas été modifiée ou mise à jour depuis son archivage. Pour obtenir cette information dans un autre format, veuillez communiquer avec nous. This document is archival in nature and is intended for those who wish to consult archival documents made available from the collection of Public Safety Canada. Some of these documents are available in only one official language. Translation, to be provided by Public Safety Canada, is available upon request. Le présent document a une valeur archivistique et fait partie des documents d’archives rendus disponibles par Sécurité publique Canada à ceux qui souhaitent consulter ces documents issus de sa collection. Certains de ces documents ne sont disponibles que dans une langue officielle. Sécurité publique Canada fournira une traduction sur demande.
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ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé

Archived Content

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available.

Contenu archivé

L’information dont il est indiqué qu’elle est archivée est fournie à des fins de référence, de recherche ou de tenue de documents. Elle n’est pas assujettie aux normes Web du gouvernement du Canada et elle n’a pas été modifiée ou mise à jour depuis son archivage. Pour obtenir cette information dans un autre format, veuillez communiquer avec nous.

This document is archival in nature and is intended for those who wish to consult archival documents made available from the collection of Public Safety Canada. Some of these documents are available in only one official language. Translation, to be provided by Public Safety Canada, is available upon request.

Le présent document a une valeur archivistique et fait partie des documents d’archives rendus disponibles par Sécurité publique Canada à ceux qui souhaitent consulter ces documents issus de sa collection. Certains de ces documents ne sont disponibles que dans une langue officielle. Sécurité publique Canada fournira une traduction sur demande.

./ ST. VINCENT DE PAUL, QUE.

HV 9308 F45 1962

hi V 930g

/ 962 THE FEDERAL TRAINING CENTRE

OCT 23 199.i

6099 Levesque Blvd., St. Vincent de Paul, rue. CANADA.

I Copyright of this documeoes belong to the Crown.

any intended use

Proper authonzation must be obtained from the author for

Les droits dàuteur du présent document n'appartiennent pas à Ittat. Toute utilisation du contenu du présent document doit être approuvée préalablement par l'auteur

February 8, 1962

NOTES

• ;

1

THE CANADIAN PENITENTIARY SERVICE

In Canada , persons se -ntenced to - terins of less, than two y'ears serve their time in training or reform schools, in-dustrial farms or common goals, under the jurisdictitin of provincial or municipal authorities.

• . • .

Those sentenced to life imprisonment or ;for a term of years, not less,than two, are senten.ced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the province in which the cen.viction takes place. The Penitentiary Commission of the Department of Justice is charged with the administration of these insti-tutions, ten in number, divided as follows:

a) Maximum secutiry institutions:

St. Vincent de Paul Kingston Dorchester Stémy Meuntain.- .1Vlahitoba.) . Prince Albert (Saskatchewan)

• New Westniinster (B.C. )` . ,

h) Medium security InStitutions: _ . : Fede.ra.1 Training Centre

:Leclerc Joyceville (Ont.) Collinis Bay (Ont.)

c) Minimum security• establishments:

They consist of correction.al work camps which are a.ctuall.y under the jur i diction of maximum or medium se-curity insetui:.i.or.s, as follows:

Camps

Gatineau Ccrrectional Work Camp Valleyfield Pre-Release Camp Springhill. Corr. Work- Camp Bea.ver Creek Corr , Work Camp

Jurisdiction

Federal Training Centre St. Vincent de Paul_ Penty Dorchester Pen'y-Collin's Bay Pe&y

Camps Jurisdiction

Landry Cross'ing Cor r. Work.Camp •Collin'sBay.Pen'y • ..Agassiz Corr...Work Camp • ' • :B.C. Penitentiary

William Head Corr. IT.i.ork'Camp B. G.. Penitentiary

In addition, St. Vincent de Paul, Dorchester, Col-lin's Bay, -Manitoba and Saskatchewan penitentiaries

' : have one "Satellite" establishment called "Farm Camp" where inmates a.nnenable to a minimum security regime are transferred: • ., .

-0 -0 -0 -0 -0 -0 -0 -0 -0 -0 -0 -0 -

The Penitentidry ComrhiSdiàn elso adn-iinisters a Correctional Staff College, knoiï,aS. " ..CALDERWOCD", located at Kingston Ot a prison fer women senten-ced in the ise-verai:PrOVinCeS ,t6'a' . 1-ienitentiary term, al-so located at Kingston ; On.t.''Wher:d ,Special accommoda-tion and super-vie3o'rY pseiiïhét "a:re asSigned to them; a new Correction.al,Staff Çollege situated at St. Vincent de Paul, Que, which wa:Stbitidially inaugurated laSt Fall. This Staff Ccillege' Will serve esibecially for the training of French speaking .pehitentiary officers.

3

THE FEDERAL TRAINING CENTRE

1. Around 1929, the Canadian Government decided to build two distinct penal institutions, in the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec, for youthful first offenders. Between 1929 and 1932 a large parcel of land was purchased, for local purposes, east of the St. Vincent de Paul Peniten-tiary property, which is located in the town bearing the sa-me name, some ten miles north-east of the center of the City of Montreal. •

2. Excavation work started in 1930. Preliminary cons-truction was undertaken the following y-ear on the grounds which were then. designated "LAVAL BUILDINGS" which were later changed to "FEDERAL TRAINING CENTRE". Inmates were then used as common labourers and at the start . progress was rather slow. As a consequence of the outbreak of World Vilar II and for other considerations, the project was laid aside at that time, being revived.in 1950, when contracts were given for the construction of the main buildings', /no s t of which were completeddduring the .winter of 1952. On April lst of that year, 140 inmates were trans-ferred from St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary: it was the official date of birth of this new institution.

3. The area of the grounds inside the perimeter wall is some 25 acres, about a third of which is used for open air retreation and sports a.ctivities for inmates.

4. The institution comprises the following buildings:

(a) .The administration building, housing. administration, psychological, classification and accounting offices; gerprint and identification services; supervisors' hall; in-

: mates' vis'iting hall and -their visitors' waiting room;

(b)" • 'TWO ,elaa.pc:ls', With total-accoinmodation for .600, 'for inn-iates of roman catholic and protestant faiths; .

(c) A 16-bed sick bay and' two individual rooms and a dental clinic, under the management -of a surgeon assis-ted by six hospital officers;

. . , , (d) A reception and orientation centre for newcomers;

(e) . ..segregation purpose;;;;. , •i• •

g yrn na iern, for physical training and theatre and moving picture presentations , andiothe r : entertainment;

(g) Five apprenticeship areas, for the vocational train- mg of a maximum'pf Z66 inmates in ZO trades; ,

(h) A libra.ry with over 7000 reading books. , (A maxi-mum issue of five library books per week, available to each inmate, upon request). Over 50' different maga r zincs, foreign and domestic, in French and English., are at the disposal of the inmate population, in the library which remains open every, evening until 9. 30 P. M..

(i) Five classrooms, with a capacity for 100 pupils, under the direction of an educational supervisor, four teachers and a secretary;

main-kitchen, with two .adjoining S ghalls, with accommodation for 600, where inmates take :all•their meals together;

(k) Central stores, for the receiving, checkin.g and distribution of machinery, equipment, :tgres and sup-plies; - '

(1) :11,-;laundry, .change room and shoe. repairS services;

(M) ,:: .,•:Vs,rorkshops, -,for the construction and maintenance staff and inmate crews; • • • •:

• 5

(n) Four 100-bod dormitories, Of two-story. .construction. Ch floor irieIndes tWo separate 'wings, each*àf which has

its own ablution room, common recreation rObm, three 6rbed, dormitorie.s and 7 individua." rooms, to which meri-tOrious inmates are-allotted. The two;:wings on each•floor are , divided by a. pa.rtitioned office reServed.for -the custo-dial officer s ,duty: • ' • . . .

•Inmates 'Wash and iron. 'their own personal. clothing in the ablution rooms -, 'which are provided V;iith r aishing :

steani 'dryers; ironing board s . and flat irons; Ëecl-di ng IS'svashed in the regional laundry. ComMOn rebnià aie tis'ed regularly, during : leisure hôurs, either tà read; write, listen tà the radio', Play ca.rds, chess, cheCkeré, T.V. , etc.. . • : .

5. The institution is of the medium :security type and is intendèd for younger male inmates of all creeds and races. While it•can accommodate' a total of 490, its normal maxi-mum population should not exceed 42,5, becauSe ofthe Pe-culiar houe.sing facilities and the constant need for ,segrrga-tion for administrative, disciplinary and other rea.son.S.

. " Moreover, Federal Training Centre has, on July 1961, established a correctional work Scamp -in the Gatineau region., approximately 35 miles north of -Flull, Que. The Ca.MP's actual population in 37 inmates. Population will increase gra.dually up to a possible maximum of 88; This figure svill be rea.ched as soon . 'as. facilities ,permit it, pro-bably by the beginning of next Sta.mmer: . .

» 6

• 6. Purpose and operational principles of a correctiOnal camp •

a)- Thé CorrectiOnal camp is an open institution *Which fakrours the development of onetà personality in rendering him conscions of his personalresponsibilitiOs through mul-tiple initiatives. The inmates assigned to this camp are necessarily h.andpicked. The use of restricted security and disciplinary measures not being necessary, therefore the application of a constructive .and progressive treatment programme especially ada.pted to this type of inmates is greatly : facilitated in this easier atmosphere which con-trasts vividly with the one existing, in maximum security institutions.

b)- Furthermore, the construction costs for necessary housing and treatment fa.çilities.are comparatively small in the installation Of a camp of this type, ensuing therefore an appreciable eConorny of public fpnds.

c)-, On the practical plan, inmates are employed at the execution of GovernMental public'ütility works. Such works cover the grading of public parks and beaches, road construction, bridges, the retimbe ring and clearing of wooden areas, the maintenance of buildings ,used to house inmates, and othe r. public utility , works. .The présent un-derstan.ding states that such works ,need. ,not normally be

. exeçute,d before a period of ten years, .therefore not affec-ting 'civilian labor.. This is the reason why the help of inmate labour has been requested. This work programme ioffers the inmates an occasion to perform tasks closely !related to working conditions outside. It also provides the opportunity to develop their personal efficiency and 'to acquire • good working habits in :their daily close contact .with nature, which helps them in the acquisition of a rea-.1istic sense of life.

d)- The general programme of the camp also comprises several cultural activities which will allow inmates to

: 7.

develop their physical and intellectual faculties ? end:also.s:, their moral and social sens e ThLç.nh.e.aççtm1P1eeJ,' by the sound organization of constructive recreational ac-tivities such as organi - ed sports, reading; E,pecialized and general eduçational C 011.Z s ,,.grupdis-CussiOns,./1"forma-tive hobbies, music and group _siriging, ète.,. -el:» by the practice of religion and the Pe't à oriel contacts of;iturgies - with the chaplains. We will al'rço endéavotit to d'ieèàtè permissive atmosphere which will allow the inrnates;::to or-ganize themselves these activities in order that they-.1:;eco-me conscious of their community respOnsibilitieS Whiéh will help them develop social maturity.

e)- The staff assigned to the correctional ihp, iri . eddi-tiontci set good example as citizens,:wiiËe,xercise .ffieir du-ties in a climate of confidence, bea.ring in mind that inmates und-et their:care needigtaidance and rinderstanding-=a-nd shotild be taught hoW :tci think •constructively and realistically their pers:onal ànd•dOcial.,Ptoblenis: '•;•• must be particularly convfncedkef eeha:biritatïn.g: everyone of them.

f)- In addition, it is important '49 sti as:Tiaue4 as possible: -.freeent ,contectS1Setween':the'ihriiateà:eia their families, and to>-,eneoitrages ;the pattièii;atibrr of wortwhile citizens in the organizàtion-of éduetioner and recteational camp activities for the .'benefit 'of itirnateàr. This With'a vie:w to reenforcing the family ties between the inmates, their relatives - and society , Irâtii-nu\cii a 4u-tie initiatives. favour their normal return to civilianlifè:

g)- It is ali-3 .6 neCessary thaf inrnates Nvotking nner the direction of employees of : other. ,departnients.;9.r.Peiva» en-terprises, be .fteatè d'as reguiatiworkers are,: ip..an.en-deavour to obtain working re1ation4 as normal considering of course, at the Same tirne, that essential regulations for the good administration of the.,easnp must be respected. - • .

• • -- •

8

7.1 The poPulation on February 8, 196Z, consisted of 465 inmates and the following averages theri prevailed:

Racial Origin - French-Canaclians 87% (Most of the others are English-Canadians)

Creeds - Roman Catholics 93% (The remainder are Protestants)

Age 18-19

Average length of sentence 3 years •

Schooling .

5 - 6th grade

Prevailing Offence - Theft of auto and Break, enter and theft . • - over 65%

8. The administration of the institution and the appli- cation of the treatment programme involve responsibili-ties, duties and obligatio-n.s which are under the mana-gement of the following senior office ri:

DIRECTOR Deputy Director • Assistant Director. (Administration & Organization) .

. Assistant Director (Services & Supply) Assistant Deputy Director (Treatment) • Assistant Deputy- Director (Custody)

• ..Local administrative divisions: There are four main

divisions, as follows: . • . 1- Organization and administration; in-service

training of personnel; 21." Treatment and Training of inmates; -3- Services and" Supply • 4- Discipline and custody. '

' Thes'e . foUr "divis.i.oris are subdivided in eleven depart-ments. Our staff establishment is composed - of 230 offi-cers comprising executive staff, treatment officers (heads of departments and assistants officers), 26

vocational training instru.ctors, 9 rna.intenan.Ce instructors, 4 schoolteachers and 120 custodial officers..., , •

• 9. The Reclassification Board is the ma.inspring of the applie.d trea.tnaent programme. Under the chairma,nship of the Deputy Director, it is composed of the Assistant Depu-ty Direçtor (Treatment and Training), Assistant peputy Di-rector (Custody), chaplain, physician, schoolrnaSter, steward, chief vocational officer, classification. : ,Officers, works officer and selected assistants. -

10. In the Province of Quebec (except the Magdalen Is-lands), all inmates liable to a term of two years or more are automatically .sentence&at,S4- : Vincent de Paul Peniten-tiary. First penitentiary offenderS:are. interviewed :by an Area Classification Board made:up of the Deputy Directqrs and .claseification officers ,of the three regional institutions. This Board meets every fortnight: • -

The age limit for, inmates to•be conside.red for tra.ns- .fer at Federal. Training Centre i:-.4 from 16 to .25 years of age (some ,exceptional case e may exceed this limit); , ,

First penitentiary sentence; Apparently amenable .to treatment and rehabilitation.

• .. . . . .. . . • • Inmates not considered foi- transfert are those presen-

ting . the following: clia.ra.cte•ristice: ' . , ..

• ) Mental defecti».es..

« 2) Emotionally unStable individualà. . .

. . •3,) Inmates y,.eith an escape history.. . • .

_ • '4) Dri_ig addicts. •

. -

5) Thos e who have had serious offence reports inilie . . last 12-month period. . . . . . . .

«6) Active hoinosexuals: • . . . .

:

7) Certain cases Of long sentence s but «notvell. Cônéide-ration must be given to the type of offencé and the per-, ..

.." sonalitY. of the offender: .. , . • -- ..

.11. The, population today stands at. 465 nmates; ..distribu- ted as follows.:: . - . ,, .. . . : ,..

10

Newcomers 20 Vocational trainees 177 Construction and maintenance crews 33 Attending school 37 Kitchen crew 26 La.undry and change room 15 Other services and employment 120

428 Gatineau Camp • , 37

Total 465

12. The youngsters accepted for tr'an.sfer are not, and •with few possible exceptions, will likely , not becon-ie crimi-nals. For the most part, they are poor unfortunates, il-

• leterates, left to themselves, lacking home, i,•eligious •academic and 'social education.. Thé majOrity of them have never known the affection, security, peace and.joy of a normal home life. In most cases, their parents (either . ignorant unWorthy of theii sacred obligations) are res- ponsible one w' ay or another for their downfall.

• •". Upon arrival at the Centre, newcomers, who are

tran.sferred in groups averaging 25 a month, are qu.artered in the orientation 'unit. They are interviewedby the mem-bers of the Reclassification Board; This boatd meets-weekly, to determine the newcomersi programme; to re-view special cases; to con.sider a:pplications for clemency and sugge,st the cOnclitiOnal releaSe of deserving cases; to consider pre-relea:se n action advisable in individual ca- ses, .

14. During the four-week oi-ientation. period, :regula- tions, privileges and obligations a're therOughly explained to #e"wcbrnerrie i -rThey pa.rticipate in phyical training

•courses, engage in organied .spets, are given instruc-tion in sociology, physical and Mental hygiene, etc. They Pasà;intelligence and aptitude tests, with a' view to direé-ting them towards the apprenticeship of a trade of their own choosing. •

11

15. At the conclusion of this orientation period, new-comers are assigned to a 6-bed dormitory, in one of the housing units, and are .usually sent to school (if they need to increase their academic knowledge) or are put to work at common labour, while awaiting the opportunity - to start their apprenticeship. When..that tirne comes, they are first taught the eleMents of their chosen trade and are subse- - quently assigned to formal trade training.

16. Vocational training is given in the following trades:

Barbering Bricklaying Body & fender repirs Cabinet making . Carpentry (construction) Electricity (construction) Forge Furniture finishing Garage servicemen Industrial drafting

Machine shop Motor mechanics Oil burning , apparatus Pip efitting Plastering Plumbing Sheet metal Steamfitting Uphol:a te ring Welding

17.- Courses average. 6 Months duration:and compare with those ,given in provincial appren.ticeship centers subsidized by the proviricialibVernment, general building contraetors and labour syndicates. Pra.ctical and theoretical training is complemented by blueprint reà.ding, drafting and related elementary sciences .and shop Mathematics. Courses are given in large, well lighted shops fitted with modern:machi-nery, equiprnent and tools by instructors who, in:majority, are gradnates , from tecb.nical and arts and trades schools. These instructors must have gained:practical trade- or in-« dustrial experience prior to joining tlie penitentiary servi-ce: following, their local employMent, 'they all receive sound pedagogical training.. Each instructor teaches a' maximum group of 12 apprentices, whose pràgress and achievements. ' are noted and recOrded monthly. At the Conclusion of .their apprenticeship training, graduates are usually posted to 'cOnstrüCtion•and maintenance crews, to acquire practi-cal Onith'è-jôb exPerience,-,prior to their release.

12

18. Inmates Wok from .eight'otclock in.' the' merning until five'in the afterndon, frorn Monday' to Frida-9' They : a:re reinunerated aethe rate' of 25, 35, 45 or 55' cents per dày, dePending on their dispositions, 'conduct; indus-try and thé :length of tire Served. They•a:re called upon to saVe resi3e-ctively 10, .10, 15 or 20 centâ . a daY, depending ori their rate of remunératien.' 'Once a Week, -they may Use their spending money to purchase tobacdo, 'cigarettes', sweets and oth.er approved articles from the canteen which is Operated 'fer - ;this' Specific FiurpoSe ' •

19. The Educa,tional Supervisor and his four school teadhers teach elementary French, Englis h and arithmetic to prospective tra.de trainees whose school standing is in-ferior to the Gth grade.' More than 100 inmates take up correspondence ,courses in their-spare time. In addition to the regular school programme, the Educational Super-visor gives to:Specially .gifted inmates individual-instruc-tion in music, painting, ;artistic and commercial drawing, -typing, sh.orthand,:-.bôokkeeping and routine office work.

20. Religieus services are held every Sunday and Holy • Day, in two separate chapels reserved exclusively 'for such 'purpose for in-MateS 'of the Roman Catholic faith or of va-rious Protestant deno.minations. A.one-week mission is 'preached annually ; . usually during the•first week of Lent, by outside rnissioners. .Chapla,ins are on:cluty five days a

• ,,week, including Sunday. They go about-the,institution at

inma.tes in the sheps and werk parties, 'and grant .interviews to individual inmates* upon request.. The Fede-ral Training,Gentre is thé only Canadian penitentiary where

-Midnight Mass and other:religious services are celebrated . on ChristmaS morning, bothIn the Roman Catholic. and-

. Protestantchapels.- The- first 'such ocçasion.was on Christmas day,; 1953: The genuine good. ch.eer and humour

• of inmatéS is truly rema.r.kable, during the,Yuletide,

• ...Inmates' phy,sical education, sports anerecreation are matters of-constant concern. ..:The follovving ,statement summarizes regular activities," between 6.30 and 9.30 PM,

every evening, and also is closed., on Saturdays,

IN DORMITORIES

Chess Checkers Cards Hobbies Parlor games Radio & Television

OUTDOOR.

Baseball Cinder traek Hockey Quoits Rugby Soccer Tennis

13

during the day, when the institution Sun.days and other legal holidays:

IN THE .G.'"MNASIUM

(Spectators) Moving pictures Plays and shows

(Participants) Physical training Basket ball Boxing and wrestling Ping-pong'.

Weight lifting Badminton Rope climbing Horizontal and vertical

ladders Medicine ,bail Jumping Trapeze

22. Inmates may be visited by their immediate relatives twice a month. Normally such visit's last half an hour ;and are permitted each afternoon and evening during week-days. This privilege is granted all day on Saturdays and excep-tionally on Sundays' and legal holidays., if relatives reside a considerable distance from the institution or areprevented by their obligations to call during week days.Inmatee.s may write a letter a week'to their relatives with postage:paid from public funds and any, additional letters with postage paid by themselves through the canteen.

23. A repreSentative of the National Parole Board calls regularly.at the' institution once a week to consider worthy cases, some four months prior to half:a sentence being servesl.' Authorized representatives of w.elfare societiés (John Howard Society, Catholic Rehabilitation Service, Salvation Arn-iy, Social Oriehtation.and :Rehabilitation So-ciety) and a special placement offièer from the Unemploy-

: •;.

• 14

ment Service call at regular intervalsç,te help nmates formulate pre-release plans. Members of vai-ious Mont-real organizations (amongst others the Knighi:s of Columbus, Rotary Club, Dalse Welfare Club, -welfare agences pre-viously mentioned) participate actively in our'citizénship programme of inmates educational and recreational acti-vities.

24. Imnats ezenuplary in conduct, in.dustry and attitude usually•benéfitlpy Conditional release, :under supervision, :Between April 1St 1952 and March 31st 1961, 1342 inmates out of 2145:released (or 62.5%), have enjoye d a con.ditional release. The percentage of inmates whose parole certifi-cates had te be reVoked for misconduct or crimes arnounted only to 4.03% during This period.

25. The Canadian Penitentiary Commission has cendensed in the Penitentiary. Officers Handbook issued in 1952, its conception of the treatment of inmates in the following terms:

"In the prison community, "TREAT1ViENT" means all.the activities of the institution which-make their impact on the inrhatesl.physidal and crnotionallife.from the day he is received until the day he is :discharged..":..: •

-•- • • . . . . "At'its •worst,.:".TR. EATMENT" is merely "ware- ,

housing". -- the: stbrage of men's minds a.nd bodies for the yea.rs of • e ntence andithe imposition of:.a regime of liar-

- -row regiMentation and austere.- discipline that.ill prepares the inmate to walk the streets again as'-a selfsupporting and competent citizen,: .

. • .: "At its best i "TREATMENT" looks ho.pefully to the improvement Of the individual inmate's' attitudes, and skills, by providing a well-balanced programme of reli-gious, activities , -work, .:education botb...acadernic - and vocationali:treatinent for bodily orth ntal.ailments, - re- creation.and in:additioñ to_ the '; physical needs of food; .• clothing and Shelter, " , , •

ST-PIERRE; Director.

15

26. We endeavou-r; .by all means at our diSposal,'' to.. apply , to inmates theiprecônized treatment; to direct tho-se youngsters Tigwares the . right path; to re-edu.cate thern tô give tb.em, by religious:and academic education, tra-cle :training and-_pther formative means, a sound concep-: tion: of what's fair and good'and a solid foundation for . their readjustrnent io norm:al:and honeSt living, Upon-their

27; Thé Federal Training. Centre is practiCally ten yea.rs old. During that teiatively Short period of time,

. a worthwhile deerease has been observed in local peni- tentiary recidiNism namely 24.'9% on M.a.rch 31, 1960,

. ix "comparison with 81.3% of gene,i'al. recidivism in all fe- dèral institutions adnâniStered by the Penitentiary Cern -rnission.

. However, a:çôinpa.rison of these figures can - hardly be made, when.Cônsiderin,g that statistics applica- ble tô other.penitentiaries'CoVer à period exceeding 50 yea.rs..;l4ôWe'ver; this substantial-improvement augurs .Well for the future, and the continued application of the ekisting programme (modified and:improved as needs diCtate),foreçasts the Possibility of a more efficient pro-tection of society›,. by,redeeming and rehabilitating a lar-ger number of individu.ars, by ciitting down the numerous social and.financial'problerns inherent to recidivism and, in the.proCe.sS,..considerably reducing iriaintenance costs borne -bY:the..government..; ,Such'iS the constant aim of all the personnel of the`l'ederal Training' Centre.

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