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BACHELOR OF COMPUTER SCIENCE (COMPUTER NETWORKING)
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Page 1: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

BACHELOR OF COMPUTER SCIENCE (COMPUTER NETWORKING)

Page 2: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES A bachelor’s degree course in Computer Science, B.Sc. (Computer Networking) (Honours) is aimed to produce highly knowledgeable and skillful graduates in the field of information technology and communication. Graduates are competent in advanced specialized knowledge and skill in analyzing, developing, installing, administrating, servicing, and controlling computer and communication network system.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The aim of FTMK bachelor’s degree program is to produce students with the following characteristics:

1. Able to implement knowledge learnt in Computer Science and Information Technology. 2. Able to analyze, create and develop ICT applications. 3. Able to analyze, create, assemble, configure, implement, manage, maintain and administer network infrastructure and security. 4. Able to develop advance computer network applications. 5. Able to obtain recognition from professional bodies. 6. Able to solve problems critically and creatively, and are able to communicate effectively. 7. Able to contribute individual or group skills in various disciplines and domains. 8. Able to reflect high self esteem, strong ethics, moral values, leadership and entrepreneurship skills. 9. Able to perform continuous self learning to obtain knowledge and skills.

Page 3: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

CAREER PROSPECTS The graduates can be employed in the government and private sectors as well as undertaking business ventures of their own. The positions suitable for the graduates including Information System Executive, System Analyst, Computer Security Executive, Network Project Administrator, Network Programmer and Network Engineer.

CURRICULUM STRUCTURE The students intended to be awarded an honor Bachelors Degree in Computer Science (Computer Networking) are subjected to complete a minimum of 120 credits from various predetermined program components. Below are the lists of the components:

Component Credit Hours University Compulsory Subjects 18 Program Core Subjects 72 Course Core Subjects 24 Elective Subjects 6 TOTAL 120

Page 4: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

UNIVERSITY COMPULSARY SUBJECTS (18 credits) BLHC 4042 Entrepreneur Skills and New Business

(Kemahiran Keusahawanan dan Perniagaan Baru) BLHW 1702 Islamic and Asian Civilizations

(Tamadun Islam dan Tamadun Asia –TITAS) BLHW 2712 Etnique Relation

(Hubungan Etnik) BLHW 2402 Technical Communication I

(Komunikasi Teknikal I) BLHW 3402 Technical Communication II

(Komunikasi Teknikal II) BLHW 1722 Philosophy of Science and Technology

(Falsafah Sains dan Teknologi) BLHL 4032 Critical and Creative Thinking

(Pemikiran Kritis dan Kreatif) BLHW 1012 Foundation English

(Asas Bahasa Inggeris)* BLHL 1 - - 2 Third Language

(Bahasa Ketiga) BKK* - - - 1 Co-Curriculum I

(Kokurikulum I) BKK* - - - 1 Co-Curriculum II

(Kokurikulum II) PROGRAMME CORE SUBJECTS (72 credits) BACS 1253 Mathematics for Computer Science I (Matematik Sains Komputer I) BACS 1263 Mathematics for Computer Science II (Matematik Sains Komputer II) BACS 2213 Statistic and Probability (Statistik dan Kebarangkalian) BITP 1113 Programming Technique (Teknik Pengaturcaraan) BITP 1123 Data Structure and Algorithm (Struktur Data dan Algoritma) BITP 1213 System Development (Pembangunan Sistem) BITP 1323 Database (Pangkalan Data) BITP 3113 Object Oriented Programming (Pengaturcaraan Berorientasikan Objek) BITP 2213 Software Engineering (Kejuruteraan Perisian)

Page 5: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

BITS 1123 Computer Organization and Architecture (Organisasi dan Senibina Komputer) BITS 1213 Operating System (Sistem Pengoperasian) BITS 1313 Data Communication and Networking (Komunikasi Data dan Rangkaian) BITS 2513 Internet Technology (Teknologi Internet) BITM 1113 Multimedia System (Sistem Multimedia) BITM 2113 Web Application Development (Pembangunan Aplikasi Web) BITI 1113 Artificial Intelligence (Kepintaran Buatan) BITU 2913 Workshop I (Bengkel I) BITU 3923 Workshop II (Bengkel II) BITU 3926 Industrial Training (Latihan Industri) BITU 3946 Industrial Training Report (Laporan Latihan Industri) BITU 3973 Project I (Projek Sarjana Muda I) BITU 3983 Project II (Projek Sarjana Muda II) COURSE CORE SUBJECTS (24 credits) BITS 2313 Local Area Network (Rangkaian Komputer Setempat) BITS 2323 Wide Area Network (Rangkaian Komputer Meluas) BITS 2333 Network Analysis and Design (Analisa dan Rekabentuk Rangkaian) BITS 3313 Network Administration and Management (Pentadbiran dan Pengurusan Rangkaian) BITS 3323 Network Project Management (Pengurusan Projek Rangkaian) BITS 3333 Multimedia Networking (Rangkaian Multimedia) BITS 3413 IT and Network Security (Keselamatan Teknologi Maklumat dan Rangkaian) BITS 3513 TCP/IP Programming (Pengaturcaraan TCP/IP)

Page 6: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

ELECTIVE SUBJECTS (6 credits) Choose any two from the following. BITP 2223 Software Design and Requirement (Keperluan dan Rekabentuk Perisian) BITS 3343 Fiber Optic (Fiber Optik) BITM 1123 Interactive Media Authoring (Pengarangan Media Interaktif) BITM 2123 Digital Audio and Video Technology (Teknologi Audio dan Video Digital) BITS 2213 Network Operating System (Sistem Pengoperasian Rangkaian) BITS 3533 Wireless Network & Mobile Computing (Rangkaian Tanpa Wayar dan Pengkomputeran Mudahalih)

Page 7: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

CURRICULUM STRUCTURE PER SEMESTER Year One (Semester I)

Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite Lecture Lab

BLHW 1702 BLHW 1012 BLHW 1722 BACS 1263 BITP 1113 BITP 1213 BITS 1123 BLHW 2712

Islamic and Asian Civilizations Foundation English Philosophy of Science and Technology Mathematics for Computer Science I Programming Technique System Development Computer Organization and Architecture Etnique Relation

2 1 2 3 2 2 2 2

0 2 0 0 2 2 2 0

2 2* 2 3 3 3 3 2

*Exemption for students with MUET

TOTAL 18 Year One (Semester II)

Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite Lecture Lab

BKK ---- BITM 1113 BLHW 2402 BACS 1263 BITP 1123 BITP 1323 BITS 1313

Co-Curriculum I ** Multimedia System Technical Communication I Mathematics for Computer Science II Data Structure and Algorithm Database Data Communication and Networking

0 2 1 3 2 2 2

3 2 2 0 2 2 2

1 3 2 3 3 3 3

BLHW1012 BITP 1113

TOTAL 18 Year Two (Semester I)

Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite Lecture Lab

BKK ---- BLHW 3402 BITU 2913 BACS 2213 BITS 2313 BITS 1213 BITP 3113

Co-Curriculum II** Technical Communication II Workshop I Statistic and Probability Local Area Network Operating System Object Oriented Programming

0 1 0 2 2 2 2

3 3 9 2 2 2 2

1 2 3 3 3 3 3

BLHW 2402 BITP 1113 BITS 1313 BITP 1123

TOTAL 18

**This subject can be taken in any semester.

Page 8: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

Year Two (Semester II) Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite

Lecture Lab BITM 2113 BLHL 4032 BITP 2213 BITS 2333 BITI 1113 BITS 2323

Web Application Development Critical and Creative Thinking Software Engineering Network Analysis and Design Artificial Intelligence Wide Area Network

2 2 2 2 2 2

2 0 2 2 2 2

3 2 3 3 3 3

BITS 1313, BITS 2313 BITS 1313

TOTAL 17 Year Three (Semester I)

Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite Lecture Lab

BLHL ---- BITU 3923 BITS 3313 BITS 2513 BITS 3323 BIT- ----

Third Language Workshop II Network Administration and Management Internet Technology Network Project Management Elective I

1 0 2 2 2 2

2 9 2 2 2 2

2 3 3 3 3 3

BITU 2913 BITS 2333

TOTAL 17 Year Three (Semester II)

Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite Lecture Lab

BLCH 4042 BITS 3333 BITS 3513 BITU 3973 BIT- ---- BITS 3413

Entrepreneur Skills and New Business Multimedia Networking TCP/IP Programming Project I Elective II IT and Network Security

2 2 2 0 2 2

0 2 2

25* 2 2

2 3 3 3 3 3

BITS 2313 BITP 1113 BITU 3923 BITS 1213, BITS 1313

TOTAL 17 Year Three ( SpecialSemester)

Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite Lecture Lab

BITU 3983 Project Il 0 25 * 3 BITU 3973 TOTAL 3

* Equivalent to 9 hours of contact if carried out in normal semester.

Page 9: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

Year Four (Semester I) Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite

Lecture Lab BITU 3926 BITU 3946

Industrial Training Industrial Training Report

0 0

24 24

6 6

TOTAL 12 Elective Subjects

Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite Lecture Lab

BITP 2223 BITS 3343 BITM 1123 BITM 2123 BITS 2213 BITS 3533

Software Design and Requirement Fiber Optik Interactive Media Authoring Digital Audio and Video Technology Sistem Network Operating System Wireless Network & Mobile Computing

2 2 2 2 2 2

2 2 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3 3

BITP 2213 BITS 1313 BITS 1313

Third Language

Code Subject Contact Hours Credit Pre-requisite Lecture Lab

BLHL 1012 BLHL 1022 BLHL 1112 BLHL 1122 BLHL 1212 BLHL 1222 BLHL 1312 BLHL 1322 BLHL 1412 BLHL 1422 BLHL 1512 BLHL 1522

Malay I Malay II Arabic I Arabic II Mandarin I Mandarin II Japanese I Japanese II German I German II French I French II

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

- BLHL 1012 - BLHL 1112 - BLHL 1212 - BLHL 1312 - BLHL 1412 - BLHL 1512

Page 10: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

PROGRAMME CORE SUBJECTS BACS 1253 Mathematics for Computer Science I (3,3,2) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Explain the concepts of fundamental Linear Algebra and Discrete Mathematic.

2. Solve problems in Computer Science related to Linear Algebra and Discrete Mathematic theory using software.

3. Solve application problems using appropriate techniques.

Synopsis This course covers two disciplines of mathematics namely Linear Algebra and Discrete Mathematics. The topics for Linear Algebra are linear equations, matrices, determinants, vectors in Rn, real vector spaces, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization and linear transformation. The topics for discrete mathematics include logic, sets, function, algorithms, integers, mathematical reasoning, counting, relations, graphs, trees and Boolean algebra. References 1. Kolman, B. and Hill, D.R. Introductory Linear Algebra

with Application, 7th edition. Prentice Hall 2001. 2. H. Anton. Elementary Linear Algebra. 8th edition.

McGraw Hill. 1995. 3. David C.Lay. Linear Algebra and Its Applications 3rd

edition. Addison Wesley 2003. 4. Kenneth H. Rosen. Discrete Mathematics and Its

Applications, 4th edition. McGraw-Hill 1998. 5. Johnsonbaugh, R. Discrete Mathematics. Prentice

Hall 2005.

BACS 1263 Mathematics for Computer Science II (3,3,2) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Apply the knowledge and basic concepts of calculus and numerical analysis.

2. Solve problems in Computer Science related to calculus and numerical analysis theory using software.

3. Solve application problems using appropriate techniques.

Synopsis This course covers two disciplines of mathematics namely calculus and numerical analysis. The topics for calculus are derivatives, function, differentiation techniques, logarithmic function and exponents as well as its application, integration techniques, and multivariable functions. The topics for numerical analysis include Taylor polynomial, numbers, error, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration as well as numercal solution for differential equation. References 1. Goldstein, L. J., David I. S. (2004). Calculus and Its

Application. Prentice Hall. 2. James Stewart (2003). Calculus. Thomson. 3. Johnston, E.H., Mathews J.C. (2002). Calculus.

Pearson Education. . 4. Atkinson, K. (2004). Elementary Numerical Analysis.

John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 5. Richard L.B., J. Douglas Faires (2004). Numerical

Analysis. Thomson.

BACS 2213 Statistic and Probability (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this subject, students should be able to:

Page 11: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

1. Explain the concepts of fundamental statistics and probability.

2. Solve problems in statistic inference related to hypothesis test using software.

3. Solve application problems using appropriate statistic techniques.

Synopsis Students will be introduced to the concept of probability and inferential statistics. The course starts with Probability followed by Discrete Random Variables, Continuous Random Variables and Sampling Distribution. The main topics for Inferential statististics are Estimation, Hypothesis Testing, Estimation and Hypothesis Testing: Two Populations, Anova, Simple Linear Regression and Correlation. This course will also provide the students with some exposure to statistical software.

References 1. Sh. Sara, Hanissah, Fauziah, Nortazi, Farah Shahnaz,

Introduction to Statistics & Probability A Study Guide (2008), Pearson – Prentice Hall

2. Douglas C. Montgomery, George C.Runger, Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers, 3rd Edition (2002), John Wiley

3. Richard A. Johnson, Probability and Statistics for Engineers, 7th Edition (2005), Pearson Prentice Hall

4. Jay L. Devore, Probability and Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences, 6th Edition (2000), Thomson – Duxbury

5. David M Levine, Patricia P. Ramsey, Robert K. Smidt , Applied Statistics for Engineers and Scientists Using Microsoft Excel and MINITAB (2001),Prentice Hall

BITP 1113 Programming Technique (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

1. Explain basic principles of problem solving in Software Engineering.

2. Demonstrate basic principles of programming. 3. Develop basic construction of C++ language in

building program.

Synopsis This course introduces the students to the basic concepts of computer and programming techniques that includes program lifecycle variable, identifier, data type, operator, selection, repetition, function, array, string, file and pointer. References

1. D.S Malik (2009), “C++ Programming from Problem Analysis to Program Design”, Cengage Learning.

2. A.Forouzan, Behrouz, (2000), “A Structured Programming Approach Using C++”, Brooks/Cole Thomson Learning.

3. H.M Deitel, P.J Deitel, (2005), “C++ How To Program”, Prentice Hall.

4. Savitch, Walter, (2006),”Absolute C++”, Addison Wesley.

5. Bronson, Gary J, (2000), “Program Development and Design Using C++”, Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.

6. Knowlton, T, (2000), “Introduction To Computer Science Using C++”, Thomson Learning.

7. Schildt, H, “The Single Easiest Way To Master C++ Programming”, Mc Graw Hill.

BITP 1123 Data Structure and Algorithm (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

1. Identify suitable data structure for certain application.

2. Solve problems by applying knowledge in data structure and algorithm.

3. Analyze the memory and run time efficiency of an algorithm design.

4. Use and develop data structure based on the current problem requirement.

Synopsis This course introduces the students to data structures and algorithms. The basic concepts in structure, class, array and

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pointer are discussed in order to understand the fundamental of data structures and algorithms. The course focuses on data structures such as list, stack, queue, tree, searching and hash while sorting, graph and heaps topics cover the algorithms. This also includes the algorithm efficiency for run time. Pseudo code and C++ programming language will be used in algorithm implementation. Apart from the theory, the students must apply the data structures and algorithms in the development of small scale application as a group work. References

1. Richard F. Gilberg, Behrouz A. Fourouzan, “Data Structures A Pseudocode Approach with C++”, Brooks/Cole Thomson Learning, 2001

2. Malik, D. S. “Data Structures Using C++”. Thomson Course Technolgy, 2005.

3. Michael Main, Walter Savich, “Data Structures & Other Objects Using C++”, Addison Wesley, 2004.

4. Sartaj, Sahni, “Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++”, Mc Graw Hill International Editions, 1998.

5. Berman A., Michael, “Data Structure Via C++ - Objects by Evolution “, Oxford, 1997.

BITP 1213 System Development (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

1. Identify and explain all the phases in system development.

2. Follow suitable methodology used in system or application development.

3. Apply system development life cycle based on the current problems.

Synopsis This course introduces the students to the basic system development concept, analysis, design, modeling, methodology, technique, tool and other perspectives that are important to be considered in the development of information system.

References

1. Valacich, J. S., George, J. F. & Hoffer, J.A. 2006. Modern Systems Analysis and Design, 5th Ed, Pearson Prentic Hall.

2. Whitten, J., Bentley L. & Dittman, K. 2001. Systems Analysis and Design Methods, McGraw-Hill.

3. Masrek, M. N., Abdul Rahman, S. & Abdul Jalil, K. 2001. Analisis & Rekabentuk Sistem Maklumat. McGraw-Hill.

4. Kendall, K. E. & Kendall, J. E. 2002. System Analysis and Design. Prentice Hall.

5. Shelly, G., Cashman, T. & Rosenblatt, H. 2000. Systems Analysis and Design, Shelly Cashman Series.

6. Blair, R., Crossland, J., Reynolds, M., Willis, T. 2003. Beginning VB.Net, 2nd edition, Wiley Productions.

7. Bradley, J. C. & Millspaugh, A. C. 2005. Programming in Visual Basic.Net: Visual Basic.NET 2003 Update Edition, McGraw-Hill International Edition

BITP 1323 Database (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

1. Identify and explain the concept of database, data modeling (relationship) and SQL statements.

2. Produce data conceptual representation using Entity Relationship Model.

3. Develop database application based on the current problem requirement.

Synopsis This course is an introduction to database and file management system. It assists the students to form an understanding of data modeling, file management and database system functionality in information system. The students will be introduced to the process of designing, developing and executing database applications. This course focuses on practical skills to create, control and execute statement for database relationship. Exercises based on various resources will be given in all lab sessions. The students will submit their exercises at the end of the lab

Page 13: Bachelor of Computer Science (Computer Networking)

session. The students must present their database application project to demonstrate their understanding of the course. This allows the students to apply their knowledge and the techniques that they have learnt into the real world database applications.

References 1. Rob, P. & Coronel, C. (2004) Database Systems:

Design, Implementation, and Management 6th Edition. Course Technology.

2. Connolly, T., Begg, C. & Strachan, A. (2005) Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation, and Management. 4th Edition. Addison- Wesley.

3. Hoffer, Jeffrey A ., Prescott, Mary B. & McFadden, Fred R. (2004) Modern Database Management 7th Edition. Prentice Hall

4. Pratt, P.J. (2004) A Guide to SQL Seventh Edition. Course Technology

5. Mannino, M.V. (2001) Database Application Development & Design. McGraw-Hill.

BITP 2213 Software Engineeering (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

1. Explain the concept and importance of requirement engineering in software development process.

2. Implement software requirement phase and analyze the requirement engineering specification.

3. Create official documents for software requirement specification based on the current problems by following the software requirement engineering process.

4. Choose a suitable tool to design a case study. Synopsis This course introduces the students to system development and software engineering. The topics includes the software lifecycle, requirement analysis, software design, processes in software design, design quality, strategy in design and metric in software testing. This course also covers software project

management including the budgeting and quality management. References

1. Sommerville, I (2007) Perisian Engineering, 8th Edition, Addison Wesley.

2. Pressman, R.S (2005) Perisian Engineering A Practitioner’s Approach, 6th Edition. McGraw-Hill.

3. Pfleegar, S.L (2001) Perisian Engineering Theory & Practice. 2nd Edition. Prentice Hall.

4. Braude J.E, (2001) Perisian Engineering: An Object-Oriented Perspective, Wiley.

5. Ghezzi C, Jazayeri M, Mandrioli D, (2003) Fundamentals of Perisian Engineering. 2nd Edition Prentice Hall.

6. Bern Oestereich,(2002), Developing Perisian with UML Object oriented Analysis and Design Practice,. 2nd Edition. Addison-Wesley.

BITS 1123 Computer Organization and Architecture (3,2,1) Learning Outcomes At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

1. Define and explain computer architecture and organization concept including functional components and their characteristics, performance and the detailed interactions in computer system including system bus, different types of memory and input/output as well as CPU.

2. Apply computer architecture theory to solve the basic functional computer problem.

3. Show and assemble basic computer components.

Synopsis

This course provides detail of computer system’s functional components, their characteristics, performance and interactions including system bus, different types of memory and input/output and CPU, as well as practical implementations of the components. This curse also covers the architectural issues such as instruction set program and data types. On top that, the students are

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also introduced to the increasingly important area of parallel organization.

References 1. William Stallings, (2007). Computer Organization &

Architecture, 7th Edition. Prentice Hall. 2. Carl Hamacher, Zvonko Vranesic, Safwat Zaky, (2002). Computer Organization, 5th Ed. McGraw Hill. 3. Irv Englander, (2003). The Architecture of Computer Hardware and System Software: An Information Technology Approach., 3rd Ed. John Wiley & Sons. 4. James L. Antonakos, (2004). The 68000 Microprocessor, 5th Edition. Prentice Hall. 5. H.Aslinda, R. Marliza, Computer Organization and Architecture, First Edition.

BITS 1213 Operating System (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Explain the major components of an operating system.

2. Elaborate the major operating system responsibilities or aspects.

3. Explain the differences of the functionality among various kinds of operating system.

Synopsis

This course gives exposure to the students about the basic of operating system which comprises process, memory management, file and I/O and also CPU scheduling. The introduction part covers the evolution of operating system followed by the basic concepts, technology and theories used in operating system such as concurrency, kernel, deadlock and multithreading.

References

1. William Stallings, Operating Systems: Internals and

Design Principles 6th Ed., Prentice Hall International, Inc.

2. Silberschatz, A (2003). Operating System Concept 6th . Ed., John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

3. Nutt, G. (2002), Operating Systems : A modern Perspective 2nd .Ed., Eddison Wesley Longman, Inc., ISBN 0-201-74196-2

4. Jason W. Eckert, M. John Schitka. Linux Guide to Certification.

5. Zurina, Fairuz, Zaki, Ariff (2009), Fedora Core 9: For Beginner and Intermediate, First Edition.

BITS 1313 Data Communication & Networking [3, 2, 2] Learning Outcomes At the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Explain and apply the fundamental concept of data communication and networking.

2. Differentiate types of media, network topologies and network technologies.

3. Practice the best technique in developing network 4. Configure and troubleshoot a basic network.

Synopsis This course introduces the fundamental concepts and terminology of data communication and networking, encompassing both technical and managerial aspects. It also provides an understanding about the challenges and opportunities faced by the modern businesses. The topics include: fundamentals of telecommunications, data transmission mechanisms, telecommunication media and technologies, considerations for LAN and WAN implementations, the Internet and intranet applications, emerging telecommunications technologies, and trends in the telecommunications industry. Students will also be able to understand, explain and apply the fundamentals of data communication and networking as well as skills in network applications to troubleshoot and configure a basic computer networks using guided or unguided media. References

1. Behrouz Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking, 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2007.

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2. Andrew S Tanenbaum, Computer Network, Prentice Hall, 1997. 3. E. Ramos, A. Schoroeder and A. Beheler, Computer

Networking Concepts, McMillan, 1996. 4. Azhar, Haniza and Zakiah, Komunikasi Data dan

Rangkaian (Modul Pengajaran), Edisi Pertama, 2005.

5. B. Nazrulazhar and H. Erman, Data Communications and Networking: Practical Approach, 1st Edition, Venton, 2008.

BITS 2513 Internet Technology (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes

Upon completing this subject, students should be able to:

1. Apply the concepts of computer networks, core components of the Internet infrastructure, protocol and services.

2. Show the implementation of client and server application

3. Select the best Internet application according to the current situation.

Synopsis

Internet has become a major tool in doing business today. The evolutions of web based knowledge also contribute to this phenomenon. Hence, this course is purposely designed to provide an introduction to Internet technologies. This course covers a wide range of material about the Internet and the major areas of study including basic concepts of client and server, networking, Internet Security and its application.

References

1. Douglas E. Comer (2007). The Internet 4th edition. Pearson Prentice Hall.

2. Behrouz Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking, 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2007.

3. Fred T. Hofstetter(2005), Internet Technologies at Work, McGraw Hill Technology Education

4. Douglas E. Comer (2004), Computer Networks and Internets with Internet Applications, 4th Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall

5. Preston Gralla (2002). How Internet Works, 6th edition. Que Publishing

BITM 1113 Multimedia System (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Use several media editing software to create original multimedia content.

2. List down and discuss the software and hardware components used in multimedia system.

3. Demonstrate life long learning by relating and describing the fundamental concept of multimedia systems into other subjects (e.g. Software Engineering, Internet Technology, PSM etc).

4. Apply problem solving skills by identifying several different environments in which multimedia might be used and several different aspects of multimedia that benefit other forms of information presentation.

Synopsis

This subject prepares the students with the basic concept of multimedia, technology and the importance of multimedia application. It covers the introduction to media, multimedia graphic implementation, 2D/3D graphics and animation, video, audio, authoring, multimedia integration and application development. In lab sessions, the students will be introduced to tools for selected media elements and authoring software for media integration. Students will be trained for practical preparation of still image, simple animation, sound and effectively apply it in a multimedia project. Students will be exposed to teamwork, leadership, problem solving and communcation skills while performing their various tasks and project.

References

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1. Norazlin et al. Sistem Multimedia, Venton Publishing, 2007

2. Todd Perkins. Adobe Flash CS3 Profesional Hans-on Training, 2008.

3. Tay Vaughan, Multimedia: Making It Work 7th Edition, McGraw-Hill Osborne Media, 2006.

4. Mark Drew and Ze-Nian Li, Fundamentals of Multimedia 4th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2004.

5. Nigel Chapman, Digital Multimedia, John Wiley and Sons, 2004.

6. Ken Abernethy and Tom Allen, Exploring the Digital Domain: An Introduction to Computing with Multimedia and Networking, Pws Pub Co, 1999

7. Jamalludin Harun & Zaidatun Tasir, Multimedia: Konsep & Praktis, Venton Publishing, 2006

BITM 2113 Web Application Development (3,2,2)

Learning Outcomes

Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Explain the concept and the principle of Internet and WWW based on the latest technologies.

2. Identify and develop important components in Web applications which comprises client site technology, server site technology, database server and Web server.

3. Relate relevant key components in developing Web applications.

Synopsis

The purpose of this course is to provide the students with a comprehensive understanding of the tools and problem-solving techniques related to the development of effective World Wide Web. It emphasizes on four (4) components of Web application development which are: Client Site Technologies: HTML, XHTML, CSS, XML,

and JavaScript Server Site Technologies: PHP Database Server: MySQL. Web Servers : Apache

References

1. Robert W.Sebesta (2005), Programming The World Wide Web – 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley,

ISBN: 0-321-31257-0 2. Harvey Deitel, Paul Deitel, Andrew Goldberg (2003),

Internet & Internet & World Wide Web How to Program - 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, ISBN: 0131450913

3. Keith Darlington (2005), Effective Website Development – Tools and Techniques, Addison Wesley, ISBN: 0-321-18472-6

4. Luke Welling, Laura Thomson (2003), PHP and MySQL Web Development -Third Edition, Sams Publishing, ISBN: 0-672-32672-87

5. Bai, Ekedahl, Farrell, Gosselin, Zak, Kaparthi (2003), The Web Warrior Guide to Web Programming,Thomson Course Technology, ISBN: 0-619-06458-7

BITP 3113 Object Oriented Programming (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

1. Apply object oriented programming concept and methods.

2. Build program that implement programming language syntax and semantic in Java application.

3. Develop object oriented application based on the current case study.

Synopsis This course introduces the students to the object oriented programming methods by using Java programming language. Student will apply and design the basic object oriented structure, swing, event handling, interface components, exception handling, database, multimedia, networking and threads. Student will also develop a complete Java programs and applications.

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References

1. Liang ,Y .Daniel,(2008) , Introduction Java Programming , 7th Ed.,Prentice Hall.

2. Deitel, H.M . & Deitel ,P.J.,(2006) , Java How to Program ,7th Ed., Pearson Education International .

3. Bronson ,Gary J.,(2004), Object Oriented Program Development Using Java –Class Centered Approach , Thompson Course Technology .

4. Farrel,Joyce , (2003),Java Programming 2nd Ed.,Thomson Course Technology.

5. Doke, E.Reed ,Satzinger,John W.& Williams, Susan Rebstock , (2002), Object –Oriented Application Development Using Java. Thomson Course Technology.

BITI 1113 Artificial Intelligence (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this subject, students should be able to:

1. Explain the basic definition of artificial intelligence. 2. Identify the types of artificial intelligence techniques. 3. Use the artificial intelligence techniques in problem

solving. Synopsis Students will be exposed to the basic and branches of Artificial Intelligence (AI) such as various search techniques, knowledge representation and reasoning, inference techniques, learning from experience and planning. This course also covers some applications of AI including game playing, expert systems, machine learning, and natural language processing. References

1. Coppin, B (2004). Artificial Intelligence Illuminated, Jones and Bartlett.

2. Russel, S & Norvig, P. (2003). Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, 2nd. Edition, Prentice Hall.

3. Luger, G. F & Stubblefield, W.A. (2002). Artificial Intelligence: Structures and Strategies for Complex Problem Solving, 4th. Edition, Addison Wesley.

4. Negnevitsky, M., (2002), Artificial Intelligence: A Guide to Intelligent System, Addison Wesley.

5. Dean, T, Allen, J & Aloimonos, Y (1995), Artificial Intelligence Theory and Practice, The Benjamin Cummings.

BITU 2913 Workshop I (3,0,9) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Use the knowledge learnt specifically the programming techniques to develop a project.

2. Identify and solve problems systematically based on the information from various resources.

3. Run and produce a project individually. 4. Present and defend the project output.

Synopsis The aim of Workshop 1 is to provide the students with experience and skills to develop and present an individual project. Students must use the knowledge learnt to solve the problems and think creatively to achieve their projects’ objectives and scopes. Students should be able to apply programming technique in their projects. The systems/applications developed must have logic process flow, robust, consistent, have attractive user interface and are able to detect errors in input/output data. At the final stage of this workshop, the students must present and defend their project. A supervisor will supervise the students for the whole 12 weeks and will evaluate the progress during the implementation and final presentation. This course is also a fundamental course to prepare the students for industrial training. References

1. Burhanuddin Mohd Aboobaider et. all., Software Development Using Visual Basic.NET BITU 2913.

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2. Julia Case Bradley, Anita C.Millspaugh, Programming in Visual Basic .NET, McGraw-Hill, 2005 Edition.

3. Jack Koh, Gourab Sen Gupta, Jesicca Goh, Ronnie Peh, VB.net With Database Access, Prentice Hall, 2002.

4. Dave Grundgeiger, Programming Visual Basic .NET, O’Reilly, 2002.

5. Francesco Balena, Programming Visual Basic .NET, Version 2003, Microsoft Press, 2004.

BITU 3923 Workshop II (3,0,9) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Analyze and develop a group project. 2. Apply the concept of system design and

development in their projects. 3. Identify, analyze and organize the changes made to

project scope during the project life cycle. 4. Organize a group project with good manner. 5. Present and defend the project output.

Synopsis This course allows the students to practice their knowledge and experience gained from the courses taken earlier. This course builds the students understanding about problem solving techniques based on their project scopes. The scope of their projects is based on their programme specializations. This course requires the project to be developed in a team of three to five students. References

1. Schwalbe, K., (2004). Information Technology Project Management, Thomson.

2. Hughes, B., and Cotterell, M., (2002), Software Project Management, McGraw-Hill.

3. Gonzalez, A. and Dankel, D., (2004). The Engineering of Knowledge-Based Systems (Second Edition), Prentice Hall.

4. Alpaydin, E., (2004). Introduction to Machine Learning, The MIT Press.

5. Russel, S and Norvig, P., (2003). Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (Second Edition), Prentice Hall.

BITU 3926 Industrial Training (6,0,6) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Be responsible in performing tasks as an ICT worker.

2. Apply skills and knowledge learnt in classes. 3. practice discipline and ethique in performing daily

tasks. 4. Use the latest technology in the ICT domains. 5. Interact and communicate with collleagues in a good

manner. Synopsis During this course, students will be able to practice the knowledge that they have learnt in UTeM such as analyzing and designing, database programming, data structure and algorithm, operating system, web programming, network and data communiation etc. It is an opportunity for the students to gain ICT knowledge as in the industry. The students can develop soft skills and professionalism through interaction and communication with colleagues. References Industrial Training Committee ”Industrial Training Guidelines”, UNIC, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka. BITU 3946 Industrial Training Report (6,0,6) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Apply the skills and knowledge learnt

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2. Use the latest technlogy in the ICT domain. 3. Organize information to produce a formal report.

Synopsis This course requires the students to produce a report while undergoing the industrial training. The students should be able to apply the courses that they have learnt at UTeM such as to analyze and design, database programming, data structure and algorithm, operating system, web programming, network and data communication etc. It is an opportunity for them to gain industrial ICT knowledge. References Industrial Training Committee ”Industrial Training Guidelines”, UNIC, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka.

BITU 3973 Project I [3,0,9]

Learning Outcomes Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Run testing and validate their systems based on the projects’ timeline.

2. Solve problems related to the industrial need in the ICT domain.

3. Complete the project output that has the commercial value.

4. Present and defend the output. 5. Organize information to produce a formal report.

Synopsis This course joins together all the subjects learnt from year one of the studies including to analyze and to design a specific system, the application of database, algorithm and data structure, web programming, data communication etc. It is compulsory to the final year students to develop a Final Project and to attend the offered courses. References

1. Bachelor Degree Project and Diploma Project Committee, PSM Report Guideline, FTMK, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka.

2. Bachelor Degree Project and Diploma Project Committee, PSM Report Guideline Book, FTMK, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka .

3. Bachelor Degree Project and Diploma Project Committee, PSM Report Guideline Reference, FTMK, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka.

BITU 3983 Project II [3,0,9] Learning Outcomes Upon completing this subject, students should be able to: 1. Run testing and validate their system based on the

project timeline. 2. Solve problems related to the industrial need in the ICT

domain. 3. Complete the project output that has the commercial

value. 4. Present and defend the output. 5. Organize information to produce a formal report.

Synopsis This course joins together all the subjects learnt from year one of the studies including to analyze and to design a specific system, the application of database, algorithm and data structure, web programming, data communication etc. It is compulsory to the final year students to develop a Final Project and to attend the offered courses. References

1. Bachelor Degree Project and Diploma Project

Committee, PSM Report Guideline, FTMK, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka.

2. Bachelor Degree Project and Diploma Project Committee, PSM Report Guideline Book, FTMK, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka .

3. Bachelor Degree Project and Diploma Project Committee, PSM Report Guideline Reference, FTMK, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka.

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COURSE CORE SUBJECTS BITS 2313 Local Area Network (3,2,2)

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Explain and elaborate the concepts of local Area Network and its usage.

2. Study and identify suitable method in selecting hardware, topology and protocol in Local Area Network.

3. Demonstrate and configure the software and hardware required in Local Area Network communication.

Synopsis

This course is an introduction to the current methods and practices in the use of Local Area Networks (LANs). The emphasis will be placed on LAN hardware and software, installation management and connection to other networks. The topics include network architecture, network communication protocol, end-to-end protocol stacks, network components, network management and the (OSI) reference model.

References

1. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, "Computer Networks", Fourth

Edition, Prentice Hall, Pearson Education, 2003, ISBN 0-13-038488-7

2. Todd Lammle, CCNA Cisco Certified Network Associate, Wiley (2005). ISBN: 0-7821-4391-1

3. Palmer M., Sinclair R.B., Guide to Designing and Implementing Local and Wide Area Networks, Second Edition, Thomson, 2003, ISBN-01619-12122-X

4. Fred Halsall, "Computer Networking and the Internet", Fifth Edition, Addison-Wesley, Pearson Education, 2005, ISBN 0-321-26358-8

5. Forouzan, Behrouz. A., Local Area Networks, McGraw-Hill Forouzan Networking Series(2003), ISBN 0-07-233605-6

BITS 2323 Wide Area Network (3, 2, 2) Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, students should be able to: 1. Explain and elobrate the wide area network concept

and technology. 2. Invistigate and identify the suitable method in choosing

server, wide area network devices and an appropriate network technology.

3. Demonstrate the network architecture design with using structure design approach to solve wide area network problem.

Synopsis

By the end of this course, the students should have an understanding of concepts, practices, and technologies used in the design and implementation of Wide Area Networks. The course covers basic network concepts primarily WAN technologies, design processes, network security requirements and also prepare students to sit for CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Associates) examination. References

1. Patrick Regan, Wide Area Network, Pearson

Prentice Hall (2004), ISBN : 0-13-046578-X. 2. Michael A. Gallo, William M. Hancock,

Computer Communications and Networking Technologies, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning (2002), ISBN : 0-534-37780-7.

3. William Stallings, Data and Computer Communications (Sixth Edition), Prentice Hall International Inc. (2000), ISBN : 0-13-086388-2.

4. Greg Tomsho, Ed Tittle, David Johnson, Guide to Networking Essentials (Third Edition) (2003), ISBN : 0-619-13087-3

5. John E. Canavan, Fundamentals of Network Security, Artech House Inc. (2001), ISBN : 1-58053-176-8

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BITS 2333 Network Analysis & Design (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes At the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Explain and elaborate methodology to create computer network effectively. 2. Research and identify the suitable technique to solve

the analysis process and design network structure. 3. Design and implement using tool in order to design

the network structure to fulfill the user needs.

Synopsis This subject covers system approach to design the network, concept, guideline and practice to Requirement Analysis and Flow Analysis. Technology options, mechanism and chain management relation and security will be taught in logical design. Several issues in design network will be included in design physical, addressing and routing. Software for analysis and design network such as Microsoft Visio will be introduced and used to help the students understand and apply the network analysis, design area as well as knowledge process.

References

1. Kaufmann, M. and Mc Cabe, J. (2007), “Network Analysis, Architecture, and Design”, Morgan Kaufman

2. Oppenheimer, P (2007), “Top Down Network Design”, Cisco Press

3. Mc Cabe, J and Kaufmann, M. (2007), “Practical Network Analysis and Design”, Morgan Kaufman

4. Yusof, R. (2007), “Network Analysis and Design”, UTeM, 5. Blommers, J. (2007), “Practical Planning for Network

Growth”, Prentice Hall BITS 3313 Network Administration and Management (3,2,2)

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

1. Explain the standards and protocols used for network administration and management.

2. Research and define suitable technique of problem solving in network administration and management.

3. Manipulate the software tools for network administration and management.

Synopsis This course provide some exposure to the students about the topics in network administration and management, duties as network administrators/managers, host management, infrastructure components, users management, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), Management Information Base (MIB), Remote Monitoring, desktop management, web-based management and network security management.

References

1. Burke, J.R, Network Management

Concepts and Practice: A Hands-on Approach, Pearson Education, 2004

2. Limoncelli, T.L, The Practice of System and Network Administration, O’reilly, 2000. 3. Olaf, K & Terry, D., Linux Network Administrator’s Guide , O’reilly ,2000. 4. Scott, M., Linux TCP/IP Network Administration, Prentice Hall, 2001 5. Shinder, T.W., MCSE Windows 2000 Network Administration, Osborne Publishing, 2000.

BITS 3323 – Networking Project Managemnet (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes Upon completing this subject, students should be able to:

1. Explain and analyze the concept and fundamental theory in network project management including the processes, the tools and the techniques.

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2. Research and identify a appropriate method in project management problem solving specifically projects related to networking.

3. Developed project schedule plan relevant to networking using project management software.

Synopsis This subject covers the structure of project management knowledge that is the project integration management, scope management, time management, cost management, quality management and human management. It also includes processes and steps in project management (project launching, planning, implementation, control and closing or project termination). Software for project management (Microsoft Project and Microsoft Excel) are introduced and used for assisting and applying the enclosure knowledge of project management and its processes. References

1. Schwalbe, Kathy. Information Technology Project

Management, 4th Ed. Thomson Course Technology 2006, ISBN No. 0-619-21528-3

2. Robert K. Wysocki, Robert Beck, Jr. & David B Crace. Effective Project management, 2nd Ed. John Wiley & Sons 2000.

3. Gwen Lowery & Teresa Stover. Managing Projects with Microsoft Project 2000. John Wiley & Sons, 2001.

4. Elaine Marmel. Microsoft Office Project 2003. Wiley Publishing, 2004.

5. Tim Pyron. Using MS Office Project 2003. Que Publishing 2004.

6. Sazilah Salam Nurazlina Mohd Sanusi, Fararishah Khalid and Robiah Yusof. Project Management. FTMK UteM, 2008.

BITS 3513 TCP/IP Programming (3,2,2)

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this subject, students should be able to: 1. Explain and elaborate the concept and theory of basic

TCP/IP programming.

2. Research and identify suitable method in solving the problem of network programming.

3. Manipulate Java computer programming to solve the TCP/IP programming problem.

Synopsis

This subject is intended to expose the students on how network programming works. Since Java is one of the most demanding skill in industry,therefore this subject emphasizes on how to write a network programming by using Java language. This subject shows the students on how to use Java’s network class library to quickly and easily write programs which can accomplish many common networking tasks.

References

1. David Reilly , Micheal Reilly , "Java Network Programming and Distributed Computing", Addison-Wesley, 2002.

2. Elliotte Rusty Harold, Java Network Programming 3rd Edition, O’Reilly & Associates. (2004)

3. Dick Steflick, Prashant Sridharan, Advanced Java

Networking 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, (2000) 4. Kenneth L. Calvert, TCP/IP Sockets in Java: Practical

Guide for Programmers, Morgan Kauffman. (2002) 5. Dan Harkey, Client/Server Programming with Java and

CORBA, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons (1998) BITS 3413 Network and Information Technology

Security (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Explain and elobrate concepts of computer and network security.

2. Investigate and identify the suitable method to solve the computer and network security problem.

3. Configuring computer and network in order to make it secure from any intrusion.

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4. Define and analyze the legal/ethical issues in computer network security and decides the suitable cyberlaws based on security issues.

Synopsis This course covers background views of ICT threats and the needs to have theoretical and method in controlling ICT security, Software and Operating System Security, Data and Database Security, Network Security, Cryptography, Network Access and Authentication, IP Addressing and Security, Firewall Design, Security Management and issues regarding computer crime and Cyber Law. References 1. Siti Rahayu, Robiah, Mohd Faizal and

Nazrulazhar (2006), Information Technology Security, Pearson.

2. W. Stallings (2003). Network Security Essentials: Applications and Standards, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, Inc.

3. C.P. Pfleeger, S. L. Pfleeger (2003). Security in computing 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall International, Inc.

4. D. Gollmann (2005). 2nd Edition, Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

5. B. Schneier (1996). Applied Cryptography: Protocols, Algorithms and Source Code in C 2nd Ed, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

BITS 3333 Multimedia Networking (3,2,2)

Learning Outcomes

Upon completing this subject, students should be able to:

1. Explain and elaborate the concepts, multimedia components, standardizations, and aplications of Multimedia Networking.

2. Search and identify a suitable technique in Multimedia Networking problem solving approach.

3. Manipulate the mechanisms that support the multimedia application in Multimedia Networking problem solving approach.

Synopsis

This subject covers basic and advanced topics related to multimedia networking. Specific topics will be selected from high-speed networks such as: Frame Relay, ATM and High Speed LANs. Special emphasis will be given to multimedia transport protocols (TCP, UDP, RTP, RTCP, RTSP) as well as Quality of Service architectures (IntServ, DiffServ, RSVP, MPLS). References

1. 1. William Stalling, (2002). High-Speed Networks

and Internets: Performance and Quality of Service, (Second Edition) , Prentice Hall.

2. Francois Fluckiger, (2001). Understanding networked multimedia: Applications and technology, Prentice Hall.

3. Nalin K. Sharda(2005), Multimedia Information Networking, Prentice Hall.

4. F. Hallsall, (2001). Multimedia Communications: Applications, Networks, Protocols and Standards, Pearson Education.

5. K.R. Rao (2002), Multimedia Communication Systems: Techniques, Standards and Networks, Prentice Hall.

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ELECTIVE SUBJECTS BITP 2223 Software Requirement and Design (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes At the end of the lesson, students should be able to :

1. Understand and explain about the concept of requirement analysis and software design.

2. Analyze software requirements and design the software using object oriented concept and Unified Modeling Language (UML) notations.

3. Build analysis software requirement models and software design model by using UML notation.

4. Identify and solve problems on software design by using pattern design concept.

Synopsis This course introduces the students to the concept application software development cycle especially requirement analysis and software design which based on objects, UML notations, difference between OOAD and SDM. It covers requirement analysis modeling besides activity diagram, sequence diagram and class diagram. Design phase will be introduced to students including on how to develop relations between class, operations, attributes, decomposition, frameworks, layers and tiers. References 1. Ian Sommerville, Software Engineering 6th Edition,

Addison Wesley 2006 2. Martin Fowler, UML Distilled Third Edition A Brief

Guide to the Standard Object Modeling Language, Addison Wesley 2003

3. Cay Horstman, Object Oriented Design and Patterns, John Wiley and Sons 2006

4. Alan Shalloway, James Trott Design Patterns Explained: A New Perspective on Object-Oriented Design, 2/E, Addison-Wesley Professional, 2005

5. Jim Arlow, Ila Neustadt UML 2 and the Unified Process: Practical Object-Oriented Analysis and Design, 2/E, Addison-Wesley Professional, 2005

BITM 1123 Media Interactive Authoring (3,2,2)

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Prepare various interactive media applications using the mutlimedia authoring tools based on industrial requirements.

2. Discuss, report and use a systematic approach in choosing appropriate instructional design to achieve the objectives.

3. Apply interactivity in multimedia application based on the current authoring tools used by the industry.

Synopsis

This subject introduces the students to various stages of interactive media project development; from definition to delivery of a project. The students will also be introduced to the instructional design followed by different stages in the process of developing instruction including prior analysis, design, delivery considerations and later evaluation. The lessons also cover different models in instructional design, e-learning standards and concept of interactivity. The lab sessions consists of the advanced scriptwriting techniqued for animation and the usage of Adobe Flash in detail. Students are required to form their own project team in order to produce an interactive multimedia product with appropriate interactivity using Adobe Flash and ActionScript. A complete project and report has to be submitted at the end of the semester.

References 1. Boyle, T., Design for Multimedia Learning,

Prentice-Hall International, 1997. 2. England, E. and Finney, A., Managing Multimedia:

Project Management for Web and Convergent Media Book 1, Addison Wesley, 2002.

3. Fallon, C. and Brown, S., e-Learning Standards, CRC Press LCC, 2003. 4. Perkins, T. Adobe Flash CS3 Professional. Hands-on- Training (HOT) Lynda.com, 2008

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5. Perkins, T. ActionScript 3.0 for Adobe Flash CS3 Professional. Hands-on-Training. Lynda.com, 2008.

BITM 2123 Digital Audio and Video Technology (3,2,1)

Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

1. Apply the knowledge and principles of digital audio and video.

2. Apply advanced skills in using audio video software and hardware including the digital media composition techniques to demonstrate the idea and to develop as well as to edit digital audio video products in a group.

3. Choose and organize audio video software and hardware in the conducive production environment with the latest and relevance information.

Synopsis

This course is an extension from Multimedia System and Interactive Media Authoring subjects. It gives details and valuable insight of the wonderful world of digital audio and video. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to topics on audio production, recording techniques, video production tools, video hardware, shooting procedure, special effects, MIDI sequencing, and audio/video production concepts. Besides, various tools for editing, practical as well as composing digital audio and video will be taught during the course. References

1. Pete Shaner, Real World Digital Video Second

Edition, Peachpit Press, 2004. 2. Herbert Zettl, Video Basic 3, Wadsworth Thomson

Learning, 2001. 3. Frederic Jones, How To Do Everything With Digital

Video, McGraw-Hill, 2002.

4. Arch C. Luther, Video Camera Technology, Artech, 1998.

5. Jose Alvear, Guide to Streaming Multimedia, MecklerMedia, 1998

6. Howard W. Sams, Complete Guide to Audio, PROMPT Publication, 1998.

7. Chris Middleton, The Complete Guide to Digital Audio, Muka&Lipman Publishing, 2003.

8. Chris Mylrea, Digital Video and Audio, Swinburne, 2006.

BITS 2213 Network Operating System (3,2,2)

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Explain and elaborate concepts of NOS. 2. Invistigate and identify the suitable method of

network services depending on the heterogeneous of OS platform.

3. Design the Network Operating System, NOS memory management, and NOS Processing Management.

Synopsis This subject covers fundamental network administration and system management. Topics include accessing and configuring basic network services, managing directory services, and using network management software on heterogeneous operating system platform. Students should be able to apply system administrator skills in developing a network management strategy.

References

1. Tanenbaum & Woodhull, Operating System Design and Implementation, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall 1997 ISBN 0-13-638677-6

2. Silberschatz & Galvin, "Operating Systems Concepts," 5th Ed., Addison-Wesley 1998 ISBN 0-201-59113-8

3. Silberschatz, Peterson, and Galvin, Operating System Concepts, Addison-Wesley

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4. Dee-Ann LeBlanc (2000), Linux: Install and Configuration, Little Black Book, Coriolis

5. Ida M. Flyn (2001), Understanding Operating Systems, Thomson Learning.

BITS 3533 Wireless Network & Mobile Computing [3, 2, 2] Learning Outcomes By the end of this subject, student should be able to: 1. Explain and elobrate the basic concept of wireless theory

and access control in wireless network and cellular. 2. Investigate and identify problem related to wireless and

access control in wireless network and cellular 3. Demonstrate the three types of wireless operation, risk

and threat as well as the method of securing the network. Synopsis This subject explains the basic knowledge of the concept of mobile and wireless technology via exploring the relationship between hardware, software and development kits. Through lecture, research and application development student will understand the current mobile technology such as J2ME and WAP and also the relationship with operating system and standardization. Student will be exposed to challenges to overcome the hardware shortage of the memory and storage. References

1. J. Schiller, Mobile Communications, 2nd Ed., Addison-Wesley, 2003.

2. T.S. Rappaport, Wireless Communications: Principle and Practice, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 2002.

3. W. Stallings, Wireless Communications & Networks, 2nd Ed., Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005.

4. J. Geier, Wireless Networks: First Step, Cisco Press, 2005.

5. J. Knudsen, Wireless Java: Developing with Java 2 Micro Edition, Apress, 2001.

BITS 3343 Fiber Optic (3,2,2) Learning Outcomes

Upon completing this subject, students should be able to: 1. Explain and elaborate the concept of fiber optic

basic theories. 2. Investigate and identify the suitable cable and

network devices for fiber optic. 3. Manipulate the mechanism to support and create

the network using fiber optic.

Synopsis

This subject covers basic and advanced applications related to optical fiber communication essential. Specific mechanism will be discussed from operating principles of optical communication device to fiber optic communication technology.

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References 1. Gerd Keiser (2003),Optical Communications

Essentials, 1st Edition, McGraw Hill 2. Jeff Hecth (2005), Understanding Fiber Optics, 5th

Edition, Prentice Hall 3. James N. Downing (2004), Fiber Optic

Communication, 1st Edition, Thomson 4. Govind P.Agrawal (2002), Fiber Optic

Communication System, 3rd Edition, New York, John Wiley & Son

5. Jim Hayes (2006), Fiber Optics Technician’s manual, 3rd Edition, Thomson Delmar Learning.


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