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1 | Page Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science Diné College offers vigorous pre-Professional pathways for Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Physician Assistant, Veterinary, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Mortuary Science, Clinical Laboratory sciences and Biomedical Research through the “BS in Biomedical Sciences” Program. Proposed By: Dr. Shazia Tabassum Hakim, PhD, SCCM (MLS) CCM , MLA/T CSMLS/MLPAO , CRC CITI Dr. Joseph Angel deSoto, MD, PhD, DSSc. Committee Members: Mr. James Tutt (Dean of STEM) Ms. Barbara Klein, MS Dr. Donald K. Robinson, PhD Dr. Babatunde Ojo, PhD Dr. Rajneesh Verma, PhD
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Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science

Diné College offers vigorous pre-Professional pathways for Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry, Pharmacy,

Physician Assistant, Veterinary, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Mortuary Science, Clinical

Laboratory sciences and Biomedical Research through the “BS in Biomedical Sciences” Program.

Proposed By:

Dr. Shazia Tabassum Hakim, PhD, SCCM (MLS)CCM, MLA/TCSMLS/MLPAO, CRCCITI

Dr. Joseph Angel deSoto, MD, PhD, DSSc.

Committee Members:

Mr. James Tutt (Dean of STEM)

Ms. Barbara Klein, MS

Dr. Donald K. Robinson, PhD

Dr. Babatunde Ojo, PhD

Dr. Rajneesh Verma, PhD

mcury
Typewritten Text
Exhibit A

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Table of Contents

S. No. Item Page No.

1 Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science an Overview 3

2 Program’s Goals and Objectives 7

3 Program’s Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs) 7

4 Curriculum & Assessment 9

5 Rationale 10

6 Proposed Checklist 11

7 Suggested Elective Courses 11

8 NAU Checklist for Comparisons 12

9 Additional proposed courses & their Description 13

10 Administration 15

11 Metrics of Success 15

12 Breakdown of Program 16

13 Proposed Budget 17

14 Survey Response Collected from STEM students 19

15 References 20

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Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science an Overview

This 125-126 credit hours program is designed to prepare students to pursue a career in Biomedical

Science and the Health Care Professions: Medicine, Osteopathic Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Pharmacy,

Physician Assistant, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Laboratory Sciences, and Biomedical

Research. This program emphasizes both theoretical and practical knowledge in the biomedical sciences

and offers the flexibility to tailor fit one’s curriculum to their career pathway. The program emphasizes

biomedical health promotion for American Indians.

Approximately Ninety (~90) % of the courses included in this proposed program, are already offered at

Diné College, and college has all basic requirements available to teach these courses. Six additional

courses are proposed here (see below), they do not demand a big additional budget, we can

accommodate these courses within our current facilities and in case we secure some of recently submitted

grants we will be more than sufficient in offering these courses. Currently, School of STEM has overall

good enrolment rate as compare to other schools of the college (Figure #1). This number is increasing

continuously (Figure # 2 & 3). Overall, this proposed program is not a white elephant; instead, it will help

increase the reputation and credibility of School of STEM among other institutes of the region. It will help

retain more AS students for their BS program at their own school, close to their home and families, and

will provide the more options for our Navajo youth with interest in biomedical/ healthcare sciences (Figure

#4, 5 & 6).

Figure #1 Enrolment in STEM Programs Fall 19-20 to Fall 20-21

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Figure # 2 Enrolment in STEM at Tuba City Center

Figure # 3 Graduation Rate in STEM at Tuba City Center

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Figure # 4 Future Strategy

Figure # 5 Current Market for Medical Scientists (US Bureau of Labor Statistic)

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Figure # 6 Current wages & Need of Medical Scientists (US Bureau of Labor Statistic)

List of all Famous Biomedical Sciences Colleges/ Universities in Arizona

1. Northern Arizona University (Public)

2. University of Arizona (Public)

3. Midwestern University Glendale (Private)

List of all Famous Biomedical Sciences Colleges/ Universities in New Mexico

1. University of New Mexico (Public)

2. New Mexico Tech (Public)

3. New Mexico State University (Public)

Therefore, we are not crowded with so many institutions offering similar program. We are not really

competing, as we cannot claim for competition until we reach some standard that we are striving for.

However, yes, we want to retain our students. We do not want to feed other institutes anymore in our

neighboring states. We want to develop our own identity, for our Diné youth, for our own communities

close to their homes and their families.

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Program Goals and Objectives:

Goal 1: To obtain the necessary knowledge and skills, essential for a career in medical sciences or allied

healthcare professions. Biomedical Sciences majors need more than the average amount of Science,

Operations Analysis, and Programming.

Objective 1: Students will successfully complete the comprehensive courses in clinical Chemistry/

biochemistry, molecular biology/genetics, clinical microbiology, infectious disease and immunology.

Students will get training in various analytical methodologies using spectrophotometry, PCR/RT-PCR,

Immunoblotting, ELISA, CRISPER, Electrophoresis, etc.

Objective 2: Students will participate in translational research and hands on experiences through

laboratory exercises and group projects.

Goal 2: To grace the interpersonal communication skills to convey the results of scholarly work and being

able to work with others in groups and teams. Reading Comprehension, Science, and Critical Thinking are

the three most important skills for people in the field.

Objective 1: Students will participate in Journal clubs and research projects to be trained in complex

problem solving, Active learning and Judgement & Decision making.

Objective 2: Students will encouraged attending scientific workshops/ training and meetings to learn

social perceptiveness and management of personal resources.

Goal 3: To develop competent Biomedical Native Scientists it is necessary to develop operational skills.

Objective 1: Students will trained in collecting, organizing, evaluating and analyzing data, trouble shooting,

instrument calibration and time management.

Objective 2: Students will encouraged participating in summer internship / research opportunities,

proposal writing, grant writing, poster and paper presentations and publication to learn coordination and

system evaluation skills.

Program Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs) and their Alignment:

Given below is the list of PSLOs and how they will be aligned to the Diné Education Philosophy, mission

and strategic goals described by Nitsahakees, Nahat’a, Iina, and Siihasin (Figure # 7) i.e.

1. (Nitsáhákees: thinking) Using critical thinking skills, students will be able to outline the different

responses of the human body to physical, Chemical and microbial interaction, and demonstrate a

commitment to the application of biomedical science in the improvement of health disparities.

Additionally, via series of laboratory experiments they will be trained in collecting, organizing, evaluating

and analyzing data, trouble shooting, instrument calibration, equipment selection, operation monitoring

and time management.

2. (Nahat’a: planning) Through research and synthesizing information, students will be able to describe a

chosen health care profession in detail, obtain knowledge from other students’ descriptions, and use this

knowledge to reflect on their own career path. This training will develop their social perceptiveness and

decision-making skills.

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3. (Iiná: performance) By implementing course material, students will be able to identify structures of the

human body, describe their functional interrelatedness, and communicate scientific information

successfully, with specialized knowledge of concerns in health-related fields. They will learn various

analytical methodologies and laboratory techniques to master the skills as required for successful

completion of the program.

4. (Siihasin: application and evaluation) By reflecting on and applying the significance of their educational

goals, students will demonstrate a professional scholastic behavior and attitude that will make them

active listeners, problem solvers, team player and achiever.

Figure # 7 Proposed PSLO’s based on Four Pillars of Diné Learning Philosophy

Nitsáhákees Nahat’a

lináSiihasin

Using critical thinking skills, students will be able to

outline the different responses of the human body to

physical, Chemical and microbial interaction, and

demonstrate a commitment to the application of

biomedical science in the improvement of health

disparities. Additionally, via series of laboratory

experiments they will be trained in collecting, organizing,

evaluating and analyzing data, trouble shooting,

instrument calibration, equipment selection, operation

monitoring and time management.

Through research and synthesizing information,

students will be able to describe a chosen health care

profession in detail, obtain knowledge from other

students’ descriptions, and use this knowledge to

reflect on their own career path. This training will

develop their social perceptiveness and decision-

making skills.

By implementing course material, students will be

able to identify structures of the human body,

describe their functional interrelatedness, and

communicate scientific information successfully,

with specialized knowledge of concerns in health-

related fields. They will learn various analytical

methodologies and laboratory techniques to

master the skills as required for successful

completion of the program.

By reflecting on and applying the significance of

their educational goals, students will

demonstrate a professional scholastic behavior

and attitude that will make them active listeners,

problem solvers, team player and achiever.

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Curriculum & Assessment

As per Student Learning Committee’s requirement, answers are provided to the following fundamental

questions related to assessment:

1. How are the stated PSLO’s differentiated from other academic programs? (Biomedical Sciences vs BS

Biology , Environmental/ Agricultural Sciences, BS Secondary Education & BS Public Health)

BS Biology: PSLOs measures generalized knowledge of students about living creatures in PSLO1,

2, while emphasizing on Agricultural, environmental and traditional knowledge in PSLOs 3, 4 &5.

BS Environmental/ Agriculture Sciences: PSLOs measures are not available

BS Secondary education (Math & Science): PSLOs emphasize on teaching methodologies,

classroom management etc., as this program is for those who want to make education/ teaching

their career.

BS Public Health: PSLOs measures student’s knowledge with reference to community health and

wellness, methodologies for prediction and control with emphasize on epidemiology.

BS Biomedical Sciences: PSLOs will measure a broad knowledge of biomedical sciences and

human diseases, to understand and investigate disease processes. To integrate new biomedical

knowledge and emerging technologies in their professional practice, weigh critically the

capabilities of students to understand and evaluate the scientific literature. Their abilities to apply

fundamental concepts in the core areas of biomedical sciences, formulate adequate scientific

questions to solve specific research problems and apply laboratory skills such as planning of

experiments, data acquisitions, data management, analysis and interpretation to a specific

research problem. These PSLOs are designed to measure the competences of students to deal

with healthcare related responsibilities in future.

2. How is the student learning goals differentiated between 2-year vs. 4-year level learning? (AS Vs. BS)

This is an extension of many pre professional AS programs. Any student pass out from AS Biology, AS

Occupational health, AS Public Health or AS Secondary Education can be admitted to BS Biomedical

Sciences. This program will provide the advance knowledge of subjects offered at AS level (Chemistry,

biochemistry, infectious diseases, clinical microbiology, forensics etc.) and prepare them for Medicine,

dentistry, Nursing and other Allied healthcare pathways (Table #1). These courses will provide the food

for thought and action, improve the ability to locate and critically evaluate the problem, trouble shoot

and understand that “How can one person make a difference? By helping ill people or animals, or

preventing them from becoming ill in the first place through various career paths.

3. How does the proposed assessment plan ensure that grades are not used or equated with student-

learning assessment?

Based on program assessment matrix several artifacts will be collected during different courses

throughout the program that will reflect on program success rather than grades. These artifacts will

develop a separate data set other than grades to help faculty in program assessment and modifications

as needed.

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4. How does the proposed assessment plan ensure that the assessment measures, in fact, do assess student

learning?

All the PSLOs will be part of routine course activities, they will be integrated in assignments, quizzes,

exams and laboratories so nothing could be left unassessed and reflect the overall competitive nature of

the program. Later on career path tracking of program graduates will also help us to judge our level of

assessment and its role in student’s success. Dine College O & P department has developed a strong

alumni network and we believe school of STEM will be able to be benefited with that network to track our

BS Biomedical Sciences alumni.

Program Assessment Matrix: separately attached along with DPAR2 form

Rationale:

According to Business Insider among the most needed and high paying jobs in the future will include those

in Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry, Physical Therapy, Health Care Management, and Physician Assistant

(Kiersz, 2019). This will also lead to a high demand from college students to enter those degree programs

that will most readily prepare them for these occupations. According to the Journal Medical Daily, the

Health Care on Reservations and available to Native American Indians can best be described as Horrifying!

(Dovey, 2016).

Health Care Disparities is often defined as "a difference in which disadvantaged social groups such as the

poor, and racial/ethnic minorities who have persistently experienced social disadvantage or

discrimination tend to systematically experience worse health or greater health risks than more

advantaged social groups.” This in turn leads to increase morbidity and mortality. There is a growing

realization among healthcare researchers, clinicians, and advocates that a focus on health care disparities

is an important aspect of improving healthcare outcomes and that activities toward improvement must

bring together many elements of our healthcare delivery system.

This can start by increasing the number of ethnic minorities in the health care professions who are

culturally proficient and will in turn serve their communities.

These disparities must end and Diné College can put itself in the position of preparing students for

positions in health care and taking leadership roles nationally in this endeavor thereby increasing its

enrolment, reputation and more importantly helping the college fulfill its mission to the Native American

People.

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Table # 1 Diné College, School of STEM, BS Biomedical Sciences Proposed Checklist (Total Credit 126 – 127)

Suggested Elective courses including pre requisites:

BIO 498 (Senior Seminar), BIO 365 (Writing in the Biological Sciences), PSY 315 (Health Psychology), PUH 395

(Epidemiology), NIS 371 (Navajo Philosophy), NAV 231(Medical Terminology of Navajo), BIO 351 (Developmental

Biology), PSY-413 (NAS-413), BIO- 390 Principles of Forensic sciences.

Freshman Semester I Credit Freshman Semester II Credit

BIO 181- General Biology I 4 BIO 182- General Biology II 4

CHM 151- General Chemistry I 5 CHM 152- General Chemistry II 4

ENG 101- Freshman English I 3 ENG 102- Freshman English II 3

MTH 110 - College Algebra 4 MTH 190- Pre-Calculus 4

Total Credit 16 Total Credit 15

Sophomore Semester III Credit Sophomore Semester IV Credit

BIO 201- Anatomy & Physiology I 4 BIO 202- Anatomy & Physiology II 4

CHM 301- General Organic Chemistry I 5 CHM 302- General Organic Chemistry II 4

MTH 213- Statistics 4 MTH 191- Calculus 4

General Education Course-I 3 BIO 205- Microbiology 4

Total Credit 16 Total Credit 16

Junior Semester I Credit Junior Semester II Credit

PHY 110- Algebra -based Physics I 4 PHY 111- Algebra -based Physics II 4

CHM- 310 Introduction to Pharmacology 4 BIO 320 - Human Pathophysiology 4

CHM 360- Fundamental Biochemistry 3 BIO340-General Genetics 4

BIO 344- Cellular & Molecular Biology 4 General Education Course-II

3

Total Credit 15 Total Credit 15

Senior Semester III Credit Senior Semester IV Credit

BIO 495- Cancer Biology 4 BIO-485- Undergraduate Research 4

BIO-488 Medical Microbiology 4 Upper Division Elective in any Discipline 3-4

BIO 450- Bioinformatics or Upper Division Elective in any Discipline

3 General Education Course-V 3

General Education Course-III 3 General Education Course-VI 3

General Education Course-IV 3 General Education Course-VII 3

Total Credit 17 Total Credit 16 -17

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Table # 2 NAU BS Biomedical Sciences Proposed Checklist for Comparison/ Articulation

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Additional proposed courses that currently are not offered:

CHM-310 Introduction to Pharmacology (new)

This course will help our students to gain an ample understanding of the basic concepts related to drug

actions, their physicochemical properties and interactions with their specific targets in host. The students

will be able to discuss a number of clinically available drugs used to treat infections and diseases.

Alongside with a basic understanding of related topics, this course will develop critical thinking, awareness

and understanding of use of these magical bullets through sophisticated thought processes. Prerequisites:

BIO 181, BIO 182, CHM301, CHM302

BIO- 390 Principles of Forensic Sciences (Articulated with ASU: Arizona State University; new)

This course will provide our students with a solid introduction to the field of forensic science. Students

will progress towards a compulsion of the critical methods of scientific investigation, critical thinking,

perception, and communication, will learn about many of the techniques routinely carried out in forensic

biology laboratories. They will begin with search and recovery of mock biological evidence, move on to

serological testing of body fluids, with focus on DNA techniques, crime scene processing, analysis of

physical evidence by the crime lab , firearms and tool marks, Chemistry (toxicology, controlled

substances), and trace evidence. Prerequisites: BIO-181, CHM301, CHM302, CHM 310.

(Course on Forensic is not a personal choice but a suggestion considering market demand that will

increase the value of the proposed program (Figure # 8). Just by adding this one course your BS

biomedical Science graduate can have good job market in several state and public health departments

too, see below statics from US bureau of Labor. Additionally, you can provide workforce for your local

police departments who deal a lot with robberies, cases of stolen animals etc.)

Figure # 8 Forensic Scientists Market Value (US Department of Labor Statistics)

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BIO 488 - Medical Microbiology (new, articulated with NAU, same course code)

Medical aspects of host-parasite relationships in bacterial, mycotic, rickettsial, and viral diseases of

human. This course will cover the challenge presented by various groups of infectious microorganisms.

Serves as a guide to the complex subject of infectious disease; constructs on fundamental biological

principles to examine different agents of disease. Including the modes of transmission, interaction of

pathogens with the host immune system, and the ecological factors facilitating or inhibiting the

emergence of epidemic disease, their prognosis, diagnosis and treatment. A wide variety of diagnostic

techniques including culturing, staining, ELISA, Immuno-chromatography, PCR/RT-PCR, Immuno-

electrophoresis, and Western blotting will be taught in laboratories. Prerequisite: BIO 205, CHM 301, CHM

302, BIO310.

BIO 450 – Bioinformatics (new, articulated with NAU, same course code)

Bioinformatics focuses on the analysis of DNA/RNA sequence data, and this class will include discussion

of the mathematical, statistical, and computational techniques used in studying genomes and proteomes.

This course teaches biologists the fundamentals of bioinformatics, the application of the tools of computer

science (such as programming languages and databases) to address biological questions. As biological

research becomes increasingly data intensive, literacy in bioinformatics, and experience using, evaluating,

and presenting on bioinformatics tools have become essential skills for modern biologists. Prerequisite:

BIO-181, BIO-182, BIO-205, CHM-301, CHM-302, BIO-344

BIO 495 - Cancer Biology (new, articulated with BIO 515 - Cancer Biology (UNM) and CHM 567Chemical

And Molecular Biology of Cancer (NAU)

Fundamental elements of cancer development and progression will be the focus of this course. Basic

biochemical and genetic mechanisms of tumorigenesis, including genomic instability, principles of tumor

cell invasion and growth dysregulation will be emphasized. The lectures will be organized into 4 broad

thematic groups: A) Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms (e.g., tumor suppressor and oncogene function, DNA

repair pathways, senescence, apoptosis); B) Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms (e.g., tumor

microenvironment, hypoxia, angiogenesis); C) Organ Systems (e.g., pancreatic cancer, hematopoietic

malignancies); and D) Therapeutic Approaches (e.g. protein kinase inhibitors, immunotherapy, radiation

therapy). Prerequisites: BIO181, BIO 340 or BIO344, CHM 310, BIO360, BIO488.

Administration

The proposed program will get approvals from all concerned departments during Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 with a proposed start date of Fall 2021 (Figure # 9 ). The Department of STEM will retain and manage the records for those admitted to the “BS Biomedical sciences” program.

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CIP Code: 26.0102 CIP Title: Biomedical Sciences (General) SOC Occupation Code & Title: 19-1040.00 “Medical Scientists”

Figure # 9 BS Biomedical Sciences Program Timeline

Award of Degree

Students completing all requirements will receive a BS in Biomedical Sciences Degree acknowledging completion from the administering department. The completed courses will appear on the student’s official transcript.

Metrics of Success

The program faculty will meet twice per year to discuss progress of the students and, to assess the degree to which goals and outcomes are being achieved. The assessment approach will include both program and student learning outcome assessments. Program assessments will include development of courses in specified time frames, posting of program in specified time frames, evaluation of recruitment strategies, and enrolment of projected number of students, time to graduation and student experiences. Direct and indirect measures of learning outcomes will also be developed. Faculty Annual Teaching Performance

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Evaluations will be conducted by faculty peers in attendance during a scheduled class using a standard teaching evaluation rubric.

Breakdown of Program

A. Faculty

1. Didactic Instructor Appointments (current faculty is fully capable of teaching all proposed courses in the program)

The program must have qualified faculty/instructors who hold appointments within the educational program (e.g., qualified/certified professionals in their respective or related fields). The program must ensure and document ongoing professional development of the program faculty/instructors.

a. Qualifications Faculty/instructors designated by the program must: i. Demonstrate adequate knowledge and proficiency in their content areas; ii. Demonstrate the ability to teach effectively at the appropriate level. b. Responsibilities The responsibilities of the faculty/instructors must include: i. Participation in teaching courses; ii. Evaluation of student achievement; iii. Development of curriculum, policy and procedures; iv. Assessment of program outcomes. 2. Program Liaison (from collaborating healthcare facility/ industries/other HLC institutions)

Considering the need of collaborations with other organizations/ healthcare facilities/ research and academic institutes needed for the development and conduct of valued student research projects at least one program liaison, *who is employee of the collaborating institute/organization, must be designated at each collaborating site affiliated with the program to coordinate hands on technical experiences for students. (Faculty/mentor can also considered in the same capacity as we do for other collaborative projects).

a. Qualifications The program liaison must: i. Be a bio medical Scientist/ professional who demonstrates the ability to effectively coordinate real life experiences of the students; ii. Demonstrate knowledge of the program discipline; iii. Have at least one year experience as a bio medical scientist. b. Responsibilities The program liaison must be responsible for: i. Coordinating technical instruction at the collaborating site ii. Maintaining effective communication with the program director or designee. B. Advisory Committee (in kind from Diné College, Collaborating institute/ organization)

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There must be an advisory committee composed of individuals from the community of interest (e.g., practicing professionals, academic professionals, scientific consultants, administrators, pathologists and other physicians, public member) who have knowledge of biomedical Sciences education and training. This committee will work under the Dean of STEM or his designee. a. Responsibilities The advisory committee of the program shall have input into the program/curriculum to maintain current relevancy and effectiveness.

Proposed Budget: Budget priorities (Figure # 10 & Table # 3) taken into consideration are

• Budgeted lab supplies and equipment support Simulation equipment and teaching labs at least 50% should be committed from DC ($300,000/yr).

• Recommend local budgets @100,000 per campus/ center (flexible to relocate between campuses/ centers depending upon number of enrolment at a particular location)

• Expedited ordering process for urgent lab supplies- expansion of current pilot program.

• Support staff- Laboratory Assistants/Teaching Assistants/Adjuncts ($50,000/yr) • Lab Set-up • Small discussion group/mentoring

Figure # 10 Proposed Budget

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Current Research/ Scholarship/ Fellowship/Externship Programs at School of STEM that can support

our BS Biomedical Sciences Programs in different ways

In a survey recently conducted at School of STEM asking questions about start of BS in Biomedical Sciences

program at Diné College we received a very overwhelming response (Figure # 11), 100% of participants

were in favor of starting this program while 96% showed their interest in taking admission in BS Biomedical

Sciences Program at Diné College. Our students at Diné College, School of STEM have multiple

opportunities available to them, to develop their hands on skills and expertise in their chosen field, close

to their home, in a culturally supportive atmosphere; embedded in traditional Native American culture

and life style.

NSF-TCUP, Navajo-NARCH, Land Grant Extension & Outreach, UoA Fairbank BLaST, Summer Research

Enhancement Program (SREP), Summer Internship Program, TCUP-SGR, USDA-NIFA, URbrain and Indige-

FEWSS are few grant programs that support the students at STEM.

Multiple grants have been submitted recently and are pending including TCUP-TEA Center, DOE, CDC etc.

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Table # 3 Proposed Instructional Budget /year (20 students) for three years 2021-2023

This proposed budget is for planning purpose with recommendation to rely more on committed hard

money from Diné College (~50%) rather than on soft money coming through different grants.

Item Justification

Totals Amounts

Salaries: Faculties 8FTE@75K/year (average) $600,000.00

Comments: Overlaps with the other programs offered at School of STEM, as faculty is already on board

Special/Miscellaneous Fees

Accreditation/Faculty development/publication cost & Teaching Materials

$40,000.00

Comments: This amount overlaps with faculty development fund allotted to all schools.

*Enrolment: 20 Students Tuition: $55 per credit hr. x 121 credits x 20 $133,100.00

Comments: This amount will come from student enrolment

Simulation Lab Purchase of equipment & General supplies @100,000/center or campus, that can be shuffle in between the locations, according to number of enrolment later.

$300,000.00

Comments: • This amount overlaps with the other programs offered at School of STEM. Most of the equipment either we already have or have been proposed in different Grants recently submitted. We will be in Good position if these grants approved, if not still we can gradually manage to purchase these equipment.

• General Supplies is something we need to consider, as they are required day to day. Proposed 100,000/ center or campus per year will be an overlapping budget with other programs offered at School of STEM

Instructional supplies:

Books

Lab Coats/gowns

20 students x $500 per student 24 (with college logo) x $100

$ 10,000.00 $ 2,400.00

Additional Fees:

Lab Fees

20 students x $500

$ 10,000.00

Comments: Students will be responsible for these expenses either through financial AID or from their own pocket, not the college.

Support staff Laboratory Assistants/Teaching Assistants/Adjunct as/if needed

$ 50,000.00

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Additionally, this program will immediately open up the vast amount of money NIH has to Diné College.

This money is 10x what NSF has to offer and which the above grants represent.

Comments: Currently we are hiring these individuals through different student employment program. However, we may hire a permanent Lab Assistant at all three location.

TOTALS Proposed Budget $1,145,500.00

Final Note: Budget Required

This proposed budget is required to start the program from zero level. As you can see most of our items are overlapped with other programs already offered at School of STEM that is why, the suggested required budget at the moment to start the program is $100,000 that will used as $50,000 for equipment and $50,000 for Laboratory supplies.

*If you see by having only 20 students in this program we can have $133,100.00, that means the program can be a self-supported program and may be feed others too in future.

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Item Justification

Totals Amounts

Salaries: Faculties 8FTE@75K/year (average) $600,000.00

Special/Miscellaneous Fees

Accreditation/Faculty development/publication cost & Teaching Materials

$40,000.00

Enrolment: 20 Students

Tuition: $55 per credit hr. x 121 credits x 20 $133,100.00

Simulation Lab Purchase of equipment & General supplies @100,000/center or campus, that can be shuffle in between the locations, according to number of enrolment later.

$300,000.00

Instructional supplies:

Books

Lab Coats/gowns

20 students x $500 per student 24 (with college logo) x $100

$ 10,000.00 $ 2,400.00

Additional Fees:

Lab Fees

20 students x $500

$ 10,000.00

Support staff Laboratory Assistants/Teaching Assistants/Adjunct as/if needed

$ 50,000.00

TOTALS $1,145,500.00

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Figure # 10 BS Biomedical Science Survey Response Collected on October 29 & 30th, 2020

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References:

Dovey Dana (Feb 5, 2016), Healthcare on Native American Reservations Is 'Horrifying:' In The US, Who

You Are Affects How You're Treated. Medical Daily.

https://www.medicaldaily.com/native-americanreservations-healthcare-terrible-372442

Kiersz A (Mar 2, 2019) The 30-best high-paying jobs of the future, Business Insider,

https://www.businessinsider.com/best-jobs-future-growth-2019-3

United States Bureau of Labor Statistics: Medical Scientists

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/medical-scientists.htm

CIP Codes: Biomedical Science General

https://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/cipcode/cipdetail.aspx?y=55&cipid=87430

SOC Occupation Code: Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists

https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/19-1042.00

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Degree Program Assessment Report PART 2 Diné College---Office of Academic Assessment

I. Program Information

Academic Term& Year: 2021-22

Division/School: STEM

Degree Type: BS

Degree Program: BS Biomedical Sciences

II. Contact Information

Faculty Name(s), Title: (Provide the faculty or staff members who contributed

to the assessment of the degree program).

Dr. Shazia Tabassum Hakim

Dr. Donald K. Robinson Jr.

III. General Assessment Information

III. a Stated Program Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs) (Provide the established PSLO’s for this academic program and

verify the PSLOs are on the DC portal under the Office of Assessment “Degree-Level Assessment intraweb):

PSLO1: (Nitsáhákees: thinking) Using critical thinking skills, students will be able to outline the different responses of the human

body to physical, chemical and microbial interaction, and demonstrate a commitment to the application of biomedical science in the improvement of health disparities. Additionally, via series of laboratory experiments they will be trained in collecting, organizing, evaluating and analyzing data, trouble shooting, instrument calibration, equipment selection, operation monitoring and time management.

PSLO2: (Nahat’a: planning) Through research and synthesizing information, students will be able to describe a chosen health

care profession in detail, obtain knowledge from other students’ descriptions, and use this knowledge to reflect on their own career path. This training will develop their social perceptiveness and decision-making skills. PSLO3: (Iiná: performance) By implementing course material, students will be able to identify structures of the human body,

describe their functional interrelatedness, and communicate scientific information successfully, with specialized knowledge of concerns in health-related fields. They will learn various analytical methodologies and laboratory techniques to master the skills as required for successful completion of the program.

PSLO4: (Siihásin: application and evaluation) By reflecting on and applying the significance of their educational goals, students

will demonstrate a professional scholastic behavior and attitude that will make them active listeners, problem solvers, team player and achiever.

III.b Assessment Improvements (Indicate any changes or adjustments that will be made to the assessment of student-learning this academic year. EX. During the last academic year, students did not complete the senior survey when it was only on a volunteer basis. Therefore, this year all seniors will be required to take the senior survey or Are the PSLOs listed above measurable?):

This is a newly developed program so no assessment improvements suggested or required at this moment.

IV. Assessment Plan—Methods Narrative

IV.a Assessment of PSLO’s (Indicate which PSLOs the academic school/division will assess this academic year):

Faculty wanted all PSLOs measured each semester (See below: assessment matrix)

25 | P a g e

IV.b Assessment Matrix (The matrix must have PSLOs along one axis, and the required/elective courses along the opposite

axis. The matrix must indicate at which point along the program curriculum student-learning is Introduced, Reinforced, Mastered, and Assessed. **NOTE** Not every single outcome/course needs to be “checked”, but every outcome must be addressed as a program curriculum. If a matrix cannot fit into the report please attach) If an assessment matrix has not created or developed yet, please indicate by stating “To be developed.” Those Academic school/divisions who have an assessment matrix in place, please verify that the matrix is up to date under the Degree Program section on the Degree-Level Assessments page.

The assessment matrix is given below, at the end of this document

IV.c Assessment Artifact Target (Indicate how many artifacts will be collected to assess the PSLO(s) the academic

school/division will assess this year. Academic schools/division are welcomed to utilize the Assessment Sample Size Table and Unduplicated Declares Majors documents found underneath the Degree Programs section of the Degree-Level Program Assessment page):

This is a newly proposed program that we are hoping to start in the Fall 2021 depending all required approvals. All PSLOs will be measured each semester as per offering of the specific course. (Please consult the assessment matrix below).

IV.d Assessment Measure (Provide a description of the measures that will be used for each PSLO that will be assessed this

academic year. The following are fundamental questions that should be answered when considering the measures. o Which measures are direct or indirect measures?

o Will more than one measure be used to assess one PSLO?

o How is the academic school/division sure the measures reflect appropriate program-level assessment and

not individual courses in the program?

o Are the assessment measures this year formative or summative in nature?

o Which courses will be used in the assessments?

If a rubric will be used in the assessment of the student learning, please do not forget to attach to this DPAR2.

Please provide and/or attach all assessment prompts that will be used this year.):

PSLO # 1: Using critical thinking skills, students will be able to outline the different responses of the human body to physical, chemical and microbial interaction, and demonstrate a commitment to the application of biomedical science in the improvement of health disparities. Additionally, via series of laboratory experiments they will be trained in collecting, organizing, evaluating and analyzing data, trouble shooting, instrument calibration, equipment selection, operation monitoring and time management. Measure #1: via series of laboratory experiments(direct measure) students will be trained in collecting, organizing, evaluating and analyzing data, trouble shooting, instrument calibration, equipment selection, operation monitoring and time management. Measure #2: Students will demonstrate (indirect measure) a commitment to the application of biomedical science in the improvement of health disparities PSLO #2: By implementing course material, students will be able to identify structures of the human body, describe their functional interrelatedness, and communicate scientific information successfully, with specialized knowledge of concerns in health-related fields. They will learn various analytical methodologies and laboratory techniques to master the skills as required for successful completion of the program. Measure #1:Describe (direct measure)a chosen health care profession in detail, obtain knowledge from other students’ descriptions Measure # 2: use this knowledge to reflect (indirect measure) on their own career path. This training will develop their social perceptiveness and decision-making skills. PSLO3: By implementing course material, students will be able to identify structures of the human body, describe their functional interrelatedness, and communicate scientific information successfully, with specialized knowledge of concerns in health-related fields. They will learn various analytical methodologies and laboratory techniques to master the skills as required for successful completion of the program. Measure # 1: Identify (direct measure) structures of the human body, describe their functional interrelatedness

26 | P a g e

Measure # 2: Communicate (indirect measure) scientific information successfully, with specialized knowledge of concerns in health-related fields. Measure # 3: They will learn various analytical methodologies and laboratory techniques (direct measure) to master the skills as required for successful completion of the program. PSLO4: By reflecting on and applying the significance of their educational goals, students will demonstrate a professional scholastic behavior and attitude that will make them active listeners, problem solvers, team player and achiever. Measure # 1: Scientific presentations (oral/poster), Research thesis, Grant writing (both direct and indirect measure)

IV.e Assessment Implementation (Provide a description on a step by step process that will take place this year in implementing the assessment plans, collecting the student evidence (artifacts), who is responsible for what, and a timeline on completing assessment activities. Academic schools/divisions are welcome to use a table to illustrate what will talk place his academic year):

This is a newly proposed program that we are hoping to start in the fall 2021 depending all required approvals. So no

assessment plans for current year. (Please consult the assessment matrix below).

Table for Deliverables and Deadlines: Not applicable at this moment

Persons Responsible Deliverable Deadline

Assessment webpage for BS Biomedical Science:

https://warriorweb.dinecollege.edu/ICS/Faculty__Staff/Office_of_the_Provost/Office_of_Assessment/D

egree_Program_Assessment/BS_Biomedical Science/

BS Biology Program Matrix

Program

Outcomes for

BS in

Biomedical

Science

CHM 310, 4

Intro to

Pharmacology

Junior Fall

CHM 360, 3

Fundamental

Biochemistry

Junior Fall

BIO 320, 4

Human

Patho-

physiology

Junior

Spring

BIO 344, 4

Cell &

Molecular

Biology

Junior Fall

BIO 340, 4

General

Genetics

Junior

Spring

BIO 488, 4

Medical

Micro-

biology

Senior Fall

BIO 485, 4

Under-

graduate

Research

Senior

Spring

Measure #1: via series of

laboratory experiments

students will be trained in

collecting, organizing,

evaluating and analyzing

data, trouble shooting,

instrument calibration,

equipment selection,

operation monitoring and

time management.

Art Art (use

either

BIO 340

or BIO

344)

Art (use

either

BIO 340

or BIO

344)

Measure #2: Students

will demonstrate a

commitment to the

application of biomedical

science in the

Art Art

27 | P a g e

Program

Outcomes for

BS in

Biomedical

Science

CHM 310, 4

Intro to

Pharmacology

Junior Fall

CHM 360, 3

Fundamental

Biochemistry

Junior Fall

BIO 320, 4

Human

Patho-

physiology

Junior

Spring

BIO 344, 4

Cell &

Molecular

Biology

Junior Fall

BIO 340, 4

General

Genetics

Junior

Spring

BIO 488, 4

Medical

Micro-

biology

Senior Fall

BIO 485, 4

Under-

graduate

Research

Senior

Spring

improvement of health

disparities

Measure #1: Describe a

chosen health care

profession in detail,

obtain knowledge from

other students’

descriptions:

Art Art

Measure #2: use this

knowledge to reflect on

their own career path.

This training will develop

their social

perceptiveness and

decision-making skills:

Art Art

Measure #1 Identify

structures of the human

body, describe their

functional

interrelatedness:

Art Art

Measure #2:

Communicate scientific

information successfully,

with specialized

knowledge of concerns in

health-related fields:

Art Art

Measure #3 : They will

learn various analytical

methodologies and

laboratory techniques to

master the skills as

required for successful

completion of the

program:

Art (use

either

BIO 340

or BIO

344)

Art (use

either

BIO 340

or BIO

344)

Art

Measure #1: Scientific

presentations

(oral/poster), Research

thesis, grant writing:

Art

28 | P a g e

Table of 2021-22 BS Biomedical artifacts to be collected:

Course Proposed

Instructors

When/

semester

PSLO#/

Measure#

Artifact/

Scoring

Rubric?

Collected?

Scanned?

Uploaded?

When

Analyzed? and

conclusion

(met, partially

met, not met)

CHM 310

Pharmacology

Dr. DeSoto

or Dr. Ojo

Fall 1/1;

4/1

CHM 360

Biochemistry

Dr. Begaye

Dr. Verma

Dr. Ojo

Fall 2/1;

2/2;

BIO 340

Genetics

Dr. DeSoto

Dr. Boyd

Spring 1/1;

3/3

BIO 320

Pathophysiology

Dr. DeSoto

Dr. Hakim

Dr.

Robinson

Ms. Klein

Spring 1/2;

3/1

BIO 344

Cell &

Molecular Bio

Dr. Boyd or

Dr. Hakim

Dr. DeSoto

Fall 1/1;

3/3

BIO 488 Medical

Microbiology

Dr. DeSoto

Dr. Hakim

Ms. Klein

Fall 3/2;

3/1

BIO 485

Undergraduate

Research

Dr. DeSoto

Dr. Hakim

Ms. Klein

Dr. Verma

Dr. Hakim

Dr.

Robinson

Dr. Boyd

Dr. Ojo

Dr. Webster

Spring 1/2;

2/1;

2/2;

3/2;

3/3

29 | P a g e

Diné College

New Program Request Form

Type in the designated areas. Do not alter any element of the form.

1. Initiator: Drs. Hakim, deSoto & Don 1Date: November 23, 2020

2. Subject Area: Biomedical Sciences

3. Academic Division: STEM

4. Major: Science Minor: Biomedical Sciences

5. Proposed Title for New Curriculum Program: BS in Biomedical Sciences

6. To begin: Semester: Fall Academic Year: 2021-22

7. Name of Degree or Certificate to be offered: BS in Biomedical Sciences

8. Program Statement: Brief introduction statement for program listed in the catalog.

Diné College offers vigorous pre-Professional pathways for Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry,

Pharmacy, Physician Assistant, Veterinary, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Mortuary

Science, Clinical Laboratory sciences and Biomedical Research through the “BS in Biomedical

Sciences” Program.

9. Program Description: If needed, attach material (Proposal details attached).

This 125-126 credit hours program is designed to prepare students to pursue a career in Biomedical

Science and the Health Care Professions: Medicine, Osteopathic Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing,

Pharmacy, Molecular Sciences, Physician Assistant, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Clinical

Laboratory Sciences, and Biomedical Research. This program emphasizes both theoretical and

practical knowledge in the biomedical sciences and offers the flexibility to tailor fit one’s curriculum

to their career pathway. The program emphasizes biomedical health promotion for American Indians

and Indigenous communities.

10. Plan for Evaluation:

The program faculty will meet twice per year to discuss progress of the students and, to assess the

degree to which goals and outcomes are being achieved. The assessment approach will include both

program and student learning outcome assessments. Program assessments will include

development of courses in specified time frames, posting of program in specified time frames,

evaluation of recruitment strategies, and enrollment of projected number of students, time to

graduation and student experiences. Direct and indirect measures of learning outcomes will also be

30 | P a g e

developed. Faculty Annual Teaching Performance Evaluations will be conducted by faculty peers in

attendance during a scheduled class using a standard teaching evaluation rubric.

11. Tentative calendar of events in planning and implementation:

Date of Curriculum Committee Meeting

Recommendations:

Vote: in favor oppose abstain

CURRICULUM APPROVAL PROCESS

Signature: School Dean Date

Signature: Curriculum Committee Chair Date

Signature: Provost Date

2-1-2021

2.9.21

31 | P a g e

Five New courses are proposed in this program

1. Intro to Pharmacology

2. Bioinformatics

3. Principles of Forensic Sciences

4. Medical Microbiology

5. Cancer Biology

32 | P a g e

Diné College

New Course Request Form

Type in the designated areas. Do not alter any element of the form.

1. Initiator: Drs. Hakim, deSoto & Robinson Date: November 23, 2020

2. Major: Science Minor: Biomedical Sciences

3. To begin: Semester: Fall Academic Year: 2021-2022

Prefix No. Course Title: Cr. Lec. Lab.

CHEM 310 Introduction to Pharmacology 4 3 1

4. Course description for the catalog including prerequisites.

This course will help our students to gain an ample understanding of the basic concepts related to

drug actions, their physicochemical properties and interactions with their specific targets in host. The

students will be able to discuss a number of clinically available drugs used to treat infections and

diseases. Alongside with a basic understanding of related topics, this course will develop critical

thinking, awareness and understanding of use of these magical bullets through sophisticated thought

processes. Prerequisites: BIO-181, CHM-301, CHM-302

5. Explain the reason/rational for developing this course.

Current list of courses offered at DC does not have any course that provides basic and fundamental

knowledge of pharmacology. This basic background is needed for majority of professional pathways

in biomedical sciences. That is why it is very important to develop this course for our DC students.

6. State concisely how this course fits with the mission and goals of the college.

The proposed Course is developed in complete alignment with DINĔ College Vision and Mission, that

states “Through the principles and values of Sa’ah Naaghai Bik’eh Hozhoon, rooted in Diné language

and culture, our mission is “to advance quality post-secondary student learning and development to

ensure the well-being of the Diné People, and to improve continuously our programs and services to

make Diné College the exemplary higher education institution for the Diné People”.

7. Instructional methodology: describe procedures for presenting the content and any special

needs or limitations of the course.

The learning style will be cognitive in nature, meaning there will be aspects of memorization,

comprehension, and application. The concepts will be based on the SNBH paradigm and have a

33 | P a g e

classroom lecture style curriculum but will also include hands on learning, Laboratory

experimentation, summer internships and classroom presentations from subject matter experts in

the area of biomedical sciences.

8. Will approval of this course necessitate a program change? Explain fully any program change or

any other relationship of the proposed course to a program.

No, this is a newly proposed course that will fulfill the requirements of newly proposed “BS in

Biomedical Sciences Program”.

9. Provide evidence of articulation within the college regarding the proposed new course.

This is a new course, no articulation available.

10. Identify similar course(s):

a. Offered at DC.

No similar course offered at DC

b. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico community colleges.

No similar upper level course offered at Community colleges in Arizona and New Mexico

c. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico universities.

Northern Arizona University offers a similar course at 300 level with more emphasize on nursing

profession i.e. “NUR 331 - Applied Pharmacology and Pathophysiology”. Our proposed program

will provide the foundation for multiple medical sciences programs that is why we are adopting

that course according to our needs at DC, focusing multiple healthcare programs including

nursing.

11. For courses that are intended to transfer, provide evidence (Major Change Form) that you have

contacted at least one of the universities near the reservation for an initial assessment of the

transferability of the course.

Since this is a new program and new course is in articulation with other Arizona Institutes, we

Do not see any issue in course transfer if needed.

12. Program/College Impact: Include staffing requirements, capital equipment requirements, facility

additions or modifications, classroom availability.

We at School of STEM already have faculty with background in pharmacological sciences and

medicine that can easily take care of this course. This course will be adjusted along with available

laboratory and classroom facilities for other science courses offered at School of STEM, DC.

13. Attach a Course Content Display.

Attached

34 | P a g e

Date of Curriculum Committee Meeting

Recommendations:

Vote: in favor oppose abstain

CURRICULUM APPROVAL PROCESS

Signature: School Dean Date

Signature: Curriculum Committee Chair Date

Signature: Provost Date

2-1-2021

2.9.21

35 | P a g e

Semester Fall 2021, August

Course Code CHM - 310

Course Name Introduction to Pharmacology

Course Section and Credit hours

4 credit hrs

Revision Date November 23, 2020

Faculty TBD

Cell Phone #

Office Phone # 1-928-283-5113 Ext:

Email TBD

Office hours TBD

Theory Class meeting time & Location

TBD

Laboratory meeting time & Location

TBD

Course Program(s) BS Biomedical Sciences

Course Pre requisites BIO-181, BIO-201, CHM-301, CHM-302

Course Description This course will help our students to gain an ample understanding of the basic concepts related to drug actions, their physicochemical properties and interactions with their specific targets in host. The students will be able to discuss a number of clinically available drugs used to treat infections and diseases. Alongside with a basic understanding of related topics, this course will develop critical thinking, awareness and understanding of use of these magical bullets through sophisticated thought processes.

Course Contents Will be covered according to the textbook

Course Goals as Related to SNBH

Course goals will be related to the Dine Educational Philosophy, Sa’ah Naaghei Bek’eh Hozhoon.

Nitsahakees, Nahat’a, Iina, and Siih Hasin are processes found in all aspects of nature. Students will understand themselves through the teachings of Naayee’eek’ehgo Na’nitin (protection way teaching) and Hozhoojik’ehgo Na’nitin (blessing way teachings).

The goal of this course is to develop within the students a working knowledge of biology that can be incorporated into their lives. The following four step process will be developed and will consist of:

1) Preparing ourselves mentally by clearly envisioning and conceiving of our goals and desires in the context of our world and our universe;

2) Generating plans, images, and models by which we can achieve these goals

3) Living and working with the course material in the context of our plans and goals; and

4) Reflecting on what we have achieved and learned so that we can develop greater understandings of ourselves, our world, and our universe.

36 | P a g e

Specific Objectives for Students

Upon completion of this course the student will:

Demonstrate understanding of basic principles of Pharmacology, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics.

The student will be able to identify a range of drugs used in medicine and discuss their mechanisms of action.

The student will be able to report the clinical applications, side effects and toxicities of drugs used in medicine.

The student will be able to explain the mechanisms of action and pathology of ethanol and drugs of abuse.

The student will be able to translate pharmacological principles into clinical decision-making.

Mode of Delivery This course uses a combination of lecture with discussion and feedback, textbooks, workbooks, supplemental hand-outs, group and peer discussion, instructor led laboratory/clinical exercises, multi-media materials, videos, animations and PowerPoint presentations.

Text Book (s) Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, by Bertram Katzung, ISBN-10 : 126045231X, ISBN-13 : 978-1260452310, McGraw-Hill Education / Medical; 15th edition

(December 5, 2020) Educational Resources (Instructional material & References)

Class Lectures and handouts. Other recommended books and resources as per instructors recommendations

Method of Evaluation Grades for CHM- 310 will be based upon points accumulated during: 1. lecture exams 2. laboratory exams 3. Presentations 4. Individual laboratory exercises and by successfully completing

selected extra credit assignments. 5. Midterm & Final Exams

A = 90-100 B= 80-89 C= 70-79 D= 60-69 F= less than 60

Teaching Method This will be a hybrid or blended class. The common lecture time is three hours. This class will meet twice as per designated schedule. The student is responsible for reading the chapter and following the attached work plan. The face-to-face time will be used for clarification of points, answering questions, and working with the concepts that the students investigated on their own. Further explanation and clarification will be given in class.

Classroom Requirements

NO electronic devices including cell phones are permitted in lecture

or lab unless with instructor’s permission.

There will be NO make-up exams. Students are held responsible for

any class or lab that is missed.

NO instructor drops will be given. Students are responsible for

dropping the course if need be.

A legitimate interest in this topic and the development of a curiosity of how the human body is organized and how it functions is required.

37 | P a g e

Students are expected to attend all lecture and laboratory sessions and to arrive at these sessions on time. If you miss in excess of 4 lecture sessions without a legitimate excuse, you will be asked to file the necessary paperwork on your own in order to drop the course.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty defined as an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author's work as one's own. Plagiarism is a serious offense and will carry penalties including but not limited to failing an assignment or failing the course.

Participation As is true of most courses, what you get out of this course is highly correlated to what you put into it. Your degree of preparation, class attendance, effort in homework assignments and participation in discussions will all affect how well you do in the course. It is assumed that each student will have read all assigned chapters prior to class meetings.

Lecture Schedule Week 1: Introduction to Pharmacology; General Principles Week 2: Pharmacokinetics; General Principles Week 3: Pharmacodynamics; General Principles Week 4: Pharmacology of the Autonomic Nervous System Week 5: Pharmacology of the Autonomic Nervous System Week 6: Pharmacology of Adrenergic Drugs Week 7: Pharmacology of Adrenergic Drugs Week 8: Pharmacology of Cholinergic Drugs Week 9: Spring Break Week 10: Pharmacology of Cholinergic Drugs Week 11: Pharmacology of Anti-Hypertensive Drugs Week 12: Pharmacology of Anti-Hypertensive Drugs Week 14: Pharmacology of Anti-Arrhythmic Drugs Week 15: Pharmacology of Anti-Arrhythmic Drugs Week 16: Course Review Week 17: Final Exam Week

Laboratory Schedule Pertaining to the Theory classes

Exam Schedule:

TBD

Prepared by: ___________________________ Date: 11/23/2020

Reviewed by:___________________________ Date: ___________

2-1-2021

38 | P a g e

Diné College

New Course Request Form

Type in the designated areas. Do not alter any element of the form.

1. Initiator: Drs. Hakim, deSoto & Robinson Date: November 23, 2020

2. Major: Science Minor: Biomedical Sciences

3. To begin: Semester: Fall Academic Year: 2021-2022

Prefix No. Course Title: Cr. Lec. Lab.

BIO 390 Principles of Forensic Science 4 3 1

4. Course description for the catalog including prerequisites.

This course will provide our students with a solid introduction to the field of forensic science.

Students will progress towards a compulsion of the critical methods of scientific investigation, critical

thinking, perception, and communication, will learn about many of the techniques routinely carried

out in forensic biology laboratories. They will begin with search and recovery of mock biological

evidence, move on to serological testing of body fluids, with focus on DNA techniques, crime scene

processing, analysis of physical evidence by the crime lab , firearms and tool marks, chemistry

(toxicology, controlled substances), and trace evidence. Prerequisites: BIO-181, BIO-182, CHM-301,

CHM-302

5. Explain the reason/rational for developing this course.

Current list of courses offered at DC does not have any course that provides basic and fundamental

knowledge of forensic sciences. Considering rapidly increasing interest among students and

professionals and its association with majority of professional pathways in biomedical sciences we

feel that we should develop this course especially for those students who want to adapt this pathway

of biomedical sciences.

6. State concisely how this course fits with the mission and goals of the college.

The proposed Course is developed in complete alignment with DINĔ College Vision and Mission, that

states “Through the principles and values of Sa’ah Naaghai Bik’eh Hozhoon, rooted in Diné language

and culture, our mission is “to advance quality post-secondary student learning and development to

39 | P a g e

ensure the well-being of the Diné People, and to improve continuously our programs and services to

make Diné College the exemplary higher education institution for the Diné People”.

7. Instructional methodology: describe procedures for presenting the content and any special

needs or limitations of the course.

The learning style will be cognitive in nature, meaning there will be aspects of memorization,

comprehension, and application. The concepts will be based on the SNBH paradigm and have a

classroom lecture style curriculum but will also include hands on learning, Laboratory

experimentation, summer internships and classroom presentations from subject matter experts in

the area of biomedical sciences.

8. Will approval of this course necessitate a program change? Explain fully any program change or

any other relationship of the proposed course to a program.

No, this is a newly proposed course that will fulfill the requirements of newly proposed “BS in

Biomedical Sciences Program”.

9. Provide evidence of articulation within the college regarding the proposed new course.

This is a new course, no articulation available.

10. Identify similar course(s):

a. Offered at DC.

No similar course offered at DC

b. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico community colleges.

No similar upper level courses offered at Arizona/ New Mexico community colleges

c. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico universities.

Arizona State University offers similar course for their Forensic Sciences program as “FOR 286:

Principles of Forensic”. Our proposed program will provide the foundation for multiple medical

sciences programs including forensic sciences that is why we are adopting that course according

to our needs at DC.

11. For courses that are intended to transfer, provide evidence (Major Change Form) that you have

contacted at least one of the universities near the reservation for an initial assessment of the

transferability of the course.

Since this is a new program and new course is in articulation with other Arizona Institutes, we

do not think there will be any issue in course transfer if needed.

12. Program/College Impact: Include staffing requirements, capital equipment requirements, facility

additions or modifications, classroom availability.

40 | P a g e

We at School of STEM already have faculty with background in pharmacological/ clinical sciences

and medicine that can easily take care of this course. This course will be adjusted along with

available laboratory and classroom facilities for other science courses offered at School of STEM,

DC. A budget will be required to allocate for to establish faculty/ instructor salaries and benefits,

textbooks, travel expenses for students from facility to facility, and to utilize classroom/ laboratory

space at Diné College

13. Attach a Course Content Display.

Attached

Date of Curriculum Committee Meeting

Recommendations:

Vote: in favor oppose abstain

CURRICULUM APPROVAL PROCESS

Signature: School Dean Date

Signature: Curriculum Committee Chair Date

Signature: Provost Date

2-1-2021

2.09.21

41 | P a g e

Semester Fall 2021, August

Course Code BIO - 390

Course Name Principles of Forensic Science

Course Section and Credit hours

4 credit hrs

Revision Date November 23, 2020

Faculty TBD

Cell Phone #

Office Phone # 1-928-283-5113 Ext:

Email TBD

Office hours TBD

Theory Class meeting time & Location

TBD

Laboratory meeting time & Location

TBD

Course Program(s) BS Biomedical Sciences

Course Pre requisites BIO-181, BIO-182, CHM-301, CHM-302

Course Description This course will provide our students with a solid introduction to the field of forensic science. Students will progress towards a compulsion of the critical methods of scientific investigation, critical thinking, perception, and communication, will learn about many of the techniques routinely carried out in forensic biology laboratories. They will begin with search and recovery of mock biological evidence, move on to serological testing of body fluids, with focus on DNA techniques, crime scene processing, analysis of physical evidence by the crime lab , firearms and tool marks, chemistry (toxicology, controlled substances), and trace evidence.

Course Contents Will be covered according to the textbook

Course Goals as Related to SNBH

Course goals will be related to the Dine Educational Philosophy, Sa’ah Naaghei Bek’eh Hozhoon.

Nitsahakees, Nahat’a, Iina, and Siih Hasin are processes found in all aspects of nature. Students will understand themselves through the teachings of Naayee’eek’ehgo Na’nitin (protection way teaching) and Hozhoojik’ehgo Na’nitin (blessing way teachings).

The goal of this course is to develop within the students a working knowledge of biology that can be incorporated into their lives. The following four step process will be developed and will consist of:

5) Preparing ourselves mentally by clearly envisioning and conceiving of our goals and desires in the context of our world and our universe;

42 | P a g e

6) Generating plans, images, and models by which we can achieve these goals

7) Living and working with the course material in the context of our plans and goals; and

8) Reflecting on what we have achieved and learned so that we can develop greater understandings of ourselves, our world, and our universe.

Specific Objectives for Students

Upon completion of this course the student will:

Demonstrate understanding of basic principles of forensic sciences

Ask a scientific question and develop an hypothesis to answer the question

Design an experiment to test the hypothesis

Carry out the experiment

Collect and analyze the data

Write up and report the results

Students will describe the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will solve problems scientifically.

Students will communicate scientific information.

Students will apply quantitative analysis to scientific problems.

Students will apply scientific thinking to real world problems.

In addition to the theory discussed in lecture, students should learn to synthesize the crime scene and identify and investigate the crime that how and which type of sample should be collected and processed to support the evidential values involving molecular techniques DNA typing techniques RFPL, STRs etc.

Mode of Delivery This course uses a combination of lecture with discussion and feedback, textbooks, workbooks, supplemental hand-outs, group and peer discussion, instructor led laboratory/clinical exercises, multi-media materials, videos, animations and PowerPoint presentations.

Text Book (s) Bertino, A. J., & Bertino, P. N. (2016). Forensic Science: Fundamentals & investigations. Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Educational Resources (Instructional material & References)

Class Lectures and handouts. Other recommended books include:

1. Brown, R. M., & Davenport, J. S. (2016). Forensic science: Advanced investigations. Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

2. Katz, E., &Halamek, J. (2016). Forensic Science: Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Engineering. Wiley.

3. Siegel, J. A. (2016). Forensic Science: A beginner's guide. Oxford : Oneworld Publications,

4. Taylor, D., Abarno, D., Rowe, E., Taylor, D., Abarno, D., Rowe, E., & Rask-Nielsen, L. (July 01, 2016). Observations of DNA transfer within

43 | P a g e

an operational Forensic Biology Laboratory. Forensic Science International: Genetics, 23, 33-49.

https://nij.ojp.gov/about-nij/about-nijs-office-investigative-and-forensic-sciences

Method of Evaluation Grades for Bio- 390 will be based upon points accumulated during: 6. lecture exams 7. laboratory exams 8. Individual laboratory exercises and by successfully completing

selected extra credit assignments. 9. Midterm & Final Exams

A = 90-100 B= 80-89 C= 70-79 D= 60-69 F= less than 60

Teaching Method This will be a hybrid or blended class. The common lecture time is three hours. This class will meet twice as per designated schedule. The student is responsible for reading the chapter and following the attached work plan. The face-to-face time will be used for clarification of points, answering questions, and working with the concepts that the students investigated on their own. Further explanation and clarification will be given in class.

Classroom Requirements

NO electronic devices including cell phones are permitted in lecture

or lab unless with instructor’s permission.

There will be NO make-up exams. Students are held responsible for

any class or lab that is missed.

NO instructor drops will be given. Students are responsible for

dropping the course if need be.

A legitimate interest in this topic and the development of a curiosity of how the human body is organized and how it functions is required.

Students are expected to attend all lecture and laboratory sessions and to arrive at these sessions on time. If you miss in excess of 4 lecture sessions without a legitimate excuse, you will be asked to file the necessary paperwork on your own in order to drop the course.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty defined as an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author's work as one's own. Plagiarism is a serious offense and will carry penalties including but not limited to failing an assignment or failing the course.

Participation As is true of most courses, what you get out of this course is highly correlated to what you put into it. Your degree of preparation, class attendance, effort in homework assignments and participation in discussions will all affect how well you do in the course. It is assumed that each student will have read all assigned chapters prior to class meetings.

Lecture Schedule Week 1: Introduction to forensic biology Week 2: Disciplines of forensic sciences Week 3: Forensic toxicology

44 | P a g e

Week 4: Forensic evidence; types and importance Week 5: Documentation, examination and preservation of forensic evidence Week 6: Types of microscopy & their use for the analysis of evidence Week 7: DNA Analyses: Extraction and Quantification of human DNA Week 8: Analysis of human DNA using molecular biology techniques Week 9: Spring Break Week 10: Compare, contrast and explain the genetic and technical differences between various DNA typing techniques (Sequence-based methods) Week 11: Compare, contrast and explain the genetic and technical differences between various DNA typing techniques (nDNA, mDNA, RFLP, SGR) Week 12: Compare, contrast and explain the genetic and technical differences between various DNA typing techniques (Y Chromosomes, NGS) Week 14: Statistical analysis of DNA profile Week 15: Analysis of physical evidence by the crime lab Week 16: Microscopy and serological testing of body fluids Week 17: Final Exam Week

Laboratory Schedule Pertaining to the Theory classes

Exam Schedule:

TBD

Prepared by: ___________________________ Date: 11/23/2020

Reviewed by:___________________________ Date: ___________

2-1-2021

45 | P a g e

Diné College

New Course Request Form

Type in the designated areas. Do not alter any element of the form.

1. Initiator: Drs. Hakim, deSoto & Robinson Date: November 23, 2020

2. Major: Science Minor: Biomedical Sciences

3. To begin: Semester: Fall Academic Year: 2021-2022

Prefix No. Course Title: Cr. Lec. Lab.

BIO 488 Medical Microbiology 4 3 1

4. Course description for the catalog including prerequisites.

Medical aspects of host-parasite relationships in bacterial, mycotic, rickettsial, and viral diseases of

human. This course will cover the challenge presented by various groups of infectious

microorganisms. Serves as a guide to the complex subject of infectious disease; constructs on

fundamental biological principles to examine different agents of disease. Including the modes of

transmission, interaction of pathogens with the host immune system, and the ecological factors

facilitating or inhibiting the emergence of epidemic disease, their prognosis, diagnosis and treatment.

A wide variety of diagnostic techniques including culturing, staining, ELISA, Immuno-

chromatography, PCR/RT-PCR, Immuno-electrophoresis, and Western blotting will be taught in

laboratories. Prerequisite: BIO-181, BIO-205, CHM-301, CHM-302

5. Explain the reason/rational for developing this course.

Current list of courses offered at DC does not have any advance level course that provides detailed

and much deeper knowledge of Clinical/ Medical Microbiology that is required for majority of

biomedical sciences professions. Therefore, to fulfill the need of proposed BS in biomedical sciences

program we feel that we have developed this course and want to offer this course at School of STEM,

DC.

6. State concisely how this course fits with the mission and goals of the college.

46 | P a g e

The proposed Course is developed in complete alignment with DINĔ College Vision and Mission, that

states “Through the principles and values of Sa’ah Naaghai Bik’eh Hozhoon, rooted in Diné language

and culture, our mission is “to advance quality post-secondary student learning and development to

ensure the well-being of the Diné People, and to improve continuously our programs and services to

make Diné College the exemplary higher education institution for the Diné People”.

7. Instructional methodology: describe procedures for presenting the content and any special

needs or limitations of the course.

The learning style will be cognitive in nature, meaning there will be aspects of memorization,

comprehension, and application. The concepts will be based on the SNBH paradigm and have a

classroom lecture style curriculum but will also include hands on learning, Laboratory

experimentation, summer internships and classroom presentations from subject matter experts in

the area of biomedical sciences.

8. Will approval of this course necessitate a program change? Explain fully any program change or

any other relationship of the proposed course to a program.

No, this is a newly proposed course that will fulfill the requirements of newly proposed “BS in

Biomedical Sciences Program”.

9. Provide evidence of articulation within the college regarding the proposed new course.

This is a new course, no articulation available.

10. Identify similar course(s):

a. Offered at DC.

No similar course offered at DC

b. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico community colleges.

No similar upper level courses offered at Arizona/ New Mexico Community Colleges

c. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico universities.

Arizona State University offers similar course for their BS in biomedical Sciences and BS in

Microbiology programs with same course number and title (BIO-488C Medical Microbiology).

Our proposed BS in biomedical sciences program will provide the foundation for multiple

medical sciences programs including MD, PhD and masters in microbiology, molecular biology

and infection control that is why we are adopting that course according to make our BS

biomedical sciences program marketable.

11. For courses that are intended to transfer, provide evidence (Major Change Form) that you have

contacted at least one of the universities near the reservation for an initial assessment of the

transferability of the course.

Since this is a new program and new course is in articulation with other Arizona Institutes, we

47 | P a g e

do not think there will be any issue in course transfer if needed.

12. Program/College Impact: Include staffing requirements, capital equipment requirements, facility

additions or modifications, classroom availability.

No adverse impact, we at School of STEM already have faculty with background in Microbiology/

clinical sciences and medicine that can easily take care of this course. This course will be adjusted

along with available laboratory and classroom facilities for other science courses offered at School of

STEM, DC.

13. Attach a Course Content Display.

Attached

Date of Curriculum Committee Meeting

Recommendations:

Vote: in favor oppose abstain

CURRICULUM APPROVAL PROCESS

Signature: School Dean Date

Signature: Curriculum Committee Chair Date

Signature: Provost Date

2-1-2021

2.09.21

48 | P a g e

Semester Fall 2021, August

Course Code BIO-488

Course Name Medical Microbiology

Course Section and Credit hours

4 credit hrs

Revision Date November 23, 2020

Faculty TBD

Cell Phone #

Office Phone # 1-928-283-5113 Ext:

Email TBD

Office hours TBD

Theory Class meeting time & Location

TBD

Laboratory meeting time & Location

TBD

Course Program(s) BS Biomedical Sciences

Course Pre requisites BIO-181, BIO-205, CHM-301, CHM-302

Course Description Medical/ clinical aspects of host-parasite relationships in bacterial, mycotic, rickettsial, and viral diseases of human. This course will cover the challenge presented by various groups of infectious microorganisms. Serves as a guide to the complex subject of infectious disease; constructs on fundamental biological principles to examine different agents of disease. Including the modes of transmission, interaction of pathogens with the host immune system, and the ecological factors facilitating or inhibiting the emergence of epidemic disease, their prognosis, diagnosis and treatment. A wide variety of diagnostic techniques including culturing, staining, ELISA, Immuno-chromatography, PCR/RT-PCR, Immuno-electrophoresis, and Western blotting will be taught in laboratories.

Course Contents There will be no textbook for this class but a series of papers from peer-reviewed journals, Promed.org, case studies from ASM, ISID and ASCP etc. will be used throughout this class, with emphasize on the underlying mechanisms of pathogen maintenance and emergence. Thus, a fundamental background/understanding of how the host defends itself against infection (Immunology) is paramount to the initial understanding of disease processes.

Course Goals as Related to SNBH

Course goals will be related to the Dine Educational Philosophy, Sa’ah Naaghei Bek’eh Hozhoon.

Nitsahakees, Nahat’a, Iina, and Siih Hasin are processes found in all aspects of nature. Students will understand themselves through the teachings of Naayee’eek’ehgo Na’nitin (protection way teaching) and Hozhoojik’ehgo Na’nitin (blessing way teachings).

49 | P a g e

The goal of this course is to develop within the students a working knowledge of biology that can be incorporated into their lives. The following four step process will be developed and will consist of:

9) Preparing ourselves mentally by clearly envisioning and conceiving of our goals and desires in the context of our world and our universe;

10) Generating plans, images, and models by which we can achieve these goals

11) Living and working with the course material in the context of our plans and goals; and

12) Reflecting on what we have achieved and learned so that we can develop greater understandings of ourselves, our world, and our universe.

Specific Objectives for Students

Upon completion of this course the student will:

Demonstrate understanding of interaction of the host and parasite (infectious microorganism) within the realm of medical microbiology

Search and synthesize peer-reviewed literature in infectious disease ecology and evolution

Ask a scientific question and develop an hypothesis to answer the question

Design an experiment to test the hypothesis

Carry out the experiment, collect and analyze the data

Write up and report the results

Solve the mysteries behind case studies

Mode of Delivery This course uses a combination of lectures and guest presentations with discussion and feedback, textbooks, workbooks, supplemental hand-outs, group and peer discussion, instructor led laboratory/clinical exercises, multi-media materials, videos, animations and PowerPoint presentations.

Text Book (s) No specific text book is recommended

Educational Resources (Instructional material & References)

Promed.org (http://www.promedmail.org/), REGISTER!!! This Week in Virology (TWiV), http://www.twiv.tv/ This Week in Microbiology (TWiM), http://www.microbeworld.org/podcasts/this-week-in-microbiology This Week in Parasitism (TWiP), http://www.microbeworld.org/podcasts/this-week-in-parasitism www.asm.org www.ascp.org Clinical Microbiology Manual (ASM press) latest edition.

50 | P a g e

Infectious Disease Ecology: Effects of Ecosystems on disease and of Disease on Ecosystems, Rick Ostfeld The Ecology of Wildlife Disease, Peter Hudson Disease Ecology: Community Structure and Pathogen Dynamics, Sharon Collinge and Chris Ray Spillover, David Quammen

Method of Evaluation Grades for BIO-488 will be based upon points accumulated during: 10. lecture exams 11. laboratory exams 12. Individual laboratory exercises and by successfully completing

selected extra credit assignments. 13. Midterm & Final Exams

A = 90-100 B= 80-89 C= 70-79 D= 60-69 F= less than 60

Teaching Method This will be a hybrid or blended class. The common lecture time is three hours. This class will meet twice as per designated schedule. The student is responsible for reading the chapter and following the attached work plan. The face-to-face time will be used for clarification of points, answering questions, and working with the concepts that the students investigated on their own. Further explanation and clarification will be given in class.

Classroom Requirements

NO electronic devices including cell phones are permitted in lecture

or lab unless with instructor’s permission.

There will be NO make-up exams. Students are held responsible for

any class or lab that is missed.

NO instructor drops will be given. Students are responsible for

dropping the course if need be.

A legitimate interest in this topic and the development of a curiosity of how the human body is organized and how it functions is required.

Students are expected to attend all lecture and laboratory sessions and to arrive at these sessions on time. If you miss in excess of 4 lecture sessions without a legitimate excuse, you will be asked to file the necessary paperwork on your own in order to drop the course.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty defined as an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author's work as one's own. Plagiarism is a serious offense and will carry penalties including but not limited to failing an assignment or failing the course.

Participation As is true of most courses, what you get out of this course is highly correlated to what you put into it. Your degree of preparation, class attendance, effort in homework assignments and participation in discussions will all affect how well you do in the course. It is assumed that each student will have read all assigned chapters prior to class meetings.

51 | P a g e

Lecture Schedule Week 1: Introduction & course overview Week 2: Pathogens and Host-Pathogen interaction Week 3: Immunology I Week 4: Immunology II and diagnostics Week 5: Disease Modeling I (epidemiology vs ecology, R0) Week 6: Disease Modeling II (spatial epi) Week 7: Spillover (zoonosis) and multi-host systems Week 8: Community ecology, disease dynamics and dilution Week 9: Spring Break Week 10: Intro to Pathogen Evolution Week 11: Vector-borne: Plague and Lyme Disease Week 12: Food –borne: Listeriosis and E. coli (O:157) Week 14: Water-borne: Negleria and Giardiasis Week 15: Rabies virus and other Lyssavirus Week 16: Ebola and Coronaviruses Week 17: Final Exam Week

Laboratory Schedule Pertaining to the Theory classes

Exam Schedule:

TBD

Prepared by: ___________________________ Date: 11/23/2020

Reviewed by:___________________________ Date: ___________

2-1-2021

52 | P a g e

Diné College

New Course Request Form

Type in the designated areas. Do not alter any element of the form.

1. Initiator: Drs. Hakim, deSoto & Robinson Date: November 23, 2020

2. Major: Science Minor: Biomedical Sciences

3. To begin: Semester: Fall Academic Year: 2021-2022

Prefix No. Course Title: Cr. Lec. Lab.

BIO 495 Cancer Biology 4 3 1

4. Course description for the catalog including prerequisites.

Fundamental elements of cancer development and progression will be the focus of this course. Basic

biochemical and genetic mechanisms of tumorigenesis, including genomic instability, principles of

tumor cell invasion and growth dysregulation will be emphasized. The lectures will be organized into

4 broad thematic groups: A) Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms (e.g., tumor suppressor and oncogene

function, DNA repair pathways, senescence, apoptosis); B) Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms (e.g.,

tumor microenvironment, hypoxia, angiogenesis); C) Organ Systems (e.g., pancreatic cancer,

hematopoietic malignancies); and D) Therapeutic Approaches (e.g. protein kinase inhibitors,

immunotherapy, radiation therapy). Prerequisites: BIO181, BIO 340 or BIO344, CHM 310, BIO360,

BIO488.

5. Explain the reason/rational for developing this course.

Current list of courses offered at DC does not have any course that specifically train our students in

Cancer biology and provides basic and fundamental knowledge of this important field of science that

is now a center of many healthcare fields and research. This basic background is also needed for

majority of professional pathways in biomedical sciences. That is why it is very important to develop

this course for our DC students.

6. State concisely how this course fits with the mission and goals of the college.

The proposed Course is developed in complete alignment with DINĔ College Vision and Mission, that

states “Through the principles and values of Sa’ah Naaghai Bik’eh Hozhoon, rooted in Diné language

53 | P a g e

and culture, our mission is “to advance quality post-secondary student learning and development to

ensure the well-being of the Diné People, and to improve continuously our programs and services to

make Diné College the exemplary higher education institution for the Diné People”.

7. Instructional methodology: describe procedures for presenting the content and any special

needs or limitations of the course.

The learning style will be cognitive in nature, meaning there will be aspects of memorization,

comprehension, and application. The concepts will be based on the SNBH paradigm and have a

classroom lecture style curriculum but will also include hands on learning, Laboratory

experimentation, summer internships and classroom presentations from subject matter experts in

the area of biomedical sciences and Bioinformatics.

8. Will approval of this course necessitate a program change? Explain fully any program change or

any other relationship of the proposed course to a program.

No, this is a newly proposed course that will fulfill the requirements of newly proposed “BS in

Biomedical Sciences Program”.

9. Provide evidence of articulation within the college regarding the proposed new course.

This is a new course, no articulation available.

10. Identify similar course(s):

a. Offered at DC.

BIO-165 Cancer Prevention and Control is an entry level course offered at School of

STEM, DC

b. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico community colleges.

No community colleges offer this upper level course in bioinformatics.

c. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico universities.

The University of New Mexico offers similar course (BIO 515 – Cancer biology) with same course

number and title. Our proposed BS in biomedical sciences program will provide the foundation

for multiple Medical/ Health sciences programs including MD, PhD and masters in molecular

biology/ molecular genetics/ microbiology, infection control, and clinical laboratory sciences

etc., that is why we are adopting that course according to the importance based need of the

course in BS biomedical sciences program.

11. For courses that are intended to transfer, provide evidence (Major Change Form) that you have

contacted at least one of the universities near the reservation for an initial assessment of the

transferability of the course.

Since this is a new program and new course is in articulation with other Institutes

54 | P a g e

(eg., UNM), we do not think there will be any issue in course transfer if needed.

12. Program/College Impact: Include staffing requirements, capital equipment requirements, facility

additions or modifications, classroom availability.

We at School of STEM already have faculty with background in Medicine, Microbiology/ clinical

sciences/ bioinformatics/ biochemistry and data sciences that can easily take care of this course. This

course will be adjusted along with available computer/science laboratories and classroom facilities

for other science courses offered at School of STEM, DC.

13. Attach a Course Content Display.

Attached

Date of Curriculum Committee Meeting

Recommendations:

Vote: in favor oppose abstain

CURRICULUM APPROVAL PROCESS

Signature: School Dean Date

Signature: Curriculum Committee Chair Date

Signature: Provost Date

2-1-2021

2.09.21

55 | P a g e

Semester Fall 2021, August

Course Code BIO - 495

Course Name Cancer Biology

Course Section and Credit hours

4 credit hrs

Revision Date November 23, 2020

Faculty TBD

Cell Phone #

Office Phone # 1-928-283-5113 Ext:

Email TBD

Office hours TBD

Theory Class meeting time & Location

TBD

Laboratory meeting time & Location

TBD

Course Program(s) BS Biomedical Sciences

Course Pre requisites BIO181, BIO 340 or BIO344, CHM 310, BIO360, BIO488.

Course Description Fundamental elements of cancer development and progression will be the focus of this course. Basic biochemical and genetic mechanisms of tumorigenesis, including genomic instability, principles of tumor cell invasion and growth dysregulation will be emphasized. The lectures will be organized into 4 broad thematic groups: A) Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms (e.g., tumor suppressor and oncogene function, DNA repair pathways, senescence, apoptosis); B) Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms (e.g., tumor microenvironment, hypoxia, angiogenesis); C) Organ Systems (e.g., pancreatic cancer, hematopoietic malignancies); and D) Therapeutic Approaches (e.g. protein kinase inhibitors, immunotherapy, radiation therapy).

Course Contents Will be covered according to the textbook

Course Goals as Related to SNBH

Course goals will be related to the Dine Educational Philosophy, Sa’ah Naaghei Bek’eh Hozhoon.

Nitsahakees, Nahat’a, Iina, and Siih Hasin are processes found in all aspects of nature. Students will understand themselves through the teachings of Naayee’eek’ehgo Na’nitin (protection way teaching) and Hozhoojik’ehgo Na’nitin (blessing way teachings).

The goal of this course is to develop within the students a working knowledge of biology that can be incorporated into their lives. The following four step process will be developed and will consist of:

13) Preparing ourselves mentally by clearly envisioning and conceiving of our goals and desires in the context of our world and our universe;

14) Generating plans, images, and models by which we can achieve these goals

56 | P a g e

15) Living and working with the course material in the context of our plans and goals; and

16) Reflecting on what we have achieved and learned so that we can develop greater understandings of ourselves, our world, and our universe.

Specific Objectives for Students

Upon completion of this course the student will:

Demonstrate understanding of basic principles of Cancer biology

Ask a scientific question and develop an hypothesis to answer the question

Design an experiment to test the hypothesis, carry out the experiment collect and analyze the data, write up and report the results.

Students will describe the process of scientific inquiry, solve the problems scientifically, and learn to communicate the scientific information.

Students will apply scientific thinking to real world problems.

In addition to the theory discussed in lecture, students should learn to synthesize the rational behind cancer development and identify and investigate the root cause that how and which type of sample should be collected and processed to support the evidential values involving science.

Mode of Delivery This course uses a combination of lecture with discussion and feedback, textbooks, workbooks, supplemental hand-outs, group and peer discussion, instructor led laboratory/clinical exercises, multi-media materials, videos, animations and PowerPoint presentations.

Text Book (s) No specific text book, multiple literature reviews and resources as provided by the instructor

Educational Resources (Instructional material & References)

Class Lectures and handouts. Other books , literatures and resources as per instructors recommendation

www.ASCP.org www.AMT.org

Method of Evaluation Grades for Bio- 390 will be based upon points accumulated during: 14. lecture exams 15. laboratory exams 16. Individual laboratory exercises and by successfully completing

selected extra credit assignments. 17. Midterm & Final Exams

A = 90-100 B= 80-89 C= 70-79 D= 60-69 F= less than 60

Teaching Method This will be a hybrid or blended class. The common lecture time is three hours. This class will meet twice as per designated schedule. The student is responsible for reading the chapter and following the attached work plan. The face-to-face time will be used for clarification of points, answering questions, and working with the concepts that the students investigated on their own. Further explanation and clarification will be given in class.

57 | P a g e

Classroom Requirements

NO electronic devices including cell phones are permitted in lecture

or lab unless with instructor’s permission.

There will be NO make-up exams. Students are held responsible for

any class or lab that is missed.

NO instructor drops will be given. Students are responsible for

dropping the course if need be.

A legitimate interest in this topic and the development of a curiosity of how the human body is organized and how it functions is required.

Students are expected to attend all lecture and laboratory sessions and to arrive at these sessions on time. If you miss in excess of 4 lecture sessions without a legitimate excuse, you will be asked to file the necessary paperwork on your own in order to drop the course.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty defined as an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author's work as one's own. Plagiarism is a serious offense and will carry penalties including but not limited to failing an assignment or failing the course.

Participation As is true of most courses, what you get out of this course is highly correlated to what you put into it. Your degree of preparation, class attendance, effort in homework assignments and participation in discussions will all affect how well you do in the course. It is assumed that each student will have read all assigned chapters prior to class meetings.

Lecture Schedule TBD

Laboratory Schedule Pertaining to the Theory classes

Exam Schedule:

TBD

Prepared by: ___________________________ Date: 11/23/2020

Reviewed by:___________________________ Date: ___________

Type text here

2-1-2021

58 | P a g e

Diné College

New Course Request Form

Type in the designated areas. Do not alter any element of the form.

1. Initiator: Drs. Hakim, deSoto & Robinson Date: November 23, 2020

2. Major: Science Minor: Biomedical Sciences

3. To begin: Semester: Fall Academic Year: 2021-2022

Prefix No. Course Title: Cr. Lec. Lab.

BIO 450 Bioinformatics 4 3 1

4. Course description for the catalog including prerequisites.

Bioinformatics focuses on the analysis of DNA/RNA sequence data, and this class will include

discussion of the mathematical, statistical, and computational techniques used in studying genomes

and proteomes. This course teaches biologists the fundamentals of bioinformatics, the application of

the tools of computer science (such as programming languages and databases) to address biological

questions. As biological research becomes increasingly data intensive, literacy in bioinformatics, and

experience using, evaluating, and presenting on bioinformatics tools have become essential skills for

modern biologists. Prerequisite: BIO-181, BIO-182, BIO-205, CHM-301, CHM-302, BIO-344

5. Explain the reason/rational for developing this course.

Current list of courses offered at DC does not have any course that specifically train our students in

bioinformatics and provides basic and fundamental knowledge of this important field of science that

is now a foundation of many data analysis projects. This basic background is also needed for majority

of professional pathways in biomedical sciences. That is why it is very important to develop this

course for our DC students.

6. State concisely how this course fits with the mission and goals of the college.

The proposed Course is developed in complete alignment with DINĔ College Vision and Mission, that

states “Through the principles and values of Sa’ah Naaghai Bik’eh Hozhoon, rooted in Diné language

and culture, our mission is “to advance quality post-secondary student learning and development to

ensure the well-being of the Diné People, and to improve continuously our programs and services to

make Diné College the exemplary higher education institution for the Diné People”.

59 | P a g e

7. Instructional methodology: describe procedures for presenting the content and any special

needs or limitations of the course.

The learning style will be cognitive in nature, meaning there will be aspects of memorization,

comprehension, and application. The concepts will be based on the SNBH paradigm and have a

classroom lecture style curriculum but will also include hands on learning, Laboratory

experimentation, summer internships and classroom presentations from subject matter experts in

the area of biomedical sciences and Bioinformatics.

8. Will approval of this course necessitate a program change? Explain fully any program change or

any other relationship of the proposed course to a program.

No, this is a newly proposed course that will fulfill the requirements of newly proposed “BS in

Biomedical Sciences Program”.

9. Provide evidence of articulation within the college regarding the proposed new course.

This is a new course, no articulation available.

10. Identify similar course(s):

a. Offered at DC.

No similar course offered at DC

b. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico community colleges.

No community colleges offer this upper level course in bioinformatics.

c. Offered at Arizona/New Mexico universities.

Arizona State University offers similar course for their BS programs (BIO 450 – Bioinformatics)

with same course number and title. Our proposed BS in biomedical sciences program will

provide the foundation for multiple Medical/ Health sciences programs including MD, PhD and

masters in molecular biology/ molecular genetics/ microbiology, infection control, and clinical

laboratory sciences etc., that is why we are adopting that course according to the importance

based need of the course in BS biomedical sciences program.

11. For courses that are intended to transfer, provide evidence (Major Change Form) that you have

contacted at least one of the universities near the reservation for an initial assessment of the

transferability of the course.

Since this is a new program and new course is in articulation with other Arizona Institutes

(eg., NAU), we do not think there will be any issue in course transfer if needed.

12. Program/College Impact: Include staffing requirements, capital equipment requirements, facility

additions or modifications, classroom availability.

60 | P a g e

We at School of STEM already have faculty with background in Microbiology/ clinical sciences/

bioinformatics/ biochemistry and data sciences that can easily take care of this course. This course

will be adjusted along with available computer/science laboratories and classroom facilities for other

science courses offered at School of STEM, DC.

13. Attach a Course Content Display.

Attached

Date of Curriculum Committee Meeting

Recommendations:

Vote: in favor oppose abstain

CURRICULUM APPROVAL PROCESS

Signature: School Dean Date

Signature: Curriculum Committee Chair Date

Signature: Provost Date

2-1-2021

2.09.21

61 | P a g e

Semester Fall 2021, August

Course Code BIO - 450

Course Name Bioinformatics

Course Section and Credit hours

4 credit hrs

Revision Date November 23, 2020

Faculty TBD

Cell Phone #

Office Phone # 1-928-283-5113 Ext:

Email TBD

Office hours TBD

Theory Class meeting time & Location

TBD

Laboratory meeting time & Location

TBD

Course Program(s) BS Biomedical Sciences

Course Pre requisites BIO-181, BIO-182, BIO-205, CHM-301, CHM-302, BIO-344

Course Description Bioinformatics focuses on the analysis of DNA/RNA sequence data, and this class will include discussion of the mathematical, statistical, and computational techniques used in studying genomes and proteomes. This course teaches biologists the fundamentals of bioinformatics, the application of the tools of computer science (such as programming languages and databases) to address biological questions. As biological research becomes increasingly data intensive, literacy in bioinformatics, and experience using, evaluating, and presenting on bioinformatics tools have become essential skills for modern biologists. Letter grade only

Course Contents Will be covered according to the textbook

Course Goals as Related to SNBH

Course goals will be related to the Dine Educational Philosophy, Sa’ah Naaghei Bek’eh Hozhoon.

Nitsahakees, Nahat’a, Iina, and Siih Hasin are processes found in all aspects of nature. Students will understand themselves through the teachings of Naayee’eek’ehgo Na’nitin (protection way teaching) and Hozhoojik’ehgo Na’nitin (blessing way teachings).

The goal of this course is to develop within the students a working knowledge of biology that can be incorporated into their lives. The following four step process will be developed and will consist of:

17) Preparing ourselves mentally by clearly envisioning and conceiving of our goals and desires in the context of our world and our universe;

18) Generating plans, images, and models by which we can achieve these goals

19) Living and working with the course material in the context of our plans and goals; and

20) Reflecting on what we have achieved and learned so that we can develop greater understandings of ourselves, our world, and our universe.

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Specific Objectives for Students

Upon completion of this course the student will:

Demonstrate understanding of basic principles of Bioinformatics

Evaluate and apply bioinformatics algorithms for database searching, sequence alignment, sequence clustering and phylogenetic reconstruction

Identify and apply the correct bioinformatics tools to address real-world problems

Initiate, perform, carry out, and present a bioinformatics experiment

Evaluate a research problem or question and apply appropriate bioinformatics tools to find an answer.

In addition to the theory discussed in class, students will be provided with a real microbiome science data set and will use bioinformatics tools and techniques learned throughout the semester to answer several specific microbiome science questions.

Mode of Delivery This course uses a combination of lecture with discussion and feedback, textbooks, workbooks, supplemental hand-outs, group and peer discussion, instructor led laboratory/clinical exercises, multi-media materials, videos, animations and PowerPoint presentations.

Text Book (s) The text book for this class is “An Introduction to Applied Bioinformatics”. This is a free, online book https://readIAB.org

Educational Resources (Instructional material & References)

Class Lectures and handouts. Other recommended books include: http://readiab.org/book/latest/1/ https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/dna-transcription-426/

https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/translation-dna-to-mrna-to-protein-393/ https://www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/psa/ https://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi https://molbiol-tools.ca/Alignments.htm https://realpython.com/jupyter-notebook-introduction/ https://www.anaconda.com/

Method of Evaluation Grades for Bio- 450 will be based upon points accumulated during: 18. lecture exams 19. laboratory exams

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20. Individual laboratory exercises, presentations and by successfully completing selected extra credit assignments.

21. Midterm & Final Exams

A = 90-100 B= 80-89 C= 70-79 D= 60-69 F= less than 60

Teaching Method This will be a hybrid or blended class. The common lecture time is three hours. This class will meet twice as per designated schedule. The student is responsible for reading the chapter and following the attached work plan. The face-to-face time will be used for clarification of points, answering questions, and working with the concepts that the students investigated on their own. Further explanation and clarification will be given in class.

Classroom Requirements

NO electronic devices including cell phones are permitted in lecture

or lab unless with instructor’s permission.

There will be NO make-up exams. Students are held responsible for

any class or lab that is missed.

NO instructor drops will be given. Students are responsible for

dropping the course if need be.

A legitimate interest in this topic and the development of a curiosity of how the human body is organized and how it functions is required.

Students are expected to attend all lecture and laboratory sessions and to arrive at these sessions on time. If you miss in excess of 4 lecture sessions without a legitimate excuse, you will be asked to file the necessary paperwork on your own in order to drop the course.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty defined as an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author's work as one's own. Plagiarism is a serious offense and will carry penalties including but not limited to failing an assignment or failing the course.

Participation As is true of most courses, what you get out of this course is highly correlated to what you put into it. Your degree of preparation, class attendance, effort in homework assignments and participation in discussions will all affect how well you do in the course. It is assumed that each student will have read all assigned chapters prior to class meetings.

Course Content & Lecture Schedule

Course content will include algorithms for biological sequence alignment, sequence database searching, and phylogeny reconstruction; working with Illumina DNA sequencing data; microbiome science; and introductory computer programming. Students will develop skills with tools including Jupyter Notebooks, Python 3, BLAST, scikit-bio, and QIIME 2. This will be achieved through lectures, labs and associated quizzes, in-class hands-on bioinformatics exercises, homework assignments, and group presentations where students will analyze real world microbiome data and learn to write a report that addresses several specific scientific questions. Week 1: Introduction: Biological data and biological information Week 2: Using the IPython Notebook and IAB; in-class exercise, (please bring your laptop if possible)

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Week 3: Biological information Week 4: Biological information, using the IPython Notebook Week 5: Introduction to sequence evolution Week 6: Pairwise sequence alignment Week 7: Pairwise sequence alignment Week 8: Sequence homology searching Week 9: Spring Break Week 10: Sequence homology searching Week 11: Multiple sequence alignment Week 12: Multiple sequence alignment Week 13: Machine Learning for Biological Classification Tasks Week 14: Phylogenetic reconstruction Week 15: Amplicon sequencing and microbiome science Week 16: Amplicon sequencing and microbiome science Week 17: Final Exam Week

Laboratory Schedule Pertaining to the Theory classes

Exam Schedule:

TBD

Prepared by: ___________________________ Date: 11/23/2020

Reviewed by:___________________________ Date: ___________

2-1-2021


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