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BSITSEC 4.20.2009 1 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY EMPHASIS STUDENT PROGRAM GUIDE The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (IT) provides a solid foundation in computer information systems and technologies, including programming, web systems, project management, networks, operating systems, databases, and security. In addition to the IT content, the degree program includes a broad, collegiate- level education. The program is primarily designed for those who have some technical knowledge and are ready to move to increased levels of expertise and responsibility in the information technology field. The IT component of the Bachelor of Science program consists of four domains of study: IT fundamentals, software, networks and IT project management. There are eight areas of study (sub-domains) that students master including IT fundamentals, operating systems, software, networks, database, web systems, security, and project management. At the end of the program, students develop a comprehensive portfolio and complete a capstone project. Students who are seeking a specialization in one of the sub-domains of software, networks, database or security can complete the basic IT degree program and pass additional assessments to earn one of these designated emphases. Students seeking the BS ITSecurity Emphasis demonstrates additional competencies in this area by taking and passing a specific industry certification exam, the Microsoft 70-298: Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network. Students who have passed this exam prior to enrollment will have the requirement waived. Understanding the Competency-Based Approach Practically speaking, what does it mean when we say that WGU programs are competency-based? Unlike in traditional universities, WGU does not award degrees based upon credit hours or upon a certain set of required courses. Instead, students earn their degrees by demonstrating their skills, knowledge, and understanding of important concepts through a series of carefully designed assessments. Progress through your degree program is governed, not by classes, but by satisfactory completion of the required assessments that demonstrate your mastery of the competencies. Of course, you will need to engage in learning experiences as you brush up on competencies or develop knowledge and skills in areas in which you are weak. For that, WGU has a rich array of learning resources that you may engage, under the direction of your mentor. You will work closely with your mentor to schedule your program for completing the assessments. (We discuss assessments in much more detail later in this guide.) You will work closely with additional faculty members as you proceed through Courses of Study that are designed to lead you through the content that you must master in order to pass individual assessments. The benefit of this competency-based system is that it makes it possible for people who are knowledgeable about a particular subject to make accelerated progress toward completing a WGU degree even if they lack college experience. You may have gained your skills and knowledge of a subject on the job, by accumulating wisdom through years of life experience, or, indeed, by taking a course on a particular subject. But WGU awards a degree to you based on the skills and knowledge that you possess and can demonstrate, not the number of credits you have on your transcript. Accreditation Western Governors University is the only university in the history of American higher education to have earned accreditation from four regional accrediting commissions. WGU's accreditation was awarded by: (1) the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, (2) the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, (3) the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, and (4) the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The University’s accreditation status is now managed by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. The University is also accredited by the Distance Education
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Page 1: Bachelor of Science, Information Technology Security Emphasis

BSITSEC 4.20.2009 1

BBAACCHHEELLOORR OOFF SSCCIIEENNCCEE,, IINNFFOORRMMAATTIIOONN TTEECCHHNNOOLLOOGGYY

SSEECCUURRIITTYY EEMMPPHHAASSIISS STUDENT PROGRAM GUIDE

The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (IT) provides a solid foundation in computer information systems and technologies, including programming, web systems, project management, networks, operating systems, databases, and security. In addition to the IT content, the degree program includes a broad, collegiate-level education. The program is primarily designed for those who have some technical knowledge and are ready to move to increased levels of expertise and responsibility in the information technology field. The IT component of the Bachelor of Science program consists of four domains of study: IT fundamentals, software, networks and IT project management. There are eight areas of study (sub-domains) that students master including IT fundamentals, operating systems, software, networks, database, web systems, security, and project management. At the end of the program, students develop a comprehensive portfolio and complete a capstone project. Students who are seeking a specialization in one of the sub-domains of software, networks, database or security can complete the basic IT degree program and pass additional assessments to earn one of these designated emphases.

Students seeking the BS IT—Security Emphasis demonstrates additional competencies in this area by taking and passing a specific industry certification exam, the Microsoft 70-298: Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network. Students who have passed this exam prior to enrollment will have the requirement waived.

UUnnddeerrssttaannddiinngg tthhee CCoommppeetteennccyy--BBaasseedd AApppprrooaacchh Practically speaking, what does it mean when we say that WGU programs are competency-based? Unlike in traditional universities, WGU does not award degrees based upon credit hours or upon a certain set of required courses. Instead, students earn their degrees by demonstrating their skills, knowledge, and understanding of important concepts through a series of carefully designed assessments. Progress through your degree program is governed, not by classes, but by satisfactory completion of the required assessments that demonstrate your mastery of the competencies. Of course, you will need to engage in learning experiences as you brush up on competencies or develop knowledge and skills in areas in which you are weak. For that, WGU has a rich array of learning resources that you may engage, under the direction of your mentor. You will work closely with your mentor to schedule your program for completing the assessments. (We discuss assessments in much more detail later in this guide.) You will work closely with additional faculty members as you proceed through Courses of Study that are designed to lead you through the content that you must master in order to pass individual assessments. The benefit of this competency-based system is that it makes it possible for people who are knowledgeable about a particular subject to make accelerated progress toward completing a WGU degree even if they lack college experience. You may have gained your skills and knowledge of a subject on the job, by accumulating wisdom through years of life experience, or, indeed, by taking a course on a particular subject. But WGU awards a degree to you based on the skills and knowledge that you possess and can demonstrate, not the number of credits you have on your transcript.

AAccccrreeddiittaattiioonn Western Governors University is the only university in the history of American higher education to have earned accreditation from four regional accrediting commissions. WGU's accreditation was awarded by: (1) the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, (2) the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, (3) the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, and (4) the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The University’s accreditation status is now managed by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. The University is also accredited by the Distance Education

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and Training Council (DETC), and the WGU Teachers College is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

TThhee AAccaaddeemmiicc AAccttiioonn PPllaann ((AAAAPP)) The focus of your program is your Academic Action Plan (AAP). The AAP is a detailed blueprint of the learning resources and assessments that comprise your program. The length of your program depends upon both the amount of new information to be learned and the amount of time you plan to devote each week to study. Students will vary widely in the specific skills and information they need to learn. For example, some may be highly knowledgeable in a subject matter area and would not need to engage in new learning opportunities. Others may find that portions of the program require completely new learning and that they need to take an online class or participate in a study module to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to pass the program competencies in that area. Some individuals may be able to devote as little as 15-20 hours per week to the program, while others may have more time. For this reason, you will complete pre-assessments to help your Mentor form a profile of your prior knowledge and experience for use in creating your AAP.

WWGGUU’’ss MMeennttoorriinngg AApppprrooaacchh Our mentoring approach is a powerful component of the WGU educational experience. When you enroll at WGU, you will begin interacting with your personal mentor, community mentors, and support staff. Your mentor takes an active role and a personal interest in your success. Whether by email or phone, your mentor will be your “point person” of communication throughout your program. Your mentor will help motivate you to work hard to complete your program. When you have questions or concerns, your mentor team will help you resolve them. You and your mentor will work together to evaluate your educational background, strengths, and weaknesses. With this analysis, your mentors will help determine in which areas you are already competent (and can move quickly to assessment) and those you need to work on; this will become your personalized AAP. Your mentor will suggest the best learning resources for you (courses, texts, independent study modules, etc.) in your AAP for each major component of your degree. As you proceed through your academic program, your mentor and you will determine when you are ready for the required assessments. If you are ready, your assessment will be scheduled. You will follow this same process as you proceed through each domain.

CCoonnnneeccttiinngg wwiitthh OOtthheerr MMeennttoorrss aanndd FFeellllooww SSttuuddeennttss As you proceed through your AAP, you may also have direct contact with other faculty members. These communications can take a variety of forms, including participation in learning communities, office hours, and webinars. As a WGU student, you will have access to your own personal MY.WGU portal that provides a gateway to learning communities and program communities where you will have these interactions as well as interactions with other students. Learning communities are specifically designed to support you as you develop competence in preparation for your assessments through the utilization of threaded discussions, blogs, and chats that are guided by content experts. You will access your program community during the Education Without Boundaries introductory course to network with peers who are enrolled in your program and receive continued support through professional enrichment and program-specific chats, blogs, and discussions. WGU also provides a Student Services Associate to help you and your mentor solve any special problems that may arise.

EEdduuccaattiioonn WWiitthhoouutt BBoouunnddaarriieess

Education Without Boundaries (EWB) is a required introductory course that focuses on acquainting the student with WGU’s competency-based model, distance education, technology, and other resources and tools available for students. You will also utilize tutorials, message boards, online chats and other activities to connect with other students in your program. During the EWB course you will be introduced to your mentor and you will develop your Academic Action Plan.

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TTrraannssffeerraabbiilliittyy ooff PPrriioorr CCoolllleeggee CCoouurrsseewwoorrkk Because WGU is a competency-based institution, it does not award degrees based upon credits but upon demonstration of competency. However, if you have completed college coursework at another accredited institution, you may have your transcripts evaluated and may be able to have some lower-division or co-requisite assessments cleared. The guidelines for determining what will “clear” through transfer vary based upon the degree program. The following guidelines generally apply: Upper-division degree requirements cannot be cleared through prior college work. However, students who have already demonstrated competence by passing certain industry certification exams within the past five years may “clear” some of the upper-division assessments. The certifications that will clear WGU requirements vary by program. WGU does not clear any requirements based upon a student's professional experience and does not perform a "resume review" or "portfolio review" that will automatically clear any degree requirements. Degree requirements and transferability rules are subject to change in order to keep the degree content relevant and current. Remember: WGU's competency-based approach lets you take advantage of your knowledge and skills, regardless of how you learned them. Even when you don't directly receive credit, the knowledge you possess may help you accelerate the time it takes to complete your degree program.

SSaattiissffaaccttoorryy AAccaaddeemmiicc PPrrooggrreessss && CCoonnttiinnuuoouuss EEnnrroollllmmeenntt WGU is a “continuous enrollment” institution, which means you will be automatically enrolled in each of your new terms while you are at WGU. Your “terms” are six months long and your first term will begin the first day of the month that you enrolled in the EWB introductory course. Longer terms and continuous enrollment allow you to focus on your studies without the hassle of unnatural breaks between shorter terms that you would experience in a more traditional environment. At the end of every six-month term, you and your mentor will review the progress you have made and revise your Academic Action Plan for your next six-month term. WGU requires that students make measurable progress toward the completion of their degree programs every term. We call this “satisfactory academic progress (SAP).” If you are a financial aid student, SAP will be particularly important because you must make SAP in order to maintain eligibility for financial aid. We measure your progress based on the assessments you are able to pass, not on the accumulation of credit hours or course grades. Every time you pass an assessment you are demonstrating that you have mastered skills and knowledge in your degree program. For comparison to traditional grading systems, passing an assessment means you have demonstrated competency equivalent to a “B” grade or better. WGU has assigned competency units to each assessment so that we can track your progress through the program. A competency unit is equivalent to one semester credit of learning. Some assessments may be assigned three competency units while other assessments may be as large as twelve competency units. We will measure your SAP quantitatively by reviewing the number of competency units you have completed each term. Graduate students must enroll in at least 8 competency units each term and undergraduate students must enroll in at least 12 competency units each term. In order to remain in good academic standing you must complete at least 67% of the units you attempt. Additionally, during your first term at WGU you must pass at least three competency units in order to remain eligible for financial aid. We know that SAP is complex, so we will discuss it in greater detail with you during the EWB introductory course and your mentor will provide additional guidance.

AAsssseessssmmeennttss Your AAP will include the assessments to complete your program. To obtain your degree you will be required to demonstrate your skills and knowledge via the following assessments:

Performance Assessments contain, in most cases, multiple tasks such as scored assignments, projects, essays, and research papers. Performance Assessments contain detailed instructions and rubrics for completing each assigned task and are submitted via TaskStream, an online project management and grading tool.

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Objective Assessments are designed to evaluate your knowledge and skills in a domain of knowledge. Most objective assessments include multiple-choice items, multiple selection items, matching, short answer, drag and drop, and point and click item types, as well as case study and video based items. Essay Assessments are used to measure your ability to integrate and apply concepts. Your writing will be scored against competency-based rubrics established by the faculty. Certification Assessments are used to determine competency in specific IT skills. Your program will include certifications from Microsoft, CompTIA, Sun Microsystems, and CIW. These exams may include performance items, simulations, and/or objective exam questions. Each certifying organization sets the passing score that WGU follows to award you credit for earned competencies. More details on individual certification exams will be provided later in this document

As mentioned earlier, we have assigned competency units (CUs) to each assessment in order to measure your academic progress. As an undergraduate student, you will be expected to enroll in a minimum of twelve competency units each term. A standard plan, at 12 units per term, for the program for a student who has no transfer units would look similar to the one on the next page. Your personal progress can be faster, but your pace will be determined by the extent of your transfer units, the time commitment you can make, and your determination to proceed at a faster rate. The standard path below lists the required liberal arts competencies. Your previous courses in these areas will be evaluated for transfer of credit (TOC). You will be notified which competencies have been met by TOC and which ones you need to complete.

SSTTAANNDDAARRDD PPAATTHH FFOORR BBAACCHHEELLOORR OOFF SSCCIIEENNCCEE,,

IINNFFOORRMMAATTIIOONN TTEECCHHNNOOLLOOGGYY——SSEECCUURRIITTYY

CODE ASSESSMENTS CUs TERM EWOB Education Without Boundaries 1

1

WFV1 IT Fundamentals I 3

LAC1 Language and Communication: Foundations 2

LAE1 Language and Communication: Essay 2

LAT1 Language and Communication: Research 2

LUT1 Language and Communication: Presentation 2

INC1 Integrated Natural Sciences 4

2 INT1 Integrated Natural Sciences Applications 4

TEV1 IT Fundamentals II 3

TTV1 IT Fundamentals III 3

QLC1 Quantitative Literacy: College Algebra, Measurement, and Geometry 3

3 QMC1 Quantitative Literacy: Statistics, Probability, and Problem Solving 3

QLT1 Quantitative Literacy: Quantitative Problem Solving and Applications 3

AKV1 Web Programming 3

SSC1 General Education Social Science 1

4

SST1 General Education Social Science: Analysis and Applications 2

HVC1 Literature, Arts and the Humanities 3

HVT1 Literature, Arts and the Humanities: Analysis and Interpretation 3

AAT1 Introduction to Programming Part I 3

LET1 Leadership Concepts and Applications 4 5

CLC1 Reasoning and Problem Solving 3

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CST1 Reasoning and Problem Solving: Analytical Essay 3

ABT1 Introduction to Programming Part II 3

TNV1 Networks I 6 6

ABV1 Operating Systems 6

WSV1 Web Technologies 6 7

WDV1 Database I 6

TPV1 Project Management 6 8

TSV1 Security I 6

MGC1 Principles of Management 4 9 ORC1 Fundamentals of Organizational Behavior and Leadership 4

TWA1 Technical Writing 4

AOV1 Designing Customized Security 6

10 PFI4 IT Portfolio 3

CPW4 IT Capstone Project 9

In this example, the program will take 10 terms for the student to complete. The standard path shown above lists the courses of study (assessments) and the associated competency units by term, but that is only half the story. The AAP will include greater detail about the courses of study including the assessments and their associated standard learning resources.

LLeeaarrnniinngg RReessoouurrcceess You will work with your mentor to select the courses and other learning resources needed to prepare for the required assessments. Some of the classes are taught through outside education providers with whom WGU has made arrangements. The education providers include universities, colleges, training companies, and other learning providers. The cost of many learning resources is included in your tuition, and you can enroll directly in those through your AAP as your mentor has scheduled them. In some instances, the learning materials you use may be independent learning resources (ILRs) such as textbooks, modules, study guides, or tutorials. Some resources (e.g., textbooks) are not covered by your tuition, and you will need to cover those costs separately. WGU has excellent bookstore and library arrangements to help you obtain the needed learning resources.

AREAS OF STUDY WITHIN THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE,

IT—SECURITY EMPHASIS The WGU Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program was developed in consultation with our IT Council, made up of industry experts representing all facets of the discipline from the high-tech business world to national research laboratories. The degree uses industry-endorsed certifications from Microsoft, CompTIA, and CIW, to validate a student’s skill competency. Additionally, the competencies in quantitative literacy, language & communications, and problem solving assure that the graduate has the well-rounded educational background that is required in today's challenging environment. The following section includes the larger domains of knowledge followed by the subject-specific subdomains of knowledge, their associated assessments (followed by the four-character code that is used to identify the assessment), and sample learning resources that have recently been used to help students gain the competencies needed to pass the assessments. Your specific learning resources and level of instructional support will vary based on the individual competencies you bring to the program and your confidence in developing the knowledge, skills and abilities required in each area of the degree. Please note that the learning resources included in the following sections are sample resources that will vary based on your own academic action plan and the resources current at the time you enroll in the program. Learning resources and the AAP are dynamic so you need to review your AAP and seek mentor advice regarding the resources before you purchase them.

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LLiibbeerraall AArrttss DDoommaaiinn The Liberal Arts domain focuses on basic subject matter knowledge that is typically included in baccalaureate level programs. Evaluation of your previous college transcripts may clear assessment requirements for some areas of the Liberal Arts Domain, which could shorten your program of study by removing assessments. To waive or clear a sub-domain, the transcript must show that you have taken equivalent classes in the sub-domain content areas and passed those classes with a ‘C’ grade or higher at an accredited institution of Higher Education.

Liberal Arts Assessments Sample Learning Resources

Language and Communication: Focuses on collegiate reading skills, basic information retrieval skills, writing skills, and speaking skills.

Language and Communication: Foundations (LAC1): Proctored, computer-based objective exam.

Reading, Writing, and Composition with eBooks This online resource includes e-text version of the following texts: Faigley, L. (2007). Writing: A guide for college and beyond. New York: Pearson Longman. ISBN 0-321-39626-X Ruszkiewicz, J., Seward, D. E., & Hairston, M. (2007). SF writer (4th edition). New York: Pearson Longman. ISBN 0-13-233458-5 Smith, B. D. (2007). The Reader’s Handbook: reading strategies for college and everyday life (3rd edition). New York: Pearson Longman. ISBN-10 0321476840

Language and Communication: Essay (LAE1): Proctored, computer-based essay exam.

Language and Communication: Research (LAT1): Performance Assessment that includes writing a research paper.

Language and Communication: Presentation (LUT1): Performance Assessment that includes an oral presentation.

Quantitative Literacy: Content includes numeracy; algebraic concepts; geometry; measurement; statistics and probability; mathematical reasoning; and mathematical problem solving.

Quantitative Literacy: College Algebra, Measurement, and Geometry (QLC1): Proctored, computer-based objective exam.

MyMathLab is online resource that includes e-text version of the following texts: Lial, M., Hornsby, J. & McGinnis, T. (2008). Algebra for College Students.8th ed. Addison-Wesley. ISBN 9780321442543 Bittinger, M. & Beecher J. (2008). Developmental Mathematics: College Mathematics and Introductory Algebra. 7th ed. Addison-Wesley. ISBN 9780321331915 Agresti, A. & Franklin, C. (2006). Statistics: The Art and Science of Learning from Data. 1st ed. Prentice Hall. ISBN 9780130083692

Quantitative Literacy: Statistics, Probability, and Problem Solving (QMC1): Proctored, computer-based objective exam.

Quantitative Literacy: Quantitative Problem Solving and Applications (QLT1): Performance assessment that utilizes quantitative problem solving strategies.

Natural Science: Focuses on scientific concepts and inquiry as well as key concepts across and within the scientific disciplines.

Integrated Natural Sciences (INC1): Proctored, computer-based objective exam.

Integrated Natural Science is an online resource includes e-text version of the following text: Hewitt, P.G., Lyons, S., Suchocki, J. & Yeh, J. (2007). Conceptual Integrated Science. 1st ed. San Francisco: Addison-Wesley. ISBN 0805390383 Thinkwell’s Scientific Inquiry is an online text that communicates the fundamentals of science to students using interactive media.

Integrated Natural Sciences Applications (INT1): Performance assessment that utilizes scientific inquiry and analysis of evidence.

General Education Social Sciences: Content includes social science theory and method; human development and behavior; modern economic, social, and political institutions; and geography and human cultures.

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General Education Social Science (SSC1): Proctored, computer-based objective exam.

General Education Social Sciences is an online interactive module system which allows students to move at their own pace as they work through the content of General Education Social Sciences. This online resource includes e-text versions of the following: Bergman, E., & Renwick, W. (2008) Introduction to Geography: People, Places and Environment. 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ; Pearson Prentice Hall. ISBN-13: 9780132238991 Perry, J., & Perry, E. (2009). Contemporary Society: An Introduction to Social Science. 12th ed. Boston: Pearson Allyn and Bacon. ISBN-13: 9780205578672

General Education Social Science: Analysis and Applications (SST1): Performance assessment that includes analysis and application of social science theories and methods.

Literature, Arts, and the Humanities: Focuses on content, concepts, terminology, methodology, models, and issues within and across the disciplines of the humanities.

Literature, Arts, and the Humanities (HVC1): Proctored, computer-based objective exam.

MindEdge Humanities Learning Resource is an online interactive module system which allows students to move at their own pace as they work through the content of the Humanities. Janaro, Richard Paul & Altshuler, Thelma C. (2009). The Art of Being Human, (9th ed.). New York: Longman. ISBN-10: 0205605427

Literature, Arts, and the Humanities: Analysis and Interpretation (HVT1): Performance assessment that includes subjective and objective analysis and interpretation in the Humanities.

College-Level Reasoning & Problem Solving: Content includes problem identification and clarification; planning and information gathering; assumptions and values; analysis and interpretation of information/data; reaching well-founded conclusions; and identifying the role of critical thinking in the disciplines and professions.

Reasoning & Problem Solving (CLC1): Proctored, computer-based objective exam.

MindEdge Collegiate Level Reasoning and Problem-Solving Skills is an online interactive module system which allows students to move at their own pace as they work through the content of Critical Thinking. Paul, R., & Elder, L. (2006). Critical Thinking: Tools for taking charge of your learning and your life. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ; Pearson Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-114962-8

Reasoning & Problem Solving: Analytical Essay (CST1): Performance assessment includes writing an analytical essay.

OOrrggaanniizzaattiioonnaall BBeehhaavviioorr aanndd MMaannaaggeemmeenntt DDoommaaiinn Understanding how to lead and manage in the business environment is critical to a graduate’s success in the workplace. This domain includes two objective assessments on Principles of Management and Fundamentals of Organizational Behavior and Management. Students are asked to demonstrate the ability to apply these concepts in a series of scenario-based problems in the Leadership Concepts and Applications tasks. Prior coursework does not transfer to meet the requirements of this domain.

Organizational Behavior and Management Assessments

Sample Learning Resources

Organizational Behavior and Management: Focuses on management and leadership concepts and applications.

Fundamentals of Organizational Behavior and Leadership (ORC1): Proctored, computer-based objective exam.

Skillsoft modules on Leadership, Management, Human Resource Management, and Organizational Behavior Bateman, T.S & Snell, S.A. (2007) Leading and Collaborating in the Principles of Management (MGC1): Proctored, computer-

based objective exam.

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Leadership Concepts and Applications (LET1): Performance Assessment.

Competitive World. (7th ed.) New York, NY: McGraw-Hill/Irwin. Robbins, S.P. & Judge, T.A. (2006) Organizational Behavior (12th ed.) Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice-Hall.

IInnffoorrmmaattiioonn TTeecchhnnoollooggyy FFuunnddaammeennttaallss DDoommaaiinn This domain covers the foundations of the field of information technology. It prepares the student for the subject matter sub-domains of the program. To clear a sub-domain, the transcript must show that you have taken equivalent classes in the sub-domain content areas and passed those courses with a ‘C’ grade or higher at an accredited institution of higher education. Certain industry certifications will also transfer or clear a sub-domain.

IT Fundamentals Assessments Sample Learning Resources

IT Fundamentals: Content includes computing fundamentals and programming concepts.

IT Fundamentals I (WFV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric/Pearson Vue Testing Center, computer-based CIW Foundations Exam.

CIW v5 foundations Self Study Kit

Network Technology Foundations

Internet Business Foundations

Site Development Foundations

LearnKey CompTIA A+ Certification Course 12 Online Sessions, support materials (workbook and practice exams), plus a recommended text. Each session has a pre-test, set of one or more labs, and a post-test. Recommended Text: A+ Certification All-In-One Exam Guide, Sixth Ed.

IT Fundamentals II (TEV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric/Pearson Vue Testing Center, computer-based CompTIA A+ Essentials Exam.

IT Fundamentals III (TTV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric/Pearson Vue Testing Center, computer-based CompTIA A+ 220-602 exam.

WWeebb DDeevveellooppmmeenntt DDoommaaiinn This domain builds competencies in web site design and development.

Web Development Assessments Sample Learning Resources

Web Development: This sub-domain covers skills and concepts students need to know to plan for and implement web-based technologies. Scripting languages are covered.

Web Programming (AKV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer-based CIW JavaScript Fundamentals Exam.

JavaScript Student Guide by ComputerPrep LearnKey video expert series:

JavaScript for Developers Part 1

JavaScript for Developers Part 2 CIW v5 Site Designer Self Study by ComputerPrep Including the ProSoft LiveLabs (Virtual Labs) software simulations and the VCampus online practice question engine. SkillSoft Modules: JavaScript Client-Side Scripting • JavaScript: Language Basics • JavaScript: Scripting • Design Concepts for Web Sites • Advanced HTML Design Elements • Advanced Technology Concepts for Web Designers • Getting Started With Frontpage 2003-Working With Graphics, Hyperlinks and Tables in

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Web Technologies (WSV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer-based CIW Site Designer Exam.

Frontpage 2003 • Working with Web Sites in Frontpage 2003-Organizing Content using templates and Frames in Frontpage 2003 • Working with Code in Frontpage 2003 • Importing Data in Frontpage 2003 • Enhancing Web Sites with Advanced Frontpage 2003 Features • Setting Up a Site and Adding Content in Dreamweaver Mx 2004 • Adding Links, Images, and Flash Objects in Dreamweaver Mx 2004 • Reusing Content in Dreamweaver Mx 2004 • Creating Interactive Web Pages in Dreamweaver Mx 2004 • Site Testing and Maintenance in Dreamweaver Mx 2004 • Working with Images in Macromedia Fireworks Mx 2004 • Using Fireworks Mx With Dreamweaver Mx and Flash Mx • Intro to Creating Graphics in Flash Mx 2004 • Using Text in Flash Mx 2004 • Animation, Sound and Video in Flash Mx 2004 Movies • Navigation and Movies in Flash Mx 2004

LearnKey video expert series: The World Wide Web Session • Design Principles Session • Design Layout Session • Design Process • History of HTML Session • Metadata • Using Images • Working with Mulitmedia Session • Multimedia Tools • HTML Tables • Working with Frames • Cascading Style Sheets • Creating CSS Rules Session • Using CSS • Working in Frontpage Session • Exploring Dreamweaver Session • Design in Dreamweaver Session • Enhance in Dreamweaver • Macromedia HomeSite • Working with Plug-ins Session • Paint Shop Pro Session • Exploring Flash Session • Working with Flash • Scripting Languages Session • JavaScripts Basics Session • Java Basics Session • XML Basics • Server Administration Session • Cookies and Publishing Session • Using Databases

Atomic Learning

Front Page

Dreamweaver MeasureUp: Computer-based Training

SSyysstteemmss AAddmmiinniissttrraattiioonn aanndd MMaannaaggeemmeenntt DDoommaaiinn This domain covers operating systems, project management, networking and information security.

Systems Administration and Management Assessments

Sample Learning Resources

Operating Systems: This sub-domain covers skills and concepts in relation to implementing, administering and troubleshooting information systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows Vista.

Operating Systems (ABV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer-based Microsoft 70-620 exam.

MCTS Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-620): Configuring Windows Vista Client By Walter Glenn, Ian McLean and Orin Thomas Microsoft Press Copyright Microsoft Corporation © 2007 ISBN: 9780735623903

Project Management: This sub-domain covers skills and concepts students need to know to plan and implement projects. The project initiation and planning process is covered in-depth, culminating in the creation of a project schedule. Learning how to manage business concerns such as cost and risk is balanced by thorough coverage of best practices in managing people and resources. Students will also learn how to manage change and the steps necessary in closing a project.

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Project Management (TPV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer-based CompTIA Project+ Exam.

LearnKey video expert series: Project Management Professional 2005 course Project 2003 course SkillSoft Modules: An Introduction to Project Management • Project Life Cycles and Stakeholders • Project Management Essentials • Managing the Execution and Control of IT Projects • Project Management for Non-project Managers • Cost Management and IT Project Trade-offs • Initiating a Project and Preparing the Project Plan • Project Management for IT Professionals • Project Integration: Executing and Completing a Project • Project IT Management: The Early Stages • Project IT Management: Design to Rollout • Elements of Project Time Management • Estimating Activity Costs Planning Project Scope

MeasureUp: Computer-based Training.

Heldman, W. and Cram, L. (2004). IT Project+ Study Guide.

Network I: This sub-domain covers skills and concepts to include features and functions of networking components, knowledge and skills needed to install, configure and troubleshoot basic networking hardware protocols and services. Additionally, concepts including media and topologies, protocols, standards, network implementation and network support are covered.

Networks I (TNV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer-based CompTIA Network+ exam.

CompTIA Network+ Certification, 2009 edition Annotated Instructor’s Edition by ILT Series ISBN10: 1-4260-0609-8 ISBN13: 1-4260-0609-8

Security I: This sub-domain covers industry-wide topics to include general security concepts, network infrastructure security, access control, assessments & audits, cryptography and organizational security.

Security I (TSV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer-based CompTIA Security+ exam.

ComputerPrep: CompTIA Security+ Certification, 2008 Edition (Instructors Edition) ILT Series, 2008 Text: CompTIA Security+ Study Guide, Fourth Edition, by Emmett Dulaney, Sybex 2009. ISBN: 978-0-470-37297-5 Text: CompTIA Security+ Review Guide, by James Michael Stewart, Sybex 2009. ISBN: 978-0-470-40484-3 Text: Security Administrator Street Smarts, Second Edition, by David R. Miller and Michael Gregg, Sybex 2009. ISBN: 978-0-470-40485-0

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DDaattaabbaasseess DDoommaaiinn This domain builds on competencies in database theories and practice with relational database concepts.

Databases Assessments Sample Learning Resources

Database I: This sub-domain covers skills and concepts students need to know to understand the structure and analysis of databases.

Database I (WDV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer-based CIW Database Specialist.

Measureup: Computer-based Training Computer Prep: Textbook Computer Prep Online Practice Exams and Exercises: Modules Learnkey: Modules Skillsoft: Modules

SSooffttwwaarree DDeevveellooppmmeenntt DDoommaaiinn This domain builds on competencies in software development and practice with the object-oriented language Java.

Software Development Assessments Sample Learning Resources

Introduction to Programming Part I: This sub-domain covers skills and concepts students need to know to understand the basic syntax and structure of the Java programming language.

Introduction to Programming Part I (AAT1): This is a performance assessment in which students develop a portfolio of Java applications.

Skillsoft 24x7Books: Big Java by Cay Horstmann ISBN:9780470105542 Sun Academic Initiative https://sailearningconnection.skillport.com/

Introduction to Programming Part II (ABT1): This is a culminating activity that results in the student developing one or more Java applications with documentation.

SSeeccuurriittyy EEmmpphhaassiiss AArreeaa Students pursuing a bachelor of science in Information Technology may elect this emphasis area. It enables them to obtain an additional certification while they earn their Bachelor’s degree. Students who have taken and passed the Microsoft 70-298: Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network exam prior to enrollment will have this assessment waived. The domain cannot be cleared through previous college work or professional experience.

Security Emphasis Assessments Sample Learning Resources

Designing Customized Security (AOV1): Proctored at an authorized Prometric Testing Center, computer-based Microsoft Exam 70-298: Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network exam.

Students who do not otherwise have access to a lab setting where they can engage in learning activities and practice their skills, are expected to provide their own small networking system which would consist of at least two desktop or laptop computers—one of which can be frequently reconfigured by installing and deinstalling system and application software. Students are expected to obtain

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all necessary systems and application software. Microsoft makes limited-term licenses (90-120 day) of its software available free. Full-time WGU students are eligible for academic pricing on this software. Purchase of the Microsoft Technet Plus subscription is advised. Prior to starting this area of study, the student will be enrolled in the SkillSoft library of web-based learning resources. The student will also have access to a number of text and reference books in the SkillSoft Books 24x7. Students who require more structured learning activities may purchase the following self-paced training kits: MCSA/MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-298): Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network

TTeecchhnniiccaall WWrriittiinngg The technical requirement allows students to demonstrate that they possess the competencies to think and write in a technical and professional setting. These skills will be integrated into practice through preparation of a technical writing project capstone proposal. This sub-domain cannot be cleared by a course or certification and must be taken by the student prior to the start of work on either the portfolio or project capstone.

Technical Writing Assessments Sample Learning Resources

Technical Writing: The technical writing requirement draws from the evidence students have accumulated in improved proficiency in research and professional written communication; the ability to think about and write for different audiences; and improved style, grammar and syntax.

Technical Writing (TWA1): Performance assessment.

Requirements and instructions for completing the Technical Writing assessment can be obtained from IT Upper-Division Technical Writing, Portfolio, & Capstone community or the student’s mentor.

PPoorrttffoolliioo RReeqquuiirreemmeenntt The Portfolio requirement allows students to demonstrate that they not only posses the competencies of the degree program, but are able to integrate them in practice (through a set of four exhibits-of-work) and to articulate their application in an essay about a current topic.

IT Security Portfolio Requirement (PFI4): The portfolio consists of four artifacts: 1. A written paper about an emerging technology trend 2. A technically prepared curriculum vitae (resume) 3. A technical artifact created during a chosen course of study 4. A second technical artifact created during a chosen course of study.

*Requirements and instructions for completing the Portfolio can be obtained from IT Upper-Division Technical Writing, Portfolio, & Capstone community or the student’s mentor.

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CCaappssttoonnee PPrroojjeecctt The Capstone is the culmination of the student’s WGU degree program. It requires the student to demonstrate the integration and synthesis of competencies in all domains required for the degree, in particular the area of emphasis. It includes a work product specified in consultation with and with the approval of the mentor. It may be a project, a set of policy recommendations, a business plan, a marketing plan, action research, a strategic plan, a product, or a service.

IT Security Capstone Project (CPW4): The Capstone Project consists of a technical work product and a report which details various aspects of that product. The final product will also include a journal which contemporaneously describes the candidate’s experience in developing the Capstone. The topic of the Capstone must be presented and approved by the student’s mentor. *Requirements and instructions for completing the Capstone can be obtained from the student’s mentor.

NNeeeedd MMoorree IInnffoorrmmaattiioonn?? WWGGUU SSttuuddeenntt SSeerrvviicceess You may also contact the Student Services office by email at [email protected] or by phone at 1-866-903-0110 Monday through Friday from 6:00am to 8:00pm, MT, and Saturday from 9:00am to 1:00pm, MT, for general student questions or concerns and the service desk for technical support issues by accessing the “HELP” tab at http://my.wgu.edu or by phone at 1-877-HELP-WGU (435-7948). The WGU IT Service Desk is open Monday through Friday from 6:00am to midnight, MT, and Saturday and Sunday from 10:00am to 7:00pm, MT. For other University services you can visit the student portal at http://my.wgu.edu for the most current information regarding WGU support services and contact information for individual WGU staff.


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