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Big Red Homecoming 2012 Edition

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The Harvard-Westlake Chronicle
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  • BIG REDOCT. 26, 2012 VOLUME 8 NO.1 HOMECOMING EDITION

    Water Polo: Plays first Homecoming match in $6.5 million pool p. 16Field Hockey: No sibling rivalry for Wasserman sisters p. 18Volleyball: Girls hone indoor skills in the sand p. 20

    GOLDEN RECEIVERSP. 10

  • thePlaybook

    BIG RED is a publication of the Harvard-Westlake Chronicle. Harvard-Westlake School, 3700 Coldwater Canyon, Studio City, CA 91604. For any questions, additional information or to purchase a subscription please contact us at [email protected] Letters to the editor can be sent to editors-in-chief Michael Aronson and Luke Holthouse, at [email protected] or [email protected] Reproduction without permission is prohibited.

    BIG REDOCT. 26, 2012 VOLUME 8 NO.1

    FOOTBALL

    10-15 WIDE RECEIVERSClinton Hooks 13, Chris Sebastian 13, Julian Shabahang 14 and Hassan Smith 15 make up the football teams receiving corps.

    BY LUKE HOLTHOUSE, ERIC LOEB, ROBBIE LOEB AND SAM SACHS

    FIELD HOCKEY

    18-19 SISTERLY LOVESisters and fellow field hockey attackers Annie 13 and Emma Wasserman 16 are the only sibling duo playing on Homecoming.

    BY AARON LYONS

    WATER POLO

    16-17 BEST IN THE U.S.From Milan to Coldwater Canyon, the new Copses Family Pool traveled around the world this past summer before being assembled at the Upper School.

    BY PATRICK RYAN

    VOLLEYBALL

    20-21 BEACH PARTYSeveral members of the varsity girls volleyball team play beach volleyball competitively outside of school in addition to playing in-doors.

    BY LUKE HOLTHOUSE

    Back and ForthBig Red staffer Lizzy Thomas sits down with girls varsity tennis co-captain Savannah de Montesquiou 13 for a question and answer session.

    4-7 PHOTO GALLERY

    8 COACHS OTHER HALF

    theStaffeditors-in-chief

    Michael Aronson, Luke Holthouse

    managing editorRobbie Loeb

    adviser Kathleen Neumeyer

    staffMila Barzdukas, Mazelle Etessami, Jack Goldfisher,

    Tyler Graham, Eric Loeb, Aaron Lyons, Grant Nussbaum, Lucy Putnam, Patrick Ryan, Sam Sachs,

    Lizzy Thomas Cover Photo by Jack Goldfisher

    Page 26

    ROBBIE LOEB/BIG RED

    CELEBRATE GOOD TIMES Receiver Chris Sebastian 13 (8) meets running back Correy King 13 (21) in the air after King ran in a 37-yard score.

    27 FOOTBALL REVAMPED

    3 MEET THE HEAD FANATICS

    22 ESPN ANCHOR

    Head Football Coach Scot Ruggles has a second career as an actor.

    Doug Kezirian 95 is an anchor on SportsCenter and Highlight Express.

    23 PEBBLE BEACH

    24-25 DRUMLINE

    LUKE HOLTHOUSE/BIG RED

    Bakari Bolden 14 competed in the Nature Valley First Tee Open at Pebble Beach this past summer.

    2 BIG RED HOMECOMING 2012

  • popCULTURE

    SIDNEY MOSKOWITZ 13Cheerleading

    ANDREW SOHN 13Golf

    DAVEY HARTMEIER 14Football

    Wolverine Athlete

    in the gridRunning back Correy King 13, top, heismans the St. Paul secondary in the Wolverines 44-11 victory over the Sworsdmen on Oct. 5. Josephine Kre-mer 14 serves in the girls volleyball teams loss to Notre Dame on Sept. 27.

    Favorite fall sport?

    Superbowl contender?

    Favorite movie?

    FRONT AND CENTER

    FRANCIS HYDE 13

    Four out of this years five Head Fanatics are athletes on a varsity sport at Harvard-Westlake.

    HENRY NEALE 13 THOMAS OSER 13 MIKE HART 13 CORREY KING 13Im glad to be a Head

    Fanatic because we get to bring the ideas weve had for four years into play, Hyde said.

    Hyde will start on the boys varsity basketball team this year at shooting guard.

    The senior averaged 6.4 points per game last season on the squad.

    Being a head fanatic means that I can represent my school and have fun at the same time, Neale said.

    Neale is the only Head Fanatic out of the five not on a varsity team at Har-vard-Westlake.

    He is a former bas-ketball player on middle school teams and the ju-nior varsity team.

    It was something that I wanted to do because I love going to sports games, seeing everything and cheering for other athletes, Oser said.

    Oser plays center for the varsity football team. The 6-foot-5, 275-pound big man has 10 offers from Division I programs to play college ball.

    Being a Head Fanatic means handling a lot of pressure from faculty and students, but ultimately its about giving our teams an edge by being as roudy as possible, Hart said.

    Hart has been on the boys varsity volleyball team for the past three years as a libero for the squad.

    It all started in eighth grade when I came to the HW-Loyola basketball game. I was laughing and chanting and loving the atmosphere in general, King said. I ad-mired the students making the clever chants and always wanted to be like them.

    King is the starting run-ning back on the varsity foot-ball team.

    DOLPHINS FOOTBALLINGLORIOUS BASTERDSTAYLOR SWIFT

    Favorite country artist?

    FALCONS FOOTBALLTALLADEGA NIGHTSJOHN DENVER

    PATRIOTS FOOTBALLOLD SCHOOLBRAD PAISLEY

    ELIJAH AKHTARZAD/BIG RED

    JACK GOLDFISHER/BIG RED

    ANNELISE COLVIN 15Volleyball

    RAIDERS GIRLS VOLLEYBALLCRAZY, STUPID, LOVETAYLOR SWIFT

    BIG RED HOMECOMING 2012 3

  • 4 BIG RED HOMECOMING 2012

  • An El Camino Real defender flips wide receiver Clinton Hooks 13 by his collar in the Sept. 21 matchup. Hooks found the end zone twice and caught six balls for 127 yards in the 56-14 win.

    WITH FLYING COLLARS

    Photograph byROBBIE LOEB

  • 4 BIG RED HOMECOMING 2012

  • Sean Fisher 13 rises above water to pass in the water polo teams 13-8 home win over Huntington Beach Sept. 28.

    FISH OUT OF WATER

    Photograph byROBBIE LOEB

  • A Different StageFirst year Head Football Coach Scot Ruggles moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in acting. He has appeared in various commercials and soap operas since moving to the West Coast.

    I n 2005, a Boston casting company called current Head Football Coach and Boston native Scot Ruggles to try out for a part in a movie. An aspiring actor, Ruggles auditioned for the part as a drill instructor in a state police academy. Driving home from the audition, Ruggles was not optimistic about being picked for the role because of the competition, but the casting company granted him a call back and told him to meet at the Ritz Carlton Hotel immediately.

    When Ruggles arrived at the hotel, he re-alized that he was going to audition in front of the director of the movie.

    Ruggles walked into a suite and saw Academy Award-winning director Martin Scorsese. He later found out that the audi-tion was for The Departed, the 2006 Oscar-winner for best picture.

    I had no idea that the audition was for The Departed, Ruggles said. I got a phone call from the casting office once I got off the road recruiting, and they said that they had no idea what my story was, but they were looking for alpha male type people for this role, and if you have any aspirations to be an actor, you wouldnt miss this.

    At the time, Ruggles was a defensive line coach for Harvard University, his alma ma-ter. In the morning audition, he was asked to be a drill instructor proctoring a test in the police academy. Though he didnt have much experience as an actor, Ruggles was intrigued by it.

    They gave me about five lines, but they told me to improvise being a drill instructor proctoring an exam, Ruggles said. It was almost like running a football meeting in a classroom. I think it came out naturally in the morning, and by the time I got the call back, they started directing me a little bit. Being inexperienced at the time, it just didnt come out as naturally as it did in the morning. I didnt get the part, but at that point I didnt even have a head shot. It was one of those random accidents, and next thing you know youre reading in front of Martin Scorsese wondering why youre in the room.

    Ruggles had been around football his en-tire life, growing up with a father who was a head football coach for a local high school. Ruggles watched his father coach from the

    sidelines on Friday nights during the football season. It wasnt until he became a football coach himself at Marshall University that he began his career in acting.

    I started with a commercial when I was coaching at Marshall, and actually I was forced by the head coach to do it because none of the other coaches wanted to, Rug-gles said. I had always been intrigued by act-ing, but growing up my dad was a coach and the only thing involved in my life was sports. I really never had an opportunity to act, but when I did, it was a neat experience.

    Ruggles resigned from Harvard and moved to Los Angeles to be an actor. Since then, he has performed in Andy Dicks re-cent football movie, Division III: Footballs Finest, The Days of Our Lives and various commercials including one for a pistachio company.

    There are a lot of A-list people that have some cameos like Adam Corolla and a bunch of the MADTV people in [Division III: Footballs Finest], Ruggles said. I play the rival coach opposite Andy Dick, and I have a nice scene with him in the cafeteria. For me it was a great experience to be on set with peo-ple who have done this for a long time. At the end of the day, it gave me the confidence that I can do this and get the experience I need.

    This fall season is Ruggles first as head coach of the Wolverine football team. He joined the Wolverines football program for the 2012 season as an offensive coordinator.

    Harvard-Westlake was intriguing to me because our kids here are allowed to do so many things, Ruggles said. Back when I was in high school, you were just a jock and that was it. I wonder where I would be to-day if I was able to play football but still be in the school play. I thi

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