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Catalogues and Keywords

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    Catalogues and Keywords

    A Library Perspective

    Karen Stone,State Library of Queensland

    April 2009

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    Organising your information

    Where does the catalogue fit within todays

    information environment?

    What part do classification and descriptive

    schema play in organizing information today?

    How to build the ideal 21st century catalogue?

    Where does the catalogue fit within todays information environment?

    Are they still relevant with the likes of Google, Wikipedia and online databases?

    What part do classification and descriptive schema play in organizing information

    today?

    What is out there and are they useful or relevant?

    How to build the ideal 21st century catalogue?

    How do you organise your information in a way that makes it more attractive than

    the web?

    And if you build it, how to make sure that they will come and use it?

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    Organising your information

    Relevant

    Current

    Comprehensive

    Cost-efficient

    How to make it -

    There are many factors that need to be considered in determining how to makeyour catalogue

    relevant to your clientele

    Current

    Comprehensive

    cost-efficient.

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    Organising your information

    Client focus

    Clients basic needs + Added value

    Client focus should be at the heart of all the decisions that are made when

    organizing your information and building your catalogue

    Determining your clients needs will guide you in making decisions on how yourinformation should be organized and described.

    Always remember who will be using the information that you provide? Is it your

    library staff or is your clientele? Make sure you are building a system that meets

    your clients needs and not just your own.

    Find out what your clients basic needs are

    What is it that they must have

    What is it that they want to access from the catalogue.

    Then you can work out ways to provide for these needs and how you can build

    on these needs through value added services or resources. Give them more than

    they want

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    Organising your information

    Client expectations

    Remote access

    Instant access

    One stop shop

    Wide range of material

    Hard copy

    Soft copy

    Online resources

    In-house collections

    Corporate records

    Off-site collections

    As well as needs, clients will have certain expectations. These may include -

    Remote access

    Instant access

    One stop shop including online doc del requestsOnline delivery requests

    Wide range of material

    Each set of clients will have a different set of expectations.

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    Organising your information

    Client experience

    Digital natives or digital immigrants?

    Looking for the Google search box or a

    traditional library search?

    Keyword users or subject heading savvy?

    Every set of clients will also have a different set of experiences.

    Digital natives or digital immigrants?

    Looking for the Google search box or a traditional library search?

    Keyword users or subject heading savvy?

    These will also help to determine how the catalogue should be structured to meet

    clients needs and expectations and provide the capacity for value adding

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    Building the catalogue

    What

    How

    When

    Who

    Access

    Clear plans for

    Take the identified needs, expectations and experiences and use these to develop what role your

    catalogue will play.

    Once this is established you can start to develop a plan for organizing your information and

    building your catalogue

    This plan or strategy should include

    what you will catalogue formats, sources

    How will it be catalogued -

    when will it be catalogued setting priorities

    who will catalogue it inhouse, outsourced, purchased records

    how will you provide access to the resulting data

    At State Library we have developed a cataloguing strategy that starts with a statement of

    principles outlining what we are trying to achieve with our catalogue and then sets out how that

    will be done, the standards and schema that we use, the levels of cataloguing that we apply and

    the priorities we assign to all types of resources.

    This provides the backbone to our catalogue management. Specific guidelines, procedures and

    protocols are developed based on the strategy and it gives us a solid base for the efficient

    processing of material and for our quality management

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    Building the catalogue

    Points to consider

    LIMS capability

    OPAC capability

    Metadata scheme

    Cataloguing rules/standards

    Descriptive schema

    Classification scheme

    Along with your clients needs there are a number of points to consider when

    developing your plan -

    LIMS capability what can it do, what type of data can it handle, what can youmanipulate

    OPAC capability display options, access options, search options

    Metadata scheme to employ MARC, DC, other

    Cataloguing rules/standards to apply

    Descriptive schema to employ one or more, free or controlled

    Classification scheme that suits your needs

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    What to catalogue?

    Points to consider

    Audience

    Research depth

    Coverage

    Formats

    One of the main considerations will be what to catalogue. This will be the driver

    behind many other decisions as you need to tailor your catalogue to suit the type

    of information your are organisingDetermine audience of catalogue who will search and what will they be looking

    for?

    Depth Intensive research, ready reference,

    Full coverage of the organisational knowledge or as a resource for additional

    information or both?

    Formats will you be concentrating on physical resources, online resources,

    equal measures of both

    Have clients expressed a need for AV resources or access to photos?

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    Online resources

    Wide variety

    Online versions of print journals

    E-journals

    Online versions of publications

    E-books

    Databases free & subscription

    Websites

    Online resources

    More and more resources are becoming available online and increasingly only

    available online.Decision on what to include.

    Which formats to include,

    Online versions of print journals

    E-journals

    Online versions of publications

    E-books

    Databases free & subscriptionWebsites

    How much to include (individual records for serials indexed in aggregated

    databases

    Decision should be driven on clients needs - what will they be looking for or

    expect to find within the catalogue. How far do you want to make it a one-stop

    shop without cataloguing the entire web?

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    Cataloguing rules

    The past

    Catalog rules: author & title entries (1908)

    Vatican Code (1931)

    Prussian Instructions (English translation)

    ALA Catalog rules: Author & title entries (1941)

    ALA Catalog rules for Author & title entries (1949)

    AACR (1967)

    AACRII (1978)

    Once you have decided on the metadata scheme that you wil use, the next step

    is to decide what rules you will need to follow.

    How you catalogue and classify these resources will be determined by the rules

    and standards that you employ as well as your clients needs.

    History of cataloguing rules shows us that there were different rules once upon a

    time

    The past

    Catalog rules: author & title entries referred to as AA 1908)

    Vatican Code (1931)

    Prussian Instructions (English translation)

    ALA Catalog rules: Author & title entries (1941

    ALA Catalog rules for Author & title entries (1949)

    AACR (1967)

    AACRII (1978)

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    Cataloguing rules

    The present

    AACRII used extensively in the English speaking world

    While most libraries use the same set of rules, there are choices that can be

    made.

    How strictly you apply the rules is a decision that you make locally.

    If you are using AACRII, you decide locally what level of description you want to

    apply to your records. Different records can be described at different levels

    depending on their use, value, format, and retention period

    State Library

    HC rare and valuable fullest extent with extensive notes as resource will be

    kept forever

    Ephemera collection level record top group many items together

    Public library fiction basic record to allow clients to choice; only kept for a few

    years

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    Cataloguing rules

    The future

    RDA (2010?)

    FRBR (Functional Requirements for Bibliographic

    Records)

    FRAR (Functional Requirements for Authority Records)

    catalogu

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