Home >Documents >CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTI-GAP LOOP MAR smhhhhlohll .afwl-tr-82-82 afwl-tr-*82-82 measured...

CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTI-GAP LOOP MAR smhhhhlohll .afwl-tr-82-82 afwl-tr-*82-82 measured...

Date post:09-Feb-2019
Category:
View:226 times
Download:5 times
Share this document with a friend
Transcript:

R127 817 MEASURED CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTI-GAP LOOP AND 1/2ASYMPTOTIC CONICAL DIPOLE..(U) MICHIGAN UNIY ANN ARBORV V LIEPA ET AL. MAR 83 t786-i-F AFWL-TR-82-82

UNCLASSIFIED F2968i-78-C-6882 F/G 9/i NL

smhhhhlohllEhhmhhhhhhllIl/ll/llllllllEEIIIIIIIIIIIIEIIIhIIIIhIIIElllllllflflll.l

*L 6

. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

m

I 2

ilIuilna

1.25m

MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHARTNATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963-A

_ _ __'

_ _ _ _1

. . . . . .

AFWL-TR-82-82 AFWL-TR-*82-82

MEASURED CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTI-GAP* LOOP AND ASYMPTOTIC CONICAL DIPOLE

ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD SENSORS

iV. V. LiepaT. B. A. Senior

The University of MichiganINO Ann Arbor MI 48109

"* March 1983

'14 Final Report , )T. C5 (M A*Y 19830' Approved for public release; distribution unlimited.

r4..

IJ AIR FORCE WEAPONS LABORATORYAir Force Systems CommandKirtland Air Force Base, NM 87117

,8 05 u6-009

AFWL-TR-82-82

This final report was prepared by the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor,Michigan, under Contract F29601-78-C-0082, Job Order 37630132 with the AirForce Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. Mr. William D.Prather (NTAA) was the Laboratory Project Officer-in-Charge.

When Government drawings, specifications, or other data are used for anypurpose other than in connection with a definitely Government-related procure-ment, the United States Government incurs no responsibility or any obligationwhatsoever. The fact that the Government may have formulated or in any waysupplied the said drawings, specifications, or other data, is not to beregarded by implication, or otherwise in any manner construed, as licensingthe holder, or any other person or corporation; or as conveying any rightsor permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that mayin any way be related thereto.

This report has been authored by a contractor of the United StatesGovernment. Accordingly, the United States Government retains a nonexclusive,royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the material contained herein,or allow others to do so, for the United States Government purposes.

This report has been reviewed by the Public Affairs Office and isreleasable to the National Technical Information Service (NTIS). At NTIS,it will be available to the general public, including foreign nations.

If your address has changed, if you wish to be removed from our mailinglist, or if your organization no longer em~ioys the addressee, please notifyAFWL/NTAA, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 to help us maintain a current mailing list.

This technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publication.

WILLIAM D. PRATHERProject Officer

FOR THE COMMANDER

DAVID W. GARRISON RO CASE, JR.Lt Colonel, USAF Lt Colonel, USAFChief, Applications Branch Chief, Aircraft & Missiles Division

* DO NOT RETURN COPIES OF THIS REPORT UNLESS CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS OR NOTICEON A SPECIFIC DOCUMENT REQUIRES THAT IT BE RETURNED.

-- -- . .. .7

UNCLASSI FIEDSECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Mhn Date Entered)

PAGE READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PBEFORE COMPLETING FORM

. REPORT NUMBER 2.GOVT ACESSIUtiO. 3. RECIPIENT'S CATALOG NUMBER

AFWL-TR-82-82 __ _4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED

MEASURED'CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTI-CAP LOOP AND Final ReportASYMPTOTIC CONICAL DIPOLE ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDSENSORS S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER017816-1-F, EMPTD-6-UM-001

7. AUTHOR(@) S. CONTRACTOR GRANT NUMUER(s)

V. V. LiepaT. B. A. Senior F29601-78-C-0082

S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK

AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS

The University of MichiganAnn Arbor, MI 48109 64711 F/37630132

II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATEMarch 1983

Air Force Weapons Laboratory (NTAA) 13. NUMBER OF PAGESKirtland Air Force Base, NM 87117 158

14. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(if different from Controlling Olfie) IS. SECURITY CLASS. (of this report)

UnclassifiedISs. DECL ASSI FIC ATION/ DOWN GRADING

SCHEDULE

16. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of thls Report)

Approved for public release; distribution unlimited.

17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract entered In Block 20, It difierent from Report)

II. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES

IS. KEY WORDS (Continua on reverse side If necessary and Identify by block number)

Asymptotic Conical Dipole (ACD)Multi-Gap Loop (MGL)Electromagnetic FieldCal IbrationSensors

_ 0. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse aid* it necessar aind identify by block number)

The frequency responses of the MGL-2D(a), MGL-6A(A) and ACD-4A(R) free-spacesensors have been measured and analyzed. The measurements were made over thefrequency range 118 to 4400 MHz whose upper limit far exceeds the 3-dB roll-offfrequencies for the sensors. All three sensors were evaluated in terms of thelinearity of the frequency response, the angular behavior vis-a-vis a dipolepattern, and the rotational symmetry (MGL sensors only). Whereas the linearitypersists only slightly beyond the roll-off frequencies, the dipole and symmetry

(Ovpr)

DDIj 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65IS OBSOLETEDSR JAN IY UNCLASSIFIEDSECURITY CL.ASSIFICATION OF THIS PACE (*len Datem Entered)

UNCLASSIFIEDSECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAOE(Whan Daea Entered)

20. ABSTRACT (Continued)

properties extend to frequencies two or three times greater.

U In addition, some preliminary data for the MGL-58(R) and MGL-7A(R) groundplane sensors are presented.

UNCLASSIFIEDSECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGIEr(b~f Date Entered)

L'4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The authors are indebted to H. Yoon, of the University of Michigan, for

making the measurements, sometimes two or three times over; to C. Bickley

and T. M. Willis, III, of the University of Michigan, for developing the data

processing techniques and writing the programs; and to W. Rasey for typing

the manuscript. We are especially grateful to Dr. C. Baum of the Air Force

Weapons Laboratory for his suggestions in the area of data analysis and

presentation.

Aecoss21of ForIITIS QrA&I1

Dtic U" 1

D1istibuition

i.

.-... . - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

i. :Dist~u specia

.. .

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section Page

1. INTRODUCTION 1

2. GENERAL FORMULAS 3

2.1 Theoretical Considerations 32.2 Practical Considerations 8

3. EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY 12

4. GROUND PLANE SENSOR EVALUATION 16

4.1 Ground Plane 164.2 Measurements and Calibrations 174.3 Sensor Responses 274.4 Discussion 35

5. FREE-SPACE SENSOR EVALUATION 46

5.1 The Sensors 465.2 Experimental Techniques 495.3 Angular Response Measurements 54

5.3.1 ACD-4A(R) Sensor 545.3.2 MGL-2D(A) and MGL-6D(A) 56

5.4 Angular Response Data Analysis 595.5 Frequency Response Data Analysis 81

6. SUMMARY 87

REFERENCES 90

APPENDIX A: ACD-4A(R) DIPOLE RESPONSE DATA (RAW) 91

APPENDIX B: MGL-2D(A) AND MGL-6A(A) DIPOLE RESPONSE DATA (RAW) 107

APPENDIX C: MGL-2D(A) AND MGL-6A(A) ROTATIONAL RESPONSEDATA (RAW) 136

" ill

- " : . - . . . .- .- _ , . -.. . , -, ,-. --. . .. . . . .. ._ _ __ _ _ _ _. _.. ..__ .. ..

ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure Page

I Coordinate systems used for theoretical analysis. 6

2 Block diagram of the facility. 13

3 Resistively loaded ground plane used in themeasurements. 18

4 Ground plane sensors used in the evaluation. 20

5 Calibration of the 20-dB attenuator, deduced frommeasurements numbers 5 and 7. 24

6 Calibration of the 6-dB attenuator, deduced frommeasurements numbers 6 and 7. 25

7 Calibration for the 0.020-inch coax, deduced frommeasurements numbers 9 and 10. 26

8 Computed calibration for the 0.020-inch coax. 28

9 Calibration for the 0.030-inch coax, deduced frommeasurements numbers 7 and 8. 29

10 Computed calibration for the 0.030-inch coax. 30

11 Response of the MGL-7 sensor referenced to that ofthe MGL-8. 31

12 Response of the MGL-7 sensor with MGL-8 used asa standard. 33

13 Response of the MGL-7 sensor referenced to that ofthe MGL-8. 34

14 Response of the MGL-5 sensor with the MGL-8 usedas a standard. 36

15 Amplitude of the MGL-7 response compared with theSharpe-Roussi simulation. The dots show thefrequencies corresponding to the dominant polesin the 10-pole simulation. 38

16 Phase of the MGL-7 response compared with theSharpe-Roussi simulation. The dots show thefrequencies corresponding to the dominant polesin the 10-pole simulation. 39

iv

Figure Page

17 Amplitude of the MGL-5 response compared with theSharpe-Roussi simulation. The dots show thefrequencies corresponding to the 18 poles used inthe simulation. 42

18 Phase of the MGL-5 response compared with theSharpe-Roussi simulation. The dots show thefrequencies corresponding to the 18 poles usedin the simulation. 43

19 Amplitude of a portion of the MGL-5 compared withthe Sharpe-Roussi simulation using 14 poles. 44

20 Phase of a portion of the MGL-5 compared with theShapre-Roussi simulation using 14 poles. 45

21 Sensors used in the study. 48

22 Modified MGL-9(R). (The coaxial cables were bent4.75 inches from the loop to adapt for H-verticalpolarization. In the original design the coaxwas straight.) 50

a 23 Twinaxial to dual-coaxial adapters. 53

24 Measurement geometry for the ACD sensors

of 166

Click here to load reader

Embed Size (px)
Recommended