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Connally Playbook (digital)

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  • M A K E R

    P L A YB O O KSTE(A)M TRUCK

    CONNALLY ELEMENTARY

    SPRING 2016

  • To close opportunity gaps and provide lifelongopportunities by transform-ing teaching and learning through an experientialmaker approach that brings together youth and adult learners within collaborative communities.

    COMMUNITY GUILDSMISSION STATEMENT

    CONTENTS

    Introduction

    Letter from the Director

    Chapter 1: Our Story History & Stats

    Our Team

    Our Vision for the Future

    Chapter 2: At-A-Glance

    STE(A)M Truck Sample Day

    Connally 20-Day Plan

    Chapter 3: Maker Kit In Review Our Badging System

    Tool of the Day Cards

    Word of the Day Cards

    STEAM Trunks Lesson Plans

    Lesson Plans

    Glossary

    Partners & Supporters

    4 - 5

    5

    6 - 9

    6 - 7

    8

    9

    10 - 11

    10

    11

    12 - 45

    12 - 13

    14 - 15

    16 - 25

    26 - 35

    36 - 53

    54 - 61

    63 - 64

    65

  • JASON MARTIN

    EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

    with community experts, build something together. Our work, based on a Maker Mindset, has struck a chord with educators, like Donna Davis, a 5th grade teacher in Atlanta Public Schools, who became inspired by the programming after seeing the impact it had on her stu-dents. But, most importantly, Donna leaves better equipped to bring similar instructional concepts and methodolo-gies into her classroom after STE(A)M Truck has driven away. Our mission is to close opportunity gaps and pro-vide lifelong opportunities by transforming teaching and learning through an experi-ential maker approach that brings together youth and adult learners within collab-orative communities.

    At Connally Elemen-tary School, STE(A)M Truck will conduct 20 visits this school year. A day by day re-view can be found on page 11 of this Playbook. Our work is being generously funded with a grant from the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation. Upon completion Connally will receive a $2,000 pass thru mini-grant to seed or supplement your own maker-space. In addition, STE(A)M Truck staff will again return

    Dear Colleagues, Thanks for jumping on board! We hope you find our Playbook useful and inspiring. Since 2014, Com-munity Guilds has focused on delivering an innovative, gap-closing approach to education through its mobile makerspace, STE(A)M Truck.

    As a classroom teach-er in Title I schools for 10 years, I believe Community Guilds provides program-ming critical to building non-cognitive and 21st Century STEM skills. Much like what happens in class-room across the country, we ignite a passion in students to learn about the real world by tackling real problems, designing solutions and then,

    to Connally and provide 12 follow up coaching ses-sions designed to support your work over the next 3-6 months.

    Creating a thriving STE(A)M community is a foundational component. Having both students and educators engage in the pro-gram helps embed the core components of learning and teaching in daily practice, and having community mem-bers as part of the experience helps make that learning real-world relevant. While STE(A)M Truck will always be limited by the number of students it can serve directly, it seeks to extend its impact through the engagement of the adults in the community, creating a ripple effect of transformative learning.

  • 7STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK6

    CHAPTER 1

    Our Story Research has been clear: Access to hands-on build-ing, tinkering, and the kinds of curriculum offered through STE(A)M Truck can increase access to STEM careers and build the skills critical for long term success. How-ever, the tools, expertise, and time needed to utilize these types of strategies are usually unavailable in public schools, and especially so in public schools serving low income communities. Our program provides access to materials,

    expertise, and curriculum that can reach students during the school day directly on their own campus.

    STE(A)M Truck is Com-munity Guilds core program, delivered in partnership with ele-mentary and middle schools and after-school programs serving high-need student populations. The experience is anchored in three strategic levers:

    Providing students with hands-on opportunities to make and learn through in-dividual and team- based ex-

    periences, building non-cog-nitive skills and igniting excitement about learning

    Connecting students to community members with maker-related careers, giving them exposure to mentors and careers different from those they typically access on a daily basis (e.g., artists, industrial designers) and expanding their worldview about future possibilities

    Equipping educators with the ability to shape instruc-tion through experiential learning, enabling them to

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    deepen and reinforce the learnings from the STE(A)M Truck experience and take them to more students, be-yond those directly served by the program.

    Since 2014, Community Guilds has focused on delivering an innovative, gap-closing approach to education through its mobile makerspace, STE(A)M (Sciece, Technology, Engineering, (Arts), and Math) Truck, targeting elementary and middle school students. The STE(A)M Truck experience is anchored by a rigorous, experiential learning-based curriculum, which is brought to life in a mobile maker-space with the support and collective expertise of the local community. STE(A)M Truck creates a community of adult STE(A)M role models maker-mentors, STE(A)M designers, and local artists, along with traditional educators and connects them closely with youth; together, they tackle real problems, design solutions, and build things.

    Over the course of the program, students learn the design process and develop a sense of self- efficacy as they create their own solutions. Community Guilds also strikes a chord with educators, who

    become inspired themselves by the experience and the impact on students, and leave better-equipped to bring similar instructional concepts and methodologies into the classroom. In its first full year of operation, over 300 students completed a STE(A)M Truck 20 day program. Community Guilds has partnered with several organizations, including district schools (e.g., Atlanta Public Schools), charter schools (e.g., KIPP Metro Atlanta, The Kindezi Schools), and community organizations (e.g., Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta). Community Guilds programming has also helped build students non-cognitive skills and awareness of a breadth of life opportunities they need to be successful.

    NON-COGNITIVE SKILLS

    97%+ of students improved non-cognitive skills

    90%+ of students performed at satisfactory competency levels on non-cognitive skills

    Increased student interest and willingness to take risks and try new things in learning

    Improved classroom behav-ior (e.g., significant decline in discipline referrals)

    STEM SKILLS ANDAWARENESS

    87%+ of students have im-

    proved applied STEM skills 2/3 (and as high as 90%)

    of students perform at satis-factory competency levels on STEM skills

    73%+ of students have increased interest and con-fidence in pursuing a STEM career

  • 9STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK8

    OUR TEAM

    JASON MARTIN

    EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

    MIKE STASNY

    ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

    SARAH LASHINSKY

    MAKER MENTOR

    MARSHA FRANCIS

    STEM DESIGNER

    DOMENIC LIGGETT

    OPERATIONS MANAGER

    KEITH DEVRIES

    MAKER MENTOR

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    OUR VISION

    Over the next five years, Community Guilds is committed to strengthening and deepening its impact, while driving to greater scale and sustainability, in two main ways. First, Community Guilds will continue to refine its STE(A)M Truck and student engagement model, both by codifying and standardizing certain elements and by piloting variations to others. Second, Community Guilds will work to deepen its sup-ports to educators over time, extending design thinking techniques into the classroom and creating longer-term sustainable impact.

    The overall value proposition is powerful. Community Guilds enables students in even the least- resourced schools to access making-focused learning experiences, and gives districts and schools the opportunity to explore the benefits of an innovation lab without building one, while beginning to deepen their own capacity around experiential learning.

    Over the next five years, Community Guilds is committed to strengthening and deepening its impact, while driving to greater scale and sustainability, in two main ways. First, Community Guilds will continue to refine its STE(A)M Truck and student engagement model, both by codifying and standardizing certain elements and by piloting variations to others. Second, Community Guilds will work to deepen its supports to educators over time, extending design thinking techniques into the classroom and creating longer-term sustainable impact.

    In parallel, Community Guilds has set ambitious yet achievable plans to grow its reach while preserving its high bar for quality and maintaining a low cost for the programming (today, an average program cost per student of $200-300). Community Guilds aims to more than double its reach in 2015- 16, with plans to serve roughly 900-1,000 students per platform per year at full utilization, and to expand to four platforms serving over 4,000 students in Atlanta and near-in districts by 2020.

    OUR FIVE-YEAR PLAN

    Four more trucks by 2020

    Reach 5.4K students in 2019-2020 school year

    Over the course of the pro-gram, students learn the de-sign process and develop a sense of self- efficacy as they create their own solutions.

  • 11STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK10

    CHAPTER 2

    AtAGlance Our recipe for creating change lies in our impactful 20-Day series of in-school pro-gramming. Each day consists of four main activites, some of which happen as a class, and some of which take place with students broken down into groups of 4-6. A sample day may look a lot like this, with flexibility for projects as neces-sary.

    STE(A)M TRUCK

    SAMPLE DAY

    Huddle (5 mins) The goal is to have all the elements connect seamlessly, and to create a class culture.

    Game plan Word of the Day (WoD) Tool of the Day (ToD)

    Activation (5-10 mins) One or two of the below will be done depending on time, either inside or outside depending on activity. remain the same for the entire program. One adult will mentor one crew.

    Icebreaker ( 1-2 mins) Energizer (3-5 mins) Game (5-10 mins) STEAM Trunk (10 mins)

    Build (30 min)Typically in small groups Time range depends on Build. Longer Builds mean shorter Acti-vation activity

    Reflection (5-10 min) Quick check in (scale 1-5) Shout outs/ Fabulous Failures Journal reflection Next steps/reminders STE(A)M Truck on 3 cheer

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    AGLANCE

    DAY 1 APRIL 12Spark Day

    DAY 2 APRIL 13Brick Build

    DAY 3 APRIL 14Journal/Name Tag Day; 1/2

    DAY 4 APRIL 19Journal/Name Tag Day; 2/2

    DAY 5 APRIL 20Safety Badging

    DAY 6 APRIL 21Design Thinking

    DAY 7 APRIL 26Bridge Build Day 1/2

    DAY 8 APRIL 27Bridge Build Day 2/2

    DAY 9 APRIL 28Two Day Build A; Day 1/2

    DAY 10 MAY 3Two Day Build A; Day 2/2

    DAY 11 MAY 4Two Day Build B; Day 1/2

    DAY 12 MAY 5Two Day Build B; Day 2/2

    DAY 13 MAY 10Big Build; Day 1/6

    DAY 14 MAY 11Big Build; Day 2/6

    DAY 15 MAY 12Big Build; Day 3/6

    DAY 16 MAY 17Big Build; Day 4/6

    DAY 17 MAY 18Big Build; Day 5/6

    DAY 18 MAY 19Big Build; Day 6/6

    DAY 19 MAY 23Share Prep Day

    DAY 20 MAY 24Share Day

    Over 20 days, we start to build the capacity for educators and

    schools to continue to do this work even after we are gone.

    CONNALLYCLASS SCHEDULES

    CLASS A11:00 am - 11:50 am

    CLASS B12:00 pm - 12:50 pm

    CLASS C1:00 pm - 1:50 pm

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    Grounded in both constructiv-ist1,2,3 (Kafai & Resnick, 1996; Piaget, 1956; Vygotsky,1978) and constructionist4 (Papert, 1991) learning theories, maker spaces are commonly defined as informal sites for creative production in art, science, and engineering where people of all ages blend digital and phys-ical technologies to explore

    ideas, learn technical skills, and create new products5 (Sheri-dan et al., 2014, p. 505). They are spaces where children and adults can gather, share, and explore6 (Britton, 2012). While much making is situated in com-munity maker spaces, innova-tors are increasingly exploring its potential to support formal education, so students and teachers can work together to create, solve problems, collab-orate, and develop new skills (Halverson & Sheridan, 2014).

    The White House Maker Faire recently implemented policies for schools to pursue hands-on innovation and manufacturing7 (Fried & Wetstone, 2014).

    Our Maker Kit is designed as a) a takeaway for your classs STE(A)M Truck experience, and b) a resource to use to further thought and discussion around making. Keep this as a reference in your classroom.

    CHAPTER 2

    Maker Kit

    1. Kafai, Y. B., & Resnick, M. (1996). Constructionism in practice : De-signing, thinking, and learning in a digital world. Mahwah, N.J: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

    2. Piaget, J. (1956). The Origins of Child Intelligence. New York: Inter-national University

    3. Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in so-ciety: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    4. Papert, S. (1991). Situating construc-tionism. In I. Harel & S. Papert (Eds.), Constructionism (pp. 111). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

    5. Sheridan, K., Halverson, E. R., Brahms, L., Litts, B., Owens, T., & Jacobs-Priebe, L. (2014). Learning in the making: A comparative case study of three makerspaces. Harvard Educational Review, 84(4).

    6. Britton, L. (2012). A fabulous labora-tory: The makerspace at Fayetteville Free Library. Public Administration Review, 1 5.

    7. Fried, B., & Wetstone, K. (2014). President Obama at the White House Maker Faire:Todays D.I.Y. is to-morrows made in America [White House blog post]. Retrieved from http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/06/18/president-obama-white-house-maker-faire-today-s-diy-tomorrow-s-made-america

    IN THIS KIT

    Our Badging System

    Tool of the Day

    Word of the Day

    STEAM Trunk Activites

    You Can do in Your

    Classroom

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    OUR BADGES

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    OUR BADGING SYSTEM

    STE(A)M Truck Badg-es have been developed to pull a common thread through the various projects and activities that we do at STE(A)M Truck as well as provide an additional incentive to our makers. The badges have been written with three things in mind: the funda-mental principles of the maker movement, STE(A)M Trucks Core Competencies, and Geor-gia Department of Educations Performance Standards.

    The badges represent the knowledge and skills that young makers develop during their explorative time with the STE(A)M Truck. Earning the Iteration badge,for example, shows that a maker has demon-strated the essential ability to evaluate and revise a project in development while strengthen-ing their perseverance, innova-tion, and design thinking. A skill such as this is not only essential but it is easily transferable to the real world. A 2014 mi-cro-credentialing and badging study found that when learners were engaged in a badging system, the use of badges

    helped motivate them toward further autonomous study8 (Elliot & Clayton, 2014). Often makers can easily see the value in the final product of a given project, but earning badges that demonstrate the built-in knowledge and skills helps them more appreciate the les-sons learned in the process and builds on their intrinsic motiva-tion. Weve seen an increase in student engagement since badges have been introduced; students are eager to hear about the next badge that they can earn.

    HOW STE(A)M TRUCK BADGES WORK

    As makers actively participate in various STE(A)M Truck projects and activi-ties, theyll be made aware of the potential badges that can be earned. There are particular requirements, or earmarks, for each badge. Many of the earmarks are built right into the projects and activities that the STE(A)M Truck provides.

    STE(A)M Team members will sign off the various earmarks until they are all completed and the maker has earned the badge. Engagement with the badging earmarks provides makers with an opportunity for reflection that builds on our integrated journaling and reflection sessions. The 2014 study highlighted badging as a means by which leaners can engage in a process of reflec-tion and self improvement. Through reflection individuals make meaning of their currentcapabilities and identify areas for improvement and person-al growth (Elliot & Clayton, 2014).

    8. Elliot, R., Clayton, J., (2014). Ex-ploring the use of micro-credential-ing and digital badges in learning environments to encourage motivation to learn and achieve. Retrieved from http://researcharchive.wintec.ac.nz/3546/1/276-Elliott.pdf

    CONNECTION TO OURCORE COMPETENCIES

    All badges fall under the realm of knowledge, skills, and disposition, and support the following competencies:

    Design Thinking Creativity & Innova-

    tion Grit & Perseverance Curiosity Optimism and Zest Focus & Self-Control Use of STEM Tools Measurement

  • 17STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK16

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    HOW TO: USE THESE CARDS IN THE CLASSROOM

    These cards are a log of the tools and technologies stu-dents learned about on STE(A)M Truck. Cut them out and use them as a reference for your classroom.

    WHATS ON THE CARDS?

    Each card includes one or two facts about how the tool works, and, in some cases the history of how the tool came about. A price range of the tool is also provided.

    CODE

    Sometimes color codes and categories can make learning easier. Here are a few groups we used to sort the tools; feel free to add your own!

    = tools that measure

    = tools that cut

    = tools that connect

    = rapid prototyping tools

    = electronics tools

    TOOLS OF THE DAY

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    ay c

    rimp,

    pin

    ch o

    r cut

    cost

    $3 -

    $30

    mite

    r saw

    accu

    rate

    cro

    sscu

    ts (th

    e sh

    ort e

    nd o

    f lon

    g sto

    ck)

    long

    rip

    cuts

    not p

    ossib

    le

    typi

    cally

    use

    d fo

    r woo

    d ex

    clus

    ivel

    y

    cost

    $200

    - $6

    00

    drill

    pre

    ss

    used

    for b

    orin

    g ho

    les

    set o

    f han

    dles

    rota

    ted

    to

    low

    er d

    rill b

    it in

    to p

    iece

    cuts

    woo

    d, m

    etal

    , pla

    s-tic

    s

    cost

    $150

    - $6

    00

    Fold along the dotted lines to make a folder to hold your cards in!

  • 25STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK24

    T OO

    L O

    F

    T

    HE

    DA

    Y

    Which tools and technologies would you like to see in your class-room? What might you make with them?

    What tools did you see on the STE(A)M Truck/Trailer for which there is no Tool Card? Which did you not see on STE(A)M Truck/Trailer?

    CRITICAL THINKING AS A CLASS

    FRONT

    BACK

    INSIDE POCKET

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

  • 27STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK26

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WORDS OF THE DAY WORDS OF THE DAY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

  • 29STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK28

    WORDS OF THE DAY

    tinke

    rT

    he e

    xper

    imen

    t ver

    sion

    of d

    oodl

    ing

    - Mik

    e St

    asny

    refle

    ctio

    nD

    iscus

    s th

    e va

    lue

    of u

    sing

    time

    to

    refle

    ct o

    n th

    e th

    ings

    you

    lear

    n. H

    ow

    does

    jour

    nalin

    g he

    lp y

    ou a

    bsor

    b in

    form

    atio

    n?

    team

    wor

    kA

    lone

    we

    can

    do s

    o lit

    tle; t

    oget

    her

    we

    can

    do s

    o m

    uch.

    - Hel

    en K

    elle

    rW

    hy m

    ight

    Hel

    en K

    elle

    r pla

    ce s

    o m

    uch

    valu

    e in

    co

    llabo

    ratio

    n?

    idea

    teEx

    plai

    n th

    e ite

    rativ

    e pr

    oces

    s. D

    iscus

    s w

    hat c

    an b

    e le

    arne

    d fro

    m tw

    eaki

    ng a

    co

    ncep

    t ove

    r and

    ove

    r.

    capa

    ble

    If y

    ou th

    ink

    you

    can

    do it

    , or i

    f you

    th

    ink

    you

    can

    t do

    it, y

    ou a

    re ri

    ght.

    - Hen

    ry F

    ord

    cons

    truct

    ive

    feed

    back

    Disc

    uss

    and

    give

    exa

    mpl

    es o

    f con

    -str

    uctiv

    e fe

    edba

    ck.

    Can

    crit

    icism

    stil

    l be

    con

    struc

    tive?

    Why

    is it

    impo

    rtant

    to

    get

    feed

    back

    on

    your

    wor

    k?

    prot

    otyp

    eA

    firs

    t or e

    arly

    exa

    mpl

    e th

    at is

    use

    d as

    a m

    odel

    for w

    hat c

    omes

    late

    r.

    inno

    vatio

    nC

    reat

    ivity

    is th

    inki

    ng u

    p ne

    w th

    ings

    . In

    nova

    tion

    is do

    ing

    new

    thin

    gs.

    - The

    odor

    e Le

    vitt

    com

    mun

    icat

    ion

    You

    can

    hav

    e br

    illia

    nt id

    eas,

    but i

    f yo

    u ca

    nt g

    et th

    em a

    cros

    s, yo

    ur id

    eas

    won

    t ge

    t you

    any

    whe

    re.

    - Lee

    Iaco

    cca,

    aut

    omob

    ile e

    xecu

    tive

    empa

    thy

    Def

    ine

    empa

    thy

    as it

    per

    tain

    s to

    the

    desig

    n th

    inki

    ng p

    roce

    ss.

    How

    can

    yo

    ur o

    wn

    life

    exp

    erie

    nces

    mak

    e yo

    u m

    ore

    capa

    ble

    of e

    mpa

    thy?

    pers

    erve

    ranc

    eI

    f you

    can

    t fly

    , the

    n ru

    n. I

    f you

    can

    t ru

    n th

    en w

    alk.

    If y

    ou c

    ant

    wal

    k, th

    en c

    raw

    l.

    But w

    hate

    ver y

    ou d

    o, y

    ou h

    ave

    to k

    eep

    mov

    ing

    forw

    ard.

    - Mar

    tin L

    uter

    Kin

    g, Jr

    focu

    sW

    hat a

    re y

    our t

    o-do

    s fo

    r the

    day

    ?

    Giv

    e us

    a te

    aser

    of y

    our p

    roje

    ct a

    nd

    the

    wor

    k th

    at h

    as a

    lread

    y go

    ne in

    to it

    .

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

  • 31STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK30

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    D

    AY

    WORDS OF THE DAY

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

  • 33STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK32

    inge

    nuity

    Disc

    uss

    the

    shar

    ed ro

    ot b

    etw

    een

    the

    wor

    d i

    ngen

    uity

    an

    d g

    eniu

    s

    grat

    itude

    How

    do

    you

    show

    gra

    titud

    e to

    you

    r fri

    ends

    ? Y

    our f

    amily

    ? Y

    our t

    each

    ers

    and

    clas

    smat

    es?

    desig

    n th

    inki

    ngTh

    e pr

    oces

    s of

    des

    igin

    g by

    cyc

    ling

    thro

    ugh

    thes

    e ste

    ps: E

    mpa

    thiz

    e, D

    e-fin

    e, Id

    eate

    , Pro

    toty

    pe, T

    est

    Has

    so P

    lattn

    er, I

    nstit

    ute

    of D

    esig

    n at

    Sta

    nfor

    d

    crea

    tivity

    You

    can

    t us

    e up

    cre

    ativ

    ity--

    the

    mor

    e yo

    u us

    e, th

    e m

    ore

    you

    have

    .

    - May

    a A

    ngel

    ou, a

    utho

    r, po

    et a

    nd

    civi

    l rig

    hts

    activ

    ist

    impl

    emen

    tatio

    nN

    o lu

    mbe

    rjack

    eve

    r tal

    ked

    a tre

    e in

    to fa

    lling

    dow

    n.

    - Pro

    verb

    revi

    sion

    A y

    ear f

    rom

    now

    , you

    ll w

    ish y

    oud

    sta

    rted

    toda

    y.

    -Kar

    en L

    amb,

    pro

    fess

    or &

    aut

    hor

    WORDS OF THE DAY

    HOW TO: USE THESE CARDS IN THE CLASSROOM

    These cards are small remind-ers of the words STE(A)M Truck uses to spark meaningful discussion and critical thought. Cut them out and use them in your classroom to keep the conversations going!

    WHATS ON THE CARDS?

    Each card includes either a concept, definition, quote, or discussion prompt on it. In some cases, it may include some combination of these!

    COLOR CODE

    Sometimes color codes and categories can make learning easier. Here are a few groups we used to sort the words; feel free to add your own!

    = concept

    = definition

    = quote

    = discussion prompt

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

    Fold along the dotted lines to make a folder to hold your cards in!

  • 35STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK34

    WO

    RD

    O

    F

    T

    HE

    DAY

    Which words of the day resonate with your classroom rather than being STE(A)M Truck-specific? Why?

    Invent some Words of the Day for your classroom, and assign each one a quote, definition, or discussion prompt.

    CRITICAL THINKING AS A CLASS

    FRONT

    BACK

    INSIDE POCKET

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

  • 37STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK36

    STEAM TRUNKS

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: Cork Ball Float

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8

    Overview: This activity has the students attempt to make a cork ball float in the Wind Tube. They will try different iterations of their design, working from sketches through to prototypes until they are successful.

    Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes

    Approximate Setup Time: 10 minutes

    Approximate Duration: 30 minutes

    Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    should be able to complete the challenge without much guid-ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal-lenge and provide scaffolding where needed.

    Once students are ready to test their design, ensure that they are wearing safety glasses and allow them to place their creation in the wind tube. If it floats they were successful. If it doesnt, have them consider why not and make some adjust-ments.

    Assessment

    Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal-lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af-terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding.

    Possible discussion questions:

    RESOURCES

    Equipment/Materials

    Wind Tube, cork ball, scissors, tape, paper and pencils, and an assortment of craft supplies such as piece of fabric, tooth-picks and straws. Table option-al.

    Safety Plan & Mitigations

    Electronics should not be used near water. Not to be done outside if it is raining. There are moving parts involved in this activity. Students should wear safety glasses when working with the Wind Tube.

    How did their drawings and ideas about pre-existing float-ing objects inform their design?

    What designs really worked well. What didnt? Why do they think that is?

    Did they collaborate with any of their peers, what did they learn from that experience?What can they explain about what is necessary to make an object float?

    What real world applications can this knowledge have?

    Clean Up

    Have students throw out or keep their drawings and return their cork ball and pencil to you. Collect all of the one pag-ers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Preparation/Setup

    Set up the Wind Tube and ensure that it works properly. Ensure that extension cords are secured to minimize the trip hazard. In each STE(A)M Trunk place a cork ball, scissors and an assortment of craft supplies such as piece of fabric, straws, and tape. Also include a piece of paper, a pencil, and a one-pager.

    Guidance During Session

    Welcome students to the STE(A)M Truck. If theyve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de-scription of what theyre about to do.

    The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri-ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager.STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Common Core/Georgia Performance Standard(s)

    S4P3. Students will demon-strate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demonstrate the effect of grav-itational force on the motion of an object.

    Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c)

    other content areas.

    Students are given a hands-on experience with aerodynamics and the movement of air. This can help them begin to under-stand the physics of flight and other practical applications for aerodynamicy.

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

  • 39STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK38

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

    TAKEAWAYS

    S T E ( A ) M T R U N KC H A L L E N G E

    Cork Ball Float

    OBJECTIVE: Make a cork ball float in the wind tube.

    REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your design more steady? Can you make it do tricks (spin, flip, etc.)?

    JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal.

    2 BUILD IT

    Build your design. Dont be afraid to iterate (change) as you build.

    1 DESIGN IT

    Come up with a plan. Check out your materials. How could you combine them to make the cork ball float in the wind tube?

    3 TEST IT

    Place your creation in the wind tube. Does it float? If so, congratulations! If not, why not? Tweak your design and retry!

    TAKEAWAYS

    S T E ( A ) M T R U N KC H A L L E N G E

    High Rise

    OBJECTIVE: Design a tower out of newspaper that is as tall as your forearm, can support a tennis ball, and also withstand wind force.

    REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your tower hold more weight or more windforce?

    JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal.

    2 BUILD IT

    Using your plan, build your tower. Dont be afraid to iterate (change) as you build.

    1 DESIGN IT

    Come up with a plan for your tower. Think about how you will use your newspaper (roll, fold, stack, etc.). Which shapes will you use in your design? Which shapes are strongest?

    3 TEST IT

    With the tennis ball in position, put your tower in front of the fan. Does it withstand the force? If so, congratulations! If not, why not? Tweak the design and retry it.

  • 41STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK40

    STEAM TRUNKS

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: High Rise

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8

    Overview: This activity will have the students attempt to make a tower at least 18 tall that can support a tennis ball on top and withstand wind force. They will use newspaper and masking tape for the build.

    Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes

    Approximate Setup Time: 15 minutes

    Approximate Duration: 30 minutes

    Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    RESOURCES

    Equipment/Materials

    Newspaper, tennis ball, mask-ing tape, tabletop fan

    Safety Plan & Mitigations

    Electronics should not be used near water. Fan should not be used if it is raining.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Preparation/Setup

    Place a predetermined amount of newspaper, masking tape, a tennis ball, a paper, a pencil, and the one-pager in each STE(A)M Trunk. Lock the trunks. Set up a fan to provide wind force.

    Guidance During Session

    Welcome students to the STE(A)M Truck. If theyve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de-scription of what theyre about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri-ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager.STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid-ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance.

    Be available to clarify the chal-lenge and provide scaffolding where needed.

    Assessment

    Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal-lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af-terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding.

    Possible discussion questions:

    How did your final design differ from your sketch?What was the strongest way to manipulate the paper (folding, rolling, stacking, etc.)?How did the wind affect your tower?If you could have one more ma-terial for this build, what would it be and why?

    Clean Up

    Have students throw out or keep their newspaper, towers, and drawings. Have them return the masking tape, tennis ball, and pencil to you. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Georgia Performance Standard(s)

    S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of ob-jects. b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction.

    S4P3. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demon-strate the effect of gravitation-al force on the motion of an object.

    Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c)

    other content areas.

    Students are given the oppor-tunity to practically understand the application of forces on structures. This introductory lesson in engineering is a good basis for further understanding in the field. This encounter can enhance their understanding of what they have been (or will be) taught in the classroom.

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

  • 43STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK42

    STEAM TRUNKS

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: Cup Float Jellyfish

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8

    Overview: This activity has the students attempt to make a cup float in the Wind Tube with the added requirement that it have tassels like a jellyfish. It is slight-ly more challenging than the Cup Float as the tassels may af-fect the movement of the object. They will try different iterations of their design, working from sketches through to prototypes until they are successful.

    Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes

    Approximate Setup Time: 10 minutes

    Approximate Duration: 30 minutes

    Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    RESOURCES

    Equipment/Materials

    Wind Tube, Styrofoam cup, pieces of fabric, straws, tape, pipe cleaners, string, scissors, drawing paper, pencils. Table optional.

    Safety Plan & Mitigations

    Electronics should not be used near water. Not to be done outside if it is raining. There are moving parts involved in this activity. Students should wear safety glasses when working with the Wind Tube.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Preparation/Setup

    Set up the Wind Tube and en-sure that it works properly. Ensure that extension cords are secured to minimize the trip hazard. In each STE(A)M Trunk place a Styrofoam cup, string, scis-sors, and an assortment of craft supplies such as piece of fabric, straws, and tape. Also include a piece of paper, a pencil, and a one-pager. Lock the STE(A)M Trunks.

    Guidance During Session

    Welcome students to the STE(A)M Truck. If theyve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de-scription of what theyre about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri-ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager.STE(A)M Trunks are designed

    to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid-ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal-lenge and provide scaffolding where needed.

    Once students are ready to test their design, ensure they are wearing safety glasses and let them place their creation in the Wind Tube. If it floats (and vaguely resembles a jellyfish), they were successful. If not, have them consider why not and make some adjustments to their design.

    Assessment

    Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal-lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af-terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified

    the challenge to push their un-derstanding. Possible discussion questions:

    How did their drawings and ideas about pre-existing float-ing objects inform their design?If the students had previously done the Cup Float Challenge, how did their knowledge of that activity inform how they ap-proached this one?Which designs worked well? Which didnt? Why do they think that is?How did the addition of the extra materials affect the effec-tiveness of their design?Did they collaborate with any of their peers, what did they learn from that experience?What can they explain about what is necessary to make an object float?

    Clean Up

    Have students throw out or keep their drawings and return their cup and pencil to you. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Common Core/Georgia Performance Standard(s)

    S4P3. Students will demon-strate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demonstrate the effect of grav-itational force on the motion of an object.

    Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c)

    other content areas.

    Students are given a hands-on experience with aerodynamics and the movement of air. This can help them begin to under-stand the physics of flight and other practical applications for aerodynamicy.

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

    : MA

    KER KIT

  • 45STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK44

    PLAYBOO

    K CHA

    PTER 3

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    KER KIT

    TAKEAWAYS

    S T E ( A ) M T R U N KC H A L L E N G E

    Floating Cup Jellyfish

    OBJECTIVE: Design and build a floating jelly-fish using the materials provided.

    REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your jellyfish more steady? Can you make it do tricks (spin, flip, etc.)?

    JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal.

    2 BUILD IT

    Build your prototype. Dont be afraid to iterate (change) as you build.

    1 DESIGN IT

    Check out your sup-plies. How could you put them together in a way that will float in the wind tube and look like a jellyfish?

    3 TEST IT

    Place your jellyfish in the wind tube. Does it float? If so, congratulations! If not, why not? Try another design!

    TAKEAWAYS

    S T E ( A ) M T R U N KC H A L L E N G E

    Watercraft

    OBJECTIVE: Design a craft that can float on wa-ter and hold at least 1 lb without sinking.

    REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your craft hold more weight?

    JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal.

    2 BUILD IT

    Build your watercraft. Dont be afraid to iterate (change) as you build.

    1 DESIGN IT

    Check out your materials. Consider how you can put them together to build a craft. Remember that the height, width, and shape can affect how well it floats.

    3 TEST IT

    Give it a try! Place your watercraft in the water and test its buoyancy (floatabil-ity). Did it work? If so, congratulations! If not, why not? Can you tweak it to improve the design?

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    STEAM TRUNKS

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: Watercraft

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 6-8

    Overview: This activity will have the students attempt to make a watercraft that can sup-port at least a pound of weight. They will use only provided materials for the build.

    Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes

    Approximate Setup Time: 15 minutes

    Approximate Duration: 30 minutes

    Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    RESOURCES

    Equipment/Materials

    A few tubs full of water, class-room materials of your choos-ing , a one pound weight, paper, and a pencil

    Safety Plan & Mitigations

    Keep all electronics away from the water.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Preparation/Setup

    Place the classroom materials of your choosing , a paper, a pencil, and the one-pager in each STE(A)M Trunk.

    Lock the trunks.

    Fill the tubs with water. No need to over fill them; they just need enough to allow their crafts to float.

    Guidance During Session

    Welcome students to the STE(A)M Truck. If theyve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de-scription of what theyre about to do.

    The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri-ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager.STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid-

    ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal-lenge and provide scaffolding where needed.

    Once students have completed their craft and are ready to test it out, allow them to carefully place their craft on the water. If it floats on its own they can add the weight. If it floats they were successful. If it doesnt, and if theres time, encourage them to assess what they could do dif-ferently and make adjustments.

    Assessment

    Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal-lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af-terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding.

    Possible discussion questions:

    How did your final design differ from your sketch?What was one technique that really helped your design? Why do you think it worked so well? Or didnt work so well?

    Clean Up

    Have students throw out or keep their watercraft. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub. Dump out the water and if you are indoors, dry up any spilled water.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Georgia Performance Standard(s)

    S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of ob-jects. b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction.

    S4P3. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demon-strate the effect of gravitation-al force on the motion of an object.

    Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c)

    other content areas.

    Students are given the oppor-tunity to practically understand the application of forces on structures. This introductory lesson in engineering is a good basis for further understanding in the field. This encounter can enhance their understanding of what they have been (or will be) taught in the classroom.

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    STEAM TRUNKS

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: Straw Bridge

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8

    Overview: This activity will have the students attempt to make a bridge that can span 12 and support a half pound of weight. They will use drinking straws and scotch tape.

    Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes

    Approximate Setup Time: 10 minutes

    Approximate Duration: 30 minutes

    Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    RESOURCES

    Equipment/Materials

    A table, 20 straws per trunk, scotch tape, scissors, a half pound weight, a paper, and a pencil, two cinder blocks (or anything similar) for the bridge to span.

    Safety Plan & Mitigations

    Follow standard safe practice for using scissors..

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Preparation/Setup

    Place 20 straws, a roll of scotch tape, a pair of scissors, a pa-per, a pencil, and the one-pag-er in each STE(A)M Trunk. Lock the trunks.

    Set up a table with two cinder blocks on top, 12 apart. Their bridges will span this gap.

    Guidance During Session

    Welcome students to the STE(A)M Truck. If theyve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de-scription of what theyre about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri-ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager.STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid-ance. In certain cases, some

    students will require guidance. Be available to clarify the chal-lenge and provide scaffolding where needed.

    Once students have bridges ready to test, have them place their bridge spanning the gap between the cinder blocks. Allow them to slowly place the weight on their bridge. If the bridge doesnt collapse they were successful. If it does collapse, and if they have time, encourage them to consider what went wrong and find a solution.

    Assessment

    Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal-lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af-terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding.

    Possible discussion questions:

    How did your final design differ from your sketch?

    What was one technique that really helped your design?

    Why do you think it worked so well? Or didnt work so well?

    Look at some of the other designs people came up with. Consider some of the types of bridges that youve seen. How could you have built yours differently?

    What shapes did you use in your design? Which shapes do you think are strongest? Squares? Rectangles? Trian-gles? Circles?

    Clean Up

    Have students throw out or keep their bridges and draw-ings. Have them return any straws and tape to you. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Georgia Performance Standard(s)

    S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of ob-jects. b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction.

    S4P3. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demon-strate the effect of gravitation-al force on the motion of an object.

    Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c)

    other content areas.

    Students are given the oppor-tunity to practically understand the application of forces on structures. This introductory lesson in engineering is a good basis for further understanding in the field. This encounter can enhance their understanding of what they have been (or will be) taught in the classroom.

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    TAKEAWAYS

    S T E ( A ) M T R U N KC H A L L E N G E

    Leaning Tower of Pasta

    OBJECTIVE: Design a tower at least 6 high that can support a textbook.

    REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your tower strong enough to support two textbooks?

    JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal.

    2 BUILD IT

    Build your tower. Consider which shapes youre using in your design. Which shapes are strongest?

    1 DESIGN IT

    Check out your sup-plies. How could you put them together in a way that will be at least 6 inches high (a little shorter than a pen) and support a textbook?

    3 TEST IT

    Test your tower by carefully placing a textbook on top. Did it work? If so, con-gratulations! If not, why not? Can you tweak it to improve the design?

    TAKEAWAYS

    S T E ( A ) M T R U N KC H A L L E N G E

    Straw Bridge

    OBJECTIVE: Design and build a bridge that can support a tennis ball.

    REFINE IT: Make small tweaks and re-test. Can you make your bridge span a longer dis-tance or hold more weight?

    JOURNAL IT: Write and sketch your takeaways from this challenge in your journal.

    2 BUILD IT

    Build your bridge. Dont be afraid to iterate (change) as you build.

    1 DESIGN IT

    Come up with a plan for your bridge. Think about which shapes you will use. Which shapes are strongest? Dont forget to design a spot for the ball.

    3 TEST IT

    With the tennis ball in place, put your bridge in position. Does it withstand the weight of the ball? If so, congratulations! If not, why not? Tweak the design and retry.

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    STEAM TRUNKS

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: Leaning Tower of Pasta

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 6-8

    Overview: This activity will have the students attempt to make a tower at least 6 tall that can support a textbook. They will use only spaghetti and marshmallows for the build.

    Approximate Preparation Time: 20 minutes

    Approximate Setup Time: 10 minutes

    Approximate Duration: 30 minutes

    Approximate Clean Up Time: 10 minutes

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    RESOURCES

    Equipment/Materials

    A table, spaghetti, marshmal-lows, small textbook, a paper, and a pencil

    Safety Plan & Mitigations

    For sanitary reasons, encour-age students not to eat the materials.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Preparation/Setup

    Place a predetermined amount of spaghetti and marshmallows, a paper, a pencil, and the one-pager in each STE(A)M Trunk. Lock the trunks. Set up a table for the students to work on.

    Guidance During Session

    Welcome students to the STE(A)M Truck. If theyve never encountered STE(A)M Trunks before, give them a brief de-scription of what theyre about to do. The combination to all of the STE(A)M Trunks is 365. Give the students an age appropri-ate math or trivia question that will have them arrive at that number. Once they solve for 365 they may open their trunk and begin by following the instructions on the one-pager.STE(A)M Trunks are designed to be self-guided. The students should be able to complete the challenge without much guid-ance. In certain cases, some students will require guidance.

    Be available to clarify the chal-lenge and provide scaffolding where needed.

    Once students have built their tower and are ready to test, allow them to slowly place the textbook on top. If it supports the book they were successful. If not, have them consider why not and make adjustments (if possible).

    Assessment

    Because STE(A)M Trunks are short, warm-up style activities there is no formal assessment. Students can self assess their ability to complete the chal-lenge. With self-reflection and possibly a group discussion af-terwards, students can analyze what they did well, what they could have done differently, how they extended or modified the challenge to push their understanding. Possible discussion questions:How did your final design differ from your sketch?What was one technique that really helped your design?

    Why do you think it worked so well? Or didnt work so well?If you could have one more ma-terial for this build, what would it be and why?

    Clean Up

    Have students throw out or keep their towers, and draw-ings. Have them return any unused spaghetti and marsh-mallows, the testbook, and pencil to you. Collect all of the one pagers and put them in the folder. Close all of the STE(A)M Trunks and put them in the tub.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Georgia Performance Standard(s)

    S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of ob-jects. b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction.

    S4P3. Students will demonstrate the relationship between the application of a force and the resulting change in position and motion on an object. d. Demon-strate the effect of gravitation-al force on the motion of an object.

    Connections to (a) prior learning, (b) everyday life, (c)

    other content areas.

    Students are given the oppor-tunity to practically understand the application of forces on structures. This introductory lesson in engineering is a good basis for further understanding in the field. This encounter can enhance their understanding of what they have been (or will be) taught in the classroom.

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    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Georgia Performance Stan-dard(s)

    VA8PR,1 (d) Uses tools and materi-als with craftsmanship (e.g. with care in a safe and appropriate manner).

    VA8C,1 (a) Makes connections to other subjects that help expand art knowledge and /or skills.

    VA8C,2 (b) Integrates information and skills from art into other subject areas to support personal learning-

    VA8MC.1 Engages in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas.

    VA8MC.2 Identifies and works to solves problems through authentic engagement (thinking, planning, and experimenting) with art methods and materials, exploring the nature of creativity.

    STEAM TRUCK: TWO DAY LESSONS

    RESOURCES

    Day 1 (Name Tag)

    Safety Plan: Safety gog-gles when CNC is running, proper protocol for using hot glue guns.

    Materials and Resources: CNC mill 3D printer plywood hot glue gun one magnetic name tag

    backing per person sanding blocks

    Day 2 (Journal)

    Safety Plan: Relatively low-risk day

    Materials and Resources: laser cutter chipboard (2 sheets per

    student) three-hole punched,

    lined paper (20 per student)

    any additional papers necessary

    brads (3 per student) clamps

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    RESOURCES

    Day 1

    Key Goals for the Day: Students will have their own name tags for use for the remainder of the program.

    Prior to lesson, precut the name tags for each student. Allow 3-5 minutes per name.

    (6 min) Introduce the 3D Printer video and the CNC video, show to students and have a brief discussion.

    Instructors pass out the pre-cut Name Tags Split Group 1 into two Groups: Group 1A and Group 1B

    (5 min) Students are brought to the CNC Router where they are shown how it works.

    (5 min) Students are shown how to properly sand using a sanding block and then sand their name tags.

    (5 min) Students are given the opportunity to color their Name Tags using Paint Pens.

    Prior to lesson, precut the journal covers for each student. Allow 1-2 minutes per cover.

    (5 min) Students are brought to the Laser Cutter. Maker Mentor leads a discussion about makers prior knowledge/experience with lasers. Lead into Laser Cutter video. Maker Mentor continues discussion, referencing Additive vs. Subtractive Manufacturing. Similarities/differences to a household printer could be discussed.

    Score the backside of the front cover on the seam side, 1 in from the edge. Fold the score.

    Hold the front and back cover aligned and drill the holes. Use a piece of wood below so as to not drill through the table.

    Assemble journal with covers sandwhiching all sheets of paper.

    Day 2

    Key Goals for the Day: Students will have their own journals.

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: CNC Name Tags & Laser Cut Journals

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8

    Overview: Students will learn about rapid prototyping tech-nologies

    Deliverable: A name tag and journal that will be used by the student for the remainder of the engagement.

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    ASSESSMENT

    Use a rubric to assess a stu-dents competencies in the following categories:

    Student is able to describe the distinction between additive and subtractive manufacturing techniques

    Student can explain the pro-cess of CNC milling, laserc cutting, and 3D printing.

    Student can explain the process of assembling their journal and name tag effec-tively and clearly.

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    STEAM TRUCK: TWO DAY LESSONS

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: Bridge Build

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8

    Overview: Students will work together to build the strongest cardboard bridge that spans a kiddie pool.

    Deliverable: A bridge made of cardboard that students can use to walk across a short span.

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    ASSESSMENT

    Use a rubric to assess a stu-dents competencies in the following categories:

    Student is aware of motives and feelings of other peo-ple and oneself; including the ability to reason within large and small groups.

    Student is able to find solu-tions during conflicts with others

    Student knows when and how to include others , and allows others to speak without interruption

    RESOURCES

    Day 1

    Safety Plan: Guide will give reminder to be careful with scissors, but expects that students have previously learned safety with scissors.

    Materials and Resources: Small whiteboards (1

    per team) Scissors (1 per team) Pencils (5 per team) 2x4s Bricks/blocks Cards Paper (spans)

    Day 2

    Safety Plan: Guide will review safety procedures with students on using glove with knives and glue guns, and wearing goggles with drill.

    Materials and Resources: Scissors (1 per team) Xacto knives (1 per team) Glue guns (6) Hand drill (1 per team) Safety gloves and gog-

    gles (3 per team) Small whiteboards (1 per

    team)

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    RESOURCES

    Day 1

    Key Goals for the Day: Students will forge an understanding about bridge design, construction, and teamwork.

    (5 min) Group leaders will initiate a conversation with stu-dents about traveling on bridge or bridge they have seen on TV. Show video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7uc-3Mqe4_c (start at sec 25)

    (3 min) Maker mentor will introduce project and explain that today will focus on a prototype and testing different bridge structures: truss and beam, straw bridge, paper triangles, Knex.

    (5 min) Students will reflect as a group about what they learned about bridge design, construction, and teamwork. Create individual sketches of bridges in journals.

    (5 min) Maker mentors will help students review information discussed in the previous day. Students will have opportunity to share the sketches they created in the closing activity of previous day.

    Tinker (10 min) Students will manipulate cardboard pieces to create small structures. Student will note how they are able to reinforce and shape the pieces.

    Design (10 min) Groups will revisit the notes they took with previous builds and together, students will combine their ideas into the one theyll build.

    Build (25 min) Students will divide work among students to construct bridge, test & refine, then test over kiddie pool.

    Day 2

    Key Goals for the Day: Students will have constructed the bridge.

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Georgia Performance Stan-dard(s)

    SCSh3. Students will identify and investigate problems scientifically. Suggest reasonable hypotheses for identified problems. Develop procedures for solving scientific problems.

    SPS8. Students will determine relationships among force, mass, and motion. Calculate velocity and acceleration. Apply Newtons three laws to everyday situations by explaining the following: Explain the difference in mass and weight. Calculate amounts of work and mechanical advantage using simple machines.

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    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Georgia Performance Stan-dard(s)

    National Standard 6 The student makes connections to other disciplines and the world through the visual arts. The student develops creativity, critical-thinking, perceptual awareness, and problem-solving skills. The student considers essential questions of art, engages in aesthetic dialogue, and makes efforts to con-struct meaning in the study of art.

    VA6MC.1 -VA8C.1 Applies information from other disciplines to enhance the understanding and production of artworks.a. Makes connections to other sub-jects that help expand art knowledge and /or skills. Engages in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas.

    VA6PR.1 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes.

    M6P4 Students will make connec-tions among mathematical ideas and to other disciplines.

    National Standard 1 Use input technologies appropriately to enter and manipulate text and data.

    STEAM TRUCK: TWO DAY LESSONS

    RESOURCES

    Day 1

    Safety Plan: Relatively low-risk day.

    Materials and Resources: iPads Boxes of Lego Various clamps White board with

    markers

    Day 2

    Safety Plan: Relatively low-risk day

    Materials and Resources: iPads Boxes of Lego Various clamps

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    RESOURCES

    Day 1

    Key Goals for the Day: Create a whiteboard stop motion ani-mation as a group. Plan lego stop motion animations for Day 2.

    (15 min) Ahead of time, have a white board rigged to a wall or fence. Set up an iPad on a tripod facing the sheet. The students will complete a collaborative line drawing that will become a stop motion animation.

    Use the Lego Stop Motion app. Students will take turns drawing. Each mark is built upon

    previous makers mark and must connect. Each maker will be given no more than 10 seconds to draw and then step away. An image will be snapped in the app, next maker goes. Repeat process until complete.

    (15 min) Students will watch and critique finished video live and manipulate speed in the app.

    (5 min) Show class a stop motion clip (Lego movie, etc). Reminder of how image motion in film/video is at a rate of

    about 30 frames per second. How our eyes make motion from a series of still images.

    (10 min) Using their plans from the previous day, have stu-dents make any characters or props required for their video.

    (40 min) The students will work in small groups to create their animations.

    Showcase of all final projects and class-wide discussion Debrief on what went well, what did not go well. What math skills were used to accomplish the task?

    Be sure to document days progress!

    Day 2

    Key Goals for the Day: Film a short stop motion lego animation.

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: Stop Mo-tion

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-8

    Overview: Students will work together to create stop motion animations.

    Deliverable: A short stop mo-tion video.

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    ASSESSMENT

    Use a rubric to assess a stu-dents competencies in the following categories:

    Student works effectively with teammates

    Student is able to explain what stop motion animation is and how it works

    Student is able to produce a smooth animation

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    STEAM TRUCK: TWO DAY LESSONS

    OVERVIEW

    Name of Project: Make a Tes-sellation Mural

    This challenge is best suited for grades: 3-5

    Overview: Students will learn about tessellating art, and cre-ate a large-scale mural of their own design.

    Deliverable: A mural that can be left behind as a wall piece for the school.

    STEAM Focus: Science, Tech-nology, Engineering, Art, and Math

    ASSESSMENT

    Use a rubric to assess a stu-dents competencies in the following categories:

    Student is able to describe the assembly of a tessellat-ing image

    Student understands frac-tions as one part broken down into x amount of sections.

    Student is able to draw,la-bel, and recreate 2D and 3D shapes.

    RESOURCES

    Day 1

    Safety Plan: Relatively low-risk day

    Materials and Resources: whiteboard + Expo

    markers ruler heavy construction

    paper, cut to square pencils tape (masking) scissors

    RESOURCES

    Day 1

    Key Goals for the Day: Students will have their own tessellat-ing tile created and a color scheme for their mural selected.

    Starting with the whole class, Project Leader shows imagery of tessellating art, ie, the art of MC Escher.

    (20 min) Students will follow the step-by-step process (shown left) to construct their own tessellation out of heavy construction paper. (Instructor may consider mounting tessella-tions onto foamcore or cardboard to make them easier to trace later, and more duable. Start with large squares (8.5 x 8.5)

    Students will then select color schemes for their respective parts of the mural, and consid-er how the larger mural will come together.

    Be sure to document days progress!

    As a whole group, brief review of project plan for the day. Brief discussion on time parameters to accomplish task Mount large stock/butcher paper to wall (or spread out on the

    ground if necessary)

    Students will trace their tessellating images on the large piece.

    Set up video camera to record. One student titled documentari-an will assist the instructor in setting up the camera and framing it, then will be tasked with checking it periodically to ensure that it is still capturing footage.

    Paint/color tessellating images to complete the mural. Showcase of all final projects and class-wide discussion

    Day 2

    Safety Plan: Relatively low-risk day

    Materials and Resources: whiteboard + Expo

    markers completed tessellations

    from previous day butcher paper (or thick

    stock of something, wood, cardboard, etc)

    1 large sheet per class markers (washable and

    sharpies) acrylic paints & brushes

    Day 2

    Key Goals for the Day: Completed tessellating mural!

    LEARNING SEQUENCE

    Georgia Performance Stan-dard(s)

    MGSE3.OA.9 Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends.

    MGSE3.NF.1 Understand a frac-tion 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts (unit fraction); under-stand a faction a b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b. For example, 3/4 means there are three 1/4 parts, so 3/4 = 1/4+ 1/4 + 1/4.

    MGSE3.NF.2 Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram.

    MGSE3.NF.3 Explain equivalence of fractions through reasoning with visual fraction models. Compare frac-tions by reasoning about their size. a. Understand two fractions as equiva-lent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.

  • 63STEAMTRUCK.ORG

    "What we are learning from STE(A)M Truck is how to teach the creative thinking behind the science. Schools need to be as engaging as the STE(A)M Truck."GILBERTE PASCALTHE KINDEZI SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

    3D printera type of industrial robot which creates objects by laying successive layers of material under computer control to create an object. These objects can be of almost any shape or geometry and are produced from a 3D model or other electronic data source.

    additive manufacturingdescribes the technologies that build 3D objects by adding layer-upon-layer of material, whether the material is plastic, metal, concrete, and even food. Common to AM technologies is the use of a computer, 3D modeling software (Computer Aided Design or CAD), machine equipment and layering material.

    computational thinkinga problem solving process that includes (but is not limitedto) the following characteristics Formulating problems in a

    way the enables us to use a computer and other tools

    to help solve them. Logically organizing and

    analyzing data Representing data through

    abstractions such as models and simulations

    Automating solutions through algorithmic thinking

    Identifying, analyzing, and implementing possible solutions with the goal of

    achieving the most efficient and effective combination of steps and resources

    CNC millCNC, or Computer Numerical Control, refers to the automation of machine tools that are operated by precisely programmed commands encoded on a storage medium, as opposed to controlled manually by hand wheels or levers, or mechanically automated by cams alone. A CNC mill computer controls the process of milling -- removing layers from the surface of a flat piece of material. CNC milling is a type of subtractive manufacturing.

    design thinkingdesign-specific cognitive activities that designers apply during the process of designing. Consists of the following steps, which can be repeated, and are nonlinear: empathize define

    ideate prototype test

    iterative design processa design methodology based on a cyclic process of prototyping, testing, analyzing, and refining a product or process. Based on the results of testing the most recent iteration of a design, changes and refinements are made.

    laser cuttera technology that uses a laser to cut materials. The focused laser beam is directed at the material, which then either melts, burns, vaporizes away, or is blown away by a jet of gas,[1] leaving an edge with a high-quality surface finish. Laser cutting is a type of subtractive manufacturing.

    maker-mentorsSTE(A)M Trucks full time educators with maker or technical backgrounds.

    maker movementa contemporary culture or subculture representing a technology-based extension of DIY culture, which often includes engineering-oriented pursuits such as electronics,

    GLOSSARY

  • 65STEAMTRUCK.ORGSTE(A)M TRUCK PLAYBOOK64

    robotics, 3-D printing, and the use of CNC tools, as well as more traditional activities such as metalworking, woodworking, and, mainly, its predecessor, the traditional arts and crafts

    makerspacea community-operated workspace where people with common interests, often in computers, machining, technology, science, digital art or electronic art, can meet, socialize and collaborate.

    metacognitiondefined as cognition about cognition, or knowing about knowing. It can take many forms; it includes knowledge about when and how to use particular strategies for learning or for problem solving.

    modela visual, mathematical, or three-dimensional representation in detail of anobject or design, often smaller than the original. A model is often used to test ideas,make changes to a design, and to learn more about what would happen to a similar,real object.

    response to intervention a multi-tier approach to the early identification and support of students with learning and behavior needs.

    spatial thinkinga cognitive skill that can be used to structure problems, findanswer, and express solutions using the properties of space.

    STE(A)M an acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math, this is an approach to teaching and learning that integrates the content and skills of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. STEM Standards of Practice guide STEM instruction by defining the combination of behaviors, integrated with STEM content, which is expected of a proficient STEM student. These behaviors include engagement in inquiry, logical reasoning, collaboration, and investigation.

    STE(A)M TrunksSTE(A)M Trucks hands-on energizer kits, these are self-contained activities that are able to fit inside of a trunk a little smaller than a shoe box, with a

    combination lock.

    subtractive manufacturingany of various processes in which a piece of raw material is cut into a desired final

    transdisciplinarythe transdisciplinary approach to integration, teachers organizecurriculum around student questions and concerns. Students develop life skills as they apply interdisciplinary and disciplinary skills in a real-life context. Two routes lead totransdisciplinary integration- project-based learning and negotiating the curriculum.

    RESOURCES

    Still cant get enough? Try these websites and resources for more information on Mak-ing and STE(A)M.

    makered.org makezine.com slomakerspace.com sparktruck.org www.startcode.net steamtruck.org stemtosteam.org theconnectory.org

    PARTNERS & SUPPORTERS

  • Community Guilds

    c/o Center of Civic Innovation Third Floor

    115 M.L.K. Jr Dr

    NW, Atlanta, GA 30303

    steamtruck.org

    Playbook by Sarah Lashinsky, 2016

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