+ All Categories
Home > Documents > COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V...

COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V...

Date post: 02-Mar-2020
Category:
Upload: others
View: 10 times
Download: 0 times
Share this document with a friend
of 42 /42
B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 0 SYLLABUS SESSION: (2018-19) COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES P. G. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY MATA GUJRI COLLEGE Fatehgarh Sahib (AN AUTONOMOUS COLLEGE) Affiliated to Punjabi University, Patiala
Transcript
Page 1: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 0

SYLLABUS SESSION: (2018-19)

COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry

FACULTY OF SCIENCES P. G. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

MATA GUJRI COLLEGE

Fatehgarh Sahib

(AN AUTONOMOUS COLLEGE) Affiliated to Punjabi University, Patiala

Page 2: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 1

SYLLABUS

B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry

Semester V and VI

NOTE: Students has to choose two Discipline Specific Elective Papers in Semesters V & VI, one

each from various options of (BHC 503, BHC 504) and ( BHC 603, BHC 604) respectively.

Paper Code Title of Paper No. of

Lectures L T P

(Credits)

Max. Marks (External+Internal) Pass Percentage

40%

SEMESTER V

BHC 501 Organic Chemistry- IV 60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 501 (P) Organic Chemistry- IV Lab 60 0 0 2 (2) 50

BHC 502 Physical Chemistry-V 60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 502 (P) Physical Chemistry-V Lab 60 0 0 2 (2) 50

BHC 503 A Inorganic Materials of Industrial Importance

60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 503 A (P) Inorganic Materials of Industrial Importance Lab

60 0 0 2 (2) 50

OR

BHC 503 B Novel Inorganic Solids 60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 503 B (P) Novel Inorganic Solids Lab 60 0 0 2 (2) 50

BHC 504 A Statistical Thermodynamics 60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 504 A (P) Physical Chemistry Lab 60 0 0 2 (2) 50

OR

BHC 504 B Research Methodology 60 5 1 0 (6) 100

Page 3: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 2

Paper Code Title of Paper No. of

Lectures L T P

(Credits)

Max. Marks (External+Internal)

Pass Percentage 40%

SEMESTER VI

BHC 601 Inorganic Chemistr- IV 60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 601 (P) Inorganic Chemistry-IV Lab

60 0 0 2 (2) 50

BHC 602 Organic Chemistry-V 60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 602 (P) Organic Chemistry-V Lab 60 0 0 2 (2) 50

BHC 603 A Polymer Chemistry 60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 603 A (P) Polymer Chemistry Lab 60 0 0 2 (2) 50

OR

BHC 603 B Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 603 B (P) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab

60 0 0 2 (2) 50

BHC 604 A Analytical Methods in Chemistry

60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 604 A (P) Analytical Methods in Chemistry Lab

60 0 0 2 (2) 50

OR

BHC 604 B Solid State and Radiation Chemistry

60 4 0 0 (4) 100

(75+25)

BHC 604 B (P) Physical Chemistry Lab 60 0 0 2 (2) 50

Page 4: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 3

Semester V

Core Course XI

BHC-501: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-IV Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hrs.

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Lectures

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining

to B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of

the UGC module and demand of the academic environment. This paper is designed in such a

manner that students will be able to identify the structure and function of macromolecules.

Instructions for the Paper-Setter The question paper will consist of three units: I, II and III. Unit I and II will have four questions

from each unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9 questions from

the whole syllabus and will be of 3 marks each.

Instructions for the Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from units: I and II, unit III is compulsory.

Note: Internal assessment will be given on the basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance

(6), assignments/quiz (7).

UNIT-I Carbohydrates

Occurrence, classification and their biological importance.

Monosaccharides: Constitution and absolute configuration of glucose and fructose, epimers and

anomers, mutarotation, determination of ring size of glucose and fructose, Haworth projections

and conformational structures; Interconversions of aldoses and ketoses; Killiani-Fischer synthesis

and Ruff degradation.

Disaccharides – Structure elucidation of maltose, lactose and sucrose.

Polysaccharides – Elementary treatment of starch, cellulose and glycogen. (16 Lectures)

Nucleic Acids

Components of nucleic acids, Nucleosides and nucleotides; Structure, synthesis and reactions of:

Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, Uracil and Thymine; Structure of polynucleotides. (9 Lectures)

Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins

Amino acids, Peptides and their classification. α-Amino Acids - Synthesis, ionic properties and

reactions. Zwitterions, pKa values, isoelectric point and electrophoresis; Study of peptides:

determination of their primary structures-end group analysis, methods of peptide synthesis.

Synthesis of peptides using N-protecting, C-protecting and C-activating groups. Solid-phase

Page 5: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 4

synthesis, Classical peptide synthesis. structure of peptides and proteins, level of protein structure,

protein denaturation/renaturation. (16 Lectures)

UNIT-II Enzymes

Introduction, classification and characteristics of enzymes. Salient features of active site of

enzymes. Mechanism of enzyme action (taking trypsin as example), factors affecting enzyme action,

coenzymes and cofactors and their role in biological reactions, specificity of enzyme action

(including stereospecificity), enzyme inhibitors and their importance, phenomenon of inhibition

(competitive, uncompetitive and non-competitive inhibition including allosteric inhibition).

(8 Lectures)

Lipids

Introduction to oils and fats; common fatty acids present in oils and fats, Hydrogenntion of fats and

oils, Saponification value, acid value, iodine number. Reversion and rancidity.

(8 Lectures)

Concept of Energy in Biosystems

Cells obtain energy by the oxidation of foodstuff (organic molecules).Introduction to metabolism

(catabolism, anabolism). ATP: The universal currency of cellular energy, ATP hydrolysis and free

energy change. Agents for transfer of electrons in biological redox systems: NAD+, FAD. Conversion

of food to energy: Outline of catabolic pathways of carbohydrate- glycolysis, fermentation, Kreb’s

cycle. Overview of catabolic pathways of fat and protein. Interrelationship in the metabolic

pathways of protein, fat and carbohydrate. Caloric value of food, standard caloric content of food

types. (7 Lectures)

Reference Books:

Berg, J.M., Tymoczko, J.L. & Stryer, L. (2006) Biochemistry. 6th Ed. W.H. Freeman and Co.

Nelson, D.L., Cox, M.M. & Lehninger, A.L. (2009) Principles of Biochemistry. IV Edition. W.H.

Freeman and Co.

Murray, R.K., Granner, D.K., Mayes, P.A. & Rodwell, V.W. (2009) Harper’s Illustrated

Biochemistry. XXVIII edition. Lange Medical Books/ McGraw-Hill.

Gurdeep R.Chatwal,The Chemistry of Organic Natural Products,Himalaya publishing House

Vol.2

I.L.Finar, Organic Chemistry,Volume 1(sixth edition)Pearson education

F.A.Carey, R.M.Giuliano, Organic Chemistry, McGraw-Hill Education(9th ed.)

S.P.Singh, Kapoor R.P.Singh, S.M.Mukherji,Organic Chemistry Vol. I & II

Page 6: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 5

BHC-501 (P): ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-IV LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02)

1. Estimation of glycine by Sorenson’s formalin method.

2. Study of the titration curve of glycine.

3. Estimation of proteins by Lowry’s method/Biuret method

4. Saponification value of an oil or a fat.

5. Determination of Iodine number of an oil/ fat.

6. Analysis of Carbohydrate: aldoses and ketoses, reducing and non-reducing sugars.

7. Estimation of Glycerin with Periodic acid.

8. Estimation of Carbohydrates (Glucose, Sucrose after hydrolysis) using Benedict’s reagent.

9. Estimation of Vitamin C.

10. Qualitative analysis of unknown organic compounds containing functional groups:

(a) Carbohydrates, aryl halides, aromatic hydrocarbons, nitro compounds, amines

and amides).

(b) Melting point, derivative preparation TLC for checking the purity and effectiveness of

separation.

Reference Books:

Manual of Biochemistry Workshop, 2012, Department of Chemistry, University

of Delhi.

Arthur, I. V. Quantitative Organic Analysis, Pearson.

Vogel A. I., Tatchell A. R., Furnis B. S., Hannaford A. J., Smith P.W.G.,Vogel’s Text Book of

Practical Organic Chemistry,5th Edn.,Pubs: ELBS, 1989.

Pavia D.L., Lampanana G.M., Kriz G.S. Jr., Introduction to Organic Laboratory Techniques,

3rd Edn., Pubs: Thomson Brooks/Cole,2005.

Mann F.G., Saunders. P.C, Practical Organic Chemistry, Pubs: Green & Co. Ltd., London, 1978.

Bassett, J., Denney, R.C., Jeffery, G.H., Mendham, J., Vogel’s Textbook of Quantitative chemical

Analysis (revised); 5th edition, Pubs: Longman Scientific and Technical, 1989.

Vogel ,Inorganic Quantitative analysis .

Page 7: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 6

Core Course XII

BHC-502: PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY-V

Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hrs

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: Theory-04) Theory: 60 Hrs.

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academic environment. Major goals of quantum chemistry include

increasing the accuracy of the results for small molecular systems.

Instructions for the Paper Setter The question paper will consist of 3 units: Unit I, II and III .Unit I and II will have four questions

each from the respective unit of the syllabus and will carry12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9

questions from the whole syllabus and will carry 3 marks each.

Instructions for Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions from unit I and unit II and unit III is compulsory.

NOTE: Internal assessment will be given on basis of mid semester test (12),

classperformance(6),assignment/quiz/seminar (7).

UNIT-I Quantum Chemistry

Postulates of quantum mechanics, quantum mechanical operators, Schrödinger equation and its

application to free particle and “particle in one dimensional box” (rigorous treatment), solution of

particle in three dimensional box, quantization of energy levels, zero-point energy and Heisenberg

Uncertainty principle; wavefunctions, probability distribution functions, nodal properties.

Qualitative treatment of simple harmonic oscillator model of vibrational motion: Setting up

of Schrödinger equation and discussion of solution and wavefunctions, Vibrational energy of

diatomic molecules and zero-point energy.

Angular momentum: Quantum mechanical operator for angular momentum, ladder operator.

Rigid rotator model of rotation of diatomic molecule, Schrödinger equation, transformation to

spherical polar coordinates, Separation of variables Spherical harmonics. Setting up of Schrödinger

equation for many-electron atoms (He, Li), Need for approximation methods, Statement of

variation theorem and application to simple systems (particle-in-a-box, harmonic oscillator,

hydrogen atom).

Page 8: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 7

Chemical bonding: Covalent bonding, valence bond and molecular orbital approaches, LCAO-MO

treatment of H2+, Bonding and antibonding orbitals, Qualitative extension to H2 Comparison of

LCAO-MO and VB treatments of H2 (only wavefunctions, detailed solution not required) and their

limitations, Bond order, charge density calculation, free valance, applications of Huckel’s MOT to

ethylene, butadiene, cyclopropane.

(24 Lectures)

UNIT-II Molecular Spectroscopy: Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with molecules and various

types of spectra, Born Oppenheimer approximation.

Rotation spectroscopy: Selection rules, intensities of spectral lines, determination of bond lengths

of diatomic and linear triatomic molecules, isotopic substitution.

Vibrational spectroscopy: Classical equation of vibration, computation of force constant,

amplitude of diatomic molecular vibrations, anharmonicity, dissociation energies, fundamental

frequencies, overtones, degrees of freedom for polyatomic molecules, modes of vibration, concept

of group frequencies.

Vibration-rotation spectroscopy: Diatomic vibrating rotator, P, Q, R branches. Raman

spectroscopy: Qualitative treatment of Rotational Raman effect; Effect of nuclear spin, Vibrational

Raman spectra, Stokes and anti-Stokes lines, their intensity difference, rule of mutual exclusion.

Electronic spectroscopy: Franck-Condon principle, electronic transitions, singlet and triplet

states, fluorescence and phosphorescence, dissociation and predissociation.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy: Principles of NMR spectroscopy, Larmor

precession, chemical shift and low resolution spectra, different scales, spin-spin coupling and high

resolution spectra, interpretation of PMR spectra of organic molecules (ROH,CHO, RH, >C=O,

aromatic).

Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy: Its principle, hyperfine structure, ESR of simple

radicals(ĊH3, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Deutrium complexes).

(24 Lectures)

Photochemistry

Characteristics of electromagnetic radiation, Lambert-Beer’s law and its limitations, physical

significance of absorption coefficients. Laws of photochemistry, quantum yield, actinometry

(ferrioxalate), examples of low and high quantum yields, photochemical equilibrium and the

differential rate of photochemical reactions, photosensitised reactions, quenching. Role of

photochemical reactions in biochemical processes, photostationarystates, chemiluminescence.

(12 Lectures)

Page 9: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 8

Reference Books:

Banwell, C.N. & McCash, E. M. Fundamentals of Molecular Spectroscopy 4th Ed. Tata

McGraw-Hill: New Delhi (2006).

Quantum Chemistry by R.K Prasad Fourth Revised Edition.

House, J. E. Fundamentals of Quantum Chemistry 2nd Ed. Elsevier: USA (2004).

Kakkar, R. Atomic & Molecular Spectroscopy: Concepts & Applications, Cambridge

University Press (2015).

Lowe, J. P. & Peterson, K. Quantum Chemistry, Academic Press (2005).

B.R.Puri, L.R.Sharma, M.S.Pathania, Principles of Physical Chemistry.

Page 10: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 9

BHC-502 (P): PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY-V LAB Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

1. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of KBr using adsorption

indicator (Eosin).

2. To determine the dissociation constant of phenolphthalein.

3. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of KI by titrating against standard KIO3

solution.

Conductance:

4. To determine the strength of HCl and CH3COOH solution by titrating it against NaOH

conductometrically.

5. To determine the strength and composition of mixture of HCl and CH3COOH solution by

titrating it against NaOH conductometrically.

Potentiometer:

6. To determine the strength of FeSO4.7H2O solution by titrating it against standard KMnO4

solution potentiometerically.

7. To determine the strength of strong acid by titrating it against strong base

potentiometerically.

Colorimetery:

8. To determine the strength of Fe3+ in tap water spectrophotometrically (Record of λmax).

9. Verify Lambert-Beer’s law and determine the concentration of CuSO4/KMnO4/K2Cr2O7 in a

solution of unknown concentration .

Reference Books:

Khosla, B. D.; Garg, V. C. & Gulati, A., Senior Practical Physical Chemistry, R. Chand & Co.:

New Delhi (2011).

Garland, C. W.; Nibler, J. W. & Shoemaker, D. P. Experiments in Physical Chemistry 8th Ed.;

McGraw-Hill: New York (2003).

Halpern, A. M. &McBane, G. C. Experimental Physical Chemistry 3rd Ed.; W.H. Freeman & Co.:

New York (2003).

Jagdamba Singh, R.K.P.Singh, Jaya Singh, L.D.S Yadav, I.R Siddiqui, Jaya Srivastava Advanced

Practical Chemistry.

Khosla, B. D.; Garg, V. C. & Gulati, A. Senior Practical Physical Chemistry, R.Chand& Co.: New

Delhi (2011).

V K Ahluwalia, SunitaDhingra, Adarsh Gulati, Practical Chemistry.

O.P.Pandey, D.N.Bajpai, S.Giri, Practical Chemistry.

Page 11: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 10

Discipline Specific Elective-I

BHC-503 A: INORGANIC MATERIALS OF INDUSTRIAL IMPORTANCE Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hrs

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Lectures

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academic environment. The syllabus contents are duly arranged

unit wise and contents are included in such a manner so that due importance is given to requisite

intellectual and laboratory skills.

Instructions for the Paper-Setter The question paper will consist of three units: I, II and III. Unit I and II will have four questions

from each unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9 questions from

the whole syllabus and will be of 3 marks each.

Instructions for the Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from units: I and II, unit III is compulsory.

Note: Internal assessment will be given on the basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance

(6), assignments/quiz (7).

UNIT-I Silicate Industries:

Glass: Glassy state and its properties, classification (silicate and non-silicate glasses).Manufacture and

processing of glass. Composition and properties of the following types of glasses: Soda lime glass, lead

glass, armoured glass, safety glass, borosilicate glass, fluorosilicate, coloured glass, photosensitive

glass.

Ceramics: Important clays and feldspar, ceramic, their types and manufacture. High technology

ceramics and their applications, superconducting and semiconducting oxides, fullerenes carbon

nanotubes and carbon fibre.

Cements: Classification of cement, ingredients and their role, Manufacture of cement and the

setting process, quick setting cements.

(14 Lectures)

Fertilizer Industries:

Different types of fertilizers. Manufacture of the following fertilizers: Urea, ammonium nitrate,

calcium ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates; polyphosphate, superphosphate, compound

and mixed fertilizers, potassium chloride, potassium sulphate. (8 Lectures)

Surface Coatings:

Page 12: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 11

Objectives of coatings surfaces, preliminary treatment of surface, classification of surface coatings.

Paints and pigments-formulation, composition and related properties. (8 Lectures)

UNIT-II Oil and Fats Industry:

Natural source of oils and fats. Structure of oils and fats. Mechanical expression and solvent

extraction methods for recovery of oil from oil seeds. Rancidification of oils and fats. Refining,

bleaching, deodorization and hydrogenation of oils and fats (manufacture of vanaspati). Fat

splitting by continuous processes. Recovery of glycerine. Raw materials and manufacture of soap.

Classification of detergents. (10 Lectures)

Alloys:

Classification of alloys, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys, Specific properties of elements in alloys.

Manufacture of Steel (removal of silicon decarbonization, demanganization, desulphurization

dephosphorisation) and surface treatment (argon treatment, heat treatment, nitriding, carburizing).

Composition and properties of different types of steels. (10 Lectures)

Catalysis:

General principles and properties of catalysts, homogenous catalysis (catalytic steps and examples)

and heterogenous catalysis (catalytic steps and examples) and their industrial applications,

Deactivation or regeneration of catalysts. Phase transfer catalysts, application of zeolites as

catalysts. (6 Lectures)

Chemical explosives:

Origin of explosive properties in organic compounds, preparation and explosive properties of lead

azide, PETN, cyclonite (RDX). Introduction to rocket propellants. (4 Lectures)

Reference Books:

E. Stocchi: Industrial Chemistry, Vol-I, Ellis Horwood Ltd. UK.

R.M. Felder, R.W. Rousseau: Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, Wiley

Publishers, New Delhi.

W. D. Kingery, H. K. Bowen, D. R. Uhlmann: Introduction to Ceramics, Wiley Publishers, New

Delhi.

J. A. Kent: Riegel’s Handbook of Industrial Chemistry, CBS Publishers, New Delhi.

P.C. Jain, M. Jain: Engineering Chemistry, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, Delhi.

R. Gopalan, D. Venkappayya, S. Nagarajan: Engineering Chemistry, Vikas Publications, New

Delhi.

Sharma, B.K. & Gaur, H. Industrial Chemistry, Goel Publishing House, Meerut (1996).

Page 13: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 12

BHC-503 A (P): INORGANIC MATERIALS OF INDUSTRIAL IMPORTANCE LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02) 1. Determination of free acidity in ammonium sulphate fertilizer.

2. Estimation of Calcium in Calcium ammonium nitrate fertilizer.

3. Determination of composition of alloy (by complexometric titration).

4. Analysis of (Cu, Ni); (Cu, Zn ) in alloy or synthetic samples.

5. Analysis of Cement.

6. Preparation of pigment (zinc oxide).

Reference Books:

E. Stocchi: Industrial Chemistry, Vol-I, Ellis Horwood Ltd. UK.

R. M. Felder, R. W. Rousseau: Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, Wiley

Publishers, New Delhi.

W. D. Kingery, H. K. Bowen, D. R. Uhlmann: Introduction to Ceramics, Wiley

Publishers, New Delhi.

J. A. Kent: Riegel’s Handbook of Industrial Chemistry, CBS Publishers, New Delhi.

P. C. Jain, M. Jain: Engineering Chemistry, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, Delhi.

R. Gopalan, D. Venkappayya, S. Nagarajan: Engineering Chemistry, Vikas Publications, New

Delhi.

Page 14: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 13

Discipline Specific Elective-I

BHC-503 B: NOVEL INORGANIC SOLIDS Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hr.s

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Lectures

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academic environment. The course contents have been revised

from time to time as per suggestions of the teachers of the Chemistry . The syllabus contents are

duly arranged unit wise and contents are included in such a manner so that due importance is

given to requisite intellectual and laboratory skills.

Instructions for the Paper-Setter The question paper will consist of three units: I, II and III. Unit I and II will have four questions

from each unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9 questions from

the whole syllabus and will be of 3 marks each.

Instructions for the Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from units: I and II, unit III is compulsory.

Note: Internal assessment will be given on the basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance

(6), assignments/quiz (7).

UNIT-I Synthesis and modification of inorganic solids:

Conventional heat and beat methods, Co-precipitation method, Sol-gel methods, Hydrothermal

method, Ion-exchange and Intercalation methods. (10 Lectures)

Inorganic solids of technological importance:

Solid electrolytes – Cationic, anionic, mixed Inorganic pigments – coloured solids, white andblack

pigments.Molecular material and fullerides, molecular materials & chemistry – one-dimensional

metals, molecular magnets, inorganic liquid crystals. (10 Lectures)

Nanomaterials:

Overview of nanostructures and nanomaterials: classification. Preparation of gold and silver

metallic nanoparticles, self-assembled nanostructures-controlof nanoarchitecture-one dimensional

control. Carbon nanotubes and inorganic nanowires. Bio-inorganic nanomaterials, DNA and

nanomaterials, natural and antisical nanomaterials, bio nano composites. (10 Lectures)

UNIT-II Introduction to engineering materials for mechanical construction:

Page 15: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 14

Composition, mechanical and fabricating characteristics and applications of various types of cast

irons, plain carbon and alloy steels, copper, aluminum and their alloys like Uralumin, brasses and

bronzes cutting tool materials, super alloys thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials.

(10 Lectures)

Composite materials:

Introduction, limitations of conventional engineering materials, role of matrix in composites,

classification, matrix materials, reinforcements, metal-matrix composites, polymer-matrix

composites, fibre-reinforced composites, environmental effects on composites, applications of

composites.

(10 Lectures)

Speciality polymers:

Conducting polymers - Introduction, conduction mechanism, polyacetylene, polyparaphenylene

and polypyrrole, applications of conducting polymers, Ion-exchange resins and their applications.

Ceramic & Refractory: Introduction, classification, properties, raw materials, manufacturing and

applications.

(10 Lectures)

Reference Books:

Shriver & Atkins. Inorganic Chemistry, Peter Alkins, Tina Overton, Jonathan

Rourke, Mark Weller and Fraser Armstrong, 5th Edition, Oxford University Press

(2011-2012)

Adam, D.M. Inorganic Solids: An introduction to concepts in solid-state structural

chemistry. John Wiley & Sons, 1974.

Poole, C.P. & Owens, F.J. Introduction to Nanotechnology John Wiley & Sons, 2003.

Rodger, G.E. Inorganic and Solid State Chemistry, Cengage Learning India Edition.

Page 16: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 15

BHC-503 B (P): NOVEL INORGANIC SOLIDS LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02)

1. Determination of cation exchange method

2. Determination of total difference of solids.

3. Synthesis of hydrogel by co-precipitation method.

4. Synthesis of silver and gold metal nanoparticles.

Reference Book:

Fahlman, B.D. Materials Chemistry, Springer, 2004.

Page 17: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 16

Discipline Specific Elective –II

BHC-504 A: STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS

Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hrs.

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits:04) Theory: 60 Hrs.

Objective of the Course The objective of statistical thermodynamics is to give a molecular basis for thermodynamics. To

provide an introduction to the concepts of phase space and phase integral, temperature and

chemical potential. Student will learn to recognize, define, and solve problems in equilibrium

thermodynamics and statistical thermodynamics.

Instructions for the Paper Setter The question paper will consist of 3 units: Unit I, II and III .Unit I and II will have four questions

each from the respective unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist

of 9 questions from the whole syllabus and will carry 3 marks each.

Instructions for Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from unit I and unit II. unit III is

compulsory.

NOTE: Internal assessment will be given on basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance (6),

assignment/quiz/seminar (7)

UNIT-I Quantum Statistics

Recapitulation of classical statistics and partition function, comparison between Maxwell-

Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics, thermodynamic probability, statistics of

monatomic ideal gas, principle of equipartition of energy, barometric equation, theory of

paramagnetism,. thermionic emission.

Gaseous State

Classical and quantum mechanical treatments of specific heats of ideal diatomic gases, vibrational,

rotational and electronic contributions to the specific heats of diatomic gases, fine correction due to

rotation-vibration coupling for diatomic gases, ortho and para hydrogens, polyatomic gases, gas

mixture and entropy of mixing. (30 Lectures)

UNIT II

Solid State:

Page 18: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 17

Classical treatment of specific heat of solids, Einstein and Debye theories of specific heats, Debye's

T3 law, entropy of solids, equation of state of solids, order and disorder and the melting point.

Fluctuations:

Means distribution, mean square deviation, fluctuations in energy in a canonical ensemble, density

fluctuation in a gas. Theory of Brownian motion and Brownian motion of galvanometer.

Irreversible Processes

Introduction, entropy production, coupled phenomena, transport parameters, thermoelectric

phenomena, The Seebeck effect, Peltier effect and Thomson effect.

(30 Lectures)

Reference books:

J.F. Lee, F. W. Sears and D.L. Turcotte, Statistical Thermodynamics.

F.L. Hill, Introduction to Statistical Thermodynamics.

M.C. Gupta, Statistical Thermodynamics.

Peter Atkins, Quantum Chemistry, Spectroscopy and Statistical Thermodynamics, Vol. II

Page 19: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 18

BHC-504 A (P)-PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02)

1. To determine the density of given liquids with the help of pyknometer.

2. To find out the value of coefficient of expansion for the given liquid with the help of

pyknometer.

Refractometry:

3. To find out the molar refractivities of homologous series of alcohols and also find out the

atomic refractivities of C and H.

4. To find out the molar refractivity of the given solid.

Chemical Kinetic:

5. To find out the equilibrium constant for the given reaction, KI+I2 = KI3 by partition method.

6. To determine the rate constant of the hydrolysis of ethyl acetate catalysed by an acid and

also find out the half life period of the reaction.

7. To determine the order of saponification of ethyl acetate with NaOH.

Polarimetry:

8. To find the specific rotation and molar rotation of optically active substances.

9. To find the strength of optically active substance in the given solution.

10. To determine the order of reaction and velocity constant for the inversion of cane sugar in

acidic medium.

11. To find the percentage of d-sugar and d-tartaric acid in the given solution.

References:

1. Jagdamba Singh, R.K.P. Singh, Jaya Singh, L.D.S Yadav, I.R Siddiqui, Jaya Srivastava

Advanced Practical Chemistry.

2. B. D. Khosla,; V.C. Garg, & Gulati, A. Senior Practical Physical Chemistry, R. Chand& Co.:

New Delhi (2011).

3. V K Ahluwalia, Sunita Dhingra, Adarsh Gulati, Practical Chemistry.

4. O.P. Pandey, D.N. Bajpai, S. Giri, Practical Chemistry.

5. B. Vishwanathan, P.S. Raghavan, Practical Physical Chemistry.

Page 20: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 19

BHC-504 B: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hrs.

External Examination:75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Lectures

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academic environment. The course contents have been revised

from time to time as per suggestions of the teachers of the Chemistry . The syllabus contents are

duly arranged unit wise and contents are included in such a manner so that due importance is given

to requisite intellectual and laboratory skills.

Instructions for the Paper-Setter The question paper will consist of three units: I, II and III. Unit I and II will have four questions from

each unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9 questions from the

whole syllabus and will be of 3 marks each.

Instructions for the Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from units: I and II, unit III is compulsory.

Note: Internal assessment will be given on the basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance

(6), assignments/quiz (7).

UNIT-I Literature Survey:

Print: Sources of information: Primary, secondary, tertiary sources; Journals: Journal

abbreviations, abstracts, current titles, reviews, monographs, dictionaries, text-books, current

contents, Introduction to Chemical Abstracts and Beilstein, Subject Index, Substance Index, Author

Index, Formula Index, and other Indices with examples.

Digital: Web resources, E-journals, Journal access, TOC alerts, Hot articles, Citation index, Impact

factor, H-index, E-consortium, UGC infonet, E-books, Internet discussion groups and communities,

Blogs, Preprint servers, Search engines, Scirus, Google Scholar, ChemIndustry, Wiki- Databases,

ChemSpider, Science Direct, SciFinder, Scopus.

Information Technology and Library Resources: The Internet and World Wide Web. Internet

resources for chemistry. Finding and citing published information. (20 Lectures)

Methods of Scientific Research and Writing Scientific Papers:

Reporting practical and project work. Writing literature surveys and reviews. Organizing a poster

display. Giving an oral presentation.

Page 21: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 20

Writing scientific papers – justification for scientific contributions, bibliography, description of

methods, conclusions, the need for illustration, style, publications of scientific work. Writing

ethics. Avoiding plagiarism. (20 Lectures)

UNIT-II Chemical Safety and Ethical Handling of Chemicals:

Safe working procedure and protective environment, protective apparel, emergency procedure

and first aid, laboratory ventilation. Safe storage and use of hazardous chemicals, procedure for

working with substances that pose hazards, flammable or explosive hazards, procedures for

working with gases at pressures above or below atmospheric – safe storage and disposal of waste

chemicals, recovery, recycling and reuse of laboratory chemicals, procedure for laboratory

disposal of explosives, identification, verification and segregation of laboratory waste, disposal of

chemicals in the sanitary sewer system, incineration and transportation of hazardous chemicals.

(12 Lectures)

Data Analysis

The Investigative Approach: Making and Recording Measurements. SI Units and their use.

Scientific method and design of experiments.

Analysis and Presentation of Data: Descriptive statistics. Choosing and using statistical tests.

Chemometrics. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Correlation and regression, Curve fitting, fitting of

linear equations, simple linear cases, weighted linear case, analysis of residuals, General

polynomial fitting, linearizing transformations, exponential function fit, r and its abuse. Basic

aspects of multiple linear regression analysis. (13 Lectures)

Electronics

Basic fundamentals of electronic circuits and their components used in circuits of common

instruments like spectrophotometers, typical circuits involving operational amplifiers for

electrochemical instruments. Elementary aspects of digital electronics. (10 Lectures)

Reference Books:

Dean, J. R., Jones, A. M., Holmes, D., Reed, R., Weyers, J. & Jones, A. (2011) Practical skills in

chemistry. 2nd Ed. Prentice-Hall, Harlow.

Hibbert, D. B. & Gooding, J. J. (2006) Data analysis for chemistry. Oxford University Press.

Topping, J. (1984) Errors of observation and their treatment. Fourth Ed., Chapman Hall,

London.

Harris, D. C. Quantitative chemical analysis. 6th Ed., Freeman (2007) Chapters 3-5.

Levie, R. de, How to use Excel in analytical chemistry and in general scientific data analysis.

Cambridge Univ. Press (2001) 487 pages.

Chemical safety matters – IUPAC – IPCS, Cambridge University Press, 1992.

OSU safety manual 1.01.

Page 22: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 21

Semester VI

Core Course-XIII

BHC-601: INORGANIC CHEMISTRY-IV Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hr.s

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Lectures

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academic environment. The course contents have been revised

from time to time as per suggestions of the teachers of the Chemistry . The syllabus contents are

duly arranged unit wise and contents are included in such a manner so that due importance is

given to requisite intellectual and laboratory skills.

Instructions for the Paper-Setter The question paper will consist of three units: I, II and III. Unit I and II will have four questions

from each unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9 questions from

the whole syllabus and will be of 3 marks each.

Instructions for the Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from units: I and II, unit III is compulsory.

Note: Internal assessment will be given on the basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance

(6), assignments/quiz (7).

UNIT-I Electronic Spectra and Magnetic Properties of Transition Metal Complexes

Types of electronic transitions, selection rules for d-d transitions, relaxation to selection rules,

spectroscopic ground states, spectrochemical series, Orgel energy level diagrams, Tanabe Sugano

Diagrams for d1 and d2 systems, discussion of electronic spectrum of [Ti(H2O)6]3+ and

[V(H2O)6]3+complex ion.

Types of magnetic behavior, Gouy’s methods of determining magnetic susceptibility, Curie law,

Neel’s point, spin-only formula, L-S coupling, correlation of μs and μeff values, orbital contribution to

magnetic moment. (18 Lectures)

Reaction Kinetics and Mechanism

Introduction to inorganic reaction mechanisms. Substitution reactions in square planar complexes,

Trans- effect, theories of trans effect, Mechanism of nucleophilic substitution in square planar

complexes, Thermodynamic and Kinetic stability, Kinetics of octahedral substitution, Ligand field

effects and reaction rates, Mechanism of substitution in octahedral complexes.

(12 Lectures)

Page 23: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 22

Organometallic Compounds

Definition and classification of organometallic compounds on the basis of bond type. Concept of

hapticity of organic ligands.

Metal carbonyls: 18 electron rule, electron count of mononuclear, polynuclear and substituted

metal carbonyls of 3d series. General methods of preparation (direct combination, reductive

carbonylation, thermal and photochemical decomposition) of mono and binuclear carbonyls of 3d

series. Structures of mononuclear and binuclear carbonyls of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni using VBT. 𝜋-

acceptor behaviour of CO (MO diagram of CO to be discussed), synergic effect and use of IR data to

explain extent of back bonding.

Zeise’s salt: Preparation and structure, evidences of synergic effect and comparison of synergic

effect with that in carbonyls.

Metal Alkyls: Important structural features of methyl lithium (tetramer) and trialkyl aluminium

(dimer), concept of multicentre bonding in these compounds. Role of triethylaluminium in

polymerisation of ethene (Ziegler – Natta Catalyst). Species present in

ether solution of Grignard reagent and their structures, Schlenk equilibrium.

Ferrocene: Preparation and reactions (acetylation, alkylation, metallation, Mannich

Condensation). Structure and aromaticity. Comparison of aromaticity and reactivity with that of

benzene. (20 Lectures)

Catalysis by Organometallic Compounds

Study of the following industrial processes and their mechanism:

1. Alkene hydrogenation (Wilkinson’s Catalyst)

2. Hydroformylation (Co salts)

3. Wacker Process

4. Synthetic gasoline (Fischer Tropsch reaction)

5. Synthesis gas by metal carbonyl complexes

(10 Lectures)

Reference Books:

Svehla, G. Vogel's Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, 7th Edition, Prentice Hall, 1996.

Cotton, F.A.G.; Wilkinson & Gaus, P.L. Basic Inorganic Chemistry 3rd Ed.; Wiley India,

Huheey, J. E.; Keiter, E.A. & Keiter, R.L. Inorganic Chemistry, Principles of Structure and

Reactivity 4th Ed., Harper Collins 1993, Pearson,2006.

Sharpe, A.G. Inorganic Chemistry, 4th Indian Reprint (Pearson Education) 2005 Douglas, B.

E.; McDaniel, D.H. & Alexander, J.J. Concepts and Models in Inorganic Chemistry 3rd Ed., John

Wiley and Sons, NY, 1994.

Greenwood, N.N. & Earnshaw, A. Chemistry of the Elements, Elsevier 2nd Ed, 1997 (Ziegler

Natta Catalyst and Equilibria in Grignard Solution).

Lee, J.D. Concise Inorganic Chemistry 5th Ed., John Wiley and sons 2008. Powell, P. Principles

of Organometallic Chemistry, Chapman and Hall, 1988.

Shriver, D.D. & P. Atkins, Inorganic Chemistry 2nd Ed., Oxford University Press, 1994.

Page 24: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 23

Basolo, F. & Pearson, R. Mechanisms of Inorganic Reactions: Study of Metal Complexes in

Solution 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons Inc; NY.

Purcell, K.F. & Kotz, J.C., Inorganic Chemistry, W.B. Saunders Co. 1977

Miessler, G. L. & Tarr, D.A. Inorganic Chemistry 4th Ed., Pearson, 2010.

Collman, J. P. et al. Principles and Applications of Organotransition Metal Chemistry. Mill

Valley, CA: University Science Books, 1987.

Crabtree, R. H. The Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Metals. j New York, NY: John

Wiley, 2000.

Spessard, G. O. & Miessler, G.L. Organometallic Chemistry. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-

Hall, 1996.

Page 25: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 24

BHC-601 (P): INORGANIC CHEMISTRY-IV LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02)

(i) Qualitative semimicro analysis of mixtures containing 2 anions and 2 cations. Emphasis

should be given to the understanding of the chemistry of different reactions. The following

radicals are suggested:

CO32-, NO2

-, S2-, SO3

2-,S2O32- ,CH3COO-, Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3

-, BO33-, C2O4

2-, PO43-, NH4

+,K+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Sn2+,

Fe3+, Al3+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Ba2+,Sr2+,Ca2+,Mg2+.

(ii) Record the Absorption spectra of First trasition series metal ion aquo complexes by

spectrophotometric method.

(iii) Preparation of acetylacetanato complexes of Cu2+/Fe3+. Find the λmax of the complex.

Reference Books:

Vogel’s Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, Revised by G. Svehla. Pearson Education,

2002.

Marr & Rockett Practical Inorganic Chemistry. John Wiley & Sons 1972.

Page 26: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 25

Core Course- XIV

BHC-602: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-V Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hr.s

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Lectures

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academic environment. The course contents have been revised

from time to time as per suggestions of the teachers of the Chemistry . This paper focus on

spectroscopic techniques for the determination of molecular structure. Hence the course establish

sound foundation on which further learning in organic chemistry is based.

Instructions for the Paper-Setter The question paper will consist of three units: I, II and III. Unit I and II will have four questions

from each unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9 questions from

the whole syllabus and will be of 3 marks each.

Instructions for the Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from units: I and II, unit III is compulsory.

Note: Internal assessment will be given on the basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance

(6), assignments/quiz (7).

UNIT-I Organic Spectroscopy

General principles Introduction to absorption and emission spectroscopy.

UV Spectroscopy: Types of electronic transitions, λmax, Chromophores and Auxochromes,

Bathochromic and Hypsochromic shifts, Intensity of absorption; Application of Woodward Rules

for calculation of λmax for the following systems: α,β unsaturated aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic

acids and esters; Conjugated dienes: alicyclic, homoannular and heteroannular; Extended

conjugated systems (aldehydes, ketones and dienes); distinction between cis and trans isomers.

Stereochemical factors in electronic spectroscopy; biphenyls and binaphthyls, cis and trans

isomers, angular distortion, cross conjugation and steric inhibition of resonance.

IR Spectroscopy: Principle of IR spectroscopy. Fundamental and non-fundamental molecular

vibrations, Effect of H-bonding, vibrational coupling, conjugation, field effects, bond angles,

resonance and ring size on IR absorptions; Fingerprint region and its significance; Applications to

identify functional groups; Aliphatic, aromatic and aralkyl hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols and

ethers; aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid and ester, amines, amides and amino acids.

(30 Lectures)

UNIT-II

Page 27: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 26

NMR Spectroscopy: Basic principles of Proton Magnetic Resonance, chemical shift and factors

influencing: shielding and deshielding and anisotropic effects in alkene, alkyne, aldehydes and

aromatics, Effect of restricted rotation, concentration, temperature and hydrogen bonding.

Relaxation procesess .Spin – Spin coupling and coupling constant; Interpretation of NMR spectra of

simple compounds. Non first order spectra, Simplification of complex PMR spectra: increasing

strength, spin decoupling or double resonance and the use of chemical shift reagents. Variable

temperature NMR spectroscopy: Introduction and applications

Applications of IR, UV and NMR for identification of simple organic molecules.

Mass Spectrometry

Introduction, Mass spectra and metastable ion peak. Determination of molecular formula and

recognition of molecular ion peak and the Nitrogen rule. Molecular formula and index of hydrogen

deficiency. General rules of fragmentation and the McLafferty rearrangement. Fragmentations

associated with functional groups: Aliphatic, aromatic, aralkyl hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols and

ethers, aldehydes, ketons, carboxylic acids, esters, amines and amides, alkyl halides, aryl halides

and aralkyl halides. Hetroatomic compounds (pyrrole, furan, thiophene) and amino acids.

(30 Lectures)

Reference Books:

Kalsi, P. S. Textbook of Organic Chemistry 1st Ed., New Age International (P) Ltd. Pub.

Morrison, R. T. & Boyd, R. N. Organic Chemistry, Dorling Kindersley (India)Pvt. Ltd. (Pearson

Education).

Billmeyer, F. W. Textbook of Polymer Science, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Gowariker, V. R.; Viswanathan, N. V. & Sreedhar, J. Polymer Science, New Age International

(P) Ltd. Pub.

Finar, I. L. Organic Chemistry (Volume 2: Stereochemistry and the Chemistry of Natural

Products), Dorling Kindersley (India) Pvt. Ltd. (Pearson Education).

Graham Solomons, T.W. Organic Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

McMurry, J.E. Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry, 7th Ed. Cengage Learning India Edition,

2013.

Clayden, J.; Greeves, N.; Warren, S.; Wothers, P.; Organic Chemistry, Oxford University Press.

Singh, J.; Ali, S.M. & Singh, J. Natural Product Chemistry, Prajati Prakashan (2010).

Kemp, W. Organic Spectroscopy, Palgrave.

Pavia, D. L. et al. Introduction to Spectroscopy 5th Ed. Cengage Learning India Ed. (2015).

Page 28: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 27

BHC-602 (P): ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-V LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02)

1. Extraction of caffeine from tea leaves.

2. Preparation of benzpinacol from benzophenone (photoreduction).

3. Preparation of benzpinacolone from benzpinacol (pinacol – pinacolone rearrangement)

4. Synthesis of Benzil monohydrazone from Benzoin through benzil

5. Synthesis of Benzimidazole from o-phenylenediamine

6. Synthesis of p-Nitroaniline from Acetanilide

7. Preparation of 2,5-dihydroxy acetophenone from hydroquinone (Fries reaction).

8. Preparation of 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-2,4-dimethylpyrrole from ethylacetoacetate (Knorr

synthesis).

9. Preparation of 1,3,5-tribromobenzene from aniline (diazotization, aromatic electrophilic

substitution and deamination).

10. Identification of simple organic compounds by IR spectroscopy and NMR Spectroscopy and

mass spectroscopy (Spectra to be provided).

Reference Books:

Vogel, A.I. Quantitative Organic Analysis, Part 3, Pearson (2012).

Mann, F.G. & Saunders, B.C. Practical Organic Chemistry, Pearson Education (2009)

Furniss, B.S.; Hannaford, A.J.; Smith, P.W.G.; Tatchell, A.R. Practical OrganicChemistry, 5th

Ed., Pearson (2012)

Ahluwalia, V.K. & Aggarwal, R. Comprehensive Practical Organic Chemistry: Preparation and

Quantitative Analysis, University Press (2000).

Page 29: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 28

Discipline Specific Elective-III

BHC-603 A: POLYMER CHEMISTRY Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hrs.

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Lectures

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academic environment.. The syllabus contents are duly arranged

unit wise and contents are included in such a manner so that due importance is given to requisite

intellectual and laboratory skills.

Instructions for the Paper-Setter

The question paper will consist of three units: I, II and III. Unit I and II will have four questions

from each unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9 questions from

the whole syllabus and will be of 3 marks each.

Instructions for the Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from units: I and II, unit III is compulsory.

Note: Internal assessment will be given on the basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance

(6), assignments/quiz (7).

UNIT-I Introduction and history of polymeric materials:

Different schemes of classification of polymers, Polymer nomenclature, Molecular forces and

chemical bonding in polymers, Texture of Polymers.

(4 Lectures)

Functionality and its importance:

Criteria for synthetic polymer formation, classification of polymerization processes, Relationships

between functionality, extent of reaction and degree of polymerization. Bifunctional systems, Poly-

functional systems.

(8 Lectures)

Kinetics of Polymerization:

Mechanism and kinetics of step growth, radical chain growth, ionic chain (both cationic and

anionic) and coordination polymerizations, Mechanism and kinetics of copolymerization,

polymerization techniques.

(8 lectures)

UNIT-II Crystallization and crystallinity:

Determination of crystalline melting point and degree of crystallinity, Morphology of crystalline

polymers, Factors affecting crystalline melting point.

Page 30: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 29

Nature and structure of polymers-Structure Property relationships.

(4 Lectures)

Determination of molecular weight of polymers (Mn, Mw, etc) by end group analysis, viscometry, light

scattering and osmotic pressure methods. Molecular weight distribution and its significance. Polydispersity

index.

(8 Lectures)

Glass transition temperature (Tg) and determination of Tg, Free volume theory, WLF equation, Factors

affecting glass transition temperature (Tg).

(4 Lectures)

Polymer Solution – Criteria for polymer solubility, Solubility parameter, Thermodynamics of polymer

solutions, entropy, enthalpy, and free energy change of mixing of polymers solutions, Flory- Huggins theory,

Lower and Upper critical solution temperatures.

(4 Lectures)

Properties of Polymers (Physical, thermal, Flow & Mechanical Properties).

Brief introduction to preparation, structure, properties and application of the following polymers:

polyolefins, polystyrene and styrene copolymers, poly(vinyl chloride) and related polymers, poly(vinyl

acetate) and related polymers, acrylic polymers, fluoro polymers, polyamides and related polymers. Phenol

formaldehyde resins (Bakelite, Novalac), polyurethanes, silicone polymers, polydienes, Polycarbonates,

Conducting Polymers, [polyacetylene, polyaniline, poly(p-phenylene sulphide polypyrrole, polythiophene)].

(10 Lectures)

Reference Books:

R.B. Seymour & C.E. Carraher: Polymer Chemistry: An Introduction, Marcel Dekker, Inc. New

York, 1981.

G. Odian: Principles of Polymerization, 4th Ed. Wiley, 2004.

F.W. Billmeyer: Textbook of Polymer Science, 2nd Ed. Wiley Interscience, 1971.

P. Ghosh: Polymer Science & Technology, Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 1991.

R.W. Lenz: Organic Chemistry of Synthetic High Polymers. Interscience Publishers, New

York, 1967.

Page 31: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 30

BHC-603 A (P): POLYMER CHEMISTRY LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02)

Polymer synthesis

1. Free radical solution polymerization of styrene (St)

2. Free radical solution polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate (MMA)

3. Free radical solution polymerization of Methyl Acrylate (MA)

4. Free radical solution polymerization of Acrylic acid (AA)

5. Free Radical Copolymerization of MMA and Styrene

6. Preparation of nylon 66/6

7. Precipitation polymerization of acrylonitrile

8. Preparation of urea-formaldehyde resin

Polymer characterization

1. Determination of average molecular weight by viscometry:

(a) Polyacrylamide-aq.NaNO2 solution

(b) Poly vinyl proplylidine (PVP) in water

2. Determination of the viscosity-average molecular weight of poly(vinyl alcohol).

Polymer analysis

1. Estimation of the amount of HCHO in the given solution by sodium sulphite method.

Reference Books:

M.P. Stevens, Polymer Chemistry: An Introduction, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, 1999.

H.R. Allcock, F.W. Lampe & J.E. Mark, Contemporary Polymer Chemistry, 3rd ed. Prentice-Hall

(2003)

F.W. Billmeyer, Textbook of Polymer Science, 3rd ed. Wiley-Interscience (1984)

J.R. Fried, Polymer Science and Technology, 2nd ed. Prentice-Hall (2003)

P. Munk & T.M. Aminabhavi, Introduction to Macromolecular Science, 2nd ed. John Wiley &

Sons (2002)

L. H. Sperling, Introduction to Physical Polymer Science, 4th ed. John Wiley & Sons (2005)

M.P. Stevens, Polymer Chemistry: An Introduction 3rd ed. Oxford University Press (2005).

Seymour/ Carraher’s Polymer Chemistry, 9th ed. by Charles E. Carraher, Jr. (2013).

Page 32: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 31

Discipline Specific Elective-III

BHC-603 B: ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hrs

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Lectures

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academic environment. The course contents have been revised

from time to time as per suggestions of the teachers of the Chemistry . The syllabus contents are

duly arranged unit wise and contents are included in such a manner so that due importance is

given to requisite intellectual and laboratory skills.

Instructions for the Paper-Setter The question paper will consist of three units: I, II and III. Unit I and II will have four questions

from each unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9 questions from

the whole syllabus and will be of 3 marks each.

Instructions for the Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from units: I and II, unit III is compulsory.

Note: Internal assessment will be given on the basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance

(6), assignments/quiz (7).

UNIT-I Group Theory

The concept of group, order and classes of group, symmetry elements, symmetry operations and

their matrix representation, multiplication tables, point group determination, determination of

reducible and irreducible representations, character tables, construction of character tables for C2V

and C3V point groups, application of group theory to chemical bonding, splitting of d-orbitals under

the influence of octahedral, tetrahedral and square planar symmetry, the directed valence for Oh

and Td symmetry, use of character tables to determine which metal orbitals are used in σ and п

bond formation in octahedral, tetrahedral and square planar complexes, molecular orbital energy

level diagrams for octahedral tetrahedral and square planar complexes showing σ and π bonding in

transition metal complexes.

Applications of Group Theory in Spectroscopy

Symmetry considerations regarding selection rules and spectral intensities, vibronic coupling,

vibronic polarization in centrosymmetric complexes and non-centrosymmetric complexes,

polarization of electronically allowed transitions, selection rules regarding IR and Raman

scattering spectroscopy, fundamentals, overtones and combinations in vibrational spectroscopy,

Page 33: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 32

mutual exclusion principle, symmetry symbols for normal modes of vibration, IR and Raman

activity of their fundamentals and nature of vibrations in terms of change in internal coordinates

in simple molecules like trans N2, F2, SF6.

(30 Lectures)

UNIT-II

Metal-Ligand Bonding in Coordination Complexes

Application of the valence bond theory to coordination complexes. Crystal field theory, splitting of

d-orbitals under the effect of octahedral, tetrahedral, tetragonal and square planar crystal fields,

pairing energy, factors affecting the magnitude of crystal field splitting, use of CFT in explaining

magnetic properties of transition metal complexes, the structural (ionic radii, Jahn-Teller effects)

and thermodynamic effects (hydration and lattice energy) of crystal field splitting, the structural

consequences of crystal field splitting, the nephelauxetic effect, the spectrochemical series, the

limitations of crystal field theory, the ligand field theory, molecular orbital theory, the comparison

of the VBT, CFT and MOT picture of bonding in case of transition metal complexes, the angular

overlap model.

Atomic Spectroscopy

Spin-spin coupling, orbital-orbital coupling, LS and j-j coupling schemes, determination of free ion

terms for pn and dn configurations, determination of ground state terms, Hund’s rule, hole

formulism, spin-orbital coupling, the effect of octahedral and tetrahedral fields on S, P, D and F

terms with the help of character tables and splitting patterns of G, H, I terms under the effect of

weak octahedral and tetrahedral fields, Orgel diagrams

Free Ions in Medium and Strong Crystal Fields

Strong field configurations, transitions from weak to strong crystal fields, construction of

correlation diagrams, spin cross over in coordination compounds, Tanabe Sugano diagrams.

. (30 Lectures)

Reference Books:

1. M.C. Day, J. Selbin, Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry.

2. F.A. Cotton, Wilkinson, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 5th edition

3. Shriver and Atkins, Inorganic Chemistry, 5th edition.

4. F.A. Cotton, Chemical Application of Group Theory.

5. G. Davidson, Introductory Group Theory for Chemists

6. B.N. Figgis, Introduction to Ligand Field.

7. A.B.P. Lever, Inorganic Electronic Spectroscopy.

8. R.S. Drago, Physical Method in Chemistry.

Page 34: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 33

BHC-603 B (P): ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02)

1. Preparation of ferrous oxalate

2. Preparation of ammonium ferric sulphate

3. Preparation of tetrammine copper sulphate complex

4. Preparation of lead chromate

5. Preparation of potash alum

6. Separation of cations and anions by

(i) Paper Chromatography

(ii) Column Chromatography

Book Recommended:

Vogel’s book on Inorganic Quantitative Analysis

Page 35: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 34

Discipline Specific Elective-IV

BHC-604 A: ANALYTICAL METHODS IN CHEMISTRY Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hrs.

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 40%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Lectures

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concepts of Chemistry and their applications. The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Year course) in the subject of Chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academic environment. Due importance is given to requisite

intellectual and laboratory skills.

Instructions for the Paper-Setter The question paper will consist of three units: I, II and III. Unit I and II will have four questions

from each unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9 questions from

the whole syllabus and will be of 3 marks each.

Instructions for the Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from units: I and II, unit III is compulsory.

Note: Internal assessment will be given on the basis of mid semester tests (12), class performance

(6), assignments/quiz (7).

UNIT-I Qualitative and quantitative aspects of analysis:

Sampling, evaluation of analytical data, errors, accuracy and precision, methods of their expression,

normal law of distribution if indeterminate errors, statistical test of data; F, Q and t test, rejection of

data, and confidence intervals.

(5 Lectures)

Optical methods of analysis:

Origin of spectra, interaction of radiation with matter, fundamental laws of spectroscopy and

selection rules, validity of Beer-Lambert’s law.

UV-Visible Spectrometry: Basic principles of instrumentation (choice of source, monochromator and

detector) for single and double beam instrument;

Basic principles of quantitative analysis: estimation of metal ions from aqueous solution,

geometrical isomers, keto-enol tautomers. Determination of composition of metal complexes using

Job’s method of continuous variation and mole ratio method.

Infrared Spectrometry: Basic principles of instrumentation (choice of source, onochromator &

detector) for single and double beam instrument; sampling techniques. Structural illustration

through interpretation of data, Effect and importance of isotope substitution.

Flame Atomic Absorption and Emission Spectrometry: Basic principles of instrumentation (choice of

source, monochromator, detector, choice of flame and Burner designs. Techniques of atomization

and sample introduction; Method of background correction, sources of chemical interferences and

Page 36: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 35

their method of removal. Techniques for the quantitative estimation of trace level of metal ions

from water samples.

(25 Lectures)

UNIT-II Thermal methods of analysis:

Theory of thermogravimetry (TG), basic principle of instrumentation. Techniques for quantitative

estimation of Ca and Mg from their mixture.

(5 Lectures)

Electroanalytical methods:

Classification of electroanalytical methods, basic principle of pH metric, potentiometric and

conductometric titrations. Techniques used for the determination of equivalence points.

Techniques used for the determination of pKa values.

(10 Lectures)

Separation techniques:

Solvent extraction: Classification, principle and efficiency of the technique. Mechanism of

extraction: extraction by solvation and chelation.

Technique of extraction: batch, continuous and counter current extractions. Qualitative and

quantitative aspects of solvent extraction: extraction of metal ions from aqueous solution,

extraction of organic species from the aqueous and nonaqueous media.

Chromatography: Classification, principle and efficiency of the technique. Mechanism of separation:

adsorption, partition & ion exchange.

Development of chromatograms: frontal, elution and displacement methods.

Qualitative and quantitative aspects of chromatographic methods of analysis: IC, GLC, GPC, TLC and

HPLC.

Stereoisomeric separation and analysis: Measurement of optical rotation, calculation of

Enantiomeric excess (ee)/ diastereomeric excess (de) ratios and determination of enantiomeric

composition using NMR, Chiral solvents and chiral shift reagents. Chiral chromatographic

techniques using chiral columns (GC and HPLC). Role of computers in instrumental methods of

analysis.

(15 Lectures)

Reference Books:

Mendham, J., A. I. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis 6th Ed., Pearson, 2009.

Willard, H.H. et al.: Instrumental Methods of Analysis, 7th Ed. Wardsworth Publishing

Company, Belmont, California, USA, 1988.

Christian, G.D. Analytical Chemistry, 6th Ed. John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2004.

Harris, D.C.: Exploring Chemical Analysis, 9th Ed. New York, W.H. Freeman, 2016.

Khopkar, S.M. Basic Concepts of Analytical Chemistry. New Age International

Publisher, 2009.

Skoog, D.A. Holler F.J. & Nieman, T.A. Principles of Instrumental Analysis, Cengage Learning

India Ed.

Page 37: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 36

Mikes, O. Laboratory Hand Book of Chromatographic & Allied Methods, Elles Harwood Series

on Analytical Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons, 1979.

Ditts,.R.V. Analytical Chemistry Methods of separation, van Nostrand.1974

Page 38: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 37

BHC-604 A (P): ANALYTICAL METHODS IN CHEMISTRY LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02)

I. Separation Techniques

1. Chromatography:

(a) Separation of mixtures

(i) Paper chromatographic separation of Fe3+, Al3+, and Cr3+.

(ii) Separation and identification of the monosaccharides present in the given mixture

(glucose & fructose) by paper chromatography. Reporting the Rf values.

(b) Separate a mixture of Sudan yellow and Sudan Red by TLC technique and identify them

on the basis of their Rf values.

(c) Chromatographic separation of the active ingredients of plants, flowers and juices by TLC.

II. Solvent Extractions:

(i) To separate a mixture of Ni2+ & Fe2+ by complexation with DMG and extracting the Ni2+-DMG

complex in chloroform, and determine its concentration by spectrophotometry.

(ii) Solvent extraction of zirconium with amberliti LA-1, separation from a mixture of irons and

gallium.

3. Determine the pH of the given aerated drinks fruit juices, shampoos and soaps.

4. Determination of Na, Ca, Li in cola drinks and fruit juices using fame photometric techniques.

5. Analysis of soil:

(i) Determination of pH of soil.

(ii) Total soluble salt

(iii) Estimation of calcium, magnesium, phosphate, nitrate

6. Ion exchange:

(i) Determination of exchange capacity of cation exchange resins and anion exchange resins.

(ii) Separation of metal ions from their binary mixture.

(iii) Separation of amino acids from organic acids by ion exchange chromatography.

III Spectrophotometry

1. Determination of pKa values of indicator using spectrophotometry

2. Structural characterization of compounds by infrared spectroscopy.

3. Determination of dissolved oxygen in water.

4. Determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD).

5. Determination of Biological oxygen demand (BOD).

6. Determine the composition of the Ferric salicylate/ ferric thiocyanate complex by Job’s method.

Reference Books:

Mendham, J., A. I. Vogel’s Quantitative Chemical Analysis 6th Ed., Pearson, 2009.

Page 39: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 38

Willard, H.H. et al.: Instrumental Methods of Analysis, 7th Ed. Wardsworth Publishing

Company, Belmont, California, USA, 1988.

Christian, G.D. Analytical Chemistry, 6th Ed. John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2004.

Harris, D.C. Exploring Chemical Analysis, 9th Ed. New York, W.H. Freeman, 2016.

Khopkar, S.M. Basic Concepts of Analytical Chemistry. New Age International

Publisher, 2009.

Skoog, D.A. Holler F.J. and Nieman, T.A. Principles of Instrumental Analysis, Cengage Learning

India Edition.

Mikes, O. & Chalmes, R.A. Laboratory Handbook of Chromatographic & Allied Methods, Elles

Harwood Ltd. London.

Ditts, R.V. Analytical Chemistry: Methods of separation. Van Nostrand, New York,

1974.

Page 40: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 39

Discipline Specific Elective-IV

BHC-604 B: SOLID STATE AND RADIATION CHEMISTRY Maximum Marks: 100 Time: 3 Hrs.

External Examination: 75 Pass marks: 35%

Internal Assessment: 25

(Credits: 04) Theory: 60 Hrs.

Objective of the Course To teach the fundamental concept of chemistry and their applications.The syllabus pertaining to

B.Sc. (Hons.) (3 Years course) in the subject of chemistry has been upgraded as per provision of the

UGC module and demand of the academics environment. An overview of the structure and

compound identification in the solid state. Student should be able to improve their knowledge of

types of radioactive decay, neutral decay, nuclear properties and interaction of radiation with

matter.

Instructions for the Paper Setter The question paper will consist of 3 units: Unit I, II and III .Unit I and II will have four questions

each from the respective unit of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each. Unit III will consist of 9

questions from the whole syllabus and will carry 3 marks each.

Instructions for Candidates Candidates are required to attempt two questions from unit I and unit II and unit III is compulsory.

NOTE: Internal assessment will be given on basis of mid semester test (12), class performance (6),

assignment/quiz/seminar (7).

UNIT-I Crystallography and X-Rays Crystallography: Crystals, crystals lattices, unit cell and crystal

systems, Bravias lattice, direction and lattice planes, Miller indices, reciprocal lattice, derivation of

spacing formula for cubic, tetragonal and orthorhombic crystal. point defects, stoichiometric and

non stoichiometric crystal defects, thermodynamics of Schottky and Frenkel defects formation,

color centres , line defects and plane defects.

X-Ray spectroscopy, derivation of Bragg’s law and Laue’s law from concept of reciprocal lattice,

Rotating crystal method, Powder method, diffraction under nonideal conditions, the intensities of

differacted beams scattered by an electron, atom and unit cell, the structure factor and its

calculations. Neutron diffraction Introduction, measurement technique, difference between

neutron and X-Ray Diffraction. (26 Lectures)

Radiation Chemistry Sources, natural radioactivity, nuclear reactors, artificial radioactivity,

Radiation sources, machine sources, Vande Graff accelerator, cyclotron, microwave linear

accelerator. Absorption of radiation for X rays and gamma rays, photoelectric absorption, Compton

scattering, pair production and total absorption coefficient for fast electrons-excitation and

ionization, stopping power and linear energy transfer and other interactions for heavy particles,

Page 41: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 40

charged particles and neutrons comparison of effects of different types of radiations. Radiation

dose and its measurement: significance, units, measurement by chemical methods Frick’s

dosimeter and by ionization in gases.

LASER and MASER: Introduction, laser beam characteristics, directionality, intensity,

monochromaticity and coherence, laser action, spontaneous and stimulated emission,

amplification, population inversion, negative absorption, pumping (optical, electrical etc.) ,two

level systems, possibility of amplification, population inversion in three and four level systems,

optical resonators, solid laser-(Ruby laser), gas lasers, Q-switching, Raman laser action, stimulated

Raman scattering, semiconductor lasers, band model theory for metals Intrinsic and impurity

semiconductor, p-n junctions semiconductor diode laser, Maser, two level maser systems ammonia

maser (principal and working), applications of lasers and masers. (34 Lectures)

Reference books:

B.D.Cullity: Elements of X-Ray Differaction.

R.S. Drago: Physical Methods in Chemistry.

A.J .Swallow: Radiation Chemistry.

B.B Laud: Laser and non linear optics.

B.A.Lengyel: Introduction to Lasers.

Page 42: COURSE: B.Sc. (Hons.) III Chemistry FACULTY OF SCIENCES …B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19 Page 1 SYLLABUS B.Sc. III (Hons.) Chemistry Semester V and

B.Sc. (HONS.) CHEMISTRY III (SEMESTER V and VI) SESSION 2018-19

Page 41

BHC-604 B (P): PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LAB

Max. Marks: 50 No. of Lectures: 60 Hrs.

Time Allowed: 3 hrs. Pass Marks: 40%

(Credits: 02)

1. To study the kinetics of hydrolysis of tert.-butyl chloride by conductance measurement.

2. To find partial molal volumes of ethanol in aqueous solutions.

3. To determine the CMC for the formation of micelles from the conductivity of aqueous

solution of surfactant.

4. To draw calibration curve for various concentrations of FeSO4/1-10-phenanthroline

complex and hence to find the coefficient of its molar absorptivity.

Phase Rule:

1. To study the limit of homogeneity of three components (C6H5CH3, CH3COOH, and H2O)

system.

2. To study the limit of homogeneity of three components (CHCl3, CH3COOH, and H2O) system.

TLC:

1. To separate and identify the given mixtures of colored compounds (azobenzene,

hydroxylazobenzene, p-aminoazobenzene).

2. To separate and identify the given mixtures of colorless compounds (diphenylamine,

naphthalene, biphenyl and anthracene).

Reference Books:

Khosla, B. D.; Garg, V. C. & Gulati, A., Senior Practical Physical Chemistry, R. Chand & Co.:

New Delhi (2011).

Garland, C. W.; Nibler, J. W. & Shoemaker, D. P. Experiments in Physical Chemistry 8th Ed.;

McGraw-Hill: New York (2003).

Halpern, A. M. &McBane, G. C. Experimental Physical Chemistry 3rd Ed.; W.H. Freeman & Co.:

New York (2003).

Jagdamba Singh, R.K.P.Singh, Jaya Singh, L.D.S Yadav, I.R Siddiqui, Jaya Srivastava Advanced

Practical Chemistry.

V K Ahluwalia, SunitaDhingra, Adarsh Gulati, Practical Chemistry.


Recommended