Home > Documents > DAILY SAINT PAUL NEW feTHESHOEMAN3 \u25a0THE SAINT PAUL DAILY GLOBE: : "' SUNDAY MORNING/ FEBRUARY...

DAILY SAINT PAUL NEW feTHESHOEMAN3 \u25a0THE SAINT PAUL DAILY GLOBE: : "' SUNDAY MORNING/ FEBRUARY...

Date post: 30-May-2020
Category:
Author: others
View: 2 times
Download: 0 times
Share this document with a friend
Embed Size (px)
of 1 /1
\u25a0THE SAINT PAUL DAILY GLOBE: : "' SUNDAY MORNING/ FEBRUARY 17, 1889.— SIXTEEN PAGES. 3 SAINT PAUL GLOBULES. Diphtheria prevails' at ,393 Winslow Street. . Seven births and one death were bul- letined at the health office yesterday. The council committee on claims will meet at the city hall to-morrow after- noon. '-.*\u25a0-.--* * . The League of the Cross T. A. so- ciety will hold a rally in its hall on the West side this evening. The Ladies' Aid association will give a social hop at Lohr hall, 70 East Sev- enth street, Friday evening. Mayor Smith yesterday appointed J. C. Adams* a special policeman, to serve at the Thomas Street Mission. A meeting of the Homeopathic Hos- pital Aid society will be held at 3:30 o'clock to-morrow afternoon at the Ryan hotel. -• 7- \u25a0\u25a0 :77; ,1. If. Poteet was presented with a t-olid gold-lined silver set by his em- ployes .at the Sioux City freight house yesterday afternoon. John ('. Woolley, the temperance evangelist, will address a gospel tem- perance mass meeting at Newmarket theater, Sunday, Feb. 24, at 3 p. m. .V concert will be given at the West Side opera house Tuesday evening, un- der the auspices of the Sunday school of the Clinton Avenue M. E. church. A musical and literary entertainment will be given by the members of the Linopfiiiiaii "Society of Baldwin Semi- nary, at Unity church, Thursday, even- ing. : \u25a0" -•*•.'- A business meeting of the Minnesota Editorial and Publishers' association will be held in the chamber of com- merce at 11 o'clock Wednesday morn- ing. The case against Paul Martin, charged with' assaulting Officer Lauderdale in the Ducas street. police station Wednes- day evening, was dismissed by Judge Cory yesterday. The executive committee of the di- rectors of the Manitoba railway met yesterday afternoon in General Man- ager -Manvel's office and transacted routine business. The gospel temperance meeting to- day at 3 p. m., under the auspices of the W. C. T. CT., will be addressed by Miss Carrie Estey, state organizer of the Young Women's Temperance Union. Olive A'ernev and Edna Fuller.charged with larceny of clothing valued at $100 by Lottie Avaline, were arrested in Min- neapolis last night by Detectives Kena- ley and Daly as- they were about to board a train for Denver. There will be a special meeting of the St Paul Bar association, in the chamber of commerce, to-morrow afternoon, at 4:80 o'clock, to consider the bill now be- fore the legislature relating to the ren- dering of verdicts by juries. The Young Men's Bible Class of Ox- ford church gave a literary and musi- cal entertainment at the church Tues- day afternoon. Prof. W. H. Meeke, Rockford, 111., in his rendition of "The Creeds of the Bells,"was unique as well as forcible. A. Stamm. a furrier employed by Gor- don & Ferguson, was struck by a cable car near Seven Corners last evening, but escaped with slight injuries. Patrol- man Weidle pulled him from under the wheels in time to avert a serious acci- dent, mst Marriage licenses were issued yester- day to A. P. Hokanson and Ida F. John- sou, Frank Leitner and Anna Harmt- chock, Frank Gibis and Johanna Leit- ner. Nels Jacobson and Ellen Carlson, Frank Reitzcker and Johanna Fuchs, Henry Gaul and Mary Miller. About 8 o'clock last evening fire broke out in the Skidmore block, at Sixth and Minnesota streets, in the office of the Stevenson Mercantile company. The flames had gained considerable head- way, but quick work by the department subdued them with a loss of about $500. PERSONAL PARAGRAPHS. Traffic Manager Hanley. of the Kan- sas City, returned from Chicago jester- day morning. Newman Erb, general manager of the Kansas City, Wyandotte <.. Northwest-' crn railway, is in the city. A.. Rowley, Chicago; E. H. Brown, New York, and Louis Sitter, Milwau- kee, were among the traveling men who registered at the Ryan yesterday. The friends of Mr. and Mrs. Silas J. Gottschaumer will be grieved to learn of the death of their only daughter Bes- sie, who died the 15th iust. after a few days' illness. CROSSED THE DARK RIVER. Death of a Popular Guest at the Ryan. Col. Edward B. Emersou died at the Ryan hotel at 12:45 yesterday after- noon. Col. Emerson was the North- western representative of a Cincinnati stove company, and had made St. Paul his headquarters for the last eight years. About a week ago he returned from La Crosse and complained of malaria and kept his room for several days, but last Wednesday was so much improved that he came down to his meal? and spent several hours in the rotunda. That eveniug he was seized with pneumonia aud never left his room again. The body was taken to an undertaking es- tablishment and will be embalmed, pending the arrival of the brother-in- law of the deceased. The remains will probably be taken to Hartford, Conn., for Interment. Col. Emerson was well and favorably known in this city, and was a quiet and unobtrusive gentleman in every sense of the word. He served with dis- tinction in the war and was wounded twice, the first time in the leg and re- receiving the second wound in the face at Fort Wagner when he was in com- mand, though only nineteen years of ago. lie leaves a sister, who lives at Hartford, Conn. -^ Butchers' Ball, Standard hall, Tuesday, Feb. 19. «\u25a0' FOR WASHINGTON And the Inauguration of Harrison .7-7 and Morton, lake /.'The Northwestern Line." C, St. P., M. &O. Ry. Tickets will be on sale Feb. 27, 28 and March land 2, at the low rate of $20 for the round trip, good to return until March 10. It is not necessary to send in your name, or join any excursion, and so hamper your freedom of action, as this rate is open to the world, and the accommodations offered by "The Northwestern Line" arc ample and of the best. For further information as to route, tickets, etc., apply C. H. Petsch, 159 East Third street, St. Paul; W. B. Wheeler, 13 Nicollet House Block, Min- neapolis; or address T. W. Teasdale, general passenger agent, St. Paul. Butchers' Ball, -Standard hall, Tuesday, Feb. 19. «__\u25a0> - Boston and Return $32.50. Montreal and Return $30. Via the So© Line. Feb. 23 to March 2, good thirty days. Round trip to Inaugural from Boston $14, all rail, and $11 Sound steamers. . . \u25a0*./. .""*"* \u25a0*-*"*•\u25a0 "*'" The Finest Train in the World Via Union and Central Pacific roads. Sixty-four hours from Council Bluffs or Omaha to San Francisco. A Pullman Vestlbuled train; steam heal, electric light, bath rooms, barber shop, library and dining car— palace hotel on wheels is Th*-** Goldex Gate Special every Wednesday. The Massachusetts Mutual Life, Whose 37th annual statement appeals in toother column, deserves the thought- ful, perusal of every one contemplating life lnsurance. The company is strong, I safe and conservative. Mr. James F. I Bard. Pl'Ei-ft Fourth lv Is the n-.ident age id. 7 7-" \u25a0" I DEMANDS HIS DUCATS Allegations of Fraud Against a Leading Real Estate Firm. ; \u25a0-, Property : Purchased for a Syndicate-Results in a 7 Law Suit. Death Lurked , at Bottom of the Hill for a : : Coaster.* 2-.. Beat His: Wife Until the Neighbors Interfered for Her Protection. . A suit was filed in the district court late yesterday afternoon which appears to be the initiative step to be taken by a dozen others equally; interested in the transaction; It was that of* C. Robert Schurman, of -the state of Illinois, against Bushnell & Bushnell, a promi- nent real estate firm of this city. Plaint- iff claims that April 20.-ISS7, the defend- ants stated that they were peculiarly situated in their business, and could in- vest a - certain . amount of plaintiff's money in such " a way as to be able to realize the principal and a large profit out of the deal in which they should invest the funds within one year. They agreed to take his money, ' not' stating what they . would do with it in particular, but that they would remit the same to plaintiff one year from that date with a large per cent of profit. Further representations indi- cative of the high ahd influential posi- tion defendants held in the real estate market led the plaintiff to leave $1,000 with them, to be invested according to the agreement. . A short time after the money had been so placed with the de- fendants, they invested the amount in a piece of property in block 2of Hoyt's addition to St. Paul, with the funds of eleven other persons to whom they had made other or similar representations. At the time of placiug the $1,000 with the defendants it was agreed by and between plaintiff and defendant that plaintiff should have a form of their agreement and a receipt for his money. This, however, the plaintiff claims has never been tendered him, although often demanded. The alleged and pre- tended price paid for the properly was $50,000, one-third being paid cash as defendants represented, and a mortgage was given upon the same for the bal- ance, by Randall F. Hurd, to whom the property was. deeded. Hurd, it was represented, should hold the prop- erty for the so-called "syndicate.'' Ever since the spring of 1887 the plaintiff has been inquiring into the deal and learns, .as he claims, the following details, which prompts his action and which lie sets up as a special cause for the damages asked. The property in question was owned at the time of the alleged and pretended purchase by Boston parties .for whom the defendants were agents. The de- fendants having the funds of -the twelve persons for investment, bought the property from the Boston parties for $20,000, receiving commission from such sale, which was made to and in the name of Hurd. Then it is charged the defendants made a' pre- tended deed back and forth to Hurd for the consideration of $50,000, and they represented that Hurd exe- cuted a mortgage to the original own- ers, whom they named as being other persons, for thirty odd thousand dol- lars on the balance" of the transaction. After a while the interest on the mort- gage became due and demands were made upon the members of the "syndi- cate." Assessments came floating in at them and again demands were made upon the "interested ones." The plain- tiff states that after mature investiga- tion, he verily believes and knows that the property at the time of the alleged purchase was worth but $30,000 and that it is not worth that now. He charges that the defendants were personally interested in the matter, and that the purchase of the property and the application of his $1,000 were "a fraud. He asks that his interest in the property be annulled and declared void and wrongfully, fraudu- lently aud unlawfully obtained, and asks that his $1,000 and interest be re- tared, and $1,000 as damages for the in- jury suffered by the false representa- tion of the defendants.. '\u25a0 \ SELLING AN OPERA HOUSE. Agent and Purchaser Sue the Davidson Estate. Mark D. Flower filed a suit against the Davidson estate yesterday, in which he asks $5,000 as commission for the sale of the opera house property to Lotta M. Crabtree. He states that in March, ISSS, he entered into a verbal agree- ment with the executors of the estate that he should make efforts to sell the property and would receive $5,000 if the sale was made at $142,500. In July, 1888, the contract was made in writing, and the time extended in which to find a purchaser. Sept. 10. the actress Lotta M. i Crabtree was introduced by him to the managers of the estate, and purchased the property at $142,500, paying $5,000 as earnest mouey upon the sale, and entering into a contract to bind the same. She was accepted as a responsible and satisfactory purchaser, and a contract whereby she should pay, $70,000 unon the delivery of the deed, and the balance in one year, was signed Plaintiff claims that the sale was thus consummated as far as he was con- cerned, and therefore asks for the $5,000 commission which has .been refused by the defendant. Another chapter was added to the controversy regarding the opera house deal by the answer of Lotta, whicii was filed yesterday. Executors of the David- son estate brought suit to compel the actress to fulfill her contract by paying a balance of $95,000 and the delivery of a note and mortgage for $42,500, making the total consideration $142,500. In her answer defendant admits that in Sep- tember she executed a contract agree- ing to pay the plaintiff $100,000 on de - liven*of the. deed of conveyance, the note and mortgage for $42,500, and paid $5,000 cash on account. She denies that the plaintiff delivered the abstract of title before Sept. 10. in fact not until Sept. 13, and did not report the title good. Another point alleged is that the bill boards located in various parts of the city, regarded as indispenable to the success of tho opera house, the said hoards being valued at $7,500, were not turned over to the defendant, and that as a matter of fact the defendant had no power or authority to execute or con- tract for salo of said bill boards.. Oct. 1 the defendant withdrew from contract, giving plaintiff proper notice, and since that date has had no commu- nication whatever with the .'plaintiff re- garding the sale. Said contract is ren- dered void under the law by the reason that the parties subscribing to the contract, Ed E. Davidson and. Andrew DRaney, were not . authorized to do so, and also by the.reason.that they falsely represented that they owned I a half in- terest in the bill boards and bill-posting business. The defendant avers that she is now, and lias at all times been, ready and willing to fulfill her part of the contract ifthe plaintiffs will fulfill their part. The defendant believes that, the plaintiff has not a good title to the ease- ment in the ''rand ana Court blocks, and that the Economy. Steam Heat com- pany was in January, ISSS. granted the privilege of erecting and maintaining .a smokestack by the plaintiff in the right of way at the Fourth street entrance to the opera house. Defendant also be- lieves "that the destruction of the opera bouse was due to oareleßsaes_*a_id neg- ligence on tliopart of the plaintiff.'. On tliese grounds she **3;*r to *:nv. the suit J-'suii.-ea. KILLED WHILE COASTING. An Unmanageable Sled Causes Its Occupant's Death. William Feah, eighteen years of age, who resided on West Seventh : stree, near the Shoit Line crossing, was struck and killed by a Milwaukee train . at the .lames street crossing last even- ing. He Was coasting with a number of other boys on James street hill, and was carried by an unmanageable sled under the wheels of the approaching train. The body, which was horribly mangled, i was taken to the morgue. 7. ABUSED AND NEGLECTED. : An Attempt to Prove Marriage a Failure. Mary Morrison, wife of John D. Mor- rison, filed a suit in . the district court yesteryay, in which she seeks to allevi- ate the subjection in which she claims . she has been held by the defendant. She states that she is twenty-eight -and the defendant forty-two years old. They were married vat Farmington, Perm., Nov. 15, 1878, and had one child born to . them, Aug. 21, 1879; which they named : Eva. She charges cruel and , inhuman treatment and cites, as especial -in-, stances that at one time . during their married life he threatened to kill her if she appeared: ! in a court where he was being tried for ! wife-beating on a charge preferred by : \u25a0\u25a0 | neighbors, who were attracted late, one night to his home, where they found him aoplying_approbrious and profane epi- thets to her and beating her. in the face with his fists. In the summer of 1880,'. for reasons inexplicable to.the plaintiff, he moved to Prescott, Kan., and a short time afterwards . made his wife- and child fly to Pierce county, Wisconsin, and remain there, while he lead a stroll- ing and nomadic existence on the borders of the state. When' in a fit of ungovernable rage he once struck and severely wounded the plaintiff and drove her . from the house. She says that he is thrift- less and improvident, always neglecting and fails to provide for herself and child. That when he, was gone, which was all the time save those intervals in which he came to abuse her. she was compelled to avail herself of beneficent 1 and charitable friends and her own manual labor for support. She asks for the custody of the child and such relief as shall compart with equity and a good conscience. /% 7 7;:7'f7 7_ '7 "•'' SENT TO PRISON. Judge Kelly Disposes of a Number of Convicts. .-• *-;\u25a0 The criminal portion of the calendar yet untried having been postponed to March 18, Judge Kelly yesterday sen- tenced a dozen individuals who have been - tried and convicted. Patrick J. Fortune, forgery in the second degree, was sent to Stillwater for five years; Thomas Spelling, the railroad confi- dence man, two years and six months; Thomas McDonough, grand larceny,' two years; J. McDonald, assault, second degree, three years; Thomas Burke, grand larceny, second degree, two years and six months; Charles John- son, grand larceny, second degree; one year and six months; John Morton, grand larceny, second degree, three years; James Jenner, grand larceny, second degree, three years; Fred Piper, petit larceny, workhouse three months; John Moschiek, larceny, four months in workhouse, and Andrew Wrabel, larceny, workhouse four months. ; RAMSEY COUNTY'S NEEDS. legislators Urged to Take Action by Their Constituents. The Ramsey county delegation in the state legislature held a meeting at the office of Mayor Smith yesterday after- noon. The various bills of particular interest to St. Paul and Ramsey county were brought before the delegation and and assigned to different .- committees for investigation. J. W. Willis*pre- sented , a petition signed by 150 prom- inent" attorneys asking that the Will- iams bill, as amended, receive the sup- port of the delegation. : : A resolution was passed inviting the public to attend a meeting at the Chamber of Commerce Monday afternoon to discuss the appro- priations asked by the city. Represent- atives of the Homeopathic hospital were also present, but the question of an ap- propriation for the institution was not discussed. MANGLED BY THE CARS. A Brakeman Demands Heavy Damages From His Employers. John Brennan filed a suit in the dis- trict court yesterday against the North- ern Pacific company to recover 25,000 damages for personal injuries sustained while in the employ of the road. Plain- tiff claims that he was a brakeman on a west-bound train, and while running along the saddle-board of a freight car as the train was nearing Winnipeg Junctiou, a spike protruding upward from the board tripped him and threw him between the cars, where he was run over and badly mangled. His head, body and limbs were bruised and maimed, and he was confined to his bed for a long time and expended $800 for surgical apparatus and medical treat- ment. * \u25a0-"'" ~v* DISTRICT COURT DIGE ST. An Action Against Ex-Sheriff Richter--- Alimony Wanted in a Divorce Case. Edward J. Brenuauand E. R. Pantke, creditors ofDonahue & Gogiu, insolv- ents, filed a petition for the appoint- ment of a receiver. Herman Scheffer vs. Sheriff Richter, an action for the possession of certain machinery and implements at North St. Paul, the court overruled defendant's demurrer and granted . twenty days' leave in which to file an answer to com- plaint. : \u25a0'._ . William Bonholzer sued F. F. Ellis to recover 5250 for one month's rent of the store No. 19 East Seventh street, and attaches his property. ; - .-.\u25a0• . Caroline Burt vs. Barden M. Hicks. Suit to recover $450 on land contract. In the divorce suit of Peter W. Ohon against his wife a motion was argued before Judge Brill yesterday stipulating that 130 per month should be paid by the plaintiff for the support of the defend- ant and children pending a decision in the case. Salesmen Want Shorter Hours. At a meeting of the Retail Salesmen's \ association the early closing matter was thoroughly discussed, resulting in the adoption of the following: '• Whereas, The benefit of early closing \ has been enjoyed by employers and em- ployes alike, and has resulted in great good to all concerned, ami Whereas, There has been a disposi- tion shown among the dealers to con- tinue aud encourage the movement; therefore, be it " :: . " . Resolved, That we, the members of the Retail Salesmen's association, re- spectfully request the retail dealers in boots and shoes of this city, who have been closing at 6:30 p. m.. to extend the time of their agreement until April 1, and the dry goods dealers who have not already done so, to extend the : time . of their agreement until May 1. Order of the Iron Hall. The above order paid to the widow of the late John Michels, of State street, this city, the disability claim of $500, he having held membership in the order \u25a0or two years. This institution !is fast gaining the confidence of the public. :"\ A Fine Picture. 7 E.S. Thompson has just -received a picture produced by Miss Minnie C. Harris, a prominent young society lady . of Lake City, Minn. The conception of an old drunken Mick sitting in eclipse of a temperance sign is wonderful, and to be commended if it were the ideal of an old artist. The study of the pers- pective, foreshortening of.the hand and knee, expression of the eyes, detail of the apparel, are brought out with effect . remarkably true to life.".* The composi- tion, light "and shade, and drawing are perfect. MAKINGANEW MAYOR Voters; of South St. Paul Se- lect Delegates at a ' i*- -':.-\u25a0 r Caucus. 7 \u25a0-'.- -v --~-7 .';*- - -\u25a0; \u25a0 ' •-..:* •;\u25a0 *m; Pets of Society Don Sock and. j - 7; Buskin for a m ' Night. ' y : a* A Wedding Prevented by the ' Sudden Death of the * Bridegroom. " )£k> Champions of the Municipal Court Bill Petition \u25a0 the ry. J-. Legislature. y ---.-•.;\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 raw Caucuses were held in "the three wards'" of South St. Paul last evening for tlie . nomination, ron . the Citizens'., ticket of. aldermanic candidates, and ; three delegates from each ward. These, delegates ' are ;to convene at .Bryant block. South. Park, to-morrow evening 5 to nominate a candidate for mayor. Excellent order prevailed at all the cau- cuses, and no exercise ,of police super- vision was either noticeable- or neces- sary. The following nominees were ? selected * \u25a0 * '**- * * r ~- *~"-**"s : - First Ward of * South St. Paul (South Park District)—Alderman, to June 1, 1890; John Simon ; aldeiman, to June 1, : 1891, John Kochendorfer ; alderman, to June '- 1, 1892, Frank Waterous/ Delegates, James Nichol, John O'Leary, Theodore Klett. Sec- ond Ward (stock yards)— Alderman to June 1, 1890, Charles Fitch ; alderman" to June 1,1 891, Charles Baer; alderman to June 1, 1892, John E. Rourke. Dela-* t gates, P. Gibbons. B. Quinn, James Forsyth.' Third Ward—Alderman to June 1, 1890, Andrew Sundquist; alder- man to June 1, 1891, M. Gehan; alder- man to June 1, 1892, Pierce. Couneliy. Delegates, \u25a0"- Paul Suske, John O'Rourke, Edward Connelly. The se- lection of the above-named delegates is ; an indorsement of William G. Denny," the "people's candidate" for mayor, and is equivalent to the election of that gen- tleman on Tuesday next. ;/7 ' The proceedings at tho Second and Third wards were mostly by acclama- tion, and in consideration of the lack of preconcerted action, and of the unfa- miliarity with details that "might have, been expected in an almost disorgan- ized city, the results were reached very easily. •"\u25a0 77v;' ; A division was called for on the sub- stitution of B. Hesse for B. Quinn as a delegate at the stock yards, but the vote" showed a heavy majority iii favor of the . latter. Mr. Schneider was also defeated as a candidate for alderman at the same place. '7-., In the First ward "balloting for dele- gates was called for, and resulted in se- lecting those favorable to W. G. Denny.. It looks as though there will be but little opposition to the nominees of these , caucuses, excepting in the First ward,.' where a contest is likely to develop to" 7 *-*' morrow on the name of John Kochen7 dorfer. 7 ' \u25a0 '. ".*'•\u25a0• •\u25a0'_ The election will be held Tuesday, from 9 o'clock a. m. to 5 o'clock p. ni. at tpe following polling places: : First ward, Bryant block; Second ward, Com- - mercial hotel; Third ward, Andrew Sundquist's hotel. ,"„\u25a0 ALL MADE MERRY. 7. -i. \u25a0: I.V.U: A Charming Hostess Agreeably Surprised. '(y^. Young people . on the hill gave Miss May Judson, daughter of E. H. Judson, a surprise party last evening at her res- idence. 405 Dayton avenue. There were about three d.zen 'merry-makers ' In the party, which took possession OS the Judson homestead, and for the en- suing three, hours the fun was last and furious. Music and dancing served as,' admirable mediums for.-.whiting: the hours away, particularly as the Hill Quintette club . furnished the music. Among those present were Mrs. Will- iams, the Misses May and Grace Moor- house. Goyer. Jeshua, Thompson, Bass- ford, White, Kenyon, Weisey, Brawley, Gates,Libbie ; and Messrs.Gayer,Thomp- son, Wilde, Chapin, Scott. A. Gayer, Dr. Wood and Dr. Boyd. - - 2 CANCELED BY DEATH. Prospective Bridegroom Claimed by the Grim Reaper. s The death of David M. De Ferrer Lewis at Hastings Friday was an unus- ually sad one. Deceased was but twen- ty-eight years of age, and was a young man with a brilliant future before him; He was noted for his many charitable^ deeas, and made friends with all with whom he came in contact. The saddest, feature of his* untimely taking away was that he was engaged to be married- to a most estimable young lady, and the marriage was to have taken place April* 20. His fiancee is heart-broken, and has the sympathy of her legion of friends. Mr. Lewis died of typhoid pneumonia, and had been ill but a week, URGING LEGISLATION.. *J Champions ofthe Municipal Court Bill. 7 | "The municipal court bill is not in the,, tureen yet,": said one of Its champions yesterday afternoon as he struggled under the burden of a voluminous peti- tion to which were subscribed the names 150 attorneys of the Ramsey county bar. Judging from the names, which consti- tuted the body of the bar, the bill may yet live to waft its influence in the di- rection ot the judges and clerks of the municipal court. The increase in the salary of the municipal judges which it": will create, ana the clerships, gives the measure especial support by those in- terested. Johu W. Willis is the cus-' tudian of the petition, which will be presented to the legislature this week. * FEDERAL DELIGHT. ,; % Bob Evans Declines— Ha*f? Favored by Friends. "j* 'J? R. G. Evans said yesterday to tlie Globe : "You can say for me that as /. regards my candidacy for United States]? district attorney, I have witharawn; io- favor of Eugene Hay." ' * -.2 % Mr. Evans said this quite seriously, al~ ' thought it is thought that he still longs'. for the $4,000 plum. Apetition was drawn*,' up in the house yesterday and signed by the Ramsey county delegation, request-^ ing Senators Washburn and Davis to use their influence to secure the reten-. tion of Capt. George W. Hays as super- vising steamboat : inspector of Minne- sota. 11. F. Stevens' name headed the-- list of sinners." . 7;//l £- CLEVER AMATEURS. 7J | An Enjoyable Performance at the- Newmarket. ' The interesting and pleasing dramatic compositions, "Freezing a Mother-in- Law" and "Checkmate," ..- by the St. Paul Dramatic club, were rendered to a large and select audience at the New- market theater I last evening. >r Society peoDle were present in full force to wit- , ness the performance of the clever ama- teurs who participated in the plays." . "Freezing a Mother-in-Law" was. .well presented and the characters: were por- trayed with signal ability, and the pleasing effects produced v. by Messrs. Banning, \u25a0 Westervelt ;and MeKeever, and Mrs. Sawyer and . Miss Maud.; Taylor, were*' worthy of compliment/ Mr". , Banning,, :as -:". "Mr. .' VVatmuff, devoted to the past," was a good char- : acter with just" enough -to do. Mr. Westervelt as. Ferdinand Swift, devoted to fortune .hunting, although r at ease,' ! would have limited much easier in the wilds: of St. Anthony, hill. Mr. Mc- A Keever, as Walter Litheriand "' Devoted", to Emily, displayed a perfect stage ease f and acted his part admirably. Mrs. J. D. Sawyer and Miss Maud > Taylor, the one : as \u25a0 Mrs. Watmuff and ; the _ otlier,' as Emily '\u25a0 Watmuff,- were '.." excellent. I "Checkmate" tended to enliven the Spirit of the audience, which applauded each brilliant stroke of the performers.' •J. J. Parker delighted his hearers with ; »'~ ludicrous impersonation of -Sara "Winkle. - 'Messrs.' ' Foster,.'*. Yardly ,7 I Wanzer, Bigelow were perfectly 'at " jhbme in their characters. Miss Bend as ' Charlotte Busse was as . charmiug as i grace and elegant bearing : and ' fitness . " or the stage could make her. "No less in-! -..resting and entertaining Miss StUrgis. provoked the - house to a - continued ' Jitter. >" Miss ; Gotzian and :. Miss Arm- Strong were fortunate in light and I "minor parts, which they managed with ease and ability. The : audience was. i "like a pleasant company of friends, and* pdth performances passed; offwithout v jah error. The entertainment was . an : jaHistic as well as' a financial success, \u25a0 jalidthe-proceeds will be appropriated i to the building - fund of Christ Church i guild. •\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0*- -\u25a0-\u25a0 - \u25a0 _ •'.- 7 \u25a0 *.- ; vW* ' J "jy: THIS IS ECONOMY. *•*\u25a0 lit Gould Slakes a Sweeping Cut in : I Expenses by Abandoning Local Train Service on His Systems. ; St. Louis, Mo., Feb. IC— of the most sweeping cuts in expenses ever made -by the Gould interest has just been* accomplished. The method of economizing applies to the ; Missouri Pacific, Cotton Belt and Iron Mountain, and is nothing more nor less than the reduction of train service. Thus, in- stead of having local trains to follow through trains to pick up the local busi- ness, through trains are compelled to do the work. The Missouri Pacific has abandoned its local trains on the Lexington branch, Wichita branch, and a large number of other branches. The train service on the Iron Mountain, be- tween St. Louis and the Texas line, has been greatly reduced. Also on the St. Louis, Arkansas & Texas. It is ' esti- mated that the Missouri Pacific reduc- tion in train service amounts to fully 2,800 miles per day, or a saving of .' $40,- --000 per month. .-:.-' 'y.lj.--. .'\u25a0•\u25a0 ' \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 \u25a0'\u25a0\u25a0 'yyy l-i RULER OP ALL ROUTES. Pullman Secures a Monopoly of ' the Sleeping Car Service to the ' ' Coast. \u25a0..-"\u25a0'-'\u25a0•\u25a0-\u25a0 . Chicago, Feb. 16.—George M. Pull- man has secured a practical' monopoly of the ' sleeping car service of both classes of travel on the entire system of the transcontinental railroads. He has just closed a contract with the Union Pacific for managing the second-class sleeping car service of that line in con- nection with, the Central Pacific. -The Pullman company has already a con- tract with the Atchison & Santa ' Fe, which also covers the Souteern Pacific from San Francisco to Ma- jave, and it has also placed the Northern Pacific on its list. It will establish a uniform second-class rate of $3 for the trip between San Francisco and the Missouri river, and has put that rate into effect on the Atchison, between the coast and Kansas City. The rate between Chicago and San Francisco will be 84. First-class sleeping rates : are 818.50 from Chicago and \u25a0 $13 from the Missouri river to San Francisco. The application of the new system to the Uuion Pacific will result in the withdrawal of the excursion agents of tliat road from various Eastern and Western points. The Denver & ; Rio Grande is the only transcontinental line hot included in the deal, but a "contract Will probably be made with it in a short tihie. : \ j } RATES THAT MEAN RUIN. Railroad Moguls Vainly Endeavor ! to Secure a Modification ofthe j lowa Schedule. {Special to the Globe. ' ' : '"~ . " y l , i ( Dcs Moines, 10., Feb. 16.— President Pernins and Solicitor Blythe, of the "Q;" Judge Hubbard, of,- the North-: western, and ! Messrs. Bird and Fish, of the Milwaukee road, appeared before 'the lowa railway commissioners to-day, and made a request in geueral terms for a new schedule 1 or" rates, which shall be higher than that recently adopted and now in force. The Illinois distance tar- iff was referred, to as satisfactory, al- though it was riot insisted upon, but the representatives of the road did urge the commissioners with a great ileal, of earnestness to make a' reasonable modification in the direction asked. The commission- ers answered that they had firmlyde- termined to make a thorough test of the schedule for the purpose of ascertain- ing from actual experience whether the rates are compensatory or not. They said further that as soon as that act was determined, and it should prove the rates were too low : they would be promptly raised to a point where the loads would have no reason to com- plain. The railway officials are not all satisfied with the result of their labors, but they went away determined to make the best of what they firmly believe is a very bad mess. . ;*' Sixty Days to Kansas City. Special to the Globe. Dcs Moines, 10., Feb. 16.— The. Min- neapolis, St. Paul & Southwestern Rail- road company's engineer corps have completed the location of the company's line through this city, and are pushing the work rapidly toward the Southwest- ern terminus. They will reach Kansas City in about sixty days of good weather." » 1 ;\u25a0 THE CASE IS A TEST ONE. The Commonwealth of Kentucky f Sues the 'Bondsmen of Default- - ing Treasurer Tate. , . : Louisville. Ky., Feb. 16.—The case of The Commonwealth of Kentucky against* James W. Tate, the defaulting treasurer, and the sureties on his official bond for the term of 1.81-83, was begun, in the circuit court at Frankfort, Ky., yesterday. The shortage of this bond is $59,285.86, and the case a test one.. Tate's total deficit is about $156,000. and if this suit is won -the commonwealth will sue on all the other, bonds. . The sureties claim that when -; Tate's ac- counts were audited and certified to as correct, which was done each year, they were released from liability. : i— 1 "The Noble Outcast" Enjoined. Chicago, Feb. 16.— Judge Shepard granted an injunction this afternoon restraining "Punch" Robertson, Will Emery, Alfred Johnson. Charles Eugel, If rom further producing the play called "The Noble Outcast," which has been running at the Criterion theater all this 'week. The injunction was issued on a bill filed by John W. Summers, who Says that he is the author of the play and that the defendants are producing it in violation of his copyright. ||||f*f f m | Hatch in Hot Water. * ! New Yoek, Feb. 16.— suspension of Edward Hatch has been announced at the New York stock exchange. He Was a member of the exchange since July, 1883. , Generous Unto Death. - > -\u25a0;\u25a0_ : Obeklix, 0., Feb. 16.— C. J. Hull, of Chicago, who recently died in Texas, left Oberlin college $55,000, in insurance policies on his life, for the endowment of a chair of modern; languages. ; Dr. Gray at Death's Door. r \u25a0t Chicago, r Feb. 16.— The ; Rev. Dr. Gray, who recently, resigned as warden of Racine college, is now lying serious- ly ill of pneumonia in. this : city. His father, J. A. C. Gray, of New York, ar- \u25a0 rived here last evening to be near him. f| EMIL [JEWELER, jl C J CT I 85 E. THIRD, : ULIUII ST.FAUW feTHESHOEMAN ST M 2y y .1, A lot of Ladies' Hand-Turned French Kid Button Boots, reduced; to $3.50 (sizes broken; a big bargain for those they will fit). \u25a0A lot of Ladies' $5, $6 \u25a0 and $7 Hand- Made Easy Waukenpliast , Shoes, deduced to $4.00. A lot of Ladies' : $7 Patent Leather Dress Boots, reduced to $4.00. - - ";/, ". A big lot of Ladies' $2 Slippers, all re- duced to $1.00. : ; A lot of Men's $8 and $9 Cork Sole, Hand-Sewed French Calf Shoes, reduced t056.00. " ' '- -___V *li_?«^ _B6*i \u25a0 '''^""^-^?^h^_j?^iESff_i \u25a0HILJI. il^^M^ A lot of Men $10 Porpoise-Hide Shoes, reduced to $7.00. A lot of Men's $5 and $6 French Calf Hand-Turned Shoes, reduced to $3.00. Close at 6:30 p.m,, Except Saturdays ag___> GOODS SENT C. 0. D.0%; W^y ON APPROVAL. \u25a0-^ a OPPOSITEPOBTOFFICE. AT YOUR OWN PRICES THE ENTIRE STOCK AND FIXTURES OF Lightner's Jewelry Store \u25a0"\u25a0 *:,~y'. •' "- Mm 149 East Third Street, St. Paul, BOUGHT AT ASSIGNEE'S SALE Fine Diamonds and Watches, Choice Jewelry, Artistic Bronzes, Onyx and Marble Clocks, Solid Silverware, Triple and Quadruple Silver-Plated Ware, Novelties in Solid Gold, Silver and Rolled Plate Jewelry Suitable for An- niversary Presents, Wedding Presents, Birthday Presents, TO BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION I MORNING, AFTERNOON AND EVENING, COMMENCING SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23d. Stock Now on Exhibition at - 149 East Third St, St. Paul, Minn. ANNUAL FEBRUARY SALE OF FINE TROUSERS. The Largest Stock. The Lowest Prices, and all with the "Plymouth" Legal Guar- antee. THE 'PLYMOUTH OOTHING H OUSE ' Cor. Seventh and Robert Sts.. St. I'uul, 10, Vi Hnd 14 Washington Aye. N., Minneapolis. MED OF Suicide Seriously Contem- plated as the Only Relief From Suffering. Mr. . Jacob Graef was .found by the reporter at "No. 109 First avenue east, where the following story r was related by him. Mr. Graef said that for five years he has been suffering more than he could tell.. About that lime be got.« severe cold, which it appeared impossi- ble to get rid of ; as quick' as" it got* bet- ter, it would return with renewed vigor. He bad a dropping of mucus from the head into the throat, hawking and spitting* continually, pain over the fore- head, eyes weak and watery. His head was in such a bad condition and pained him so much that life was a burden, and he often wished it might end; * His appetite became poor and he gradually lost iD weight. He doctored and spent \u0084«___*_., money, but all to no avail, as he gradu- ally became worse until he despaired of ever getting better (but he said that now he was feeling like a different man). In answer as to what lrad brought that about, he said that he had been watching the papers.and seeing of cases treated by Dr. Cosman, whose . symptoms very much resembled bis case, and as they appeared to be get- ting relief, he concluded to go and see the doctor himself and see if there could be anything done for him. So ac- cordingly he did so, and after a careful examination of my case, Dr. Cosman told me that 1 was suffering with chronic catarrh of the head and throat, and that he could treat me successfully, so Iplaced myself in his care and com- menced treatment. I have improved from the start, and to-day 1 hardly know myself, so great has been the change effected in me. I have no moid trouble with my head or throat. Drop*- ping of mucus' from the head into the throat, hawking and spitting does not bother me any. My appetite has Im- " proved greatly. I eat with a relish and* enjoy any food. I have gained over ten pounds iii weight since starting treat- ment with the doctor. My eyes lost the weak and watery feeling and are strong as ever. I sleep well, arising in the mornine*! refreshed and ready for my day's work, and this is all due to the excellent treat- ment I received at the hands of Dr.. Cosman, and would most cheerfully '\u25a0 recommend any person suffering with apparently incurable diseases to go and ' see him. Mr. Graef can be found at No. 109 First avenue east, where he will cheer- fully corroborate the above statement to any person who would like to inter- view mm in regard to it. Do you have" frequent fits of mental oppression? Do you'experience ringing or buzz- ing noises in your ears? Do you feel as though you must suf- focate when lying down? Are yon * troubled with a hacking cough and general debility? Are your eyes generally weak and watery and frequently inflamed? Does your voice have a husky, thick ' sound and a nasal sort of twang? Is your breath frequently offensive from some unaccountable cause? Have you a dull, oppressive head- ache, generally located over the eyes? Do you have to hawk and cough fre- quently in the effort to clear your ' throat? "7V. Are you losing your sense of smell, and is your sense of taste becoming dulled? ',-*-.'\u25a0 Does your nose always feel stopped : up, forcing you to breathe through your mouth? Do you frequently feel dizzy, particu- larly "when stooping to pick anything offthe floor? Does every little draught of air and every slight change of temperature give you a cold? Are you annoyed by a constant de- sire to hawk and spit out an endless quantity of phlegm? Are you always tired and indisposed' to exertion, whether to business, work , or amusement? 7*77^ -Is great effort required to keep your ' thoughts fixed upon matters that for- merly were easily performed? If so, . call and see Dr. Cosmau.— Duluth Trib- . une. 12".y~. 2i222r : \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 '.'• DOCTOR ETHELBERTO. Late of the Cincinnati College of M -di- .: cine and Surgery (Cincinnati, Ohio) his . offices and is permanently located at ...**.. , . : I- .'ly.'- .;•\u25a0••\u25a0;•.•• NO. 49! BROADWAY, ST.PAUL, MINN., Where all curable diseases are treated with success. ; 7:Y77^ ; : Medical diseases treated skillfully. Consumption. Bright's disease. Dyspep- sia, Rheumatism and all NERVOUS. DISEASES. All diseases peculiar: to the sexes a specialty. CATARRH CURED. CONSULTATION at office or by mail, $1. .' Many diseases are treated success- ' fully by Dr. Cosman through the mail, and it is thus possible that those unable j -to make a journey can receive SKILL- FUL HOSPITAL TREATMENT AT THEIR HOMES. '^rf ' Correspondence receives prompt at-*'. tention. .y \u25a0\u25a0...-,_ yiyyl No letters- answered unless accom- panied by 4 cents in stamps. _7 Office hours, 9to 11 a. m., 2 to 4 p. vi., "\u25a0• and 7to S p. -a..", except Sunday. -_\u25a0 - : 'y \u25a0',' Address all mail to •'"'•' DR. E. O. COSMAN.7 !'" No. 491 Broadway, St. Paul, Minn.
Transcript
  • \u25a0THE SAINT PAUL DAILY GLOBE: : "' SUNDAY MORNING/ FEBRUARY 17, 1889.—SIXTEEN PAGES.3

    SAINT PAULGLOBULES.

    Diphtheria prevails' at ,393 WinslowStreet. .

    Seven births and one death were bul-letined at the health office yesterday.

    The council committee on claims willmeet at the city hall to-morrow after-noon. '-.*\u25a0-.--* * .

    The League of the Cross T. A. so-ciety will hold a rally in its hall on theWest side this evening.

    The Ladies' Aid association will givea social hop at Lohr hall, 70 East Sev-enth street, Friday evening.

    Mayor Smith yesterday appointed J.C. Adams* a special policeman, to serveat the Thomas Street Mission.

    A meeting of the Homeopathic Hos-pital Aid society will be held at 3:30o'clock to-morrow afternoon at the Ryanhotel. -• 7- \u25a0\u25a0 :77;

    ,1. If.Poteet was presented with at-olid gold-lined silver set by his em-ployes .at the Sioux City freight houseyesterday afternoon.

    John ('. Woolley, the temperanceevangelist, will address a gospel tem-perance mass meeting at Newmarkettheater, Sunday, Feb. 24, at 3 p. m.

    .V concert willbe given at the WestSide opera house Tuesday evening, un-der the auspices of the Sunday schoolof the Clinton Avenue M. E. church.

    A musical and literary entertainmentwill be given by the members of theLinopfiiiiaii"Society of Baldwin Semi-nary, at Unity church, Thursday, even-ing. : • \u25a0" -•*•.'-

    A business meeting of the MinnesotaEditorial and Publishers' associationwill be held in the chamber of com-merce at 11 o'clock Wednesday morn-ing.

    The case against Paul Martin, chargedwith' assaulting Officer Lauderdale inthe Ducas street. police station Wednes-day evening, was dismissed by JudgeCory yesterday.

    The executive committee of the di-rectors of the Manitoba railway metyesterday afternoon in General Man-ager -Manvel's office and transactedroutine business.

    The gospel temperance meeting to-day at 3 p. m., under the auspices oftheW. C. T. CT., will be addressed by MissCarrie Estey, state organizer of theYoung Women's Temperance Union.

    OliveA'ernev and Edna Fuller.chargedwith larceny ofclothing valued at $100by Lottie Avaline,were arrested in Min-neapolis last night by Detectives Kena-ley and Daly as- they were about toboard a train for Denver.

    There will be a special meeting of theSt Paul Bar association, in the chamberof commerce, to-morrow afternoon, at4:80 o'clock, to consider the bill now be-fore the legislature relating to the ren-dering of verdicts by juries.

    The Young Men's Bible Class of Ox-ford church gave a literary and musi-cal entertainment at the church Tues-day afternoon. Prof. W. H. Meeke,Rockford, 111., in his rendition of "TheCreeds of the Bells,"was unique as wellas forcible.

    A. Stamm. a furrier employed by Gor-don &Ferguson, was struck by a cablecar near Seven Corners last evening,but escaped with slight injuries. Patrol-man Weidle pulled him from under thewheels in time to avert a serious acci-dent, mst

    Marriage licenses were issued yester-day to A. P. Hokanson and Ida F. John-sou, Frank Leitner and Anna Harmt-chock, Frank Gibis and Johanna Leit-ner. Nels Jacobson and Ellen Carlson,Frank Reitzcker and Johanna Fuchs,Henry Gaul and Mary Miller.

    About 8 o'clock last evening firebrokeout in the Skidmore block, at Sixth andMinnesota streets, in the office of theStevenson Mercantile company. Theflames had gained considerable head-way, but quick work by the departmentsubdued them with a loss of about $500.

    PERSONAL PARAGRAPHS.

    TrafficManager Hanley. of the Kan-sas City, returned from Chicago jester-day morning.

    Newman Erb, general manager of theKansas City, Wyandotte - Boston and Return $32.50.Montreal and Return $30.

    Via the So© Line.Feb. 23 to March 2, good thirty days.Round trip to Inaugural from Boston

    $14, all rail, and $11 Sound steamers.. . \u25a0*./. .""*"* \u25a0*-*"*•\u25a0 "*'"The Finest Train in the WorldVia Union and Central Pacific roads.Sixty-four hours from Council Bluffs orOmaha to San Francisco. A PullmanVestlbuled train; steam heal, electriclight, bath rooms, barber shop, libraryand dining car— palace hotel onwheels is Th*-**Goldex Gate Specialevery Wednesday.

    The Massachusetts Mutual Life,Whose 37th annual statement appealsin toother column, deserves the thought-ful,perusal of every one contemplatinglifelnsurance. The company is strong, Isafe and conservative. Mr. James F. IBard. Pl'Ei-ftFourth lv Is the n-.identage id. 7 7-" \u25a0" I

    DEMANDS HIS DUCATSAllegations of Fraud Against

    a Leading Real EstateFirm. ; \u25a0-,

    Property : Purchased for aSyndicate-Results in a 7

    Law Suit.

    Death Lurked , at Bottomof the Hill for a

    : :Coaster.* 2-..

    Beat His: Wife Until theNeighbors Interfered for

    Her Protection.

    . A suit was filed in the district courtlate yesterday afternoon which appearsto be the initiative step to be taken bya dozen others equally; interested in thetransaction; It was that of* C. RobertSchurman, of-the state of Illinois,against Bushnell & Bushnell, a promi-nent real estate firm of this city. Plaint-iffclaims that April20.-ISS7, the defend-ants stated that they were peculiarlysituated in their business, and could in-vest a - certain . amount of plaintiff'smoney in such " a way as to beable to realize the principaland a large profit out of thedeal in which they should invest thefunds within one year. They agreedto take his money, ' not' statingwhat they . would do with it inparticular, but that they wouldremit the same to plaintiff one yearfrom that date with a large per cent ofprofit. Further representations indi-cative of the high ahd influential posi-tion defendants held in the real estatemarket led the plaintiff to leave $1,000with them, to be invested according tothe agreement. . A short time after themoney had been so placed with the de-fendants, they invested the amount in apiece of property in block 2of Hoyt'saddition to St. Paul, with the funds ofeleven other persons to whom they hadmade other or similar representations.At the time of placiug the $1,000 withthe defendants it was agreed by andbetween plaintiff and defendant thatplaintiff should have a form of theiragreement and a receipt for his money.This, however, the plaintiff claims hasnever been tendered him, althoughoften demanded. The alleged and pre-tended price paid for the properly was$50,000, one-third being paid cash asdefendants represented, and a mortgagewas given upon the same for the bal-ance, by Randall F. Hurd, to whom theproperty was. deeded. Hurd, it wasrepresented, should hold the prop-erty for the so-called "syndicate.''Ever since the spring of 1887the plaintiff has been inquiringinto the deal and learns, .as he claims,the following details, which promptshis action and which lie sets up as aspecial cause for the damages asked.The property in question was owned atthe time of the alleged and pretendedpurchase by Boston parties .for whomthe defendants were agents. The de-fendants having the funds of -thetwelve persons for investment, boughtthe property from the Boston partiesfor $20,000, receiving commission fromsuch sale, which was made to and in thename of Hurd. Then it is chargedthe defendants made a' pre-tended deed back and forthto Hurd for the consideration of $50,000,and they represented that Hurd exe-cuted a mortgage to the original own-ers, whom they named as being otherpersons, for thirty odd thousand dol-lars on the balance" of the transaction.After a while the interest on the mort-gage became due and demands weremade upon the members of the "syndi-cate." Assessments came floating in atthem and again demands were madeupon the "interested ones." The plain-tiffstates that after mature investiga-tion, he verily believes and knowsthat the property at the timeof the alleged purchase wasworth but $30,000 and that it is notworth that now. He charges that thedefendants were personally interestedin the matter, and that the purchase ofthe property and the application of his$1,000 were "a fraud. He asks that hisinterest in the property be annulled anddeclared void and wrongfully, fraudu-lently aud unlawfully obtained, andasks that his $1,000 and interest be re-tared, and $1,000 as damages for the in-jury suffered by the false representa-tion of the defendants.. '\u25a0 \SELLING AN OPERA HOUSE.

    Agent and Purchaser Sue theDavidson Estate.

    MarkD. Flower filed a suit againstthe Davidson estate yesterday, in whichhe asks $5,000 as commission for the saleof the opera house property toLotta M.Crabtree. He states that in March,ISSS, he entered into a verbal agree-ment with the executors of the estatethat he should make efforts to sell theproperty and would receive $5,000 if thesale was made at $142,500. In July,1888, the contract was made in writing,and the time extended in which to find apurchaser. Sept. 10. the actress Lotta M.iCrabtree was introduced by him to themanagers of the estate, and purchasedthe property at $142,500, paying $5,000as earnest mouey upon the sale, andentering into a contract to bindthe same. She was accepted asa responsible and satisfactory purchaser,and a contract whereby she should pay,$70,000 unon the delivery of the deed,and the balance in one year, was signedPlaintiff claims that the sale was thusconsummated as far as he was con-cerned, and therefore asks for the $5,000commission which has .been refused bythe defendant.

    Another chapter was added to thecontroversy regarding the opera housedeal by the answer of Lotta, whicii wasfiled yesterday. Executors of the David-son estate brought suit to compel theactress to fulfillher contract by paying abalance of$95,000 and the delivery of anote and mortgage for $42,500, makingthe total consideration $142,500. In heranswer defendant admits that in Sep-tember she executed a contract agree-ing to pay the plaintiff $100,000 on de -liven*of the. deed of conveyance, thenote and mortgage for $42,500, and paid$5,000 cash on account. • She denies thatthe plaintiff delivered the abstract oftitle before Sept. 10. in fact not untilSept. 13, and did not report the titlegood.

    Another point alleged is that the billboards located in various parts ofthecity, regarded as indispenable to thesuccess of tho opera house, the saidhoards being valued at $7,500, were notturned over to the defendant, and thatas a matter of fact the defendant had nopower or authority to execute or con-tract for salo of said bill boards..

    Oct. 1 the defendant withdrew fromcontract, giving plaintiffproper notice,and since that date has had no commu-nication whatever with the .'plaintiffre-garding the sale. Said contract is ren-dered void under the law by the reasonthat the parties subscribing to thecontract, Ed E. Davidson and. AndrewDRaney, were not . authorized to do so,and also by the.reason.that they falselyrepresented that they owned I a half in-terest in the bill boards and bill-postingbusiness. The defendant avers that sheis now, and lias at all times been, readyand willing to fulfillher part of thecontract ifthe plaintiffs willfulfilltheirpart. The defendant believes that, theplaintiff has not a good title to the ease-ment in the ''rand ana Court blocks,and that the Economy. Steam Heat com-pany was in January, ISSS. granted theprivilege of erecting and maintaining .asmokestack by the plaintiff in the rightof way at the Fourth street entrance tothe opera house. Defendant also be-lieves "that the destruction of the operabouse was due to oareleßsaes_*a_id neg-ligence on tliopart of the plaintiff.'. Ontliese grounds she **3;*r to *:nv. the suitJ-'suii.-ea.

    KILLED WHILE COASTING.

    An Unmanageable Sled Causes ItsOccupant's Death.

    William Feah, eighteen years of age,who resided on West • Seventh : stree,near the Shoit Line crossing, wasstruck and killed by a Milwaukee train .at the .lames street crossing last even-ing. He Was coasting with a number ofother boys on James street hill,and wascarried by an unmanageable sled underthe wheels of the approaching train.The body, which was horribly mangled, iwas taken to the morgue. 7.

    ABUSED AND NEGLECTED. :An Attempt to Prove Marriage a

    Failure.Mary Morrison, wifeof John D. Mor-

    rison, filed a suit in . the district courtyesteryay, in which she seeks to allevi-ate the subjection in which she claims. she has been held by the defendant.She states that she is twenty-eight -andthe defendant forty-two years old. Theywere • married vat Farmington, Perm.,Nov. 15, 1878, and had one child born to .them, Aug. 21, 1879; which they named :Eva. She charges cruel and , inhumantreatment and cites, as especial -in-,stances that at one time . duringtheir married life he threatenedto kill her if she appeared:

    ! in a court where he was being tried for! wife-beating on a charge preferred by : \u25a0\u25a0| neighbors, who were attracted late, onenight to his home, where they found himaoplying_approbrious and profane epi-thets to her and beating her. in the facewith his fists. In the summer of 1880,'.for reasons inexplicable to.the plaintiff,he moved to Prescott, Kan., and a shorttime afterwards . made his wife- andchild fly to Pierce county, Wisconsin,and remain there, while he lead a stroll-ing and nomadic existence on • theborders of the state. When' ina fit of ungovernable rage heonce struck and severely woundedthe plaintiff and drove her . fromthe house. She says that he is thrift-less and improvident, always neglectingand fails to provide for herself andchild. That when he, was gone, whichwas all the time save those intervals inwhich he came to abuse her. she wascompelled to avail herself of beneficent 1and charitable friends and her ownmanual labor forsupport. She asks forthe custody ofthe child and such reliefas shall compart with equity and a goodconscience. /% 7 7;:7'f7 7_ '7 "•''

    SENT TO PRISON.

    Judge Kelly Disposes of a Numberof Convicts. .-• *-;\u25a0

    The criminal portion of the calendaryet untried having been postponed toMarch 18, Judge Kelly yesterday sen-tenced a dozen individuals who havebeen - tried and convicted. Patrick J.Fortune, forgery in the second degree,was sent to Stillwater for five years;Thomas Spelling, the railroad confi-dence man, two years and six months;Thomas McDonough, grand larceny,'two years; J. McDonald, assault, seconddegree, three years; Thomas Burke,grand larceny, second degree, twoyears and six months; Charles John-son, grand larceny, second degree; oneyear and six months; John Morton,grand larceny, second degree, threeyears; James Jenner, grand larceny,second degree, three years; Fred Piper,petit larceny, workhouse three months;John Moschiek, larceny, four monthsin workhouse, and Andrew Wrabel,larceny, workhouse four months. ;

    RAMSEY COUNTY'S NEEDS.

    legislators Urged to Take Actionby Their Constituents.

    The Ramsey county delegation in thestate legislature held a meeting at the

    office of Mayor Smith yesterday after-noon. The various bills of particularinterest to St. Paul and Ramsey countywere brought before the delegation andand assigned to different .- committeesfor investigation. J. W. Willis*pre-sented , a petition signed by 150 prom-inent" attorneys asking that the Will-iams bill, as amended, receive the sup-port of the delegation. : : A resolutionwas passed inviting the public to attenda meeting at the Chamber of CommerceMonday afternoon to discuss the appro-

    priations asked by the city. Represent-atives of the Homeopathic hospital werealso present, but the question of an ap-propriation for the institution was notdiscussed.

    MANGLED BY THE CARS.

    A Brakeman Demands HeavyDamages From His Employers.John Brennan filed a suit in the dis-

    trict court yesterday against the North-ern Pacific company to recover 25,000damages for personal injuries sustainedwhile in the employ of the road. Plain-tiff claims that he was a brakeman on awest-bound train, and while runningalong the saddle-board of a freight caras the train was nearing WinnipegJunctiou, a spike protruding upwardfrom the board tripped him and threwhim between the cars, where he wasrun over and badly mangled. His head,body and limbs were bruised andmaimed, and he was confined to his bedfor a long time and expended $800 forsurgical apparatus and medical treat-ment. * \u25a0-"'" ~v*

    DISTRICT COURT DIGE ST.

    An Action Against Ex-SheriffRichter--- Alimony Wanted in aDivorce Case.Edward J. Brenuauand E. R. Pantke,

    creditors ofDonahue & Gogiu, insolv-ents, filed a petition for the appoint-ment of a receiver.

    Herman Scheffer vs. Sheriff Richter,an action for the possession of certainmachinery and implements at North St.Paul, the court overruled defendant'sdemurrer and granted . twenty days'leave in which tofile an answer to com-plaint. : \u25a0'._ .

    William Bonholzer sued F. F. Ellis torecover 5250 for one month's rent of thestore No. 19 East Seventh street, andattaches his property. ; - .-.\u25a0• .Caroline Burt vs. Barden M. Hicks.Suit to recover $450 on land contract.

    In the divorce suit of Peter W. Ohonagainst his wife a motion was arguedbefore Judge Brill yesterday stipulatingthat 130 per month should be paid by theplaintiff for the support of the defend-ant and children pending a decision inthe case. •

    Salesmen Want Shorter Hours.At a meeting of the Retail Salesmen's \

    association the early closing matter wasthoroughly discussed, resulting in theadoption of the following: '•

    Whereas, The benefit of early closing \has been enjoyed by employers and em-ployes alike, and has resulted in greatgood to all concerned, ami

    Whereas, There has been a disposi-tion shown among the dealers to con-tinue aud encourage the movement;therefore, be it " :: . " .

    Resolved, That we, the members ofthe Retail Salesmen's association, re-spectfully request the retail dealers inboots and shoes of this city, who havebeen closing at 6:30 p. m.. to extend thetime of their agreement until April 1,and the dry goods dealers who have notalready done so, to extend the : time . oftheir agreement until May 1.

    Order of the Iron Hall.The above order paid to the widow of

    the late John Michels, of State street,this city, the disability claim of $500,he having held membership in the order\u25a0or twoyears. This institution !is fastgaining the confidence ofthe public. :"\

    A Fine Picture. 7E.S. Thompson has just -received a

    picture produced by Miss Minnie C.Harris, a prominent young society lady .of Lake City, Minn. The conception ofan old drunken Mick sitting in eclipseof a temperance sign is wonderful, andto be commended if it were the ideal ofan old artist. The study of the pers- •pective, foreshortening of.the hand and •knee, expression of the eyes, detail ofthe apparel, are brought out with effect .remarkably true to life.".* The composi-tion, light "and shade, and drawing areperfect.

    MAKINGANEW MAYORVoters; of South St. Paul Se-

    lect Delegates at a 'i*- -':.-\u25a0 r Caucus. 7 \u25a0-'.- -v --~-7

    .';*- - -\u25a0; \u25a0 ' •-..:* •;\u25a0 *m;

    Pets of Society Don Sock and. j- 7; Buskin for a • m

    ' Night.'

    y : a*

    A Wedding Prevented by the 'Sudden Death of the *Bridegroom. " )£k>

    Champions of the MunicipalCourt Bill Petition \u25a0 the • ry.

    • J-. Legislature. y---.-•.;\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 raw

    Caucuses were held in "the threewards'" of South St. Paul last eveningfor tlie . nomination, ron . the Citizens'.,ticket of. aldermanic candidates, and ;three delegates from each ward. These,delegates ' are ;to convene at .Bryantblock. South. Park, to-morrow evening 5to nominate a candidate for mayor.Excellent order prevailed at all the cau-cuses, and no exercise ,of police super-vision was either noticeable- or neces-sary. The following nominees were ?selected * \u25a0 * '**-* * r ~-*~"-**"s: -First Ward of* South St. Paul (SouthPark District)—Alderman, to June 1,1890; John Simon ; aldeiman, to June 1, :1891, John Kochendorfer ; alderman, toJune '- 1, 1892, Frank Waterous/Delegates, James Nichol, JohnO'Leary, Theodore Klett. Sec-ond Ward (stock yards)— Aldermanto June 1, 1890, Charles Fitch ; alderman"to June 1,1891, Charles Baer; aldermanto June 1, 1892, John E. Rourke. Dela-*

    t

    gates, P. Gibbons. B. Quinn, JamesForsyth.' Third Ward—Alderman toJune 1, 1890, Andrew Sundquist; alder-man to June 1, 1891, M. Gehan; alder-man to June 1, 1892, Pierce. Couneliy.Delegates, \u25a0"- Paul Suske, JohnO'Rourke, Edward Connelly. The se-lection of the above-named delegates is ;

    an indorsement of William G. Denny,"the "people's candidate" for mayor, andis equivalent to the election of that gen-tleman on Tuesday next. ;/7' The proceedings at tho Second andThird wards were mostly by acclama-tion, and in consideration of the lack ofpreconcerted action, and of the unfa-miliarity with details that "might have,been expected in an almost disorgan-ized city, the results were reached veryeasily. •"\u25a0 77v;' ;

    A division was called for on the sub-stitution of B. Hesse for B. Quinn as adelegate at the stock yards, but the vote"showed a heavy majority iiifavor of the .latter.

    Mr. Schneider was also defeated as acandidate for alderman at the sameplace. '7-.,

    In the First ward "balloting for dele-gates was called for, and resulted in se-lecting those favorable to W. G. Denny..Itlooks as though there will be but

    little opposition to the nominees of these ,caucuses, excepting in the First ward,.'where a contest is likelyto develop to"7*-*'morrow on the name of John Kochen7dorfer. 7 ' \u25a0 '. ".*'•\u25a0• •\u25a0'_

    The election will be held Tuesday,from 9 o'clock a. m. to 5 o'clock p. ni.at tpe following polling places: : Firstward, Bryant block; Second ward, Com- -mercial hotel; Third ward, AndrewSundquist's hotel. ,"„\u25a0

    ALL MADE MERRY. 7.-i. \u25a0: I.V.U:

    A Charming Hostess Agreeably• Surprised. '(y^.

    Young people . on the hill gave MissMay Judson, daughter of E. H. Judson,a surprise party last evening at her res-idence. 405 Dayton avenue. Therewere about three d.zen 'merry-makers 'In the party, which took possession OSthe Judson homestead, and for the en-suing three, hours the fun was last andfurious. Music and dancing served as,'admirable mediums for.-.whiting: thehours away, particularly as the HillQuintette club . furnished the music.Among those present were Mrs. Will-iams, the Misses May and Grace Moor-house. Goyer. Jeshua, Thompson, Bass-ford, White, Kenyon, Weisey, Brawley,Gates,Libbie ; and Messrs.Gayer,Thomp-son, Wilde, Chapin, Scott. A. Gayer,Dr. Wood and Dr. Boyd. - - 2

    CANCELED BY DEATH.

    Prospective Bridegroom Claimedby the Grim Reaper. • s

    The death of David M. De FerrerLewis at Hastings Friday was an unus-ually sad one. Deceased was but twen-ty-eight years of age, and was a youngman with a brilliant future before him;He was noted for his many charitable^deeas, and made friends with all withwhom he came in contact. The saddest,feature of his* untimely taking awaywas that he was engaged to be married-to a most estimable young lady, and themarriage was to have taken place April*20. His fiancee is heart-broken, andhas the sympathy of her legion offriends. Mr. Lewis died of typhoidpneumonia, and had been illbut a week,

    URGING LEGISLATION.. *JChampions ofthe Municipal Court

    Bill. 7 |"The municipal court bill is not in the,,

    tureen yet,": said one of Its championsyesterday afternoon as he struggledunder the burden of a voluminous peti-tion to which were subscribed the names150 attorneys of the Ramsey county bar.Judging from the names, which consti-tuted the body of the bar, the bill mayyet live to waft its influence in the di-rection ot the judges and clerks of themunicipal court. The increase in thesalary of the municipal judges which it":will create, ana the clerships, gives themeasure especial support by those in-terested. Johu W. Willis is the cus-'tudian of the petition, which willbepresented to the legislature this week. *

    FEDERAL DELIGHT. ,; %Bob Evans Declines— Ha*f?

    Favored by Friends. "j* 'J?R. G. Evans said yesterday to tlie

    Globe : "You can say for me that as /.regards my candidacy for United States]?district attorney, I have witharawn; io-favor of Eugene Hay." ' * -.2 %

    Mr. Evans said this quite seriously, al~ 'thought it is thought that he still longs'.for the $4,000 plum. Apetition was drawn*,'up in the house yesterday and signed bythe Ramsey county delegation, request-^ing Senators Washburn and Davis touse their influence to secure the reten-.tion of Capt. George W. Hays as super-vising steamboat : inspector of Minne-sota. 11. F. Stevens' name headed the--list of sinners." . 7;//l £-

    CLEVER AMATEURS. 7J |An Enjoyable Performance at the-

    Newmarket.' The interesting and pleasing dramaticcompositions, "Freezing a Mother-in-Law" and "Checkmate," ..-by the St.Paul Dramatic club, were rendered to alarge and select audience at the New-market theater Ilast evening. >r SocietypeoDle were present in full force to wit- ,ness the performance of the clever ama-teurs who participated in the plays." ."Freezing a Mother-in-Law" was. .wellpresented and the characters: were por-trayed with signal ability, and thepleasing effects produced v. by Messrs.Banning, \u25a0 Westervelt ;and MeKeever, •and Mrs. Sawyer and . Miss Maud.;Taylor, were*' worthy of compliment/Mr". , Banning,, :as -:". "Mr..' • VVatmuff,devoted to the past," was a good char- :acter with just" enough -to do. Mr.Westervelt as. Ferdinand Swift, devotedto fortune .hunting, although r at ease,' !would have limited much easier in thewilds: of St. Anthony, hill. Mr. Mc- A

    Keever, as Walter Litheriand "'Devoted",to Emily, displayed a perfect stage ease fand acted his part admirably. Mrs. J.D. Sawyer and Miss Maud > Taylor, theone : as \u25a0 Mrs. Watmuff and ; the_ otlier,'as Emily '\u25a0 Watmuff,- were '.." excellent.I "Checkmate" tended to enliven theSpirit of the audience, which applaudedeach brilliant stroke of the performers.'•J. J. Parker delighted his hearers with;»'~

    ludicrous impersonation of-Sara"Winkle. - • 'Messrs.' ' Foster,.'*. Yardly,7

    I Wanzer, Bigelow were perfectly 'at" jhbme in their characters. Miss Bend as' Charlotte Busse was • as . charmiug asi grace and elegant bearing : and ' fitness ." or the stage could make her. "No less in-•! -..resting and entertaining Miss StUrgis.

    provoked the -house to a - continued' Jitter. >" Miss ; Gotzian and :. Miss Arm-Strong were fortunate in light andI "minor parts, which they managed with

    ease and ability. The : audience was.i "like a pleasant company offriends, and*pdth performances passed; offwithout

    v jah error. The entertainment was . an: jaHistic as well as' a financial success, \u25a0

    jalidthe-proceeds will be appropriatedi to the building -fund of Christ Churchi guild. •\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0*- -\u25a0-\u25a0 - \u25a0 _ •'.- 7 \u25a0 *.-; vW*' J "jy: THIS IS ECONOMY. *•*\u25a0lit

    Gould Slakes a Sweeping Cut in:

    I Expenses by Abandoning LocalTrain Service on His Systems.

    ; St. Louis, Mo., Feb. IC— of themost sweeping cuts in expenses evermade -by the Gould interest has justbeen* accomplished. The method ofeconomizing applies to the ; MissouriPacific, Cotton Belt and Iron Mountain,and is nothing more nor less than thereduction of train service. Thus, in-stead of having local trains to followthrough trains to pick up the local busi-ness, through trains are compelledto do the work. The Missouri Pacifichas abandoned its local trains on theLexington branch, Wichita branch, anda large number of other branches. Thetrain service on the Iron Mountain, be-tween St. Louis and the Texas line, hasbeen greatly reduced. Also on the St.Louis, Arkansas & Texas. It is ' esti-mated that the Missouri Pacific reduc-tion in train service amounts to • fully2,800 miles per day, or a saving of.' $40,---000 per month. .-:.-' 'y.lj.--..'\u25a0•\u25a0 ' \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 \u25a0'\u25a0\u25a0 'yyy

    • l-i RULER OP ALLROUTES.Pullman Secures a Monopoly of '

    the Sleeping Car Service to the '' Coast. \u25a0..-"\u25a0'-'\u25a0•\u25a0-\u25a0. Chicago, Feb. 16.—George M.Pull-man has secured a practical' monopolyof the ' sleeping car service of bothclasses of travel on the entire system ofthe transcontinental railroads. He hasjust closed a contract with the UnionPacific for managing the second-classsleeping car service of that line in con-nection with, the Central Pacific. -ThePullman company has already a con-tract with the Atchison & Santa ' Fe,which also covers the SouteernPacific from San Francisco to Ma-jave, and it has also placedthe Northern Pacific on its list. It willestablish a uniform second-class rate of$3 for the trip between San Franciscoand the Missouri river, and has put thatrate into effecton the Atchison, betweenthe coast and Kansas City. The ratebetween Chicago and San Franciscowillbe 84. First-class sleeping rates :are 818.50 from Chicago and \u25a0 $13 fromthe Missouri river to San Francisco.The application of the new system tothe Uuion Pacific will result in thewithdrawal of the excursion agents oftliat road from various Eastern andWestern points. The Denver &; RioGrande is the only transcontinental linehot included in the deal, but a "contractWill probably be made with it in a shorttihie. : \j} RATES THAT MEAN RUIN.

    Railroad Moguls Vainly Endeavor! to Secure a Modification ofthej lowa Schedule.

    {Special to the Globe. ' ' :'"~ . "yl , •i (Dcs Moines, 10., Feb. 16.—PresidentPernins and Solicitor Blythe, of the"Q;" Judge Hubbard, of,- the North-:western, and !Messrs. Bird and Fish, ofthe Milwaukee road, appeared before'the lowa railway commissioners to-day,and made a request in geueral terms fora new schedule 1or" rates, which shall behigher than that recently adopted andnow in force. The Illinois distance tar-iffwas referred, to as satisfactory, al-though it was riot insisted upon, butthe representatives of the roaddid urge the commissioners witha great ileal, of earnestnessto make a' reasonable modification inthe direction asked. The commission-ers answered that they had firmlyde-termined to make a thorough test of theschedule for the purpose of ascertain-ing from actual experience whether therates are compensatory or not. Theysaid further that as soon as that act wasdetermined, and it should prove therates were too low : they would bepromptly raised to a point where theloads would have no reason to com-plain. The railway officials are not allsatisfied with the result of their labors,but they went away determined to makethe best of what they firmly believe isa very bad mess. .

    ;*' Sixty Days to Kansas City.Special to the Globe.

    Dcs Moines, 10., Feb. 16.—The. Min-neapolis, St. Paul & Southwestern Rail-road company's engineer corps havecompleted the location ofthe company'sline through this city, and are pushingthe work rapidly toward the Southwest-ern terminus. They will reach KansasCity inabout sixty days of good weather."—»1 ;\u25a0 THE CASE IS A TEST ONE.The Commonwealth of Kentuckyf Sues the 'Bondsmen of Default-- ing Treasurer Tate. , .: Louisville. Ky., Feb. 16.—The caseof The Commonwealth of Kentuckyagainst* James W. Tate, the defaultingtreasurer, and the sureties on his officialbond for the term of 1.81-83, was begun,in the circuit court at Frankfort, Ky.,yesterday. The shortage of this bondis $59,285.86, and the case a test one..Tate's total deficit is about $156,000. andifthis suit is won -the commonwealthwill sue on all the other, bonds. . Thesureties claim that when -; Tate's ac-counts were audited and certified to ascorrect, which was done each year,they were released from liability. :

    i—

    1 "The Noble Outcast" Enjoined.• Chicago, Feb. 16.—Judge Shepardgranted an injunction this afternoonrestraining "Punch" Robertson, WillEmery, Alfred Johnson. Charles Eugel,Ifrom further producing the play called"The Noble Outcast," which has beenrunning at the Criterion theater all this'week. The injunction was issued on abill filed by John W. Summers, whoSays that he is the author of the playand that the defendants are producingit in violation of his copyright. ||||f*f fm| Hatch in Hot Water. *! New Yoek, Feb. 16.— suspensionof Edward Hatch has been announcedat the New York stock exchange. He

    Was a member of the exchange sinceJuly, 1883. ,

    Generous Unto Death. - > -\u25a0;\u25a0_:Obeklix, 0., Feb. 16.—C. J. Hull, of

    Chicago, who recently died in Texas,left Oberlin college $55,000, in insurancepolicies on his life, for the endowmentofa chair ofmodern; languages. ;

    Dr. Gray at Death's Door. r\u25a0t Chicago, r Feb. 16.—The ; Rev. Dr.Gray, who recently, resigned as wardenof Racine college, is now lying serious-lyill of pneumonia in. this : city. Hisfather, J. A. C. Gray, of New York, ar- \u25a0rived here last evening to be near him.

    f| EMIL [JEWELER,jlC J CT I 85 E. THIRD, :ULIUII ST.FAUW

    feTHESHOEMAN STM 2y y .1,A lot of Ladies' Hand-Turned French

    Kid Button Boots, reduced; to $3.50 (sizesbroken; a big bargain for those they willfit).

    \u25a0A lot of Ladies' $5, $6 \u25a0 and $7 Hand-Made Easy Waukenpliast , Shoes, deducedto $4.00.

    A lot of Ladies' :$7 Patent Leather DressBoots, reduced to $4.00. - - ";/, ".

    A big lot of Ladies' $2 Slippers, all re-duced to $1.00. • :

    ; A lot of Men's $8 and $9 Cork Sole,Hand-Sewed French Calf Shoes, reducedt056.00. " ' '-

    -___V*li_?«^ _B6*i \u25a0 '''^""^-^?^h^_j?^iESff_i

    \u25a0HILJI. il^^M^

    A lot of Men $10 Porpoise-Hide Shoes,reduced to $7.00.

    A lot of Men's $5 and $6 French CalfHand-Turned Shoes, reduced to $3.00.

    Close at 6:30 p.m,, Except Saturdays

    ag___> GOODS SENT C. 0. D.0%;W^y ON APPROVAL. \u25a0-^ a

    OPPOSITEPOBTOFFICE.AT YOUR OWN PRICES

    THE ENTIRE STOCK AND FIXTURES OF

    Lightner's Jewelry Store\u25a0"\u25a0 *:,~y'. •' "- Mm

    149 East Third Street, St. Paul,

    BOUGHT AT ASSIGNEE'S SALEFine Diamonds and Watches, Choice Jewelry, Artistic

    Bronzes, Onyx and Marble Clocks, Solid Silverware,Triple and Quadruple Silver-Plated Ware, Novelties inSolid Gold,Silver and Rolled Plate Jewelry Suitable for An-niversary Presents, Wedding Presents, Birthday Presents,

    TO BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTIONIMORNING, AFTERNOON AND EVENING,

    COMMENCING SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23d.Stock Now on Exhibition at -

    149 East Third St, St. Paul, Minn.

    ANNUAL

    FEBRUARY SALE OF

    FINE TROUSERS.

    The Largest Stock. TheLowest Prices, and all withthe "Plymouth" Legal Guar-antee.

    THE

    'PLYMOUTHOOTHING HOUSE '

    Cor. Seventh and Robert Sts.. St. I'uul,10, ViHnd 14 Washington Aye. N.,

    Minneapolis.

    MED OFSuicide Seriously Contem-

    plated as the OnlyReliefFrom Suffering.

    Mr. . Jacob Graef was .found by thereporter at "No. 109 First avenue east,where the following story r was relatedby him. Mr. Graef said that for fiveyears he has been suffering more thanhe could tell.. About that lime be got.«severe cold, which it appeared impossi-ble to get rid of; as quick'as" it got*bet-ter, it would return withrenewed vigor.He bad a dropping of mucus from thehead into the throat, hawking andspitting* continually, pain over the fore-head, eyes weak and watery. His headwas in such a bad condition and painedhim so much that lifewas a burden,and he often wished it might end; * Hisappetite became poor and he graduallylost iD weight. He doctored and spent

    \u0084«___*_.,

    money, but all to no avail, as he gradu-ally became worse until he despairedofever getting better (but he said thatnow he was feeling like a differentman). In answer as to what lradbrought that about, he said that he hadbeen watching the papers.and seeing ofcases treated by Dr. Cosman, whose .symptoms very much resembled biscase, and as they appeared to be get-ting relief, he concluded to go and seethe doctor himself and see if therecould be anything done for him. So ac-cordingly he did so, and after a carefulexamination of my case, Dr. Cosmantold me that 1 was suffering withchronic catarrh of the head and throat,and that he could treat me successfully,so Iplaced myself in his care and com-menced treatment. I have improvedfrom the start, and to-day 1 hardlyknow myself, so great has been thechange effected in me. Ihave no moidtrouble with my head or throat. Drop*-ping of mucus' from the head into thethroat, hawking and spitting does notbother me any. My appetite has Im- "proved greatly. Ieat with a relish and*enjoy any food. Ihave gained over tenpounds iii weight since starting treat-ment with the doctor. My eyes lost theweak and watery feeling and are strongas ever.Isleep well, arising in the mornine*!

    refreshed and ready for my day's work,and this is all due to the excellent treat-ment I received at the hands of Dr..Cosman, and would most cheerfully '\u25a0recommend any person suffering withapparently incurable diseases to go and 'see him.

    Mr. Graef can be found at No. 109First avenue east, where he will cheer-fully corroborate the above statementto any person who would like to inter-view mm in regard to it.

    Do you have" frequent fits of mentaloppression?

    Do you'experience ringing or buzz-ing noises in your ears?

    Do you feel as though you must suf-focate when lying down?

    Are yon * troubled with a hackingcough and general debility?

    Are your eyes generally weak andwatery and frequently inflamed?

    Does your voice have a husky, thick 'sound and a nasal sort of twang?

    Is your breath frequently offensivefrom some unaccountable cause?

    Have you a dull, oppressive head-ache, generally located over the eyes?

    Do you have to hawk and cough fre-quently in the effort to clear your 'throat? "7V.

    Are you losing your sense of smell,and is your sense of taste becomingdulled? ',-*-.'\u25a0

    Does your nose always feel stopped :up, forcing you to breathe throughyour mouth?

    Do you frequently feel dizzy, particu-larly "when stooping to pick anythingoffthe floor?

    Does every little draught of air andevery slight change of temperaturegive you a cold?

    Are you annoyed by a constant de-sire to hawk and spit out an endlessquantity of phlegm?

    Are you always tired and indisposed'to exertion, whether to business, work ,or amusement? 7*77^

    -Is great effort required to keep your 'thoughts fixed upon matters that for-merly were easily performed? Ifso, .call and see Dr. Cosmau.— Duluth Trib- .une. 12".y~. 2i222r : \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 '.'• •

    DOCTOR

    ETHELBERTO.Late of the Cincinnati College of M -di- .:cine and Surgery (Cincinnati, Ohio) his .offices and is permanently located at ...**.. ,

    . : • I- .'ly.'- .;•\u25a0••\u25a0;•.••NO. 49! BROADWAY,

    ST.PAUL, MINN.,

    Where all curable diseases are treatedwith success. ; 7:Y77^; :

    Medical diseases treated skillfully.Consumption. Bright's disease. Dyspep-sia, Rheumatism and all NERVOUS.DISEASES. All diseases peculiar: tothe sexes a specialty. CATARRHCURED.

    CONSULTATION at office or bymail, $1. .'

    Many diseases are treated success- 'fullyby Dr. Cosman through the mail,and it is thus possible that those unable j-to make a journey can receive SKILL-FUL HOSPITAL TREATMENT ATTHEIR HOMES. '^rf' Correspondence receives prompt at-*'.tention. .y \u25a0\u25a0...-,_ yiyyl

    No letters- answered unless accom-panied by 4 cents in stamps. _7

    Officehours, 9to 11 a. m., 2 to 4 p. vi., "\u25a0•and 7to S p. -a..", except Sunday. -_\u25a0 - : 'y \u25a0','

    Address all mail to •'"'•'DR. E. O. COSMAN.7 !'"

    No. 491 Broadway,St. Paul, Minn.


Recommended