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  • east first street facadesdesign GUIDELINES

    ArchitecturePlanning

  • ArchitecturePlanning

    1

    Improvement InformationHorizontal SignageBlade SignageColumn SignageWindow SignageAwningsLighting

    Table of ContentsIntroductionProject ProcessLittle Tokyo MapHistoric Photos

    1.1

    1.2

    1.3

    1.4

    1.5

    Case Study 01Case Study 02Case Study 03Case Study 04Case Study 05Case Study 06Case Study 07Case Study 08Case Study 09Case Study 10Case Study 11Case Study 12

    2.1

    2.2

    2.3

    2.4

    2.5

    2.6

    2.7

    2.8

    2.9

    2.10

    2.11

    2.12

    3.1

    3.2

    3.3

    3.4

    3.5

    3.6

    3.7

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    300 First Street ElevationBuilding 01Building 02Building 03Building 04Building 05Building 06

    4.1

    4.2

    4.3

    4.4

    4.5

    4.6

    4.7

    Additional Photos5.1

    LITTLE TOKYO HISTORIC DISTRICTSECTION 1

    HISTORIC CASE STUDIESSECTION 2

    GUIDELINESSECTION 3

    BUILDING STUDIESSECTION 4

    APPENDIXSECTION 5

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5-7

    8

    8

    8

    9

    9

    10

    10

    11

    11

    11

    12

    12

    13

    14 - 15

    16 - 18

    19

    20

    21

    22

    23

    24

    25

    26

    27

    28

    29

    1.1

  • 124

    Block 72

    Block 27

    258

    312

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    117

    258 312

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    Los Angeles

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    ArchitecturePlanning

    2

    INTRODUCTION

    The Little Tokyo Historic District preserves the last concentra-tion of buildings in Little Tokyo that pre-date World War II. For-merly the commercial heart of Little Tokyo, the district symbol-izes the cultural and social history of the Japanese-American community in Los Angeles. The district begins at 120 San Pedro Street (formerly Union Church), continues south to East First Street, and runs the length of the north side of East First Street, ending at Central Avenue. The buildings are typical ex-amples of Los Angeles commercial architecture from the first quarter of the 20th century. Ranging in height from one to four stories, all the buildings are masonry construction. While their front facades have been slightly modified over time, their rear and side facades remain almost unaltered. The facades on East First Street front the sidewalk edge. They exemplify the features and ornamentation of commercial architecture of their era. Eleven of 13 buildings in the district are close to their origi-nal form at the beginning of the 1900s and only one seems not to fit into the context of the historic district.

    These guidelines document the beginning of the restoration and rehabilitation process for the six buildings from 315 to 339 East First Street. The improvements defined are specifically for signage, awnings, and lighting. All other modifications are im-plied for the purpose of adding to the historic character of the district. Improvements in the guidelines are meant to improve the quality of the pedestrian and commercial environment while preserving the communitys architectural and historic resourc-es. The guideline will illustrate significant architectural features of the six buildings to facilitate the placement and sizing of the new signage, awnings, and lighting. These guidlines also serve as historic design criteria for future improvements in the Little Tokyo Historic District. As a reference point, all the images pre-sented in this guideline are from the districts historical dates of significance (1905-19401). All architectural restoration or reha-bilitation of buildings within the district will be based on images from this time period.

    1. National Historic Landmark Nomination Registration Form for Little Tokyo Historic Dis-trict. (See Addendum 01)

    1.2

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    North San Pedro SteetSouth San Pedro Steet

    East First Street

    #

    4

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Little Tokyo Historic District

    LITTLE TOKYO MAP

    map from Japanese American National MuseumFIGURE 1.4AHISTORIC DISTRICT / CIRCA 1940

    Photo Number (See Pages 5-7)

    1.4

  • 5

    ArchitecturePlanning

    HISTORIC PHOTOS

    photo from CRA/LAPHOTO 1.5ANORTHEAST CORNER OF SAN PEDRO AND FIRST STREET

    photo from Los Angeles Public Library digital archivesPHOTO 1.5BPHOTO LOOKING EAST FROM SAN PEDRO STREET

    1.5

  • 6

    ArchitecturePlanning

    photo from Los Angeles Public Library digital archivesPHOTO 1.5DLEFT TO RIGHT - BUILDINGS THREE THROUGH FIVE

    photo from Los Angeles Public Library digital archivesPHOTO 1.5CLEFT TO RIGHT - BUILDINGS TWO THROUGH FIVE

    HISTORIC PHOTOS 1.5

  • 7

    ArchitecturePlanning

    photo from Los Angeles Public Library digital archivesPHOTO 1.5ELEFT TO RIGHT - BUILDINGS TWO THROUGH FIVE

    photo from Los Angeles Public Library digital archivesPHOTO 1.5FPHOTO LOOKING WEST FROM BUILDING FOUR - CURRENTLY FAMILY MART

    HISTORIC PHOTOS 1.5

  • 8

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Unlighted Signage Above Clerestory at an Angle

    Signage Painted onto Storefront Windows

    Street Address Center on Bay

    Clerestory Windows Open to Light Penetration

    Door Recessed from Street Facade

    Retractable Awning

    Vertical Signage on Column

    Retractable Awning

    Business Name on Windows

    Vertical Signage on Column

    Horizontal Signage Mixing Japanese and English Languages

    HISTORIC CASE STUDIES

    photo from Los Angeles Public Library digital archives2.2CASE STUDY

    photo from One Hundred Years in Pictures p.412.3CASE STUDY

    2.1CASE STUDYphoto from Japanese American National Museum digital archives

    Use of Japanese Language

    2.1-3

  • 9

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Neon Lighted Sign Projecting Off the Face of the Facade

    Draped Exterior Shading for Storefront Windows

    Painted Window Signage

    Storefront Windows Open to Store Interior

    Unlighted Horizontal Signage

    Draped Exterior Shading for Clerestory Windows

    Open Storefront Windows

    HISTORIC CASE STUDIES

    photo from Japanese American National Museum digital archives2.4CASE STUDY

    photo from Japanese American National Museum digital archives2.5CASE STUDY

    2.4-5

  • 10

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Awning Mounted above Clerestory Window

    Striped Awning Pattern

    Retractable Awning Attachment Interior to Column Bays

    Kanji Profiles Framed by Architectural Opening

    Horizontal Signage

    Name of Restaurant on Awning Valence

    Recessed Entry

    HISTORIC CASE STUDIES

    photo from Japanese American National Museum digital archives2.6CASE STUDY

    photo from Japanese American National Museum digital archives2.7CASE STUDY

    2.6-7

  • 11

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Vertical Triangular Signage

    Street Lighting Is from Commercial Establishments Interior Spaces, Recessed Doorways, and Signage.

    Neon Signage Recessed from the Face of the Building Facade

    Signage on Column Face

    Arched Entry to Upper Floors

    Material Change From Plinth to Upper Floors

    Decorative Parapet

    Ornamentation

    Quoins

    Entry Not Centered in Bay

    HISTORIC CASE STUDIES

    photo from Japanese American National Museum digital archives2.9CASE STUDY

    photo from One Hundred Years in Pictures p.862.8CASE STUDY

    photo from One Hundred Years in Pictures p.662.10CASE STUDY

    2.8-10

  • HISTORIC CASE STUDIES

    photo from One Hundred Years in Pictures p.642.11CASE STUDY

    12

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Angled Vertical Signage

    Globe Light Centered on Door Opening

    Angled Horizontal Signage

    Glass Storefronts Recessed from the Face of Building

    Angled Vertical Signage

    Carved Wood Plaque Sign

    Aluminum Framed Neon Sign

    Clerestory Windows Continuous Across Building Face

    Retracted Awning

    photo from Japanese American National Museum digital archives2.12CASE STUDY

    2.11-12

  • 13

    ArchitecturePlanning

    IMPROVEMENT INFORMATION3.1

    1. All improvements, repair, renovation, or rehabilitation of the properties within the Little Tokyo Historic District will follow the standards set forth by Secretary of the Interiors Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties.

    2. This guideline was written in conformance with LAMC Article 4.4 (Effective date 12.20.07). All signage will conform to the most current regulations of the LAMC and Downtown Design Guide.

    3. If any proposed signage does not meet code requirements, a supplemental use district permit will be required.

    GENERAL 3.1.1

    1. All improvements will conform to the Secretary of the Interiors Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties.

    2. Building 01 (Fugetsudo/Little Tokyo Art and Gift/Zippo) was constructed after the date of historical significance, 1905-1940. All improvements will conform to the Secretary of the Interiors Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties.

    3. Facade improvements that include the restoration or reconstruction of building parapets (See Historic Photos) shall conform to the Secretary of the Interiors Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties.

    HISTORIC DISTRICT 3.1.2

    1. Solid roll down security screens, doors, shutters, etc. are prohibited.

    2. The preferred placement of security screens or gates are on the interior side of storefronts.

    3. The appearance of security screens or gates shall be minimized (i.e. recessed).

    4. Reference the Little Tokyo Community Design Overlay Guidelines for further information.

    SECURITY SCREENS 3.1.3

    1. Total signage for an individual business is dictated by the Little Tokyo CDO and the LAMC.

    2. All signage must conform with the provisions of the Little Tokyo CDO.

    3. A storefront may have a maximum of two signs. Each of these signs must be different types. Building and address signage will not count towards this total.

    4. Use of Japanese language (katakana, hiragana, and kanji) is encouraged.

    5. Paper signs and temporary advertisements are not allowed on facades or in storefront windows.

    SIGNAGE3.1.4

    1. Los Angeles Municipal Code, Chapter 1 General Provisions and Zoning, Article 4.4 Sign Regulation.

    2. The Downtown Design Guide3. Secretary of the Interiors Standards for the Treatment of

    Historic Properties4. The Little Tokyo Community Design Overlay Guidelines

    All signage and awning changes will be subject to the follow-ing documents:

    CODE 3.1.5

    1. Los Angeles Department of City Planning2. Los Angeles Office of Historic Resources3. Los Angeles Department of Building Safety

    All projects and improvement to the properties covered by this document are subject to the approval of the following entities:

    PROJECT APPROVALS 3.1.6

  • 14

    ArchitecturePlanning

    1. To promote the Historic nature of the District, signage types should reflect the era of historic significance (1905-1940).

    2. All horizontal signage is intended to be viewable from ve-hicles traveling on First Street. Both the sizing and place-ment of signage shall take this into account.

    Architectural Element - Signage Not Permitted

    Permitted Signage Area

    Non-Permitted Signage Area

    Architectural Element - Signage Not Permitted

    HORIZONTAL SIGNAGE3.2

    DESIGN INTENT3.2.1

    1. Backlit Can Signs are prohibited.2. Use of Japanese language (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji)

    is encouraged.

    GENERAL 3.2.2

    1. Horizontal plaque and neon signs shall only be on the first floor of a building (with the exception of buildings signs).

    2. Individual store front signage of a building shall align.3. Signs shall be located at least eight feet above the natural

    or finished grade as measured vertically.4. See Figure 3.2A for other placement requirements.

    LOCATION 3.2.3

    1. Sign height may not exceed three feet in height vertically.2. Sign length may not exceed 12 feet in length horizontally.3. Signs may project a maximum of 36 inches from the

    building face.4. Lettering, logos, or icons may not exceed 18 inches in

    height.

    DIMENSIONS 3.2.4

    1. Horizontal Plaque Sign (see 3.2.7)2. Horizontal Neon Shelf Sign (see 3.2.8)3. Horizontal Building Sign (see 3.2.9)

    HISTORIC EXAMPLES 3.2.5

    TYPICAL ELEVATION 3.2.6

    FIGURE 3.2A

    Clerestory Window - Signage Not Permitted

  • 15

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Building Name Signage / Extruded Lettering / No Signage For Tenants

    Aluminum Plaque / Painted Characters, Letters, And Icons /Exposed Neon Tubing

    Aluminum Shelf With Rounded Corner / Painted Characters, Let-ters, And Icons / Extruded Lettering

    Aluminum Blade / Perpendicular To Building Facade / Painted Let-tering And Profile Lines / Exposed Neon Tubing

    Plaque / Painted Characters

    Angled Plaque / Framed Edge / Painted Characters And Icons

    Angled Plaque / Framed Edge / Painted Characters And Icons

    HORIZONTAL SIGNAGE3.2

    HORIZONTAL PLAQUE SIGN 3.2.7

    HORIZONTAL NEON SIGN 3.2.8

    HORIZONTAL BUILDING SIGN 3.2.9

    PHOTO 3.2B

    PHOTO 3.2C

    PHOTO 3.2D

    PHOTO 3.2E

    PHOTO 3.2F

    PHOTO 3.2G

    PHOTO 3.2H

  • 16

    ArchitecturePlanning

    BLADE SIGNAGE3.3

    1. To promote the Historic nature of the District, signage types should reflect the era of historic significance (1905-1940).

    2. Blade signage placed on the first floor is intended to be viewable to pedestrians.

    3. Blade signage above the first floor of a building is intended to be viewable by pedestrians and vehicles traveling on First Street. Both the sizing and placement of signage shall take this into account.

    DESIGN INTENT 3.3.1

    1. Electronic Message Displays are prohibited on blade sign (i.e. scrolling text).

    2. No lettering or logos shall be allowed on that portion of a projecting sign that is parallel to the face of the building.

    3. One blade sign above first floor is allowed per building for the purpose of building identification.

    4. Use of Japanese language (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji) is encouraged.

    GENERAL 3.3.2

    1. A projecting sign shall align with major building elements such as cornices, string courses, window banding, or verti-cal changes in material or texture.

    2. Bottom edge of blade sign must be mounted no lower than eight feet from the sidewalk.

    3. See Figure 3.3A for other placement requirements.

    LOCATION 3.3.3

    1. A blade sign shall not exceed 12 feet in height as measured vertically from the bottom of the sign to the top of the sign.

    2. The sign face perpendicular to the building shall not ex-ceed 20 percent of the overall height of the sign.

    3. A blade sign may not extend past 36 inches from the build-ing face or the distance permitted by the City Sign Code, whichever is less.

    4. Triangular blade signs may not exceed five feet in height and may not extend 24 inches from the building face.

    5. Neon blade signs may not exceed 12 feet in height and may not extend three feet from the building face.

    6. Pedestrian signs may not exceed 30 inches in height and 12 inches in width.

    DIMENSIONS 3.3.4

    1. There shall be a minimum distance of 15 feet, measured horizontally, between blade signs.

    SPACING 3.3.5

    1. Triangular Blade Sign (see 3.3.9)2. Neon Blade Sign (see 3.3.10)

    HISTORIC EXAMPLES 3.3.6

    1. Pedestrian Blade Sign (see 3.3.11)NON-HISTORIC EXAMPLES3.3.7

  • 17

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Routed Metal Face Backed By Frosted Glass And Backlit

    Routed Metal Face Without Backing

    Painted Face With No Lighting

    Embossed Characters (Katakana) / Exposed Neon Outlines

    Painted Letters / Exposed Neon Outlines

    (One Per Building)

    Bottom Edge Of Sign Min. 8-0 Above Finished Floor

    Architectural Element

    Architectural Element - Signage Not Permitted

    Permitted Signage Area

    Non-Permitted Signage Area

    3.3.8TYPICAL ELEVATION

    BLADE SIGNAGE3.3

    TRIANGULAR BLADE SIGN 3.3.9

    NEON BLADE SIGN 3.3.10

    FIGURE 3.3A

    PHOTO 3.3B PHOTO 3.3C PHOTO 3.3D

    PHOTO 3.3E PHOTO 3.3F

  • 18

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Fabric (Cotton) With Silkscreened Lettering. Hung From Above

    Metal Plaque With Painted Lettering. Hung From Above

    Woodbacked Steel Frame With Inset Frosted Glass and Painted Lettering.

    Wood Plaque With Embossed Painted Lettering. Hung From Above.

    Woodbacked Steel Frame With Inset Frosted Glass and Painted Lettering.

    BLADE SIGNAGE3.3

    PEDESTRIAN SIGN 3.3.11

    PHOTO 3.3G PHOTO 3.3H

    PHOTO 3.3J PHOTO 3.3K

    PHOTO 3.3L

  • 19

    ArchitecturePlanning

    1. To promote the Historic nature of the District, signage types should reflect the era of historic significance (1905-1940).

    2. All column signage is intended to be viewed by pedestri-ans. Both the sizing and placement of signage shall take this into account.

    Permitted Column Sign Area / Top of Sign 8 Max.

    Wood Plaque with Framed Border / Painted

    Metal Plaque / Engraved and Painted Characters

    Permitted Signage Area

    Non-Permitted Signage Area

    Non-Permitted Column Sign Area

    COLUMN SIGNAGE3.4

    DESIGN INTENT3.4.1

    1. Lettering or logos shall be oriented vertically.2. Use of Japanese language (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji)

    is encouraged.3. All column plaques may not extend more than 1 inch from

    the face of column.

    GENERAL 3.4.2

    1. A column plaque shall align with major building elements such as cornices, string courses, window banding, or verti-cal changes in material or texture.

    2. See Figure 3.4A for other placement requirements.

    LOCATION 3.4.3

    1. Column signs may not exceed 12 inches in width and shall leave a minimum of three inches of the column exposed on each side of the plaque.

    2. Column signs may not exceed 5 feet in height.

    DIMENSIONS 3.4.4

    1. Wooden Column Plaque Sign (see 3.4B)2. Metal Column Plaque Sign (see 3.4C)

    HISTORIC EXAMPLES 3.4.5

    FIGURE 3.4A

    PHOTO 3.4B PHOTO 3.4C

    COLUMN SIGN 3.4.7

    3.4.6TYPICAL ELEVATION

  • 20

    ArchitecturePlanning

    1. Window signage is intended to be viewable for pedestri-ans. Both the sizing and placement of signage shall take this into account.

    2. To promote the Historic nature of the District, signage types should reflect the era of historic significance (1905-1940).

    1. No Electronic Message Display shall be permitted as a window sign.

    2. Use of Japanese language (Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji) shall be used in signage.

    1. No portion of any window sign shall be located above the first story of the building on which it is placed or higher than 35 feet above grade, whichever is lower.

    1. The total area of all window signs painted on, affixed to, or located within six feet of the window plane shall not ex-ceed 10 percent of the area of the window.

    2. Invidvidual letters or characters shall not be taller than 6. Other graphics or logos shall not be larger than 12x12.

    1. Horizontal Lettering (see 3.5A)2. Vertical Lettering (see 3.5B)3. Gold Leaf and Painted Lettering Lettering (see 3.5C)4. Painted Lettering Lettering (see 3.5D)5. Vinyl Lettering Lettering (see 3.5E)

    Vinyl Lettering

    Gold Leafed And Painted Lettering

    Painted Lettering

    Horizontal Lettering

    Vertical Lettering

    WINDOW SIGNAGE3.5

    DESIGN INTENT3.5.1

    GENERAL 3.5.2

    LOCATION 3.5.3

    DIMENSIONS 3.5.4

    HISTORIC EXAMPLES 3.5.5

    WINDOW LETTERING3.5.6

    PHOTO 3.5A PHOTO 3.5B

    PHOTO 3.5C

    PHOTO 3.5D

    PHOTO 3.5E

  • 21

    ArchitecturePlanning

    1. To promote the Historic nature of the District, awning types, colors, and patterns should reflect the era of historic significance (1905-1940).

    Deep Awning / Striped Pattern

    Shallow Awning / Solid Pattern

    Permitted Awning Mounting Locations

    DESIGN INTENT3.6.1

    1. Awning covering material shall be cotton. Substitutions are acceptable but must be similar in finish to cotton and approved by Community Redevelopment Agency, Los An-geles (CRA/LA).

    2. Awnings must be retractable.3. Individual storefront awnings of a building shall align. 4. All historic awnings (dating 1940 or earlier) shall be main-

    tained rather than replaced, unless removal is approved by CRA/LA.

    5. In accodance with Chapter 1, Article 4.4, Section 14.4.19 graphics and lettering are only allowed on valence portion of awning only.

    GENERAL 3.6.2

    1. No portion of any awning shall be located above the first story of the building on which it is placed.

    2. Preferred mounting location is interior to column bays.3. Awnings shall not cover building clerestory windows or ar-

    chitectural elements (see Figure 3.6A).4. See Figure 3.6A for other placement requirements.

    LOCATION 3.6.3

    1. Awnings shall be sized per individual column bay. A single awning may not cover multiple bays (space between two columns).

    2. Awnings valence shall not exceed 18 inches (see Figure 3.6B)

    3. Text must be proportionally spaced and not exceed 12 inches in height (see Figure 3.6B)

    DIMENSIONS 3.6.4

    1. Deep Awnings (see 3.6B)2. Shallow Awnings (see 3.6C)3. Pattern - Striped / Solid (see 3.6B/C)

    HISTORIC EXAMPLES 3.6.5

    AWNINGS 3.6.7

    3.6.6TYPICAL ELEVATION

    AWNINGS3.6

    PHOTO 3.6C

    FIGURE 3.6A

    PHOTO 3.6D

    Clerestory Windows

    FIGURE 3.6B

    HAPIValence

  • 22

    ArchitecturePlanning

    1. To promote the Historic nature of the District, lighting types and intensities should reflect the era of historic significance (1905-1940).

    2. The preferred means of providing pedestrian lighting is from signage and ambient light from storefront interiors.

    3. Exterior pedestrian light fixtures shall be provided.

    1. LED and flourescent lights shall light exterior signage.2. Recessed lighting will be acceptable in entryways.3. In lieu of exterior fixtures, the use of interior fixtures to light

    storefront windows and sidewalks is encouraged.

    1. Neon Sign (see 3.7B)2. Triangular Blade Sign (see 3.7B) 3. Showcase Lighting (see 3.7B)

    Neon Sign

    Triangular Blade Sign

    Storefront Window Lighting

    Neon Blade Sign

    Toplit Plaque Sign

    Interior Clerestory Light

    Exterior Entry LightExterior Awning Light

    Interior Storefront Window Light

    Interior Entry Light

    LIGHTING 3.7

    DESIGN INTENT 3.7.1

    GENERAL 3.7.2

    HISTORIC EXAMPLES 3.7.3

    LIGHTING 3.7.5

    3.7.4TYPICAL SECTION

    FIGURE 3.7A

    PHOTO 3.7B

  • 24

    ArchitecturePlanning

    This building is the only one of the six in the current study which was constructed post 1940. The original building (see historic photo 02, page 4) was demolished in 1957 and the current one story commercial building was constructed. The present building contains three storefronts framed by stone piers. The faade is spanned by a corrugated metal para-pet to which signs and awnings are attached. Stone is also used for the base of the storefront windows that flank the central entries of each identical storefront. Canvas awnings with cast iron frames shade the facades of all the three es-tablishments1.

    1. National Historic Landmark Nomination Registration Form for Little Tokyo Historic District. Edited by J.Uyeda for Tetra-IBI Group and CRA/LA.

    FUGETSUDO / LITTLE TOKYO ARTS AND GIFT / ZIPPO315 - 319 EAST FIRST STREET

    Neon Plaque Signage

    Awning with Cast Iron Frame

    Valence With Address

    Window Signage

    Window Address

    4

    3

    2

    1

    5

    4

    3

    2

    1

    5

    FIGURE 4.2A

    BUILDING 014.2

    PHOTO 4.2B

  • 25

    ArchitecturePlanning

    A two story brick commercial building, this structure resembles the similarly conceived three story building to the east (see Historic Photo 02, page 5). Its whitewashed faade are separated into three second story bays by pilasters. Pairs of one-over-one double hung sash windows are interupted by a single, broader, one-over-one sash window at the center of the middle bay. In 1967, the third story of this building was removed, leaving an unembellished para-pet above the second level.

    1. National Historic Landmark Nomination Registration Form for Little Tokyo Historic District. Edited by J.Uyeda for Tetra-IBI Group and CRA/LA.

    4

    3

    21

    Column plaque

    Deep awning

    Downlit signage

    Valence with address 4

    3

    2

    1

    4

    3

    2

    1

    5

    Third floor demolished in 1967

    Wrought iron fire escape

    Enlarged bay

    Arched opening

    Stone finish4 3

    2

    1

    5

    VIDEO PARADISE / KOREAN BARBEQUE321 - 323 EAST FIRST STREET

    BUILDING 024.3

    FIGURE 4.3A

    PHOTO 4.3B

  • 26

    ArchitecturePlanning

    Relative integrity characterizes the upper floors of this three story commercial vernacular building. Once the twin of the building ad-jacent to it on the west, its whitewashed faade are separated into three second story bays by pilasters. Pairs of one-over-one double hung sash windows are interupted by a single, broader, one-over-one sash window at the center of the middle bay. The windows have been altered by the substitution of metal frames for the origi-nal wood and the addition of air conditioning units to one of each pair. The pilasters continue through the plainly corbeled cornice to the top of the unembellished parapet. A complete alteration has transformed the ground level of the building. The three strorefront and the offset entry to the hotel above are unified by a shingled half gambrel canopy across the faade. Alterations made to the store-fronts are typical of the fifties through seventies.

    1. National Historic Landmark Nomination Registration Form for Little Tokyo Historic District. Edited by J.Uyeda for Tetra-IBI Group and CRA/LA.

    Window Signage

    Address Plaque

    Shallow Awning And Valence

    Downlit Plaque Signage

    Window Address

    4

    3

    2

    1Demolished Decorative Parapet

    Signage Below Architectural Banding

    Doorways Recessed From Showcase Windows

    Light Above Opening For Door To Upper Floors

    4

    3

    2

    1

    4

    3

    2

    1

    5

    4

    3

    2

    1 5

    JUNGLE / DAIKOKUYA / EAST325 - 329 EAST FIRST STREET

    BUILDING 034.4

    FIGURE 4.4A

    PHOTO 4.4B

  • 27

    ArchitecturePlanning

    photo from Los Angeles Public Library digital archives (circa 1942)

    The first floor storefronts in glazed white brick while the second and third stories are faced with brick ornamented by darker red brick details. The top two floors are symmetrical in composition. All win-dows are identical with the exception of the center window which is slightly narrower. Lintels are articulated by solider courses of red brick and lap each window with keystones of radiating bricks on the third story. Corbelled sills also ornament the third floor openings. The second story windows are set directly above the ground floor entablature. Consisting of several courses of brick culminating in a dentil-like band. End brackets, consoled in a T shape, frame the cornice. The ground floor remains close to its 1932 appearance with the exception of new tile below the storefront windows. The door to access the upper level has been changed but the marquee suspended on chains above remains in place.

    1. National Historic Landmark Nomination Registration Form for Little Tokyo Historic District. Edited by J.Uyeda for Tetra-IBI Group and CRA/LA.

    Replaced Existing Blade Sign

    Angled Toplit Plaque Sign

    Deep Awning

    Awning Address

    Refurbished Marquee - No Signage

    4

    3

    2

    1

    5

    4

    3

    2

    1

    5

    4

    3

    2

    1Demolished Architectural Feature

    White Tile Finish On Plinth

    Brick Lintels With Keystones

    Architectural Band With Dentils

    4

    3

    2

    1

    AOI / COSMOS / FAMILY MART331 - 335 EAST FIRST STREET

    BUILDING 044.5

    FIGURE 4.5A

    PHOTO 4.5B

  • 28

    ArchitecturePlanning

    photo from Los Angeles Public Library digital archives (circa 1942)

    1. National Historic Landmark Nomination Registration Form for Little Tokyo Historic District. Edited by J.Uyeda for Tetra-IBI Group and CRA/LA.

    This two story commercial building built (ca.1905) of brick has a whitewashed faade that has been altered below the transoms. Raised brick pilasters, banded by stove moldings, separate the four window sets on the upper story. Flat headed windows appear in the end sets while segmentally arched openings are in the central bays. A frieze zone is delineated by a beltcousrse beneath the windows and a stove molding which bands the faade above the storefronts. The storefronts were remodeled around 1986 and are a simplified interpretation of traditional storefronts.

    3

    2

    1Building Sign On Heightened Portion Of Parapet

    Double Height Clerestory

    Storefront Windows Recessed From Face Of Building

    3

    2

    1

    Flat Awning / Shade

    Angled Toplit Plaque Sign

    Column Plaque

    Window Address

    Window Sign

    4

    3

    2

    1

    5

    43

    2

    1

    5

    SUEHIRO / I LOVE BOBA337 - 339 EAST FIRST STREET

    BUILDING 054.6

    FIGURE 4.6A

    PHOTO 4.6B

  • 29

    ArchitecturePlanning

    This four story commercial building dates to ca. 1905. It has been almost completely unaltered above the first floor. The corbelling at the parapet has been demolished. The faade is sheathed with hard-fired brick and divided into five equal-sized bays of one over one wood-framed sash. Corbelled sills adorn the third and fourth floor window openings. Centered beneath the parapet is an inset panel which probably once contained the name of the building but has been stuccoed. The second story windows rest directly above a decorative belt course which separates the ground level retail from the upper floors. The four storefronts and entry to the upstairs which occupy the ground level have been modified significantly.

    4

    3

    2

    1Demolished Articulated Parapet

    Signage For Building

    Neon Blade Sign

    Storefront Flush To Face Of Building

    1. National Historic Landmark Nomination Registration Form for Little Tokyo Historic District. Edited by J.Uyeda for Tetra-IBI Group and CRA/LA.

    4

    3

    2

    1

    Building Sign

    Vertical Blade

    Aluminum Plaque With Painted Lettering And Neon

    Valence With Address

    Shallow Awning

    Window Sign

    4

    3

    2

    1

    5

    6

    4

    3

    21

    5

    6

    MR. RAMEN / EAST341 - 345 EAST FIRST STREET

    BUILDING 06 4.7

    FIGURE 4.7A

    PHOTO 4.7B

  • ArchitecturePlanning

    APPENDIX 5.1

  • ArchitecturePlanning

    APPENDIX 5.1

  • ArchitecturePlanning

    APPENDIX 5.1

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