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Emerging trends in_nonprofit_education_final

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  • 1. AMY CLAIRE HEITZMAN SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY ANGELA SEAWORTH RICE UNIVERSITY DAVID GARVEY UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT Emerging Trends in Nonprofit Education:The Role of the University

2. What Will Be Covered

  • The Need and Opportunity
  • Historical Track Record
  • Current Trends
  • The Dynamics within the University
  • Three Programs, Three Approaches
          • Southern Methodist University
          • Rice University
          • University of Connecticut
  • The Future
  • Questions

3.

  • 9%OF THE U.S. WORKFORCE
  • 1.4 MILLIONORGANIZATIONS
  • 11%OF U.S. GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT
  • MANAGES$3 TRILLIONASSETS
  • POISED FOR GROWTH INTO DOUBLE DIGITS IN THE NEXT DECADE
  • LACKING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND SUCCESSION PLANNING

The Need and Opportunity 4. The 2016 Nonprofit Management Shortage Daring to Lead, CompassPoint, 2001, 2006 Executive Director Tenure and Transition in Southern New England, 2004 The Nonprofit Sectors Leadership Deficit, Bridgestar Research, 2006 The Leadership Deficit, Stanford Social Innovation Review, 2006 and other national and local indicators. Need for 2.4 times the number ofsenior managers currently employed.2016 Projected Management Need 2007 Current Management Size Inadequate Succession Nationally640,000 1,250,000 Boomer Retirement Increased Demand 5. Need Defined

  • Nonprofit organizations address increasingly demanding, complex and intractable social problems (Garvey, 2009)
  • Recent study by CompassPoint
    • Five key obstacles facing sector, each relating directly to the abilities, capacities and sustainability of theleadershipof these organizations

CompassPoint, 2006 6. Need Continued

  • Professionalization of field
  • As more is required of nonprofits, deeper skills required of leaders:
    • Strategic planning
    • Commission of independent financial audits
    • Collection of quantitative data for evaluation
    • Savvy capitalization skills

7. Opportunities Presented by Higher Education

  • Nonprofit education is interdisciplinary
    • Faculty experts in organization design, research, psychology, public policy, arts and finance
    • In academia, interdisciplinary collaboration is enjoying a renaissance
  • Capacity-building via education
    • In wake of baby boomers departure from the workforce, capacity-building education is a vital key to an organizations survival
      • Funding only comes to those organizations with effective leaders
      • Social ills only solved by organizations with effective leaders

Shannon, J. & Wang, T. (2010). Model for University-Community Engagement: Continuing Education as Convener 8. Opportunities Continued

    • Changes in Higher Education landscape which favor its role with nonprofit leader education
      • Differentiation of HE providers offers credence to education shaped by practitioners
      • Globalization demands robust and formal leader education
      • Increased attention on outcomes encourages leader education be focused and deeply related to standards
      • Increasing privatization of HE brings more opportunity for creative funding models

Staley, D. & Trinkle, A. (2011). Changing Landscape of Higher Education. 9. History & Current Trends

  • A young academic discipline
  • making its way in the University landscape.
  • A note on other stakeholders
  • Nonprofits
  • Philanthropy
  • Government

10. History & Trends

  • Nonprofit management and philanthropic studies are barely 30 years old
  • Both academic and professional develop courses
  • The average age of a center is 14 years old a teenager
  • Various models for funding and structure exist
  • Some models are tailored to meet the needs of business and government. Others have shaped their programs in an ad hoc manner on the advice of faculty, administrators, consultants, practitioners, and funders(Renz, 1996; ONeill, 1998; Tschirthart, 1998; Renz and Mirabella 2002).
  • Location of nonprofit education programs also varies

11.

  • Most nonprofit academic centers are multi-disciplined, without ahome schooldegree offering
  • The home school and design of these nonprofit academic centers of higher learning vary
  • According to Renz and Mirabella, these are most commonly located in schools of public affairs, business, or social work
  • Mirabella reported, at the Nonprofit Academic Centers Council Benchmark 3.5 Conference last week, that # of nonprofit programs in business schools have dropped 36% from 2006 to 2011

History & Trends 12.

  • In 1990, only 17 universities in the United States offered graduate concentration in nonprofit management
  • In 2001, just over a decade later, nearly 100 existed, with 245 universities and colleges offering some form of credit or noncredit nonprofit management education (Mirabella and Wish, 2001
  • As of August 2010, Mirabella reported292 universities
  • At the NACCs Benchmark 3.5 Conference, it was reported there are now 324 in the nonprofit education arena

History & Trends 13.

  • Outreach
  • 91 colleges and universities provide noncredit courses for executive directors, staff, and trustees of nonprofit organizations
  • 73 colleges and universities offer nonprofit courses through continuing education
  • 12 colleges and universities have outreach components not connected to a graduate or undergraduate management degree
  • Many programs offer certificate programs a series of education programs that enhance nonprofit staff and leader capacity but are not as extensive as degree programs(Renz and Mirabella, 2006,Engagement and the Test of Time: Report on a Panel Study on the Nature and Sustainability of Nonprofit Management Outreach Centers, p. 6 )
  • Mirabella, Roseanne M. Nonprofit Management Education: Current Offerings in University-Based Programs. Seton Hall Nonprofit Study retrieved fromhttp://academic.shu.edu/npo/accessed on August 23, 2010.

14. Dynamics within the University

  • Our Reality
  • We are a:
  • a young discipline still defining itself
  • (Renz and Mirabella, 2002)
  • with limited resources
  • (Chattopadhyay, Glick, & Huber, 2001)
  • searching for legitimacy from multiple key stakeholders, practitioners, sector opinion leaders and philanthropy(Alexander, 1998 ), while also
  • seeking legitimacy in the University environment
  • (Larson and Long, 2002; Renz and Mirabella, 2002)

15.

  • Institutional Sustainability
  • Academic Credibility
  • Funding
  • Leadership Support
  • Organizational Fit
  • Community Connections
  • Mission
  • Faculty Involvement
  • Visibility

Prerequisites for Nonprofit Center Success Larson and Barnes-Moorhead. (2001).How Centers Work: Building and Sustaining Nonprofit Academic Centers 16. Key Academic Players 17.

  • NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP
  • CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

Southern Methodist University 18. SMU Nonprofit Leadership Certificate

  • Graduate certificate
  • Executive Directors, CEOs, C-level staff
  • Fully rooted in the sector; practical knowledge
  • Deep community need; CompassPoint study
  • CNM partnership

19. SMU Nonprofit Leadership Certificate

  • Based on a leadership competency model:

20. Program Origins

  • Extension campus programming
    • Outreach to suburbs
    • Open enrollment
    • Enrollee demographics + CNM interest + CompassPoint study
  • Capitalization
    • Modest start up funds from department
    • Shared expenses with CNM (facultygratisfirst 3 years)
      • Significant input share
    • Funding models are modest
        • Scholarships for internal candidates
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