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Environmental Health & Safety for Faculty - Managing Your Risks

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Environmental Health & Safety for Faculty - Managing Your Risks -. DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (EHS) & SECURITY. “ Due diligence is what we promote, risk management is what we support ”. Presented by: Catherine (Cate) Drum, BASc (OHS), CHSC, CRSP - PowerPoint PPT Presentation
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  • Environmental Health & Safety for Faculty - Managing Your Risks -

    Presented by:Catherine (Cate) Drum, BASc (OHS), CHSC, CRSPThe Department of Environmental Health,& Safety and Security

    02 February 2012

    *DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ANDSAFETY (EHS) & SECURITYDue diligence is what we promote, risk management is what we support

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Agenda

    IntroductionLearning ObjectivesWhy Should You Care?Difference Between Hazard & RiskInternal Responsibility SystemDuties of Employers/Supervisors/WorkersSupervisor DefinedSupervisor Competency - Defined Due Diligence - ExplainedManaging Risks Within Your Control and/or AuthorityRyerson & Other Ontario University Experiences

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Learning Objectives

    Know and understand your health and safety responsibilities To understand the concept of due diligence and what you need to do to demonstrate it

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Why Should You Care? Three Basic ReasonsHumanLegalFinancial

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Activity: What is the Hazard?

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Activity Sheet:Scope of Hazards in Education Sector

    BiologicalChemicalPhysicalSafetyStress/PsychosocialWork Design

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *What is the difference between Hazard and Risk?Risk = Hazard + ExposureHazard: is any source of potential damage, harm or adverse health effects on something or someone under certain conditionsExposure: The extent to which the likely recipient of the harm is exposed to or can be influenced by the hazardRisk: is the chance or probability that a person will be harmed or experience an adverse health effect if exposed to the hazard. It also applies to situations with property or equipment loss.

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *What is the difference between Hazard and Risk?

    Examples of Hazards and Their Effects

    Workplace HazardExample of HazardExample of Harm CausedThingKnifeCutSubstanceBenzeneLeukemiaMaterialAsbestosMesotheliomaSource of EnergyElectricityShock, electrocutionConditionWet FloorSlips, trips, fallsProcessWeldingMetal fume feverPracticeHard Rock MiningSilicosis

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *What is the difference between Hazard and Risk?Risk = Hazard + Exposure

    For harm to occur in practice in other words, forthere to be a risk there must be BOTH the hazardAND the exposure to that hazard; without boththese at the same time, there is no risk.

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Internal Responsibility System

    Each individual within the Ryerson communityshares responsibility for the identification of environmental health and safety hazards,managing the related risks, and improving upon any processes with the idea of ensuring that the risk is as low as reasonably practicable

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Basic Structure of the IRS

    Delegate: BOG Accountability Authority President& Responsibility Vice Presidents Senior Directors Managers/Chairs/ Academic DirectorsSupervising Faculty & Staff Workers/Students/Guests Volunteers/Contractors

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Legal Responsibilitiesare PERSONAL

  • *Activity Sheet:Bill C-45 Communication

    Amendments to the Criminal Code of CanadaWhats New?What Does It Mean?How To Protect Yourself

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Duties of Employer s. 25, 26Ontario Occupational Health & Safety ActTake every precaution reasonableEnsure that there is a health and safety program in the workplaceInform, instruct and supervise all workersAppoint competent supervisorsAssists Joint Health & Safety Committee (JHSC) in their roles and responsibilitiesEnsure proper training

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Duties of Supervisors s. 27Ontario Occupational Health & Safety ActEnsure workers work in a safe mannerEnsure use of personal protective equipment (PPE)Advise workers of hazardsProvide written instructionsTake every precaution reasonable

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Duties of Workers s. 28Ontario Occupational Health & Safety ActWork in compliance with the law and the University policies/procedures/guidelinesUse personal protective equipment (PPE)Report hazards immediatelyEnsure proper guarding is in placeWork in a safe mannerNo rough, boisterous conductDo not remove any protective equipment

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Who is a Supervisor?

    Definition of Supervisormeans a person who has charge of a workplace or authority over a workerIn a University setting the term Supervisor could be the President, Senior Director, Chair, Academic Director, Manager, Coordinator, Faculty Member, Principle Investigator, Teaching Assistant, Technician, Technologist, Lead Hand, etc.

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Who is a Supervisor?

    Supervisor is not limited by the position title but by the responsibilities held

    A supervisor must be competentthis has a specific meaning under the Occupational Health & Safety Act

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Who is a Competent Supervisor?

    Definition of Competent PersonIs qualified because of knowledge, training and experience to organize the work and its performanceIs familiar with the OHS Act and the regulations that apply to the work, andHas knowledge of any potential or actual danger to health or safety in the workplace.

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Activity Sheet:Supervisor Competency Checklist

    Key Questions an EmployerShould Ask

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Who is a Worker?

    Definition of WorkerA worker is considered as any person who receives monetary compensation for performing work or providing a serviceEveryone in an organization who receives monetary compensation is considered a worker

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Rights as a Worker

    Right to KnowWhat are the hazards in your job?Right to Participatethrough the joint health and safety committee or representative and by asking questionsRight to Refuse Unsafe Workif you believe the job is dangerous, or you have not been trained to do the job

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *

    Activity Sheet:EHS Responsibilities

    What Are YourResponsibilitiesunder RyersonsEHS Management System?

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Due Diligence What Does It Mean?

    The term due diligence is the level of judgment,care, caution, determination and activity a personwould reasonably be expected to do underparticular circumstances.

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Due Diligence Applied in a Workplace

    Applied in the workplace, due diligence means thatemployers and supervisors shall take all reasonableprecautions under those particular circumstances toprevent injuries, accidents or exposures in theworkplace. This definition presumes that you arefollowing all the minimum legal requirements!

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Due Diligence What is the Special Significance?Due Diligence is a legal defense for a person charged under the OHS legislationSo, if charged, a defendant may be found not guilty if they can prove that on the balance of probabilities, the accused had been duly diligent by taking the steps necessary to ensure the regulations were complied with You are presumed GUILTY until proven innocent the defendant bears the burden of proof, NOT the prosecution

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Due Diligence Accident/Incidents/ExposuresConsider Four Main Factors

    Was the event foreseeable?Was the event preventable?Did you have control over the circumstances?If it was within your authority to control the hazard, did you do it?

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Due Diligence Systems & Documentation

    The further away you are from the activities being performed, the more structure that has to be put into place.

    How do you do that? Systems & Documentation

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Due Diligence Develop a Worst Case ScenarioWhat equipment/material would it involve?Where would it most likely happen? What would have to fail in order for that event to take place?What time would it likely happen?Would it involve Staff, Faculty, PI or Student?What would the impact be to the department/school, staff/faculty/students, or Ryerson?

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Due Diligence SummaryAs the Supervising Faculty Member, you arelegally obligated to:

    Ensure that the workplace is safe for staff, students and the public who use or enter your space

    Ensure that your staff are taking all reasonable measures to protect themselves, their colleagues, the students and the public

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Due Diligence SummaryWhat systems, practices, procedures and training could be put into place to prevent the event? Greater Risks Demands Greater Care !!The responsibility is on your shoulders...you can delegate the work,but you cannot escape the obligationto show personal due diligence

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Activity Sheets

    Examples of Supervisor DemonstratingLACK of Due Diligence

    Checklist for Supervisor Due Diligence

    Key Court Measures Which Determine WhetherDue Diligence Steps Taken

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Managing Risks

    What are you Managing?Environmental Health& Safety and SecurityRisks

    What are you Preparing for?Contingencies & Emergencies

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Managing Risks Remember: Risk = Hazard + Exposure

    If you are managing your risks, then there is a hazard and there is exposure

    In order to reduce the risk, you can go through a sequence of options which offer a way to approach possible control measures

    Work your way down the list and implement the one that works best in the circumstances

    CEHSSM - EHS

  • *Managing Risks Hierarchy of ControlsEliminate or

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