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EUPST - HRs in CSDP Missions Guidelines for Trainers (Rev. Nov 2012)

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  • HUMAN RIGHTS IN EU CSDP MISSIONS

    This training curriculum has been produced to provide a standardised pre-deployment training on human rights for the use of EU member

    states deploying experts to European Union Common Security and Defence Policy Missions. The handbook Human Rights and Crisis

    Management by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs Finland provides the basis for the training as well as deeper knowledge and insights to the

    diverse human rights issues in CSDP missions.

    Two-hour pre-deployment training package produced by CMC Finland

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    Course developers: Annika Launiala (CMC Finland) and Sini Castrn (Consultant) Crisis Management Centre Finland (CMC Finland) Hulkontie 83/P.O.Box 1325 FI-70821 Kuopio, Finland Tel +358 (0)71 8750341 www.cmcfinland.fi Funded by: Ministry for Foreign Affairs Political Department, Unit for Human Rights Policy P.O.Box 176 FI-00023 Government, Finland Tel +358 (0)9 16005, +358 (0)9 57815 www.formin.fi

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    Contents

    Introduction for using this training package ................................................................................................ 3

    PART A: Training curriculum ....................................................................................................................... 4

    A1. Background and raison dtre of the Human Rights in EU CSDP missions...................................................4

    A2. Purpose and specific learning objectives of the training .............................................................................5

    A3. Main learning methods ................................................................................................................................5

    A4. Trainer and participants ...............................................................................................................................5

    A5. Outline of the two-hour training ..................................................................................................................6

    PART B: Training guidelines ........................................................................................................................ 7

    B1. Component 1: Pre-course self-assessment questionnaire ...........................................................................7

    B2. Component 2: Ice-breaker exercise .............................................................................................................8

    B3. Component 3: Human Rights and Civilian Crisis Management PowerPoint Presentation ....................... 10

    B4. Component 4: Case Study Exercise ........................................................................................................... 11

    B5. Component 5: Field Skills and Tools .......................................................................................................... 13

    PART C: Handouts .................................................................................................................................... 14

    C1: Handout 1: Pre-course self-assessment questionnaire ............................................................................. 14

    C2: Handout 2: Human rights victim and perpetrator identities .................................................................... 15

    C3: Handout 3: Human Rights and Gender: Four identities ............................................................................ 16

    C3: Handout 4: Case study background: What can we do? ......................................................................... 17

    C3: Handout 5: Programme for the two-hour training ................................................................................... 19

    C3: Handout 6: Evaluation and feedback ........................................................................................................ 20

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    Introduction for using this training package Welcome to use these guidelines for trainers that will allow you to carry out the two-hour training on human rights in EU CSDP missions. Basic structure: The guidelines have been divided to two main parts. Part A contains the training curriculum that forms the background of this training package. Getting familiar with the curriculum will allow understanding of why this human rights training has been developed, what are its main learning objectives, who are the participants and the summary of curriculum outline for the two-hour training. Part B provides the guidelines to carry out the training in a chronologic order. It also includes the instructions to the different exercises, as well as, the handouts that are needed in during the training. The PowerPoint presentation attached to these guidelines contains information on all the components, starting from the Ice-Breaker Exercise to the last session on Field Skills and Tools. Part C contains all the handouts for the training. Recommendation: The trainer(s) chosen to run this course must have operational experience or experience from human rights work in the country/mission in which the participants will be deployed to.

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    PART A: Training curriculum

    A1. Background and raison dtre of the Human Rights in EU CSDP missions

    Pre-deployment training for personnel deployed to EU CSDP missions has remained the sole responsibility of each EU member state. To date, there have not been any standardized pre-deployment training packages causing sometimes great variation in the civilian capabilities deployed in EU CSDP missions. To overcome this shortcoming and to strengthen the civilian capabilities, the Council of the European Union together with the Crisis Management Planning Directorate (CMPD) and the Human Rights Unit of the EU Council launched an expert seminar Developing Standard Training Elements on Gender and Human Rights in the context of CSDP Missions and Operations in Brussels, November 2010. This seminar yielded concrete results and under Belgium Presidency, the draft concepts for standard EU training elements, namely a package of three draft concepts containing minimum standard training elements on Human Rights, Gender and Child Protection in the context of CSDP, equally applicable in civilian and military training, were approved (1 December 2010), with the work taken forward to Delegations (Note 17209/10). As a concrete result, three two-hour generic training modules under CSDP were being drafted in Brussels for voluntary Member State adoption: one on human rights, one on gender, and one on childrens rights or child protection.

    Finland made a decision to contribute to the development of the two-hour human rights training package, the curriculum of which is outlined here. The training curriculum is based on the core aspects of the handbook funded by Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs: Human Rights and Crisis Management. A handbook for members of CSDP missions1. Member states utilizing this training curriculum are encouraged to distribute this handbook to participants, in order to support the two-hour training as it contains a comprehensive approach to mainstreaming human rights in activities of CSDP missions. Why human rights need to be taught to civilian crisis management experts? The answer is simple: Human rights are everyones responsibility and business in EU CSDP operations. Too often there is a misperception that human rights are the responsibility of the human rights adviser. Yet, there is a widespread agreement that CSDP mission personnel apply human rights in their daily work. Hence, the personnel working in the field of peace building, in conflict and fragile state environment, must have a thorough understanding of human rights principles that guide their work. To quote the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Finland, Alexander Stubb: mainstreaming human rights is a cross-cutting responsibility that has implications on all stages, all levels and for each and every mission member whatever their particular tasks and duties are.2

    1 Nordberg, Nina 2010. Human Rights and Crisis Management. A handbook for members of CSDP missions. The Eric Castrn Institute of International Law and Human Rights, University of Helsinki. Publications of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs 11/2010. 2 Nordberg, Nina 2010. Human Rights and Crisis Management. A handbook for members of CSDP missions, Foreword.

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    A2. Purpose and specific learning objectives of the training

    The main purpose of this training is two-folded: 1) to show that each and every expert in the mission has a responsibility and a role in mainstreaming human rights and 2) to provide basic tools to take human rights into account in their daily operational work.

    The specific learning objectives are as follows:

    1. To gain awareness of ones own personal level of understanding of human rights issues and principles;

    2. To enhance knowledge on the human rights principles; 3. To understand why human rights are important and how to take them into account in CSDP

    missions; 4. To gain practical tools for mainstreaming human rights in the daily operational work.

    After this two hour training, each one of the participants, be it a police officer, border guard, judge, prosecutor, monitoring expert, mentor and so on, should be able to say: yes, human rights are also my business and now I know how to apply them in my work. (See trainer guidelines for more details).

    A3. Main learning methods This two-hour training is planned to be highly inter-active. This means that classical presentations, in which the essential information is simply being offered though PowerPoint presentations, are kept to a minimum. Instead the trainers will engage participants through practical exercises, by asking questions, and thereby making the participants both think and to come up with answers by themselves. During the course there will be group work and case studies in order to allow enhanced and more long-term learning results. (See trainer guidelines for detailed instructions.)

    A4. Trainer and participants The trainer for this human rights pre-deployment course should have background and experience in working with human rights issues, preferably in a CSDP mission. Since this training package is not mission-specific, the trainer should have specific experience of the mission area that the pre-deployment is focusing on. In addition, the trainer should emphasise the particular mission mandate throughout the training.

    Participants will be experts with diverse professional and educational background, deployed to various kinds of positions in the mission. The trainer should therefore familiarise him/herself with the different job descriptions of the participants in order to be able to tailor particularly the tools in human rights mainstreaming relevant for the participants.

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    A5. Outline of the two-hour training

    Topic Learning objective Method Timing Self-assessment Questionnaire 15 minutes

    (previous day) Faces of human rights Option 1 & 2

    Option 1: To gain awareness of different kinds of human rights victims and perpetrators

    Option 2: To recognise the interlinkages with gender and human rights

    Ice breaker exercise

    15 minutes (Option 1) 30 minutes (Option 2)

    Human rights in EU CSDP context

    To enhance knowledge of the human rights principles

    To understand why human rights are important in CSDP missions

    PP presentation 15 20 minutes

    What can we do Exercise (Handout 4)

    To gain awareness of the complexities involved in human rights work

    To understand the importance of mission mandate as the ultimate reference of tasks

    To understand issues of choice, responsibility and contextualization

    Case study 40 minutes

    Field skills and tools To gain practical human rights tools to be used in every mission work

    PP presentation & discussion Pair exercise & discussion

    20 minutes 10 minutes

    Evaluation & feedback Questionnaire 5-10 minutes

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    PART B: Training guidelines Timings: The trainer needs to keep track of the time distribution between the different components. Note that the time needed for the two ice-breakers vary and depending which one is used will affect also the time utilized to deliver the PowerPoint presentation followed by the ice breaker.

    B1. Component 1: Pre-course self-assessment questionnaire The purpose of the pre-course self-assessment is two-folded: 1) to enhance self-assessment of ones own personal knowledge and understanding of human rights principles in relation to CSDP mission/EU responsibilities and 2) to provide the trainer information concerning the background of the pre-deployment participants, their level of understanding of human rights and training needs. The questionnaire focuses the following issues:

    Trainee's background: professional experience, previous job, human rights trainings passed. (Questions 1-2)

    Personal commitment to human rights, including values, stereotypes and prejudices. (Questions 3-4-5)

    Understanding of human rights. (Questions 6-7) Expectations of human rights work in missions. (Question 8) Expectations for human rights training. (Question 9) Evaluation of personal confidence a) to speak about human rights and b) to work in a human

    rights responsive way. (Question 10) The trainer should compile the results from the pre-course self-assessment questionnaires, conduct a qualitative analysis and consequently utilize the information to tailor the two-hour training to meet the training needs of the participants. The questionnaire should be delivered to the participants prior to the pre-deployment training. This can be done either via e-mail, via e-learning platform (e.g. Moodle) or during the beginning of the training. In this case there should be a full day left between its submission and the actual training. The earlier it is done, the more time there is to adjust and tailor the training to suit the needs of the participants. Filling in the questionnaire should not take longer than 15 minutes. The questionnaire (handout 1) can be found on the page 14.

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    B2. Component 2: Ice-breaker exercise OPTION 1: Human Rights Victims and Perpetrator Identities Purpose: The training starts with an ice-breaker exercise. The purpose of the exercise is to get the attention of the participants, get them attentive and active in order to be positively alert for the learning experience. Group size: 5 to 15 Time: 15 minutes Materials: Handout 2 (pp. 15), cards, marker Objective: To give faces to human rights violations by trying to identify a given identity with

    help of others METHOD:

    1. To prepare for the exercise you need to write the different identities to cards in capital letters (handout 2).

    2. Ask everyone to leave their desks and come closer to the open space. 3. Distribute randomly an identity card (handout 2) to each participant and emphasize the

    participants not to look at the identity they have received. 4. Ask the participants to place the identity card on their forehead for others to see but not to

    reveal the identity. (If someone accidentally see his/her card, it should be replaced with a new one.)

    5. Ask the participants to find out as quickly as possible what their identity is. In order to do this they can ask questions such as

    Am I a man/woman? Am I young/middle-aged/old Do I have a salaried job/farmland/weapon? Am I a victim/perpetrator/work on conflict resolution? Would I assist overcome the conflict peacefully? Am I local/foreigner/from an international organization?

    Answers must be only yes or no. Participants can try these or any other questions.

    6. If after ten minutes the participants have not yet been able to identify their identities ask

    them to stop the exercise and look at their identity. 7. Ask the participants to return to their seats and ask feedback of the exercise.

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    TRAINERS NOTES:

    Show the list of 30 identities (handout 2 and the PowerPoint presentation attached). Explain the following key points:

    1. The identities carried remind that human rights and human rights violations always have faces.

    2. It is sometimes very difficult to identify who the people are and it requires skill to identify people who are either victim or perpetrators. A person can also be both a perpetrator and a victim, or a potential victim or perpetrator. In addition, there might also be neutral observers (e.g. OSCE election observer). These categories are neither clear-cut nor fixed. Those helping to overcome conflict and who can be local or non-affiliated people and agencies were easier.

    OPTION 2: Human rights and gender: Four identities

    Purpose: As above the purpose of the exercise is to get the attention of the participants, get them attentive and active in order to be positively alert for the learning experience. Group size: minimum of 12 Time: 30 minutes Materials: Handout 3 (pp. 16), flip chart paper, markers Objective: To reveal the interlinkages between gender and human rights violations in a particular

    mission context. METHOD:

    1. To prepare for the exercise you need to create four identities based on the mission context; one woman, one man, one girl and one boy (see handout 3 for an example of identities). You need to modify the identities to suit the mission cultural context. When deciding the home area of the identity, try to come up with areas that are different kind (e.g. rural/urban, border/IDP camp).

    2. Divide the participants into four groups and sign each group with one identity. 3. Provide the tasks as follows and explain that the total time for the exercise is 15 minutes:

    Discuss what human rights violations pose a threat to your identity in the mission context and write them done to the flip chart paper. Remember to write to the top of the flip chart paper your identity. What threats in the particular context may cause human rights violations to your identity? (Sexual violence, physical violence, loss of livelihood, forced to join the fighting parties)

    Choose one of the possible human rights violations posed to your identity as the biggest threat and explain why you choose it.

    Prepare to present results to others (3 minutes each group). 4. Each result sheet should be hang on the wall next to each other as it will allow comparison

    between identities (gender)

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    5. Wrap up the main points utilizing the trainers notes. TRAINERS NOTES:

    1. Ask first the groups to comment what they observe when they look at the four different identity.

    2. Make sure that the following points are covered either by the participants or you:

    There are multiple threats in the (post-)conflict area that cause severe human rights violations (as experts we need to be able to observe and recognise these threats based on our background & expertise).

    Human rights violations are not the same for men, boys, girls and women and as experts we need to pay attention to these differences. Moreover, gender is more than just women.

    Human rights and gender are interlinked and connected. We should all the time keep in mind that local people consists of women, men, girls and boys with different backgrounds and hence they are being exposed to different kinds of human rights violations due to their gender, age, ethnicity, social class etc.

    Avoid to solely connect women/girls with sexuality. In recent discussions, there has been raised a critique that women/girls are sexualized in the CSDP discourse with the consequence that other human rights violations, for example the destruction of livelihoods, are given much less attention than rapes of women. Furthermore, men/boys are victims of sexual violence as well; this has for long been a war and torture technique (and a form of intimidation and humiliation in the masculine rites of the military).

    B3. Component 3: Human Rights and Civilian Crisis Management PowerPoint Presentation Time: 15 - 20 minutes Materials: PowerPoint presentation (attached) Objectives:

    To enhance knowledge on human rights principles. To understand why human rights are important in CSDP operations and missions.

    METHOD: PowerPoint presentation The trainer should modify the powerpoint presentation lecture on Human Rights and Civilian Crisis Management to better fit the needs of the participants based on the results of the pre-assessment questionnaire. This presentation is generic and based on the information in Handbook for members

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    of CSDP missions (attachment 1). You should keep the number of slides into a maximum of 15-20 slides, each slide containing 5-8 points. As an experienced human rights expert you should provide practical examples based on your mission experience to support your presentation. It is important to keep a practical focus throughout the training as this is a pre-deployment training and participants are expected to have gone through human rights training in basic training courses on civilian crisis management that cover more extensively human right issues in theory.

    B4. Component 4: Case Study Exercise Group size: 3 to 5 Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to provide hands-on training on human rights work in

    a mission, particularly in relation to the mission mandate. The purpose is also to highlight that human rights field work at its best draws on team members different occupational backgrounds and skills which are an impact multiplier.

    Time: 45 minutes Materials: Handout 4 (pp. 17)

    Copy of the mission(s) mandate(s) Flipchart paper and markers

    Objectives:

    To illustrate the complexities involved within mission's human rights work; how conflicts and immediate post-conflict periods are interlinked with multiple problems of different orders/levels and urgency which however are not easy to identify.

    To illustrate that human rights violations may lay at core of conflicts, having spin-off effects until meaningfully addressed at core.

    METHOD:

    1. Distribute the case study background paper (handout 4) to the participants previous day in order to allow participants to have enough time to read it properly through before the exercise. Emphasize that it has to be read as there will not be time for it during the actual training.

    2. When starting the exercise divide the participants in groups containing 3-5 participants in each.

    3. Explain the participants the exercise details in order to kick off the exercise. Use the PowerPoint slide Case scenario: What can we do?

    4. Assign each team their mission mandate. Ideally they should examine their mission mandate. In the handout 4, you can find three different kinds of mission mandate that you may use in the exercise.

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    5. Explain the task: the groups need to develop an appropriate human rights action plan based on the scenario and the mission mandate. They have 20 minutes to develop the plan and write it to flipchart paper.

    6. Choose one group to present their action plan (5 minutes). 7. Ask others to comment (10 minutes). 8. Wrap up the exercise utilizing the trainers notes below (5 minutes).

    TRAINERS NOTES:

    1. Human rights belong to the core of the mission. They are not compartmentalized to only dedicated and isolated mission officials, even less mainstreamed into the responsibility of everyone generally but no one in particular.

    2. Crises are becoming more complex. Without addressing the root causes, conflicts tend to re-emerge.

    3. Ideally your group came up with different solutions, relationships and tasks in the host country.

    4. Looking at team work results in their entirety, we focus on strengths and weaknesses. There are fewer right/wrong answers.

    5. In six months, the scenario could develop towards to a near-civil war or a cautious election success. You have been busy rationalizing your choices and considering best models. Consider the following points when discussing the action plans:

    prioritization needs; protection needs; conditions involving different stakeholder individuals/groups; conflicts of interest; considerations arising from the operative environment including how to prevent

    and be prepared; relief and recovery; mission defining documentation; political and other issues that might not appear relevant in a normative text book

    on human rights work.

    6. Pay attention to the case study details, for example in the scenario a You are motivated by recent incidents that are security concerns - the emphasis is on words recent and security concerns.

    7. Furthermore, it is possible that no incidents preceding mission mandate starting date belong to the missions authority. Non-mandated work can be defined by its specified timing and by its nature. The clause on retroactivity would be found in the Joint Action representing jointly agreed objectives by inviting parties, and hence in the Statement of Mission Agreement (SoMA) signed between EU and host country.

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    8. It is also important to pay attention to the most serious crimes: crimes against right to life; right to be free from torture; the need to monitor detention (and trial); the attacks by statutory forces on civilians; sexual violence

    9. At the end highlight the Handbook for Members of CSDP Missions. Those recent incidents that could demand priority addressing are found in every paragraph and come directly out of the Handbook. Tell the participants that they can study the concrete answers on good average professional practice to this case later from the What can you do boxes in the Part II of the Handbook.

    B5. Component 5: Field Skills and Tools Purpose: To conclude the training by summarizing the field skills needed and practical tools

    available for human rights work in the mission. Time: 30 minutes Materials: Flipchart paper, markers, PowerPoint presentation Objectives:

    To gain practical tools for mainstreaming human rights in the daily operational work METHOD:

    1. Start with the PowerPoint presentation (attached). 2. You should modify the presentation depending on the core tasks/mission of the participants.

    There is no need to emphasize monitoring if this is not a pre-deployment training for a monitoring mission.

    3. Use the Human Rights handbook to tailor the PP, for example, for police officers (pp. 42-54) or rule of law personnel (pp. 58-63).

    4. At the end carry out a pair exercise (total time 10 minutes). This exercise is linked to the first exercise on the mission mandate. Participants should compare in pairs their list on human rights points in the mission mandate. Secondly they should discuss (5 minutes) and to list down to a flip chart paper 3 to 5 concrete ways they can take human rights into account in their own work (in relation to their job description).

    5. Ask pairs to present their ideas and have a short discussion. 6. As a trainer you should emphasize that applying human rights into daily work is not difficult;

    it is a mindset. 7. At the end, highlight the Handbook pocket card.

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    PART C: Handouts

    C1: Handout 1: Pre-course self-assessment questionnaire Walking with human rights Please fill in this questionnaire anonymously by the start of the course. This will assist in mapping out specific training areas. 1. Please give brief details of your future mission, posting (job title) and outline its key functions.

    2. Is this your first EU civilian crisis management mission posting? (Yes / No) In how many EU and/or other missions have you already participated? How many Human rights courses/trainings did you previously follow?

    3. What do you think when hearing the words human rights? Please state the very first thought(s) that come to your mind.

    4. How has safeguarding human rights and fundamental freedoms been a part of your earlier work?

    5. What aspects of human rights protection do you consider to be fundamental? Why?

    6. How do human rights violations under peace differ from violations during conflict? Give examples.

    7. In your opinion, whose human rights are most commonly violated in modern conflicts?

    8. Please give an example of addressing human rights concerns in a crisis management mission.

    9. What are your expectations for this course in terms of enhancing your knowledge of human rights in relation to CSDP missions and operations?

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    C2: Handout 2: Human rights victim and perpetrator identities

    Female ex-combatant

    EU mission monitor

    Pregnant rape victim

    EU monitors local landlord

    Underage child soldier

    UN field agency member

    IDP parent

    EU (EEAS) Delegation diplomat

    Farmer who lost his sons

    OSCE election observer

    Old refugee

    Armed Force member

    Evicted minority member

    Military intelligence

    Jailed rights defender

    Local civil servant

    Peaceful political activist

    (Unemployed) ex-guerilla

    Local journalist

    National Police member

    Foreign journalist

    Combat/Special police

    Orphanage directress

    District Prosecutor

    Political opposition member

    Trader of stolen aid

    Religious authority

    Drug/sex worker dealer

    Womens rights lawyer

    Corrupt government official

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    C3: Handout 3: Human Rights and Gender: Four identities

    Man: 55-year-old married man with 3 children from [indicate place] working as a government official

    Woman: 32-year-old unoccupied widow with 5 children between ages of 17 years and 9 months from [indicate place]

    Boy: 15-year-old orphan living on the street from [indicate place]

    Girl: 12-year-old living in a female headed household from [indicate place]

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    C3: Handout 4: Case study background: What can we do?

    You are a team of Human Rights experts in a civilian EU CSDP mission launched two months ago in Small Country. In light of continued Protection of Civilians concerns and sporadic politically motivated violence ahead of upcoming local elections (to be covered by an EU election observation mission), your Head of Mission tasked you to reconsider the missions human rights field strategy. Please create an appropriate human rights action plan. Your most important reference is the mission mandate given to your team. Awareness of its objectives and scope means that the mechanisms at your disposal vary significantly. Please read the scenario and concluding tips before the start of the training and discuss in your team.

    TYPES OF MANDATES Non-executive monitoring mission Assistance to stabilization and normalization, monitoring peace agreement and elections, provision of state services in a non-discriminatory way. Traditional monitoring tailored to different rights and beneficiaries. Cross-border IDPs, internal conflict refugees. Monitoring, mentoring and advising function Reconstruction - institution building advising good (autonomous) governance with also support in fight against corruption and human trafficking, combatting violence against civilians. Executive mandate monitors and joint caseload management with host Support in law enforcement and support in security sector reform (SSR) and reform of this governance, where mission brought in civil police, rule of law and civil protection experts. From fact-finding to full-scale legal enquiries. Mandate is legal administration at local level. Civilian administration mandate is local administration. CONFLICT CONTEXT: Small Country invited your mission together with the Peace Panel representing two political wings of armed groups in de facto control of three provinces furthest away from capital, known to us as our Area of Operation (AOR). The Contract to End Hostilities (CEH) covering your AOR ended armed conflict. The region is still the most unstable of the porous frontiers of Small Country. Its neighbour Big Country has its own situation of fragility and suffers from cross-border movement of people. Ethnically and religiously, indigenous AOR residents feel closer to Big Country. International human rights organizations accuse the Government of crimes against humanity. A thematic EU Special Representative focusing on the cross-cutting issue of human rights is nominated. Neighbours keep quiet and import energy from your AOR. EU will not launch a military/combat element for crisis management. International military intervention is unlikely; UN Security Council would not mandate it. a. You are motivated by recent incidents that are security concerns in this area that had a long-standing permanent military operation among civilian population, targeted by both sides. Spontaneous refugees flow to Big Country where they already have family and business links. Only a few official crossing-points exist. Formerly weapons and ammunition come from Big Country.

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    Laborers without ID and drugs move the other way. You receive information about border guards harassing and abusing women at the border crossing. According to your source, women are routinely stopped and searched by male border guards with the objective of harassment and abuse. It is alleged that sometimes women have been illegally kept there overnight and raped by border guards. b. This morning you heard rumors about police officers in the police station in your operational area ill-treating detainees during interrogation. Some detainees are even alleged to have disappeared. The abuse allegedly occurs at night time. Detainees are taken away to a secret detention facility for interrogation where they are allegedly ill-treated in order to denounce others and/or sign confessions. c. As pre-election tensions harden, you receive information that the police, in a joint operation with military forces, are searching for the above mentioned, already round up young men from meetings suspected of supporting the opposition. In rounding up the men, the soldiers are alleged to have used excessive force, resulting in injuries. According to your information, the detainees have not been given any specific reasons for their arrest and are detained indefinitely on the grounds that they are a threat to state security. The detainees have not been brought before a judge and are thus not able to challenge their detention. Furthermore, they are not permitted any contact with their families or with a lawyer. There is a strong indication that the men have been rounded up with the intention of intimidating them and others in their village, which is known to support the opposition. d. A demonstration is planned by an opposition group. The authorities have not granted the necessary authorization and have warned the organizers that if the demonstration goes ahead it will be dispersed by force if necessary. The police and security forces are preparing for a confrontation and plan to use non-lethal weapons such as rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse the crowds. GENERAL TIPS:

    Think about conditions of stakeholder groups/individuals and protection needs.

    Think about priorities/concrete action. What are the building blocks for now and longer term human rights solutions? Despite of need for more policy coherence, you are ideally pragmatic because your mission documentation has clear boundaries and the first mandated period is not long.

    Think about access. As far as mandated, think about the possible emphasis in comprehensive strategy to support implementation of human rights responsibilities and policies of local authorities (these could include security forces, rule of law officials, border security, parties and bodies dealing with human rights and equality issues).

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    If it helps, map out stakeholders, potential allies, opponents, for an engagement strategy. Or, get inspired by the Pocket Card.

    You work within an unfinished conflict. Do not create new divisions.

    C3: Handout 5: Programme for the two-hour training

    Main purpose of the training: 1) to show that each and every expert in the mission has a responsibility and a role in mainstreaming human rights and 2) to provide basic tools to take human rights into account in their daily operational work.

    The overall learning objectives are as follows:

    1. To gain awareness of ones own personal level of understanding of human rights issues and principles;

    2. To enhance knowledge on the human rights principles; 3. To understand why human rights are important and how to take them into account in CSDP

    missions; 4. To gain practical tools for mainstreaming human rights in the daily operational work.

    Topic Learning objective Method Timing Faces of human rights Option 1 & 2

    Option 1: To gain awareness of all kinds of human rights victims and perpetrators

    Option 2: To recognise the interlinkages with gender and human rights

    Ice breaker exercise

    15 minutes 30 minutes

    Human rights in EU CSDP context

    To enhance knowledge of the human rights principles

    To understand why human rights are important in CSDP missions

    PP presentation 15 20 minutes

    What can we do Exercise (Handout 4)

    To gain awareness of the complexities involved in human rights work

    To understand the importance of mission mandate as the ultimate reference of tasks

    To understand issues of choice, responsibility and contextualization

    Case study 40 minutes

    Field skills and tools To gain practical human rights tools to be used in every mission work

    PP presentation & discussion Pair exercise & discussion

    20 minutes 10 minutes

    Evaluation and feedback Questionnaire 5 minutes

    Crisis Management Centre (CMC) Finland

  • Human rights in EU CSDP missions

    Page20

    C3: Handout 6: Evaluation and feedback Your opinion on this two-hour human rights pre-deployment training will be very useful for planning of the future causes. Kindly fill out this form. Please evaluate the course on the following scale: 1 - poor 2 - marginal 3 - acceptable 4 - good 5 - excellent. Include additional comments if required. PART 1: CONTENT OF THE TRAINING

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Training objectives were clearly outlined

    Sessions were carried out in a logical order and sequenced well

    Materials provided were clear and adequate

    Balance between presentation, discussions and exercises was adequate

    Additional comments: ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    PART 2: CONTENT OF SPESIFIC SESSIONS

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Ice-breaker

    Human Rights and Crisis Management presentation

    Case Study Exercise

    Field skills and tools

    Additional comments: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Crisis Management Centre (CMC) Finland

  • Human rights in EU CSDP missions

    Page21

    ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ PART 3: LEARNING

    List up three things you found positive and useful in this training.

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    List up to three things you found difficult or unclear in this training.

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    What was the most important skill/knowledge you gained during this training?

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    PART 4: RESULTS

    In what way do you think that the training will affect your work in the CSDP mission?

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    PART 5: ANY OTHER COMMENTS

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Crisis Management Centre (CMC) Finland

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    Any comments or questions concerning this human rights pre-deployment package should be addressed to: Training Sector Crisis Management Centre Finland (CMC Finland) Hulkontie 83/P.O.Box 1325 FI-70821 Kuopio, Finland Tel +358 (0)71 8750341 www.cmcfinland.fi Note: If you have any questions about this training package or wish to develop additional exercises or modify the curriculum in anyway, please contact and send suggestions to: Annika Launiala (Research & Development coordinator) Hulkontie 83/P.O.Box 1325 FI-70821 Kuopio, Finland Tel +358 (0) 50 303 8580 www.cmcfinland.fi

    Crisis Management Centre (CMC) Finland

    Introduction for using this training packagePART A: Training curriculumA1. Background and raison dtre of the Human Rights in EU CSDP missionsA2. Purpose and specific learning objectives of the trainingA3. Main learning methodsA4. Trainer and participantsA5. Outline of the two-hour training

    PART B: Training guidelinesB1. Component 1: Pre-course self-assessment questionnaireB2. Component 2: Ice-breaker exerciseB3. Component 3: Human Rights and Civilian Crisis Management PowerPoint PresentationB4. Component 4: Case Study ExerciseB5. Component 5: Field Skills and Tools

    PART C: HandoutsC1: Handout 1: Pre-course self-assessment questionnaireC2: Handout 2: Human rights victim and perpetrator identitiesC3: Handout 3: Human Rights and Gender: Four identitiesC3: Handout 4: Case study background: What can we do?C3: Handout 5: Programme for the two-hour trainingC3: Handout 6: Evaluation and feedback


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