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  • FORT BEND FAIR. BALANCED. INFORMATIVE.

    Phone: 281-980-6745wwwww.fbindependent.com.fbindependent.com

    P. O.BOX 623, SUGAR LAND, TX 77487-0623WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009

    VOL 2 No. 49

    Its time to start experiencing relief with a personalized treatment plan from our new comprehensive Back Pain Program. Our skilled health team specializes in joint and back pain, o ering both minimally invasive surgical techniques and noninvasive treatments.

    To learn more, call 281.725.5225 or visit SugarLandBackPain.com.

    Introducing the new Back Pain Programat Memorial Hermann Sugar Land.

    Reliefis within

    reach

    MHH097001_Shue11x2_FB_02.indd 1 10/19/09 7:04:14 PM

    Set for Dec. 11 and 12, the CASA Christmas Home Tour will feature six distinctive homes in First Colony, Pecan Manor and Richmond.

    Presale tickets are available for $15 at greater Houston area HEB stores, Fort Bend Amegy Bank locations, Oak-Bend Medical Centers, and the Riverstone Information Center.

    Tickets can also be pur-chased during the event for $20 at The Sweetwater Guard-house, Riverstone Informa-tion Center, OakBend Medi-cal Centers and each of the homes.

    Shown with posters and tickets L to R are: Cindy Reaves, Marketing Director for OakBend Medical Cen-ters; Home Tour Ticket Chair Barbara Benes; and Child Advocates of Fort Bend De-velopment Director Kelli Metzenthin.

    The Tour, which benefi ts Child Advocates of Fort Bend, runs Dec. 11 and 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a special candlelight tour on Friday night from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

    Tour guests will be treated to a rare glimpse of the fea-tured homes and their creative holiday decorations.

    In the late 1950s, the Im-perial Sugar Company de-cided the upkeep of its com-pany-owned houses was just getting to be too much of a drain on the companys prof-its. The rents were greatly below what it was costing the company for upkeep and infrastructure development.

    The companys brick houses on The Hill, northeast of the refi nery, were put on the market, and the company employees were given the option to buy them. And most of them did buy their homes, priced from about $4,000 to $6,000. Most of the houses had shared driveways. Hous-es along Main and up to 6th Street were largely wood or siding and were a bit cheaper; Sugar Land State Bank agreed to $500 down and mortgages with a 5 per-cent rate to be paid off in 10 years. Buyers could opt for payroll deduction. A number of people bought their homes outright.

    The land that would be-come Venetian Estates was a low, swampy land. Sugar Land Industries and Belknap Realty dug canals and used the dredged dirt to build up

    the land height. It was Mrs. Henrietta Kempners (wife of Imperial owner Isaac Kempner) idea to call it Ve-netian Estates and give Ital-ian names to many of the streets. The lots sold slowly at fi rstat $5,000 these were not cheap lots. Some spec homes were built.

    But when the U.S. 59 service roads opened, there was a way to get into Hous-ton without going on South Main. It was also the time when the area around Sharp-stown was being devel-opedbut Sugar Land was about the only place that had water-front lots! The lots in Venetian Estates began sell-ing quickly then.

    Mayfi eld Park on the north side of the refi nery was nearly exclusively Black and Hispanic. The Black chil-dren attended M.R. Wood school, while the Hispanic children attended Sugar Land Elementary since they were considered white. The homes in Mayfi eld were considered out of code in the early 1950s by the City be-cause they had an outdoor privy and just running cold water in a single faucet back

    of the house. Herb Kempner son of Isaacwas over Im-perial and was disturbed at the plight of the Mayfi eld residents. More than 200 homes were bulldozed and new brick ones built over the course of a decade in their places; residents lived in temporary housing. Herb Kempners vision for Sugar Land was much like his fa-thers, a city with no injus-tice and with opportunity for everyone. The City worked with the Federal Housing Administration on this urban renewal project, and the fi rst FHA home was sold to Mrs. Aline McLemore in 1961. It is believed that there was never a foreclosure in the Mayfi eld subdivision. Sadly, Herb Kempner died in 1953 and did not see the comple-tion of his Mayfi eld project.

    Though Sugar Land was segregated in the 50s and early 60s, there was one thing that just about every-one had: a job.

    (This article is published in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Sugar Land being celebrated with a party on New Years eve.)

    By SESHADRI KUMARThe Securities and Ex-

    change Commission has fi led a suit in the United States Dis-trict Court for the Southern District of Texas against Al-bert Fase Kaleta of Missouri City, and his company, Kaleta Capital Management, Inc.

    Two other entities, Business Radio Network, L.P. (BizRa-dio) and Daniel Frishberg Fi-nancial Services, Inc. ( DFFS Capital Management, Inc.) have been named as Relief Defendants solely for the pur-poses of equitable relief.

    Former Sugar Land Mayor David Wallace has been asso-ciated with Frishberg and Biz-Radio as a business partner.

    Kaleta and Dan Frishberg, who has the show on BizRa-dio called The Money Man, were among the founders of BizRadio Network.

    Kaleta also was part owner and chief compliance offi cer for DFFS.

    The SEC alleges that Kaleta and KCM raised approximate-ly $10 million from about 50 investors in a fraudulent of-fering of promissory-note se-curities.

    The commission further alleges that Kaleta misrepre-sented that KCM would use the offering proceeds to pro-vide short-term loans to cred-it-worthy small businesses. Instead, at Kaletas direction, KCM loaned approximately $6.7 million of the proceeds to DFFS and BizRadio, two fi nancially precarious KCM affi liates who had no reason-able prospect of repaying the

    loans. Kaleta knew the fi nancial

    condition of both companies because he was president, chief compliance offi cer, and a 44 percent owner of DFFS and, with others, controlled BizRadio.

    The complaint alleges that Kaleta also took approximate-ly $1.5 million of the offering proceeds to pay his personal expenses.

    Finally, the commission al-leges that contrary to Kaletas representations, he used in-vestor funds to make inter-est payments to some of the promissory note holders.

    The complaint requests permanent injunctions, dis-gorgement of ill-gotten gains plus prejudgment interest, and civil penalties against the De-fendants.

    In addition, the commission has fi led a motion asking the court to appoint a receiver to collect, marshal, manage and distribute these assets for the benefi t of investors.

    Without admitting or de-nying the Commissions al-legations, Kaleta and KCM have consented to permanent injunctions against future vio-lations of the anti-fraud provi-sions. Kaleta and KCM have also consented to an order ap-pointing a receiver.

    BizRadio received millions raised from investors under false pretenses, according to the lawsuit.

    The SEC claims that be-tween December 2007 and August of this year, Kaleta and Kaleta Capital Man-

    agement sold $10 million in promissory notes, telling in-vestors the money would be loaned to small businesses at 12 percent to 14 percent inter-est. Instead, the SEC said, it went to the money-losing ra-dio network and an affi liated investment advisory fi rm, Daniel Frishberg Financial Services.

    Kaletas fi rm loaned BizRa-dio $3.6 million of the money during the fi rst eight months of this year.

    During that same time, the radio network lost $1.6 mil-lion and its only signifi cant assets were illiquid radio-station licenses, the SECs lawsuit said.

    Another $1.2 million went to DFFS, which did not have suffi cient revenue or assets to service such a loan, accord-ing to the lawsuit.

    Dan Frishberg is the CEO of Frishberg, Jordan, Stewart, & Kaleta Advisors, Inc. and CEO & Founder of BizRadio Network.

    In 1992, Frishberg started Daniel Frishberg Financial Services from the ground up, and in 1997, it evolved into Frishberg Jordan Stewart & Kaleta Advisors.

    FJSK Advisors manages over 300 million dollars in as-sets and advises on more than 1.2 billion dollars, according to the companys website.

    FJSK has one of the few equity portfolios in the coun-try that has shown signifi cant gains over the past few years

    SEC sues Missouri City businessman for alleged $10 million fraud

    In addition, guests will en-joy festive entertainment by local artists and tasty home-made cookies and hot apple cider.

    A special tour lunch is available at Sweetwater Country Club for $15. One ticket provides admission to all six homes and can be used at any time during the tour.

    The map to the homes is

    on the back of the ticket. For more information about the event call 281-341-9955, ext. 5108.

    Since the Tour began, Child Advocates of Fort Bend has trained more than 600 vol-unteers and served more than 8,000 children.

    At least 400 children are touched each month by one of the agencys programs.

    CASA Christmas Home TourSee FRAUD, Page 3

    Sugar Lands fi rst developments

    Christmas at Town Square

    Sugar Land Mayor James Thompson and Santa Claus lighted a 40-foot Christmas tree to kick off the holiday season at the Sugar Land Town Square on Dec. 3. The event attracted a huge crowd despite the inclement weather. The highlight of the evening was the grand entrance of Santa Claus. Main stage performances included Sugar Land Super Star winner Nathaniel De Jesus, local school choirs and the Sugar Land Express Singers. There were stilt walkers and festive characters like snowmen to enhance the evenings entertainment. Photographer LARRY PULLEN captured the holiday spirit during the tree lighting, above, and the arrival of Santa Claus, below.

  • Building homes of quality and distinction for over 40 years.

    Plans, prices and availability are subject to change without notice. (10/08)

    Community happenings

    HOLIDAY FOOD DRIVE. The Fort Bend Junior Service League hosted a holiday food drive for East Fort Bend Human Needs Ministry (EFBHNM) at the Leagues November meeting. East Fort Bend Human Needs Ministry is a non-profi t organization that addresses the basic human needs of Fort Bend families and senior citizens. EFBHNM is one of two benefi ciaries for FBJSLs 2010 Pancakes & Pajamas Childrens Festival on February 6th at The Honor Roll School. For more information on Pancakes & Pajamas, visit the FBJSL website at www.fbjsl.com. Above, Vickie Coates, EFBHNM Executive Director, Pam Spencer, Sarah Boyd, Beth Butler & Connie Esposito, EFBHNM Community Outreach Director.

    Top producing REAL-TORS Chris Sansone, Bro-ker Associate, and Lizz San-sone, CDPE, have moved their business to RE/MAX Fine Properties.

    Team Sansone has more than 13 years of experience in the real estate business, in-cluding seven years with RE/MAX.

    Were eager to accelerate the growth of our business, and to continue delivering our clients the same level of per-sonal service theyve come to expect, said the Sansones, RE/MAX Platinum Club members.

    The level of professional-ism in this offi ce is amazing, and the technology that RE/MAX Fine Properties employs

    makes this a logical choice as we grow our business.

    The Sansones are mem-bers of St. Laurence Catholic Church and are actively in-volved in the community, with

    Lizz recently being named a Fort Bend Jewel for her work with many local charities. Lizz grew up in Fort Bend County and the Sansones have resided in Greatwood for over 10 years.

    We fully expect Team San-sone to hit the ground running here, and are very pleased to be adding veteran agents with their experience to our fam-ily, said Co-Owner Minesh Patel. Weve seen how they handle clients, and the quality of professionalism they dem-onstrate in every phase of cus-tomer service is outstanding.

    Team Sansones offi ce at RE/MAX Fine Properties, is at 4500 Hwy 6 South in Sugar Land. Call 281-753-0333, or visit www.teamsansone.com.

    Team Sansone moves business to RE/MAX Fine Properties

    Lizz & Chris Sansone

    Page 2 FORT BEND INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 9, 2009

    The Fort Bend County Ro-tary Club honored Fort Bend County resident Dee Koch as its 2009 Humanitarian of the Year at a special event on Nov. 12, at Safari Texas in Richmond. The Humanitarian of the Year award is given to honor an individual who is a citizen of Fort Bend County and has been engaged in im-proving the quality of life for the community by giving of his/her time, money, expertise and leadership on an ongoing basis and in an unselfi sh, un-conditional manner.

    Members of the club vote upon the most outstanding in-dividual, based upon Service Above Self criteria.

    Dee Koch perfectly ex-emplifi es both the letter and the spirit of the humanitarian ethic.

    From her early days of ser-vice to the community at the Fort Bend Chamber of Com-merce to her many years as Grant Offi cer of The George Foundation, Dee has made community service her way of life. A strong advocate of vol-unteerism, she has long led by example, volunteering contin-uously to work on charitable organizations fundraising efforts, to advise and/or help fi nd ways to support commu-nity organizations, and to lend her unique expertise for the development of new program initiatives.

    Besides being the great uniter of east and west Fort Bend County, Dee is a lady who passionately cares about people in all walks of life. She works hard for them, and she always does it with a smile, said Sunil Sharma, Rotary In-ternational District Governor-Elect of District 5860. She is untiring in her giving spirit, working long, long hours to serve her community.

    Dee Koch presented with Humanitarian

    award

    Koch, left, and Sharma. Photo by MARY FAVRE

    Eclipse Soccer Club is now accepting registrations for its spring 2010 recreational season. To sign up your child visit www.eclipsesoccerclub.com and click on the Register link at the top right-hand corner of the home page. Boys and girls ages 4-18 (as of July 31, 2009) are eligible to play. No prior experience is necessary and players of all skill levels are wel-come. For more information, contact Alice Javier at 281-261-5644 or by e-mail at [email protected]

    Eclipse Soccer Club opens spring registration

  • DECEMBER 9, 2009 FORT BEND INDEPENDENT Page 3

    Community news

    Houston Community Bank, N.A.Staff ord Branch

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    JEFF SMITHPresident

    18-year-Stafford Resident

    13811 Murphy Road, Staff ord, Texas 77477281-208-2111

    www.houstoncommunitybank.com

    Member

    The Bank That Listens

    TERRY CROCKETTSenior Vice President

    WINTER MINI-TERMSand SPRING SEMESTER 2010

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    Winter Mini-Term begins December 21(Register November 1 through December 17)

    Spring semester classes begin January 19, 2010(Register November 1 through January 16)

    WHARTON SUGAR LAND RICHMOND BAY CITY EL CAMPO PALACIOS

    wcjc.edu1-800-561-WCJC

    WCJC is an E.O.E. institution.

    Future educators attend-ing classes at the University of Houston System at Sugar Land (UHSSL) were given a special opportunity to speak at the re-cent Fort Bend ISD Community Connect conference at Williams Trace Baptist Church.

    As a tribute to the city of Sugar Land and surrounding Fort Bend communities, seven aspir-ing teachers from the QUEST (Quality Urban Education for Students and Teachers) program presented activities that combine child-centered themes with local community resources.

    Parents and teachers listened to student teachers explain how they infused educational goals with the local community cul-ture.

    The event marked the merg-ing of academic studies and com-munity research. QUEST is an award-winning teacher education progam now offered in Sugar Land, through the UH College of Education, Department of Cur-riculum & Instruction.

    The six student teachers mak-ing the presentation were Cydney Croney, Megan Durio, Megan Griffi n, Mollie Matak, Lindsay

    ODell, Alycia Taylor and Mari-lyn Woody.

    In partnership with the City of Sugar Land and in honor of its 50th Anniversary, we were delighted to share these parent-focused and teacher-focused standards-based lesson plans cre-ated by UHSSL student teach-ers, said Diane Jerome, QUEST (EC-6/Sugar Land) Program Manager.

    The lesson plan activities ranged from reading-readiness to fun-fi lled fi eld trips designed to highlight the citys rich histori-cal and cultural heritage. Dur-

    UHSSL future educators give special presentation

    Straight Across (left to right): Presenters Megan Durio, Lindsay ODell, Diane Jerome, Megan Griffi n, Mollie Matak, Cydney Croney, Marilyn Woody, Alycia Taylor with Dr. Melissa Pierson at the Fort Bend ISD Community Connect Conference.

    By BARBARA FULENWIDERSugar Lands fourth tax incre-

    ment reinvestment zone (TIRZ) will provide the city with its fi rst major entertainment venue as well as more retail, offi ce and residential space and not surpris-ingly got unanimous approval from council members on fi rst reading.

    The purpose of the TIRZ is to fi nance public improvements and facilities necessary to support de-velopment of commercial space, cultural arts, sports and entertain-ment districts within an urban-density mixed use center.

    The TIRZ will have 5.1 mil-lion square feet of retail, offi ce, residential, hotel-convention cen-ter, civic arts, and entertainment components.

    The preliminary public im-provements include entertain-ment venues, theaters, plazas, stadiums, parks, etc., Regina Morales, economic development

    director, told council members at their Dec. 1 meeting.

    Public improvements eligible to be fi nanced by the zone are es-timated at $56.8 million. The pri-vate development costs in TIRZ No. 4 are estimated at more than $837 million, Morales said.

    Additional money estimated at $155 million will come from the citys 4A and 4B corporations and other, and with the $56.8 mil-lion totals $211,850,000. Morales noted that the public improve-ments will be built in phases as the property develops.

    Sugar Lands participation is at 50 percent of the incremental ad valorem taxes received in the zone.

    The current total appraised value of the zone for 2009 is $22,474,421.

    Morales said projected values of development in the zone are $481 million by 2019; $935 mil-lion by 2020 and $1.3 billion by

    2030, which is also the life of the 30-year zone.

    Morales is scheduled to make the presentation to the Fort Bend ISD board at their Dec. 14 meet-ing and to the county as well. If the county participates in TIRZ No. 4, the board of governance will have four members from Sugar Land and one named rep-resenting the county.

    No one spoke at the public hearing on the TIRZ and council had no questions or comments about it prior to their unanimous vote to create it. The second and fi nal reading of the agenda item will be at councils Dec. 15 meet-ing.

    The City Council has found that the zone meets the legal cri-teria because the Zone is an area that

    (1) substantially arrests and impairs the sound growth of the City, retards the provision of housing accommodations, con-

    stitutes an economic and social liability, and is a menace to the public health, safety, morals and welfare in its present condition and use because of the presence of: (a) the predominance of de-fective or inadequate sidewalk and street layout;

    (b) faulty lot layout in relation to size, adequacy, accessibility or usefulness;

    (c) unsanitary or unsafe condi-tions;

    (d) the deterioration of site or other improvements; and

    (e) conditions that endanger life or property by fi re or other cause;

    Also, the area is predomi-nantly open and, because of ob-solete platting, deterioration of structures or site improvements, or other factors, substantially im-pairs or arrests the sound growth of the City.

    The City Council, pursuant to the requirements of the Act, fur-

    Sugar Land creates a new TIRZ for entertainment district

    tripling the S&P 500 per-formance from its inception in 2001 - despite the overall market downturn, the website says.

    Realizing the stock market is not always lucrative, Frish-berg and his team have added private equity deals to FJSKs portfolio, with its chief part-ner, Wallace Bajjali Develop-ment Partners, L.P.

    The most recent equity en-deavor, the Laffer Frishberg Wallace Economic Opportu-nity Fund, has profi tably com-mitted hundreds of millions in capital over the past two years to real estate, media, and other holdings generating consid-erable revenues at a time when money is considered tight.

    In 2002, CBS radio asked Frisherg to return to Houston for a show on Business Radio 650.

    Two years later, however, CBS brought Howard Sterns highly popular program to town, and Frishbergs show was sidelined.

    At that time, the Dallas Morning News quoted Wal-lace thus: Dismayed listen-ers approached Mr. Frishberg with an investment proposi-tion. I told him, Lets raise some capital and invest in a

    station, said David Wallace, a veteran investment banker and BizRadios largest in-vestor, with about $5 million at stake. Mr. Wallace is also mayor of the Houston suburb of Sugar Land.

    About 30 other investors joined in, bringing the total invested to about $12 million to get the network started.

    In February 2008, the three-year-old network closed a deal to purchase Houston station KTEK 1110 AM for $7.75 million.

    Houston Business Journal, in its June 13, 2008, edition reported that capital for the radio station purchases was being provided by Houston-based private equity fi rm Laf-fer Frishberg Wallace Fund, in which Frishberg is a partner.

    Dr. Arthur Laffer, noted economist, was asked by Eq-uity magazine about his asso-ciation with BizRadio.

    Laffer said, A guy named David Wallace knew [BizRa-dio founder Daniel Frishberg] very well. He thought it would be a perfect mesh. And he was right. Some of the things I do help BizRadio a little bit. And BizRadio is a perfect outlet for me. Its a marriage made in heaven.

    Wallace has not been named in the lawsuit.

    Wallace said on Monday that his investment trust is a minority partner in BizRa-

    dio and the SEC lawsuit had no impact on his investment.

    Wallace also has partner-ship with Frishberg in a pri-vate investment fund, which has invested in about 20 real estate projects, but he had no business association with Kaleta, Wallace said.

    Incidentally, Kaleta was the treasurer of the Fort Bend C Club, of which Wallace was the founder-chairman.

    Two weeks ago, Gary Gil-len, former Fort Bend GOP chair, replaced him as the treasurer.

    Wallace currently heads a task force appointed by the FBISD board to procure pri-vate funds for the proposed $20 million Global Science and Technology Center.

    BizRadio and Frishberg though listed as defendants, were not accused of any wrongdoing. However, as equitable relief defendants, they must repay the money.

    Frishberg told the Houston Chronicle that he and Kaleta are no longer partners and his fi rm and BizRadio would re-pay the debt under the terms of the promissory notes.

    Frishberg was quoted as saying that investors knew the money was being pumped into the radio network and that Kaleta simply didnt have the proper paperwork.

    ther found that development or redevelopment within the bound-aries of the Zone will not occur solely through private investment in the reasonably foreseeable fu-ture.

    ing community-based activities, children explore local trees and parks, regional foods and events, area amenities and much more. Designed for sharing with chil-dren from kindergarten through 4th grade, these lessons provide

    ways to have fun, while learning about our citys rich history and remarkable diversity.

    What a unique experience [for our students] to be able to participate in such a collabora-tion, and what a great opportu-

    nity [for the students] to grow as community-minded educators, said Melissa Pierson, associate professor and director of Teach-er Education, Associate Chair of Curriculum & Instruction.

    FraudFrom Page 1

    SUGAR LAND REDUCED

    SUGAR CREEK Great 1 story on huge corner lot. 3 bed-rooms & study. Seller has updated carpet, tile paint in and out and roof replaced. Shows great and price already reduced to go fast in the low $200s.

    SUGAR LAND/COMMON-WEALTH. Over 4000sqft! 5 bedrooms 3.5 baths, game room, study/formal and extra room. Seller has updated carpet, tile granite counters, & more in 2009. Roof replaced too. Big yard. Price reduced to go $300s.

    Suzette Peoples ABR, GRI , E-Pro, 21 years Professional

    Realtor; Owner of Peoples Properties, a

    Real Estate & Property Management Co.;American Business

    Womens Association.

    FIRST COLONY

    Mortgage Banker can do loans in less than 30 days! Call Suzette or email: [email protected]

    SUGAR LAND

    CITY OF SUGAR LAND ETJ! PERRY 2 story with master down and gameroom up. Huge cul de sac lot! Built in 2003. Tile and wood laminate fl oors thru out. 3 car dettached garage! Priced to go at $190,000.

    FIRST COLONY

    First Colony/Sugar Land! Over 3100 sqft 4 bedrooms 3 full baths. Bedroom/bath down. Game room up. All new interior/exterior paint 2009! New carpet and tile 2009! Reduced to go in the $200s and $5,000 in closing costs. Seller spent over $32K getting house ready to sell.

    REDUCE

    D

    REDU

    CED

    Suzette Peoples Broker /Owner

    21 years of experience!

    Direct: 281-980-3322 www.peoplesproperties.com

    Popular David Weekly home! 2 story with master down. 3 bedrooms, study, gam-eroom, both formals and computer area. updated kitchen with granite. Wood and tile fl oors thru-out. New roof 2009 and new exterior paint and fencing. Priced to go fast at $200,000! Hurry dont miss this one!

    SOLD IN

    10 DAYS

    SOLD

  • By JANICE SCANLANI worked in a bowling alley

    snack bar when I was 13. With my new wealth of spend-ing money I had all kinds of ideas of what I was going to buy . . . and bowling gear was part of it. I wanted a custom ball, bag and shoes. But the shirts . . . no one could con-vince a 13 year old those were attractive.

    As always, reality bites . . . and my new wealth didnt go as far as my dreams. I quick-ly decided Id rather have a pair of cool shoes rather than bowling shoes. But then, why would I buy a ball and bag when I couldnt afford more than a few games a week? Those few games quickly be-came boring so all I did was earn money at the bowling al-ley to spend elsewhere.

    Now the bowling leagues kept things going great guns for about three years. Af-ter one or two years, a local bought the bowling alley, which at the time looked like a real cash cow. But the reality of a sustainable market hit af-ter three years so the leagues dwindled to a sustainable level as did individual games. There just werent enough committed bowlers to support the bowling alley which after a few more years the building was sold at a fi re sale price to become a light assembly

    plant. That bowling alley was my

    fi rst real marketing lesson. Its demise also explained why the owner/developer never stayed anyplace longer than a couple of years nor did they keep up with the locals after they left. They had theirs.

    We have one weekend of good play on El Dorado only to read in the Chronicle that Mayor Owen not only wants to develop more golf, but he also wants to do that on the proposed park land on the old Executive 9 Missouri City dragged citizens out to plan in September.

    However, it doesnt matter even if it is a typo that should be the old Par 3. What does matter is how many viable businesses not burning tax

    dollars, spend more money to get the same number of play-ers?

    Surely with 36 holes of golf, a First Tee program can be managed on 4 to 9 of those holes when it meets!

    How many millions do we have to pore down this specu-lative dream hole? Where is the money for the park, rec-reation and civic centers go-ing to come? What about the lawyers fees, engineering and consulting studies?

    Makes you start to question our city spending.

    Will we have more studies only to announce, we cant actually build those projects because its too expensive? Couldnt someone pencil that out before we hired consul-tants? And shame on us for not knowing the Federal matching fee guidelines before we hired the trail consultants.

    While the credenza full of studies may look pretty im-pressive, Id rather see con-sulting fees be part of projects where the political will to do them exists.

    A cynical person might call many of our recent studies election year pandering. Or is that another lesson?

    Write to [email protected]

    Fort Bend Independent distribution = 40,000 households in Sugar Land, Missouri City, and Stafford. View the news online at www.fbindependent.com

    OpinionPage 4 FORT BEND INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 9, 2009

    Seshadri KumarPublisher & Editor

    10701 Corporate Drive, #282, Staff ord, TX 77477Mailing Address: P.O. Box 623, Sugar Land, TX 77487

    281-980-6745

    Email: [email protected]

    www.fbindependent.com

    David HamnerSales Associate

    Diane ParksGraphic Artist

    By RON PAULIf anyone still doubted that

    this administrations foreign policy would bring any kind of change, this weeks debate on Afghanistan should re-move all doubt.

    The Presidents stated jus-tifi cations for sending more troops to Afghanistan and es-calating war amount to little more than recycling all the false reasons we began the confl ict.

    It is so discouraging to see this coming from our new leadership, when the people were hoping for peace.

    New polls show that 49 percent of the people favor minding our own business on the world stage, up from 30 in 2002.

    Perpetual war is not solv-ing anything. Indeed con-tinually seeking out monsters to destroy abroad only threat-ens our security here at home as international resentment against us builds.

    The people understand this and are becoming increasing-ly frustrated at not being heard by the decision-makers.

    The leaders say some things the people want to hear, but change never comes.

    One has to ask, if the people who elected these leaders so obviously do not want these wars, who does?

    Eisenhower warned of the increasing power and infl u-ence of the military indus-trial complex and it seems his worst fears have come true.

    He believed in a strong national defense, as do I, but warned that the building up of permanent military and weap-ons industries could prove dangerous if their infl uence got out of hand.

    After all, if you make your money on war, peace does you no good.

    With trillions of dollars at stake, there is tremendous incentive to keep the deci-sion makers fearful of every threat in the world, real or imagined, present or future, no matter how ridiculous and far-fetched.

    The Bush Doctrine demon-strates how very successful the war lobby was philosophi-cally with the last administra-tion.

    And they are succeeding just as well with this one, in spite of having the so-called peace candidate in offi ce.

    We now fi nd ourselves in another foreign policy quag-mire with little hope of vic-tory, and not even a defi nition of victory.

    Eisenhower said that only an alert and informed elector-ate could keep these war rack-eteering pressures at bay.

    He was right, and the key is for the people to ensure that their elected leaders follow the Constitution.

    The Constitution requires a declaration of war by Con-

    gress in order to legitimately go to war.

    Bypassing this critical step makes it far too easy to waste resources on nebulous and never-ending confl icts.

    Without clear goals, the confl icts last forever and drain the country of blood and treasure.

    The drafters of the Con-stitution gave Congress the power to declare war precise-ly because they feared allow-ing the executive unfettered discretion in military affairs.

    They understood that mak-ing it easy for leaders to wage foreign wars would threaten domestic liberties.

    Responses to attacks on our soil should be swift and brief. Wars we fi ght should always be defensive, clearly defi ned and Constitutional.

    The Bush Doctrine of tar-geting potential enemies be-fore they do anything to us is dangerously vague and easily abused.

    There is nothing left to win in Afghanistan and everything to lose.

    Todays military actions are yet another futile exercise in nation building and have nothing to do with our na-tions security, or with 9/11.

    Most experts agree that Bin Laden and anyone remotely connected to 9/11 left Af-ghanistan long ago, but our troops remain.

    The pressures of the war racketeers need to be put in check before we are brought to our knees by them. Un-fortunately, it will require a mighty effort by the people to get the leadership to fi nally listen.

    (Ron Paul represents the 14th Congressional District

    U.S. Rep. Ron Paul

    Texas Straight Talk

    Musings: First lessons

    Scanlan

    By RUSSELL C. JONESSometimes being a member

    of the Sugar Land City Coun-cil is just plain fun. I love be-ing a part of this city.

    The Houston Museum of Natural Science recently opened its fi rst suburban branch.

    A new dog park just opened with the largest turn-out ever for a city sponsored grand opening.

    Last week the 7th annual Christmas tree lighting in Town Square thrilled and daz-zled thousands of residents and provided a fantastic fam-ily friendly event, with free-bies for all and Santa for the kids.

    Holiday performances and entertainers made it a special evening.

    The citys planned capital projects excite the imagina-tion for what is yet to come. Whether it will be a festival site, a professional baseball park, an indoor concert venue, or all of those, great things are surely on their way for Sugar Lands residents.

    Taxpayers enjoy the second lowest property tax rate of any comparable city in the State.

    While the annual cost of providing city services, in-cluding fi re and police, is about $2,500 per household, the average city tax bill is only about $767, refl ecting the citys diversifi ed revenue base.

    About 40% of the citys tax base is nonresidential, includ-ing 6.4 million square feet of offi ce space, 6.1 million square feet of retail space, and 7.8 million square feet of in-

    dustrial space.The city lies on two major

    transportation arteries leading to one of the most dynamic ur-ban economies in the country. Sugar Land is able to combine the best of suburban life with the many advantages of prox-imity to Houstons economic powerhouse.

    Sugar Lands government is fi nancially sound. Standard and Poors recently upgraded the citys bond rating to AA+; not bad in a time of a national economic slump when local governments nationwide are struggling to pay their bills.

    Despite the national econ-omy, Sugar Land is relatively unaffected. Sugar Lands economy today exceeds the expectations of everyone who was looking forward 20 years ago.

    It is one of only two cities among the top 20 in Texas whose sales tax revenues are up for the fi scal year, a sure sign of bustling retail sales and relative prosperity.

    New businesses have con-

    tinued to move into the city over the past year, and the rate of offi ce building occupancy is among the highest in the Houston area.

    Others recognize that Sugar Land is doing some-thing right. Forbes Maga-zine named Sugar Land as one of the Top 25 American Towns to Live Well, noting that the city boasts cultural amenities, a probusiness en-vironment, a highly educated workforce and enviable sala-ries. Business Week called the city one of the best for startup businesses.

    Last week CQ Press named Sugar Land the 11th safest city in America and the safest in Texas based upon an analy-sis of FBI crime statistics.

    Coming up soon will be Sugar Lands 50th anniversa-ry celebration. Timed to co-incide with New Years Eve, the event will take over Town Square with fun for everyone, adults and children. The new year will be welcomed with the fall of a giant sugar cube in honor of the citys history. A commemorative sculpture destined for permanent dis-play in City Hall will be un-veiled.

    A friend likes to say that life is grand in Sugar Land. He may just be right about that.

    Jones is the Mayor Pro Tem of the City of Sugar Land and serves as Councilman for Dis-trict 3. He was fi rst elected to the City Council in 2003. He owns a law fi rm and a title insurance company in Sugar Land.

    The View From Sugar Land

    Jones

    Who wanst war? Living the dream in Sugar Land

    By PETE OLSONThe White House held a Fo-

    rum on Jobs and Economic Growth last week to yet again try to revive our nations economy. Talk on Capitol Hill surrounds the possibility of a second (and costly) so-called stimulus bill to revive our slumping economy. This would be a crushing mis-take.

    When the fi rst $787 billion stimulus bill was passed, unem-ployment stood at roughly 8%. Ten months into this stimulus bill and unemployment is now at 10.2%, the highest rate in 26 years. 190,000 jobs were lost in October and more than 2.8 mil-lion overall jobs have been lost since the bill passed. Last month, the national debt surpassed $12 trillion and has increased by 39% since Democrats took control of Congress less than three years ago.

    Here is a sampling of some of the catastrophic attempts to re-vive our economy this year:

    *Higher tax rates on small businesses and capital income.

    *Crippling new regulations and higher taxes as part of risky cap and trade energy scheme.

    *Massive new taxes to pay for a government takeover of our health care system.

    *Increasing and ongoing defi -cit spending, building a bridge of unsustainable near-term defi cit

    spending to our unsustainable long-term entitlements spending.

    The state of our economy demonstrates that this approach has failed miserably.

    Our nation needs policies that focus on strengthening the busi-ness sector through low tax rates and restrained spending to allow the economy to create jobs and grow. An across the board tem-porary payroll tax cut would al-low small businesses struggling to stay afl oat to keep the employ-ees they have and even hire new ones. This would also put more money directly into the pockets of working families empowering real economic growth.

    Stimulus spending supporters claim that government spending

    injects new dollars into the econ-omy, thereby increasing demand and spurring economic growth. The only problem is that no one asks where the government got the money. The money is com-ing from the mortgaging of our childrens future and is crushing the strength of our nation.

    The Presidents proposed bud-get would increase spending to a cost of $37,000 per household by 2019. This proposal would more than double the national debt, as well as raise interest rates, cost taxpayers trillions in net interest spending, and eventually lead to painful tax hikes.

    These policies are not the poli-cies that guide a nation through an economic crisis. The policies of fi scal discipline and respon-sible spending are a better path to a strong, robust economy.

    Washington has sadly become a partisan and poisonous envi-ronment. But there are many opportunities for both parties to work together to fi nd common sense solutions to the problems our nation faces. Fiscal responsi-bility tops that list and the eco-nomic realities will come crash-ing down on us and our children if we do not work together to fi nd solutions to these problems soon.

    (Pete Olson represents the 22nd Congressional District in Texas.)

    Solutions for an economic recovery

    Olson

    Sugar Land has created a community bulletin board on SLtv 16 for meeting and event notices from governmental agencies, homeowners asso-ciations and property associa-tions in Sugar Land.

    The community bulletin board will be limited to text slides and will air on SLtv 16 from 7 to 8 a.m. and 5 to 6 p.m. SLtv 16 is Sugar Lands governmental access channel,

    which is available on channel 16 to Comcast subscribers in the Citys corporate limits.

    The new community bulle-tin board is intended to address a community need to publicize meetings and events.

    To allow for proper produc-tion, scheduling and public-ity, community bulletin board requests must be received 15 business days in advance of the scheduled event.

    Meeting and event notices for the community bulletin board will be limited to no more than one notice/event announcement per organiza-tion per week.

    Items are eligible to begin airing 30 days before event.

    Requests for meeting and event notices on the com-munity bulletin board should be submitted to [email protected] or they may

    be delivered in person to the Sugar Land Communications Department at City Hall, 2700 Town Center Blvd. North.

    Upon approval and pay-ment of a $25 administrative fee, updates will be posted each Friday.

    For more information, call 281- 275-2328 or e-mail [email protected]

    Sugar Land launches Community Bulletin Board on SLtv 16

  • FORT BEND INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 9, 2009 Page 5

    Community news

    As a mutual life insurer, the nations largest, we have only one purpose: to serve the needs of the families who put their trust in us. For the past 163 years, weve had a history of solid financial strength.* We protected families and met all of ourobligations during the panic of 1857, the crash of 1929 and throughout the Great Depression.If you are looking for a career opportunity in a Fortune 100 company, want the potentialof an unlimited income stream and excellent benefit package: Join my team tomake a difference in peoples lives by helping with their personal insurance and financial goals for their retirement, education, long term care and estateconservation needs.I am currently looking for Financial Services/Sales Professionals & Managementcandidates, for the Houston Office with offices in Galleria and Sugar Land, to join my team of financial professionals.

    *Standard & Poors (AAA), A. M. Best (A++), Moodys (Aaa) and Fitch (AAA) for financial strength. Source: Individual Third Party Ratings Reports (as of 9/4/08).

    Call or Send your resume to:

    Ramesh Cherivirala, Ph.D., LUTCF, CLTCPartner, Houston General Office New York Life Insurance Company13135 Dairy Ashford # 550, Sugar Land, TX 77478Bus: 281-295-2726 Cell: [email protected]

    EOE/M/F/V/D

    Join my Team!Were Still Hiring!

    00386972 WC, 02/03/11

    Richard Raymond, attor-ney and business owner, is running for Fort Bend Coun-ty District Attorney in the Republican Party primary on March 2, 2010.

    A lifelong Republican, Raymond has been proud to call Fort Bend County his home for over 23 years.

    Raymond intends to bring accountability and distinction back to the Fort Bend County DAs offi ce.

    Raymond, a loving father of three daughters and a dedi-cated husband, is active in his church and several clubs and civic groups across the county.

    His legal, business and ac-counting experience will allow him to marshal the manpower of the DAs offi ce in the most effective manner possible on behalf of Fort Bend County taxpayers, Raymond said in a statement.

    Raymond, age 51, gradu-ated from Baylor University in Waco, Texas in 1985 with a BBA in Accounting and Man-agement, and received a Jurist Doctorate degree from the University of Houston Law Center in 1989. Raymond is both a highly trained attorney and a Certifi ed Public Ac-countant.

    Raymond married his high school sweetheart, Melissa, 28 years ago. They have lived in Fort Bend County since

    1986 and have raised three daughters here; Brandyn, 25, Lauryn, 20, and Lexi, 12.

    Melissa is a Fort Bend ISD special education teacher at Holly Elementary School.

    Raymond and family wor-ship at Holy Cross Church and are long-time supporters of the Christian Childrens Fund.

    Raymond is a member of the Texas State Bar Associa-tion, and licensed by all Texas State Courts as well as the United States District Court, Southern District of Texas; the United States Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit; and the United States Tax Courts. Raymond currently practices both civil and criminal law.

    Raymond is a member of the Exchange Club of Sugar Land, and the Holy Cross Mens Bible Study Group and is active in the Fort Bend

    County Republican Party. Raymond is a practicing at-

    torney and partner at Cohen & Raymond, Attorneys at Law, L.C., as well as the president of Gulf Scientifi c, Inc. Ray-mond also serves as an offi cer for Access Chemicals & Ser-vices, LLC.

    Raymond says he will serve as a dedicated and conserva-tive District Attorney, ensur-ing justice and accountability for all Fort Bend County resi-dents.

    Raymond is committed to saving the taxpayers money and achieving tough punish-ments for criminals.

    Raymond said: If elected, as your next District Attorney, I pledge to make Fort Bend County a better place for fam-ilies to live, work and raise children. As District Attorney, you can be assured that Fort Bend County will not tolerate drug dealers and criminals. I believe in seeking long pris-on sentences and punishing criminals to the fullest extent of the law.

    Additionally, as an attor-ney, CPA and business man, Raymond seeks to restore fi s-cal conservatism and account-ability to the District Attor-neys offi ce.

    I will, within the budget, stop the waste of tax dollars, eliminate questionable pros-ecutions, frivolous investiga-tions, and mismanagement. I

    Attorney Richard Raymond joins the DA race

    Raymond

    Celebrate the Reason for the Season! You are invited to a Live Na-tivity, presented by the PALS Youth Group of First Presbyterian Church Sugar Land, 502 Eldridge Rd., on Saturday, Dec. 12. Per-formances are at 5:30 and 6:30 and cookies and hot chocolate will be served after each presentation. For further information contact the church offi ce at 281-240-3195.

    Live Nativity Scene

    Frederick P. Rick Forlano has announced his candidacy to replace the retiring judge of County Court-at-Law No. 2.

    Forlano is a long time Fort Bend attorney and resident, who has been actively in-volved in both the legal com-munity and the Republican Party for more than 30 years.

    I believe that with my ex-perience, competence, energy and high level of productivity, that I am the best candidate for the job, Forlano stated. He currently holds the high-est rating for a lawyer, AV, from the legal rating service of Martindale-Hubbel.

    Working with the Law Practice Management Com-mittee, I travel across the state lecturing to attorneys and law students about the basics of establishing and maintaining an effi cient and productive law practice, said Forlano.

    My expertise in this area will be advantageous in al-lowing me to evaluate and make changes to the present functioning of this court so that it can be run in the most effi cient and expeditious man-ner possible.

    Forlano cited several exam-ples of how he would improve upon the present administra-tive system.

    This court needs to up-grade and enhance its tech-nology capabilities, and to properly integrate the use of technology in its everyday functioning. Individuals com-ing before the court need judi-cial determinations in a timely manner. We can no longer afford to have probate cases lost in legal limbo waiting to be heard and fi nalized, nor can we continue to see persons in-appropriately arrested because the computer did not know a case had been reset.

    It can be extremely em-barrassing for someone who showed up in court with their attorney, had their case reset, but still got arrested at work in front of their boss, or at home in front of their family, because the computer system did not acknowledge the re-set, Forlano continued.

    I have a background in computer technology and I will work to make certain that technology helps those who have contact with the judicial system as opposed to hurting them.

    Before becoming a lawyer, Forlano worked as a computer consultant in the oil industry where he designed and inte-grated computer systems for the corporate offi ces of Shell Oil.

    As a court of general juris-diction, Forlano understands that the judge of this court must have a background in civil, criminal, juvenile and probate law.

    During his thirty-plus years as a highly respected attorney he has represented hundreds of clients in all of these very different areas of the law. He enjoys sharing his valu-

    able knowledge and expertise with attorneys throughout the state as a lecturer at Texas and County Bar seminars and pro-grams.

    Forlano advocates being tough on crime, but explains that we must also be smart on crime.

    To this end, he would like to introduce innovative judi-cial programs into the justice process.

    He points out that the veter-ans in the county should have a specialized court program. This past session of the Texas Legislature provided for a veterans court program regarding certain criminal of-fenses and I would like to see this program instituted in the county court-at-law, he said.

    Forlano is well suited to work with veterans issues since he served in the United States Air Force. He com-manded a Mobile Port Aerial Squadron and served on the staff of the 10th Air Force, re-tiring as a major.

    Veterans returning home with post traumatic stress dis-order and brain injuries who commit non-violent misde-meanor crimes need our help, instead of just being locked away in jail, said Forlano.

    Fort Bend County already has a special drug court, men-tal health court and DWI court. Now we need a veter-ans court to rehabilitate those who put their lives on the line for us, and who deserve a sec-ond chance when they return home and experience prob-lems readjusting to civilian life.

    Juvenile delinquency is an-other area of our justice sys-tem where Forlano believes that the system should work smarter.

    If we simply lock up our

    young people, then many times we only teach them to be worse criminals, Forlano observed.

    He warns that if we do not work to rehabilitate juvenile delinquents, then Fort Bend County will have no alterna-tive but to keep building more and more jails.

    Rather than invest in jails, we need to invest in people. He also proudly talks about the kids who he has helped to go on to lead productive lives. One child in particular that he helped get into a residential facility was so successful in their program, that he became their shining star student, rep-resenting the facility around the state.

    In addition to an extremely active legal practice, Forlano is committed to helping Fort Bend County be the best com-munity possible. He partici-pates in numerous civic and community organizations and projects.

    Forlano and his wife, Sha-ron, are also members of Saint Theresa Catholic Church in Sugar Land.

    Forlano has been active in the Republican party since before he was old enough to vote, starting off as the pub-licity chairman of his col-lege young Republican Club, working as a county campaign manager for Senator John Tower, working for many other Republican candidates including many of our current elected offi cials and presently serving as General Counsel to the Republican Party of Fort Bend County.

    He is very concerned about the victims of crime and will work to protect the public and never take a chance with their safety.

    Forlano announces bid to become judge of County Court-at-Law No. 2

    Forlano

    will ensure the efforts and re-sources of the District Attor-neys offi ce are re-dedicated to the business of convicting criminals.

    Raymonds campaign is endorsed by Sheriff Milton Wright. Wrights wife, Mar-ian Wright, is serving as Ray-monds campaign treasurer.

    Incumbent DA John Healey and Attorney Nina Schaffer have already announced their candidacy for the offi ce of Fort Bend County DA.

    The Fort Bend Chamber of Commerces Governmental Relations Division presents, The future of Rosenberg, This luncheon will be held Monday, Dec. 14 at 11:30 a.m. at the Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce, 445 Commerce

    Green Blvd. in Sugar Land. Individual Member- $10 and Individual Non-Member- $20.

    The Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce has invited Rosen-bergs Mayor Joe Gurecky and City Manager Jack Hamlett to

    discuss the future of their city. Do not miss this informa-

    tive event. You may register online at

    www.fortbendchamber.com or contact Ellen Bush at 281-491-0277 or [email protected]

    Chamber meeting on The future of Rosenberg

    The night dazzled on a cool evening as hundreds of fashionable attendees were wowed with the James Bond, For Your Eyes Only, themed style show from fashion show expert Lenny Matuszewski. Models fl anked the party off the runway and on at Drs. Shelena and Ayeez Laljis home, where the models showed panache in fashions from acclaimed specialty re-tailer TOOTSIES.

    The real highlight of the evening was the generous support of the attendees who raised over $94,000 for inau-gural American Cancer Soci-ety Couture for the Cure.

    This event was a success because of the overwhelm-ing support we received from our sponsors, donors and volunteers, said KK West who chaired the event with husband Scott West. Too many people have been af-fl icted with cancer and it was heart-warming to see so many come together in support of the American Cancer Society. The money we raised will go a long way in continuing the fi ght against cancer.

    The American Cancer So-ciety is the largest source of private, non-profi t cancer re-search funding in the nation.

    Research funded through The Society has reached a mul-titude of milestones, includ-ing therapies to inhibit tumor growth, factors contributing to an increased chance for cancer and effective drug treatments for specifi c cancers. The Soci-ety also provides free educa-tional programs and various support services for cancer patients and survivors.

    Presenting sponsor for Couture for the Cure was Sterling McCall Lexus and VIP Reception Sponsors were Tonja and Alex Oria with Unisource Home Health Care.

    Other sponsors were KK and Sean Tracey, Kim and Woody Williams, Methodist Sugar Land Cancer Center, Toni and Mark Burns, Fluor Corporation, The West Law Firm, St. Michaels Emergen-cy Center, NewFirst Bank, Raj and Keith Patel, Black-hawk Specialty Tools, Sullins, Johnston, Rohrbach & Mag-ers, Campbells Compound-ing Pharmacy, A&A Ambu-lance Services, Inc., Certifi ed Moving Systems, Inc., The Phoenix Design Group, Cor-porate Settings, PB&J Pave-ment Marking, Inc., Yolanda and Von Celestine, and The Legal Wizards.

    American Cancer Society Fashion Show Raises $94,000

    Sheree Moore, left, Community Manager of Distinguished Events, Kelley Stephenson - Sponsorship Chair, Rick Coleman - Director with Sterling McCall Lexus and Lorrie Hayes Director of Distinguished Events.

  • Page 6 FORT BEND INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 9, 2009

    Legal Notices

    Become a Dental Assistant!10 Week CourseStarting Soon

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    of Dental Assisting CareerCertifi ed by: The Texas

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    Community Calendar

    To list community events, email

    [email protected]

    LEGAL NOTICEINVITATION TO BIDDERS

    Sealed Bids will be received in the Offi ce of Gilbert D. Jalomo, Jr., County Purchasing Agent, Fort Bend County, Rosenberg Annex, 4520 Reading Road, Suite A, Rosenberg, TX 77471 for the following until THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009 at 1:30 P.M. (CST). All bids will then be publicly opened and read in the Offi ce of the Purchasing Agent, Rosenberg Annex, 4520 Reading Road, Rosenberg, TX 77471. Bids received after the specifi ed time will be returned unopened.BID 10-040 CONSTRUCTION OF HIKE AND BIKE TRAILS IN BUFFALO BAYOU PARK AND TRAIL SYSTEMVendors are required to perform a site visit of the location. Site visits are to be scheduled with Mike Davis, Parks Department, at 281-642-3716.Unit pricing is required; payment will be by check after products/services are rendered. Bid, payment and performance bonds are not required.Fort Bend County reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Signed: Gilbert D. Jalomo, Jr., Purchasing AgentFort Bend County, Richmond, Texas

    LEGAL NOTICEINVITATION TO BIDDERS

    Sealed Bids will be received in the Offi ce of Gilbert D. Jalomo, Jr., County Purchasing Agent, Fort Bend County, Rosenberg Annex, 4520 Reading Road, Suite A, Rosenberg, TX 77471 for the following until THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009 at 1:30 P.M. (CST). All bids will then be publicly opened and read in the Offi ce of the Purchasing Agent, Rosenberg Annex, 4520 Reading Road, Rosenberg, TX 77471. Bids received after the specifi ed time will be returned unopened.BID 10-041 IMPROVEMENTS TO KATY GASTON ROAD FROM F.M. 1093 TO CINCO RANCH BOULEVARDA pre-bid conference will be held on Thursday, December 3, 2009 at 9:00 AM in the Purchasing Department located at 4520 Reading Road, Rosenberg, Texas. Attendance is not mandatory, but all vendors are encouraged to attend.Unit pricing is required; payment will be by check after products/services are rendered. Bid, payment and performance bonds are not required.Fort Bend County reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Signed: Gilbert D. Jalomo, Jr., Purchasing Agent Fort Bend County, Richmond, Texas

    LEGAL NOTICEINVITATION TO BIDDERS

    Sealed Bids will be received in the Offi ce of Gilbert D. Jalomo, Jr., County Purchasing Agent, Fort Bend County, Rosenberg Annex, 4520 Reading Road, Suite A, Rosenberg, TX 77471 for the following until THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009 at 1:30 P.M. (CST). All bids will then be publicly opened and read in the Offi ce of the Purchasing Agent, Rosenberg Annex, 4520 Reading Road, Rosenberg, TX 77471. Bids received after the specifi ed time will be returned unopened.BID 10-042 TRAFFIC SIGNALIZATION PROJECTS: TRAMMEL-FRESNO AT TEAL BEND BLVD/CHIMNEY ROCK ROAD AND TRAMMEL-FRESNO AT WINFIELD LAKES TRAIL/LIBERTY SQUAREA pre-bid conference will be held on Thursday, December 3, 2009 at 11:00 AM in the Purchasing Department located at 4520 Reading Road, Rosenberg, Texas. Attendance is not mandatory, but all vendors are encouraged to attend.Unit pricing is required; payment will be by check after products/services are rendered. Bid, payment and performance bonds are not required.Fort Bend County reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Signed: Gilbert D. Jalomo, Jr., Purchasing Agent Fort Bend County, Richmond, Texas

    The Fort Bend Boys Choir invites boys ages 8 - 13 with unchanged voices to audition to be a part of one of Americas largest and most prestigious choirs. Eligible boys will join 28 years of music excellence, travel locally, nationally and internationally on tour, learn multi-cultural music and es-tablish lifetime friendships.

    The only requirement to au-dition for placement into the Fort Bend Boys Choir is that boys must be 8 years old or in 3rd grade with an unchanged voice. Open auditions will be held Saturday, Dec. 12, from 9 a.m. 12 Noon at the First United Methodist Church Missouri City, 3900 Lexington Blvd., Missouri City, just off Murphy Road. Thanks to a grant from The George Foun-dation, free tuition is available for new choirboys their fi rst semester! For more informa-tion, call 281-240-3800.

    Fort Bend Chamber Infra-structure Planning Division meets on Thursday, Dec. 10, at the chamber premises at 7:30 a.m. Commissioner Andy Meyers will give an update on Precinct 3. Break-fast will be provided. Res-ervations are required. For more information, contact Ellen Bush at 281-491-0277 or at [email protected]

    Remember far, far away and once upon a time, when Cinder-ella, Belle, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, Prince Charming and Robin Hood enchanted us and brought such joy into our young lives?

    Come relive those endearing moments with your youngsters as Fort Bend Theater hosts Breakfast with Santa in Once Upon a Time with your favorite storybook characters on Dec. 12 from 8 a.m. 10 a.m, at Kona Grill, 16535 SW Fwy Sugar Land.

    For Breakfast Kona Grill will be featuring Kids Breakfast Tacos and Pancakes from their Sunday Brunch which just won Best Place for Brunch in Fort Bend Lifestyles & Homes maga-zine. Sing Christmas carols, enjoy a delicious breakfast and receive a keepsake photo made with Santa or your favorite char-acter from once upon a time. This fundraising event for FBT is sure to provide a wonderful holiday experience. Tickets for adults are $25 and children 11 and under are only $15 and are available online at our website www.fortbendtheatre.com.

    Christmas MusicaleThe Fort Bend Boys Choirs

    annual Christmas Musicale will be performed at Wil-liams Trace Baptist Church in Sugar Land on Sat., Dec. 12, at 7 p.m. All four performing choirs Training, Town, Tour and Alumni will be show-cased. Tickets are available at the choir offi ce, from any choir member or at the door. All proceeds from the Mu-sicale are used for program support, operational expenses and scholarships. For more information, call 281-240-3800 visit www.fbbctx.org.

    Commissioner Andy Meyers

    Breakfast with Santa

    Clements High School Choir will have their annual Winter Wonderland on Dec. 11 at 7 p.m. in the Clements High School Commons. This is a wonderful event that showcases the sounds of the season. Individual solos, small groups and large choral selections will be performed. Tickets may be purchased at the door. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for students.

    The First United Methodist Church Missouri City, Mu-sic Department & Friends, will present the classic one-act Christmas opera by Gian Carlo Menotti, Amahl and the Night Visitors. Performances are scheduled on Friday, Dec. 18 at 7:30 p.m. and Satur-day, Dec. 19 at 4 p.m. Per-formances will take place in the sanctuary located at 3900 Lexington Boulevard in Mis-souri City.

    Set at the time of the fi rst Christmas, Amahl and the Night Visitors is an inspir-ing tale about a crippled boy and his mother. Together they experience a miracle brought about by faith, generosity and forgiveness. The story was set to music by Gian Carlo Menotti, one of Americas most prolifi c composers. The cast includes Tommy Settle-myre as Amahl and Joan Mc-Clure in the role of the Moth-er. Admission is free, but love donations will be accepted.

    Amahl and the night visitors

    LEGAL NOTICEINVITATION TO BIDDERS

    Sealed Bids will be received in the Offi ce of Gilbert D. Jalomo, Jr., County Purchasing Agent, Fort Bend County, Rosenberg Annex, 4520 Reading Road, Suite A, Rosenberg, TX 77471 for the following until THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 2010 at 1:30 P.M. (CST). All bids will then be publicly opened and read in the Offi ce of the Purchasing Agent, Rosenberg Annex, 4520 Reading Road, Rosenberg, TX 77471. Bids received after the specifi ed time will be returned unopened.BID 10-032 PURCHASE OF 13 69 TRANSIT BUSES FOR TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENTA pre-bid conference will be held on Thursday, December 3, 2009 at 10:00 AM in the Purchasing Department located at 4520 Reading Road, Rosenberg, Texas. Attendance is not mandatory, but all vendors are encouraged to attend.Unit pricing is required, payment will be by check after products/services are rendered. Bid, payment and performance bonds are not required.Fort Bend County reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Signed:Gilbert D. Jalomo, Jr., Purchasing Agent Fort Bend County, Richmond, Texas

    Clements Choir

    Loving Friends is a wid-ow and widowers group that meets the third Tuesday eve-ning of the month at the Ter-race in Sugar Land. Loving Friends is open to all widows and widowers in the area for a meal and entertainment. The next meeting will be on Dec. 15 at the Terrace. The enter-tainment will be singer Ju-lio Arriola, the winner of the 2007 Sugar Land Superstar competition. Members are asked to bring an unwrapped toy for Toys for Tots. For reservation, call Rena at 281-499-9289 by Dec. 10.

    Loving Friends

    Sugar Land Town Square is offering free photos with Santa Claus on Sunday, Dec. 13 and 20 from 1 5 p.m. Guests will have access to a free electronic copy that can be sent to Grand-parents, uploaded to Facebook or saved to a computer, all cour-tesy of the University of Phoenix.

    Santa photos will be located at 16190 City Walk between Fleet Feet and Eye Trends. For more information on all Town Square events visit SugarLandTownSquare.com.

    Free photos with Santa in Sugar Land Town Square

    Fort Bend Boys Choir auditions

    The Womens Association of Sugar Creek Country Club com-bined with the Sugar Creek Garden Club will hold its holiday luncheon on Thursday, Dec.10.

    The event begins at 11 a.m. in the main ballroom of Sugar Creek Country Club,420 Sugar Creek Blvd. Members and guests will be entertained by the Houston Choral Showcase, Houstons only pop/variety show choir. Their performance will include pop, jazz, swing, show tunes, movie songs, patriotic pieces and holiday tunes.

    Houston Choral Showcase has been entertaining audiences for over 76 years which makes them the oldest mixed commu-nity choral group in Houston.

    Reservations are necessary for members and guests. Call 281-494-5065 or email [email protected]

    Houston Choral Showcase

    CITATION BY PUBLICATIONSTATE OF TEXAS

    TO: LAURA SAENZ and to all whom it may concern, Respondent(s),You have been sued. You may employ an attorney. If you or your attorney do (does) not fi le a written answer with the clerk who issued this citation by 10:00 a.m. on the Monday next following the expiration of 20 days after you were served this citation and petition, a default judgment may be taken against you. The petition of LOPEZ, SANDRA, Petitioner, was fi led in the 328TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT of Fort Bend County, Texas on the April 16, 2007 against LAURA SAENZ,Respondent(s), numbered 07-DCV-156085, and entitled In the Interest of Angelo James Saenz A Child.The suit request to TERMINATE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP as is more fully shown by Petition on fi le in this suit.The date and place of birth of the child(ren) who is/are the subject of the suit:DATE OF BIRTH: April 02, 2003The Court has authority in this suit to render an order in the child(ren)s interest which will be binding on you, including the termination of the parent-child relationship, the determination of paternity and the appointment of a conservator with authority to consent to the child(ren)s adoption.Issued and given under my hand and seal of said Court at Richmond, Texas, on this the 1st day of December, 2009.ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER OR RESPONDENT:MEGAN A MC LELLANBENEVIDES & KELLY1314 TEXAS AVENUE SUITE 808HOUSTON TX 77002713-226-7889DISTRICT CLERK ANNIE REBECCA ELLIOTT

    Fort Bend County, Texas By: Deputy District Clerk Amanda Morales

    Telephone: 281-238-3282

    CITATION BY PUBLICATIONSTATE OF TEXAS

    TO: LAURA SAENZ and to all whom it may concern, Respondent(s), You have been sued. You may employ an attorney. If you or your attorney do (does) not fi le a written answer with the clerk who issued this citation by 10:00 a.m. on the Monday next following the expiration of 20 days after you were served this citation and petition, a default judgment may be taken against you. The petition of LOPEZ, SANDRA, Petitioner, was fi led in the 328TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT of Fort Bend County, Texas on the April 16, 2007 against LAURA SAENZ, Respondent(s), numbered 07-DCV-156085, and entitled In the Interest of Angelo James Saenz A Child.The suit request to TERMINATE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP as is more fully shown by Petition on fi le in this suit.The date and place of birth of the child(ren) who is/are the subject of the suit:DATE OF BIRTH: April 02, 2003The Court has authority in this suit to render an order in the child(ren)s interest which will be binding on you, including the termination of the parent-child relationship, the determination of paternity and the appointment of a conservator with authority to consent to the child(ren)s adoption.Issued and given under my hand and seal of said Court at Richmond, Texas, on this the 1st day of December, 2009.ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER OR RESPONDENT:MEGAN A MC LELLANBENEVIDES & KELLY1314 TEXAS AVENUE SUITE 808HOUSTON TX 77002713-226-7889DISTRICT CLERK ANNIE REBECCA ELLIOTT

    Fort Bend County, Texas By: Deputy District Clerk Amanda Morales

    Telephone: 281-238-3282

    CONSTABLE SALEUnder and by virtue of a Writ of Execution and / or Order of Sale issued on October 28TH, 2009 by the 434TH DISTRICT Court of FORT BEND COUNTY, Texas in cause #07-DCV-156834 in favor of the Plaintiff - QUAIL GREEN HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff , for the sum of $4,689.10++++costs as taxed on said Execution and / or Order of Sale and further the sum of executing the same. I have levied on the OCTOBER 19TH 2009 and will off er for sale on the 5TH day of JANUARY 2010 at the County Courthouse steps of Fort Bend County, Texas in the city of Richmond, Texas between the hours of ten oclock a.m. and four oclock p.m., and all rights, title, interests and claims which the said Defendant(s) -RONALD J. HAMILTON AND BARBARA A. HAMILTON had of, in or to the following described Real Property situated in Fort Bend County, Texas; viz.:LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 13 IN BLOCK ONE OF QUAIL GREEN, SECTION TWO (2), A SUBDIVISION IN FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 28, PAGE 1, OF THE PLAT RECORDS OF FORT BEND COUNTY ,TEXAS (THE PROPERTY) ALSO KNOWN AS 2723 GREEN MEADOW COURT, MISSOURI CITY, TEXAS 77489.

    Terms: Cash, Sale to held at or about 11 a.m.At the steps of the Fort Bend County courthouse

    RUBEN DAVIS, CONSTABLE,Precinct 2Fort Bend County , TexasBy Gary Majors #73

    CONSTABLE SALEUnder and by virtue of a Writ of Execution and / or Order of Sale issued on October 22nd, 2009 by the 240TH DISTRICT Court of FORT BEND COUNTY, Texas in cause #08-DCV-161688 in favor of the Plaintiff - QUAIL BRIDGE COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff , for the sum of $1,120.00++++costs as taxed on said Execution and / or Order of Sale and further the sum of executing the same. I have levied on the NOVEMBER 12TH 2009 and will off er for sale on the 5TH day of JANUARY 2010 at the County Courthouse steps of Fort Bend County, Texas in the city of Richmond, Texas between the hours of ten oclock a.m. and four oclock p.m., and all rights, title, interests and claims which the said Defendant(s) -ALEXANDRINE FADIPE had of, in or to the following described Real Property situated in Fort Bend County, Texas; viz.:LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT FOURTEEN (14), BLOCK ONE (1), QUAIL BRIDGE SUBDIVISION, SECTION ONE (1), FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS, BEING A REPLAT OF RIDGEMEONT SUBDIVISION, SECTION FIVE (5), AS RECORDED IN VOLUME 25, PAGE 25, PAGE 14 OF THE FORT BEND COUNTY MAP RECORDS (THE PROPERTY) ALSO KNOWN AS 5418 RIDGEMONT PLACE, HOUSTON, TEXAS 77053.

    Terms: Cash, Sale to held at or about 11 a.m.At the steps of the Fort Bend County courthouse

    RUBEN DAVIS, CONSTABLE,Precinct 2Fort Bend County , TexasBy Gary Majors #73

    This Christmas, you are invited to escape from the hectic business of the season and to refl ect on the miraculous birth of Christ while enjoying the soothing sounds of the harp and voice. Susanna Campbell and Ashley Lyons, harpists, and Joanne Bonasso, soprano, will present familiar strains of time-less carols such as Silent Night and What Child Is This to delight your senses; they will also introduce you to several beautiful lesser known carols. This special musical celebra-tion will take place on Dec. 18, at 7:30 p.m. in the sanctuary at Christ United Methodist Church, 3300 Austin Parkway, Sugar Land. Tickets are $15 and may be reserved by calling 281-232-2375 or purchased at the door. All proceeds from this event will benefi t the Pregnancy Resource Center of Fort Bend County.

    Infant Holy: A musical celebration of life

    Missouri City Flag Football League registration now

    under way Are you ready for some

    football? Youths between the ages of 6 and 13 can now register for Missouri Citys Youth Flag Football Program. Two Divisions are playing this year, one for 6- to 9-year-olds and the second for 10- to 13-year-olds.

    A $100 fee per child covers team shirts, trophies and other costs. Teams play an eight-game season as well as play-off and championship games for each division.

    The football games will begin Jan. 16 at Hunters Glen Park, 1340 Independence Blvd. Games will be played on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, with no more than two games per week.

    Practices will start on Janu-ary 11. In order to participate, parents must present a copy of their childs birth certifi cate. Coaches are needed.

    If you are interested, contact Kyle Frye with the Missouri City Parks and Recreation Department at 281-403-8637 or [email protected] for more information.

    When: January 11-Febru-ary 27, 2010

    Where: Hunters Glen Park, 1340 Independence Blvd., Missouri City, TX 77489

    Cost: $100 per child, ages 6-13. Registration ends Dec. 31.

    The Fort Bend Genealogical Society will meet on Saturday, Dec. 12, at 10 a.m. The meeting will be held at the George Memorial Library located at 1000 Golfview Drive in Rich-mond. Following the meeting, we will be having a brunch at the home of Frances Sisemore. Directions will be given at the meeting. Anyone interested in genealogy is invited to at-tend. For more information, please contact 281-762-8029.

    Genealogical society

    Join us at the next South West Area Professional Ex-press Network will meet on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. at Sugar Creek Coun-try Club. Featured Speaker, Louise Grasse, Houston Area Council of ABWA (American Business Women Association)will be sharing on education for business women. SWAP-EN is a business networking group whose goal is to bring together business women of diverse occupations and to provide opportunities for them to help themselves and oth-ers. For more informationvisit www.swapen.org

    SWAPEN meeting on Dec. 15

    COMBINED NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS

    December 9, 2009Fort Bend County, Texas4520 Reading RoadRosenberg, Texas 77471281-341-4410

    This Notice shall satisfy the above-cited two separate but related procedural notifi cation requirements.

    REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDSOn or about December 28, 2009 Fort Bend County will submit a request to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for the release of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds under Title 1 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (PL 93-383) as amended to undertake the following:

    Project Nature/Scope Project Location Federal Funds

    FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT

    Fort Bend County has determined that the project will have no signifi cant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on fi le at the Fort Bend County Community Development Department, 4520 Reading Road, Suite A, Rosenberg, Texas and may be examined or copied weekdays 8 A.M. to 5 P.M.

    PUBLIC COMMENTSAny individual, group, or agency disagreeing with this determination or wishing to comment on the project may submit written comments to the Fort Bend County Community Development Department. All comments received by December 28, 2009 will be considered by Fort Bend County prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. Commentors should specify which part of this Notice they are addressing.

    RELEASE OF FUNDSFort Bend County certifi es to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development that Robert E. Hebert in his capacity as Fort Bend County Judge consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfi ed. HUDs approval of the certifi cation satisfi es its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities, and allows the Fort Bend County to use Program funds.

    OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDSHUD will accept objections to its release of funds and Fort Bend Countys Certifi cation received by January 12, 2010 or a period of fi fteen days from its receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certifi cation was not executed by the Certifying Offi cer or other offi cer of the County of Fort Bend approved by HUD; (b) the County of Fort Bend has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or fi nding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58; (c) the grant recipient or other participants in the project have committed funds or incurred costs not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written fi nding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58) and shall be addressed to HUD, 1301 Fannin, Suite 2200, Houston, Texas 77002. Potential objectors should contact HUD to verify the actual last day of the objection period.

    Robert E. HebertFort Bend County Judge

    Sanitary sewer improvements including installing sanitary sewer lines, pint repairs, manhole improvements and service connections in various locations throughout the City.

    City of Arcola $175,000.00 FY 2009

    4-H Dog Project Meeting The Fort Bend County 4-H program is hosting an information-al meeting for all youth ages 8-18 interested in learning more about the 4-H Dog Project. The meeting will be held Tuesday, December 15 at 6:30 p.m. at the First Colony Library located at 2121 Austin Parkway in Sugar Land. For more information on this, or any other 4-H project, call the Texas AgriLife Extension offi ce in Fort Bend County at 281-342-3034.

  • DECEMBER 9, 2009 FORT BEND INDEPENDENT Page 7

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    Film Review : Invictus

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    SIMPLE ORGANIZATION

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    Clint has hit a grand slam. This fi lm is another work of art by 79 year old Director Clint Eastwood. Some of his greats: Unforgiven The Bridges of Madison County Mystic River Million Dollar Baby Flags of Our Fathers Gran Torino and now we can add Invictus.

    Will Invictus win Best Pic-ture? Probably, maybe, well lets wait until weve seen all the movies. But an early bet on the story of Nelson Man-delas fi rst term as President of South Africa in the early 90s should be a safe bet.

    The backdrop is apart-heid that left South Africa badly torn between races but somehow managed to survive long enough to democratically elect Nelson Mandela as President of the government that had impris-oned him for 27 years.

    The movie begins on Feb-ruary 11, 1990, which was the day of his release from prison.

    When Clint was in the ear-ly stages of developing this project, one of his fi rst ma-

    jor decisions had to be the choice of actor to play Man-dela. I suspect it took him a nanosecond to choose Mor-gan Freeman. Or, according to press reports, Freeman chose Eastwood. Freeman and Eastwood have had enormous success in collab-orations in the past includ-ing Unforgiven and Million Dollar Baby. In those two movies, Freeman was sec-ond banana to Clint, but this time he is the big dog. And he looks uncannily like Man-dela.

    But looking like Mandela is not the thing that will earn him a nomination and front-runner to win Best Actor. Its his acting; plain and simple.

    Freeman was born for this part. Weve known for a long time that Morgan Freeman was an accomplished actor, but now he will have the gold to prove it. His speech pattern, mannerisms, and presidential presence were stupendous. This is a re-markable movie in large part because of Freemans memo-rable performance.

    In the movie which ap-pears to be historically accu-rate, Mandela took offi ce at a time when the racial tension and distrust were extreme. As great leaders sometimes do in tough times, he looked for an out-of-the-box ap-proach to mend decades of hurt. He found the answer in the South African rugby team which was dominated by white players and de-spised by most blacks.

    The team was led by its captain Francois Pienaar played masterfully by Matt Damon. Damon has an out-side shot at Best Supporting Actor but is overshadowed by Freeman.

    In 1995, South Africa was the host of the Rugby World Cup. I know rugby is not foot-ball but much of the world is fanatical about its rugby team and it is huge in South Afr ca. The South Africa Na-tional Rugby Union team is the Springboks and you will see guys in the stands with Bokke painted on their chests. Dont be misled by the use of one of the teams

    nicknames.Part of Clints genius in sto-

    rytelling is his use of dynamic camera angles and dramatic editing to increase suspense and to make a point. My in-terest never wavered. The movie is 134 minutes and left me wanting more.

    And there will be other ac-colades for Adapted Screen-play by Anthony Peckham based on the book Playing the Enemy by John Carlin; Best Original Score by Kyle Eastwood and Michael Ste-vens, and Best Original Song Colorblind.

    So, what about the title Invictus which is Latin for unconquered? The title is taken from a short poem by William Ernest Henley fi rst published in 1875. The poem is quoted my Mandela: I am the master of my fate; I am the captain of my soul.

    And my quote is: Rock n Roll.

    Grade 94. Larry H.

    Email : [email protected]

    With over two decades of legal experience, Elizabeth Duff , right, and Amy L. Mitchell have formed the law fi rm of Mitchell & Duff , LLC. , providing a broad spectrum of rep-resentation on general civil litigation, corporate transac-tional and personal matters. According to Amy Mitchell, We are thrilled to be combining our practices to create one of the premier civil fi rms in Fort Bend County. The outpour-ing of support from the community has been heartwarm-ing. Mitchell & Duff is located within walking distance of the historic Fort Bend County Courthouse in Richmond, Texas. Mitchell & Duff handles cases in and around the Houston and Fort Bend area as well as throughout the state of Texas. The attorneys of Mitchell & Duff are licensed in all Federal and State Courts in Texas. Mitchell & Duff is located at 210 Main Street, Richmond, Texas 77469, 281-341-1718, www.mitchellandduff .com. For more information, contact Amy L. Mitchell at 281-341-1718.

    Mitchell & Duff law offi ce opens

    The Spirit of Freedom Republican Womens Club held its annual Christmas Party on Dec. 4. The outgoing president of the club Babs Miller conducted the proceed-ings. Texas Sen. Joan Huff man (SD 17) installed the new club offi cers after admin-istering the oath of offi ce. The new offi cers are Willye White, left, Treasurer, Lan-ette Dye - Recording Secretary, Judy Bayliss Second VP Programs, Senator Joan Huff man, Tina Gibson - President, Cindy Bond - First VP Programs, Jenny Hrbacek - Corresponding Secretary. Photo by MARY FAVRE.

    Drs. Ana Corteguera, Mona Sheth, Tayma Shaya, Jennifer Diamond, Yana Finkelshteyn, Lisa Holloway, Julie Hung and Seva Papageorge

    Methodist Family Medi-cine Group, an affi liate of The Methodist Physician Organi-zation, has added fi ve local physicians to expand its out-reach to the Fort Bend com-munity.

    Drs. Tayma Shaya, Jennifer Diamond, Seva Papageorge, Mona Sheth and Lisa Hol-loway have joined the fast-growing practice, bringing the number of Methodist

    Family Medicine Group phy-sicians to eight.

    The fi ve doctors each board certifi ed by the Ameri-can Board of Family Medicine join Drs. Ana Corteguera, Julie Hung and Yana Fin-kelshteyn at Methodist Fami-ly Medicine Group, which was formally established on the Methodist Sugar Land Hospi-tal campus earlier this year.

    We are proud to welcome

    these outstanding physi-cians to the Methodist Family Medicine Group, said Ayse McCracken, Chief Operating Offi cer for The Methodist Hos-pital Physician Organization and Senior Vice President at The Methodist Hospital Sys-tem. Their expertise in family medicine and their hands-on, personal approach to diagno-sis and care fi ts perfectly with the practices culture and ap-

    proach. And their eff orts are supported by the technology and leading-edge services off ered by Methodist Sugar Land Hospital.

    One of the hallmarks of Methodist Family Medi-cine Group is their ability to communicate with patients from many diff erent back-grounds. Dr. Corteguera is fl uent in Spanish while Dr. Finkelshteyn speaks Spanish

    Methodist Family Medicine Group continues to grow

    and Russian. Dr. Papageorge is fl uent in Greek, Dr. Sheth speaks Gujarati and Dr. Shaya speaks some Arabic.

    To schedule an appoint-ment call 281-275-0800.

  • Page 8 FORT BEND INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 9, 2009

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F ORT B END FAIR. BALANCED. INFORMATIVE. Phone: 281-980-6745 ww ww w.fbindependent.com .fbindependent.com P.O.BOX 623, SUGAR LAND, TX 77487-0623 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2009 VOL 2 No. 49 It’s time to start experiencing relief with a personalized treatment plan from our new comprehensive Back Pain Program. Our skilled health team specializes in joint and back pain, offering both minimally invasive surgical techniques and noninvasive treatments. To learn more, call 281.725.5225 or visit SugarLandBackPain.com. Introducing the new Back Pain Program at Memorial Hermann Sugar Land. Relief is within reach Set for Dec. 11 and 12, the CASA Christmas Home Tour will feature six distinctive homes in First Colony, Pecan Manor and Richmond. Presale tickets are available for $15 at greater Houston area HEB stores, Fort Bend Amegy Bank locations, Oak- Bend Medical Centers, and the Riverstone Information Center. Tickets can also be pur- chased during the event for $20 at The Sweetwater Guard- house, Riverstone Informa- tion Center, OakBend Medi- cal Centers and each of the homes. Shown with posters and tickets L to R are: Cindy Reaves, Marketing Director for OakBend Medical Cen- ters; Home Tour Ticket Chair Barbara Benes; and Child Advocates of Fort Bend De- velopment Director Kelli Metzenthin. The Tour, which benefits Child Advocates of Fort Bend, runs Dec. 11 and 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a special candlelight tour on Friday night from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tour guests will be treated to a rare glimpse of the fea- tured homes and their creative holiday decorations. In the late 1950s, the Im- perial Sugar Company de- cided the upkeep of its com- pany-owned houses was just getting to be too much of a drain on the company’s prof- its. The rents were greatly below what it was costing the company for upkeep and infrastructure development. The company’s brick houses on The Hill, northeast of the refinery, were put on the market, and the company employees were given the option to buy them. And most of them did buy their homes, priced from about $4,000 to $6,000. Most of the houses had shared driveways. Hous- es along Main and up to 6th Street were largely wood or siding and were a bit cheaper; Sugar Land State Bank agreed to $500 down and mortgages with a 5 per- cent rate to be paid off in 10 years. Buyers could opt for payroll deduction. A number of people bought their homes outright. The land that would be- come Venetian Estates was a low, swampy land. Sugar Land Industries and Belknap Realty dug canals and used the dredged dirt to build up the land height. It was Mrs. Henrietta Kempner’s (wife of Imperial owner Isaac Kempner) idea to call it Ve- netian Estates and give Ital- ian names to many of the streets. The lots sold slowly at first—at $5,000 these were not cheap lots. Some “spec” homes were built. But when the U.S. 59 service roads opened, there was a way to get into Hous- ton without going on South Main. It was also the time when the area around Sharp- stown was being devel- oped—but Sugar Land was about the only place that had water-front lots! The lots in Venetian Estates began sell- ing quickly then. Mayfield Park on the north side of the refinery was nearly exclusively Black and Hispanic. The Black chil- dren attended M.R. Wood school, while the Hispanic children attended Sugar Land Elementary since they were considered “white.” The homes in Mayfield were considered out of code in the early 1950s by the City be- cause they had an outdoor privy and just running cold water in a single faucet back of the house. Herb Kempner –son of Isaac—was over Im- perial and was disturbed at the plight of the Mayfield residents. More than 200 homes were bulldozed and new brick ones built over the course of a decade in their places; residents lived in temporary housing. Herb Kempner’s vision for Sugar Land was much like his fa- ther’s, a city with no injus- tice and with opportunity for everyone. The City worked with the Federal Housing Administration on this urban renewal project, and the first FHA home was sold to Mrs. Aline McLemore in 1961. It is believed that there was never a foreclosure in the Mayfield subdivision. Sadly, Herb Kempner died in 1953 and did not see the comple- tion of his Mayfield project. Though Sugar Land was segregated in the 50’s and early 60’s, there was one thing that just about every- one had: a job. (This article is published in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Sugar Land being celebrated with a party on New Year’s eve.) By SESHADRI KUMAR The Securities and Ex- change Commission has filed a suit in the United States Dis- trict Court for the Southern District of Texas against Al- bert Fase Kaleta of Missouri City, and his company, Kaleta Capital Management, Inc. Two other entities, Business Radio Network, L.P. (“BizRa- dio”) and Daniel Frishberg Fi- nancial Services, Inc. ( DFFS Capital Management, Inc.) have been named as Relief Defendants solely for the pur- poses of equitable relief. Former Sugar Land Mayor David Wallace has been asso- ciated with Frishberg and Biz- Radio as a business partner. Kaleta and Dan Frishberg, who has the show on BizRa- dio called “The Money Man,” were among the founders of BizRadio Network. Kaleta also was part owner and chief compliance officer for DFFS. The SEC alleges that Kaleta and KCM raised approximate- ly $10 million from about 50 investors in a fraudulent of- fering of promissory-note se- curities. The commission further alleges that Kaleta misrepre- sented that KCM would use the offering proceeds to pro- vide short-term loans to cred- it-worthy small businesses. Instead, at Kaleta’s direction, KCM loaned approximately $6.7 million of the proceeds to DFFS and BizRadio, “two financially precarious KCM affiliates who had no reason- able prospect of repaying the loans.” Kaleta knew the financial condition of both companies because he was president, chief compliance officer, and a 44 percent owner of DFFS and, with others, controlled BizRadio. The complaint alleges that Kaleta also took approximate- ly $1.5 million of the offering proceeds to pay his personal expenses. Finally, the commission al- leges that contrary to Kaleta’s representations, he used in- vestor funds to make inter- est payments to some of the promissory note holders. The complaint requests permanent injunctions, dis- gorgement of ill-gotten gains plus prejudgment interest, and civil penalties against the De- fendants. In addition, the commission has filed a motion asking the court to appoint a receiver to collect, marshal, manage and distribute these assets for the benefit of investors. Without admitting or de- nying the Commission’s al- legations, Kaleta and KCM have consented to permanent injunctions against future vio- lations of the anti-fraud provi- sions. Kaleta and KCM have also consented to an order ap- pointing a receiver. BizRadio received millions raised from investors under false pretenses, according to the lawsuit. The SEC claims that be- tween December 2007 and August of this year, Kaleta and Kaleta Capital Man- agement sold $10 million in promissory notes, telling in- vestors the money would be loaned to small businesses at 12 percent to 14 percent inter- est. Instead, the SEC said, it went to the money-losing ra- dio network and an affiliated investment advisory firm, Daniel Frishberg Financial Services. Kaleta’s firm loaned BizRa- dio $3.6 million of the money during the first eight months of this year. During that same time, the radio network lost $1.6 mil- lion and “its only significant assets were illiquid radio- station licenses,” the SEC’s lawsuit said. Another $1.2 million went to DFFS, which “did not have sufficient revenue or assets to service such a loan,” accord- ing to the lawsuit. Dan Frishberg is the CEO of Frishberg, Jordan, Stewart, & Kaleta Advisors, Inc. and CEO & Founder of BizRadio Network. In 1992, Frishberg started Daniel Frishberg Financial Services from the ground up, and in 1997, it evolved into Frishberg Jordan Stewart & Kaleta Advisors. FJSK Advisors manages over 300 million dollars in as- sets and advises on more than 1.2 billion dollars, according to the company’s website. FJSK has one of the few equity portfolios in the coun- try that has shown significant gains over the past few years SEC sues Missouri City businessman for alleged $10 million fraud In addition, guests will en- joy festive entertainment by local artists and tasty home- made cookies and hot apple cider. A special tour lunch is available at Sweetwater Country Club for $15. One ticket provides admission to all six homes and can be used at any time during the tour. The map to the homes is on the back of the ticket. For more information about the event call 281-341-9955, ext. 5108. Since the Tour began, Child Advocates of Fort Bend has trained more than 600 vol- unteers and served more than 8,000 children. At least 400 children are touched each month by one of the agency’s programs. CASA Christmas Home Tour See FRAUD, Page 3 Sugar Land’s first developments Christmas at Town Square Sugar Land Mayor James Thompson and Santa Claus lighted a 40-foot Christmas tree to kick off the holiday season at the Sugar Land Town Square on Dec. 3. The event attracted a huge crowd despite the inclement weather. The highlight of the evening was the grand entrance of Santa Claus. Main stage performances included Sugar Land Super Star winner Nathaniel De Jesus, local school choirs and the Sugar Land Express Singers. There were stilt walkers and festive characters like snowmen to enhance the evening’s entertainment. Photographer LARRY PULLEN captured the holiday spirit during the tree lighting, above, and the arrival of Santa Claus, below.
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