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Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoods Murali Haran Department of Statistics Pennsylvania State University 2011 Rao Prize Conference Penn State University, May 2011.
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Page 1: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Gaussian Processes for Inference

with Implicit Likelihoods

Murali Haran

Department of Statistics

Pennsylvania State University

2011 Rao Prize Conference

Penn State University, May 2011.

Page 2: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Complex Scientific Models

I Scientists working in the physical and natural sciences are

often interested in learning about the mechanisms or

“laws” and processes underlying physical phenomena.

I These models may be useful for predictions/projections.

I Critical to work with the model provided by the scientists.

I These scientific models may beI Numerical solutions of mathematical (deterministic) models

or stochastic models that reflect scientific processes.I Translated into computer code to study simulations of the

physical processes for different parameters/conditions.

Page 3: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Some Challenges Posed by Complex Models

I As models become more realistic, they become morecomplex. Challenges:

I Computationally expensive simulations.I May not be possible to write closed-form expressions

relating input/parameters to output.I (When stochastic) The likelihood function may be very

expensive to evaluate: hard to optimize or use Monte Carlo

methods.I There are non-ignorable discrepancies between the model

and reality.

I Likelihood is often implicit or has to be treated as such.

Page 4: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Two Examples

I Climate: An Earth System Model of Intermediate

Complexity (EMIC) for projecting the behavior of global

ocean circulation systems.

II Disease Dynamics: A space-time model for the spread of

infectious disease (measles).

Page 5: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

The Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and

Climate Change 5

(plots: Rahmstorf (Nature, 1997) and Behl and Hovan)

Page 6: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Climate Models: Learning About Kv

“Collapse” of MOC may result in dramatic climate change.

Kv is a key climate model parameter that influences the MOC.

I Kv quantifies the intensity of vertical mixing in the ocean.

I Kv cannot be measured directly. Two sources of indirectinformation on Kv :

I Observations of two ocean “tracers”, both provide

information about Kv : Carbon-14 (14C) and

Trichlorofluoromethane (CFC11): Z1,Z2.I Climate model output of these two tracers at different values

of Kv from the University of Victoria (UVic) Earth System

Climate Model (Weaver et. al. 2001): Y1(Kv ),Y2(Kv )

Page 7: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

CFC-11 Example

I Bottom right: observationsI Remaining plots: climate model output at 3 settings of Kv .I This is one of two such tracers.

Page 8: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Deterministic Models and EmulationStatistical interpolation

Complex Computer

Model

Inputs Output

x1

x2

f(x1)

f(x2)

x* f(x*)=??

Green inputs/output = training data.

Red = the input where predictions are desired.

Input and output are typically multivariate.

Page 9: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Computer Model Emulation

I Fit an emulator (“meta model”) to a training set of runs

from the complex computer model.

I Advantages:I Fast approximate simulator.I Uncertainties associated with interpolation (predictions), for

example greater uncertainty where there is less training

data information.I “Without any quantification of uncertainty, it is easy to

dismiss computer models.” (A.O’Hagan)I This provides a probability model.

Page 10: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Modeling with Gaussian Processes

I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful models for

dependent processes, e.g. time series, spatial data.

I GPs are also very useful for modeling complicated

functions.

Key idea: dependence (spatial random effects) adjusts for

non-linear relationships between input and output.

Page 11: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Gaussian Process Model Basics

I Process at location s ∈ D ⊂ Rd is Z (s) = µβ(s) + w(s).

Location s may be physical or from “input space”.

I Model dependence among spatial random variables by

modeling {w(s) : s ∈ D} as a Gaussian process.

I Infinite-dimensional process. If s1, . . . ,sn ∈ D,

w = (w(s1), . . . ,w(sn))T is multivariate normal.

I Parametric covariance, e.g.

Cov(Z (si),Z (sj)) = κ exp(−‖si − sj‖/φ), κ > 0, φ > 0.

Here, Θ = (κ, φ).

I Let Z = (Z (s1), . . . ,Z (sn))T , so

Z|Θ,β ∼ N(µβ,Σ(Θ)).

Page 12: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

GP Linear Model Inference

I Inference and prediction can be done via ML or Bayes.

I ML: maximize likelihood with respect to Θ,β.

I Bayes: prior on Θ,β, and MCMC to learn about

π(Θ,β | Z).

Page 13: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

GP Linear Model Prediction

I Let the predictions at the new locations s∗1, . . . ,s

∗m ∈ D be

Z∗ = (Z (s∗1), . . . ,Z (s∗

m))T .

I Under the GP assumption (µ1,µ2,Σ depend on β,Θ):[Z

Z∗

]| Θ,β ∼ N

([µ1

µ2

],

[Σ11 Σ12

Σ21 Σ22

]), (1)

ML: use above with ML estimates plugged-in.

Bayes: use above, while averaging over Θ,β | Z. This is

the posterior predictive distribution.

Page 14: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

GP Model for Dependence: Toy 1-D Example

0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0

−50

510

15

Dependent (AR−1) errors

s

y

●●

●●

●●●

●●

●●

●●

●●

●●

●●●

●●

●●

●●

●●

●●

●●

●●

Black: 1-D AR-1 process simulation. Green: independent error.

(Red, blue): GP with (exponential, gaussian) covariances.

Page 15: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

GP for Function Approximation: Toy 1-D Example

0 5 10 15 20

−2−1

01

2sin(x)

x

y ●

●●

● ●

0 5 10 15 20

−0.5

0.0

0.5

1.0

f(x)=exp(−x/5)*sin(x)

x

y

● ●

●●

● ●●

●● ●

●●

● ● ● ● ● ●

The red curves are interpolations using the same, simple GP

model with constant mean µ:

y(x) = µ+ w(x), {w(x), x ∈ (0,20)} is a zero-mean GP.

Real data: bivariate spatial process at each input. Much more

complicated.

Page 16: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Summary of Inferential Problem

Let parameter of interest be θ (here θ=Kv ).

Statistical problem:

I Model output is a bivariate spatial process at each θ: Y =

((Y1(ψ1),Y2(ψ1)), (Y1(ψ2),Y2(ψ2)), . . . , (Y1(ψK ),Y2(ψK )),

where {ψ1, ψ2, . . . , ψK} is a set of plausible θ values.

I Observations: Z = (Z1,Z2).

I What can we learn about θ given Z,Y?

Page 17: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Bayesian Approach

A Bayesian framework is useful for computer model calibration:

I There is usually real prior information about θ.

I The likelihood surface for θ may often be highly multimodal

and there may be identifiability issues; useful to have easy

access to the full posterior distribution.

I If θ is multivariate, important to look at bivariate and

marginal distributions: easier w/ sample-based approach.

I Amenable to hierarchical specification: we will exploit this

for multivariate spatial process model.

Kennedy and O’Hagan (2001); Bayarri, Berger et al. (2007,

2008).

Latter provides wavelets-based approach for functional output.

Page 18: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Two-stage Approach to Inference

1. Find probability model for Z (data) using Y (simulations.)I Model relationship between Z = (Z1,Z2) and θ via flexible

emulator for model output Y = (Y1,Y2).I Add model discrepancy and measurement error:

Z = η(Y,θ) + δ(Y) + ε

where δ(Y) = (δ1, δ2)T is the model discrepancy, also

modeled as a GP. ε = (ε1, ε2)T is the observation error.

2. Posterior distribution π(θ | Y,Z) derived from prior on θ

and likelihood based on above model.

Page 19: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Inference with Multiple Spatial Fields: Step 1

Goals: (i) flexible model for relationship between Y1 and Y2, (ii)

computational tractability.

I Model (Y1,Y2) as a hierarchical model: Y1|Y2 and Y2 as

Gaussian processes (cf. Royle and Berliner, 1999.)

Y1 | Y2,β1, ξ1, γ ∼ N(µβ1(θ) + B(γ)Y2,Σ1.2(ξ1))

Y2 | β2, ξ2 ∼ N(µβ2(θ),Σ2(ξ2))

I B(γ) is a matrix relating Y1 and Y2, with parameters γ.

I The covariances of the Gaussian processes depend on

both s (spatial distance) and θ (distance in parameter

space).

I β1,β2, ξ1, ξ2 are regression, covariance parameters.

Page 20: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Inference with Multiple Spatial Fields: Step 2

I Emulation: Fit GP via maximum likelihood, then obtain

predictive distribution at locations of observations.

I Add model discrepancy and measurement error.

I Model discrepancy term can make crucial adjustment to θ

estimates (Bayarri, Berger et al. 2007; Bhat et al., 2010).

I Separating stages: ‘modularization’ (e.g. Liu, Bayarri,

Berger, 2009). Computational advantages + reduce

identifiability issues.

I Use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) with slice sampler

to estimate π(θ | Z,Y), integrating out remaining

parameters.

Page 21: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Computational Issues

I Matrix computations are O(N3), where N is the number of

observations. Here: N ≈ tens of thousands.

I Markov chain mixes slowly so need long MCMC runs.

I We use a reduced rank approach based on kernel mixing

(Higdon, 1998): continuous process created by convolving

a discrete white noise process with a kernel function.

I Special structure + Sherman-Woodbury-Morrison identity +

Sylvester’s Theorem used to reduce matrix computations:

O(J3) where J (≈ 300 here) is dimensionality of latent

white noise process.

Page 22: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Results for Kv inference

0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6

05

1015

Kv [cm^2/s]

Den

sity

CFC11Delta14CBoth TracersPrior

posteriors: only CFC-11, only ∆14C, both CFC-11 & ∆14C.

Result: Kv pdf suggests weakening of MOC in the future.

Page 23: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Summary of Climate Model Inference

Two-stage approach:

1. Obtain a probability model connecting CFC-11, ∆14C

tracer observations to Kv by fitting a flexible Gaussian

process model to climate model runs. Hierarchical model

for multiple spatial processes + patterned covariances ⇒flexible and computationally tractable.

2. Using this probability model, infer a posterior density for Kv

from the observations.

We can use inferred Kv in the climate model to project the

MOC. We find that the MOC weakens over the next 50 years.

Page 24: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

II. Infectious Disease Models

I Gravity-TSIR model: Space-time model for the spread of

measles. Here θ=parameters controlling the dynamics of

the spread of this disease e.g. how the disease spreads as

a function of distance between locations.

I Thousands of latent variables e.g. number of immigrants

moving from one location to another.

I Rich space-time data set from England and Wales. Time

points× locations = 546×952= 519,792.

Potential for learning about parameters, but also poses

computational challenges.

Page 25: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Measles Data: London and Birmingham

Page 26: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Measles Data: Willesden and North Allerton

Complicated data: 952 cities of varying sizes, levels of

“infecteds.”

Page 27: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Inference for Gravity TSIR Model Parameters

I Stochastic model. Can write down the likelihood but it is

expensive to evaluate.

I ABC (approximate Bayesian computing) approaches

(Pritchard et al., 1999; Beaumont et al. 2002; (Marjoram et

al., 2002) are infeasible due to simulation time.

I We develop an approximate grid-based Markov chain

Monte Carlo approach that is computationally tractable.

I However, traditional likelihood-based/Bayesian inferenceeven with tractable computing is problematic:

I It does not result in a fitted model that reproduces

scientifically relevant features of the data.I Simulations reveal: we cannot recover θ.

Page 28: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Traditional Likelihood-Based Approach

Simulations from fitted model (Bayes/ML) do not match the

data for important characteristics of the process.

Page 29: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Inference for Gravity TSIR Model Parameters

I Likelihood-based approaches do not take into account

features that are of scientific interest.

I Instead, fit GP to summary statistics of model runs where

summaries are based on scientifically relevant features.

I Inference based on using this GP with the data results in

improved inference.

(Skipping lots of details, computational issues etc. . . . )

Page 30: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

GP-based Inference Using Key Summaries

Simulations from fitted model match data well.

Simulations show: can recover θ using this approach.

Other interesting scientific insights/details: see Roman

Jandarov’s poster.

Page 31: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Summary

I Gaussian processes are a powerful tool for problems

where the likelihood is implicit and simulating from the

model is expensive.

I GPs are useful for deterministic and stochastic models.

I GP-based approach can be used to take into account the

scientifically important features of the data; may be

preferable to traditional likelihood-based approaches.

I Limitation: computationally intractable when the

dimensionality of θ is large.

Page 32: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

Collaborators

I K. Sham Bhat, Los Alamos National Laboratories.

I Roman Tonkonojenkov, Dept of Geosciences, Penn State

University.

I Klaus Keller, Dept of Geosciences, Penn State University.

I Roman Jandarov, Dept of Statistics, Penn State University.

I Ottar Bjørnstad, Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics,

Penn State University.

Support: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; U.S. Geological

Survey; National Science Foundation (NSF-HSD.)

Page 33: Gaussian Processes for Inference with Implicit Likelihoodspersonal.psu.edu/dsr11/raoprize/Haran-slides.pdf · Modeling with Gaussian Processes I Gaussian processes (GPs) are useful

References

I Grenfell, B.T., Bjørnstad, O. N. and Kappey, J. (2001), “Traveling

waves and spatial hierarchies in measles epidemics.” Nature.

I Bhat, K.S., Haran, M., Tonkonojenkov, R., and Keller, K. (2011),

“Inferring likelihoods and climate system characteristics from

climate models and multiple tracers.”

I Bhat, K.S., Haran, M. and Goes, M. (2010) “Computer model

calibration with multivariate spatial output,”

I Jandarov, R., Haran, M., Bjornstad, O.N. and Grenfell, B. (2011)

“Emulating a gravity model to infer the spatiotemporal dynamics

of an infectious disease.”


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