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  • Girl Scout Juniors Home Study

    Girl Scouts of Central Maryland 4806 Seton Drive

    Baltimore, MD 21215 410.358.9711 1.800.492.2521

    www.gscm.org Revised 6/2013

    http://www.gscm.org/

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    The following resources are available to help you as a Girl Scout Junior Leader. You will

    need a copy of the essential resources to complete this Home Study Packet and

    answer the test questions. You will need one of the journey sets to complete this

    home study.

    Program Resources for Girl Scout Juniors

    Essential Resources for Leaders

    GSUSA Resources (Available in the GSCM Store)

    The Journey Materials are the Core of the Girl Scout program – you will

    need one of the journey sets to complete this home study.

    Adult Journey Guides – Agent of Change, Get Moving, and aMUSE Girl Journey Books – Agent of Change, Get Moving, and aMUSE

    Girls Guide to Girl Scouting for Juniors GSUSA Website – www.girlscouts.org

    .

    GSCM Resources

    Troop/Group Resource Packet (Available through your Service Team or

    Membership and Community Development Specialist)

    Volunteer Essentials – available in your Troop Resource Binder or on our

    website (this is a GSUSA document customized for our council)

    Safety Activity Checkpoints – available on our website (this is a GSUSA

    document)

    GSCM website – wwww.gscm.org

    For additional resources, plea se visit Girl Scouts of Centra l Ma ryla nd’s stores, Juliette’s Closets, a nd the Volunteer Resource Center.

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    DIRECTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE HOME STUDY

    1. Purchase or borrow the essential resources for Girl Scout Junior Leaders. 2. Complete each section of the Home Study Packet. 3. If you have any questions, please contact Adult Learning Services, Valerie Brooks, at

    [email protected] or 410-358-9711, ext. 220.

    4. After completing the home study, please complete the Evaluation Packet. 5. Mail the completed Evaluation Packet to: (Please keep the home study packet for your

    use.)

    Adult Learning Services Department Girl Scouts of Central Maryland

    4806 Seton Drive Baltimore, MD 21215

    You will receive certification from the Adult Learning Services Department within six

    weeks of receipt of the packet. Record the information on your Training Record (08-

    1423).

    OBJECTIVES By completing this packet, you will be able to:

    1. List characteristics of 4th and 5th graders. 2. Apply the concept of girl/adult partnership to planning troop activities with girls.

    3. Use Girl Scout Junior resources to plan meeting and learn how to customize a

    Journey.

    4. Be familiar with Girl Scout Junior Earned Awards

    5. Apply 3 types of troop government to Girl and Adult Planning

    Now, let’s get started!

    mailto:[email protected]

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    GIRL SCOUT JUNIOR BASICS

    Girl Scout Juniors are in 4th and 5th grade. This is a very busy stage in their life - a time when they are learning about themselves, exploring the world around them and making new and lasting friendships. Because all girls develop and mature at their own pace, it is important that you, as a leader, are able to recognize each individual girl’s needs and interests and help her to develop those interests. While all girls are unique, there are many characteristics that Junior Girl Scouts share. Look at Understanding Junior Age Girls in your Journey guides and in Volunteer Essentials and review these characteristics. Think about your own daughter, or the girls in your troop/group. How do you think these characteristics will affect the kinds of activities the girls will enjoy doing in their troop? Uniforms and Books Girls can wear the Girl Scout Pin, showing they belong to Girl Scouts of the USA, and the World Trefoil Pin, signifying their membership in a worldwide movement. Girl Scout Juniors can purchase uniforms with either a sash or vest to display their insignia. Girls can also buy the following Journeys - Agent of Change, Get Moving, aMUSE, and the Junior Girls Guide to Girl Scouting). Leaders use the How to Guide Girl Scout Juniors on the Agent of Change, Get Movings and aMUSE Journeys , Girls Guide to Girl Scouting and Volunteer Essentials. Girl Scout Juniors with Special Needs Girl Scouting is for Every Girl, Everywhere! This includes girls with all kinds of abilities and disabilities. Focus on Ability: Serving Girls with Special Needs is available in the Volunteer Resource Center and gives information on abilities and tips for working with and including all girls. We also have a taped presentation on our website - http://gscm.org/for-volunteers/volunteer-training/webinars/. Communication Creating a Safe Space for girls is important in Girl Scouting. Girls will need the recognition and support from their leaders in addition to open communication. Read Creating a Safe Space in Chapter 3 in Volunteer Essentia ls and answer the following: How will you provide a safe place for girls in your troop? What will you do to help manage conflict in your troop? Dealing with Sensitive Issues Chapter 3 of Volunteer Essentials discusses guidelines for handling sensitive issues that may arise in your troop/group. You should always follow GSCM procedures if you suspect a child has been neglected, or physically or sexually abused.

    http://gscm.org/for-volunteers/volunteer-training/webinars/http://gscm.org/for-volunteers/volunteer-training/webinars/

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    Tips for Working with Girl Scout Juniors

    • Focus on the talents and skills of each girl. Recognize that not all of the girls will be interested in or excel at the same things.

    • Allow girls to learn by experience. Girls learn more by doing than by watching or hearing. • Encourage girls to solve their own problems, to go to each other for assistance, and to

    take turns leading the troop/group. • Help each girl develop positive feelings about herself. This is especially important in a

    time when girls are maturing more quickly physically, socially and intellectually than they are emotionally.

    • Rejoice with the girls when they achieve something important. • Give directions the girls can understand. • Set limits. Make them clear and consistent. Allow girls to participate in writing the

    troop/group rules. They will be more willing to follow rules if they had a hand in developing them.

    • Encourage respect for different cultural, ethnic, and racial backgrounds. • Encourage girls to work on projects in pairs and groups. Learning to work with others is a

    skill that will help them for the rest of their lives. • Don’t expect every girl to participate in every activity. Girls’ interests and abilities will

    differ. • Involve each girl’s family as much as possible. Each parent/guardian has a talent that

    they can share with the troop/group - -from Troop First Aider to the Troop Camper to a badge coordinator. Encourage families to share in their daughter’s Girl Scout experience.

    • Share your successes, problems and resource with other leaders. Attend your Service Unit Meetings regularly. Your fellow leaders are one of your best resources! Valuable information for you and your troop is disseminated at the Service Unit meetings. Don’t let your troop/group miss out on exciting opportunities because you didn’t attend a meeting. If you cannot make a meeting, arrange for a co-leader or parent to attend in your place.

    What tips for working with Girl Scout Juniors do you think will be the most difficult to implement and what might you do to facilitate implementing them?

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    The 15 Outcomes of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience: DISCOVER

    • Girls develop a strong sense of self • Girls develop positive values • Girls gain practical life skills • Girls seek challenges in the world • Girls develop critical thinking

    CONNECT

    • Girls develop healthy relationships • Girls promote cooperation and team building • Girls can resolve conflicts • Girls advance diversity in a multicultural world • Girls feel connected to their communities, locally and globally

    TAKE ACTION

    • Girls can identify community needs • Girls are resourceful problem solvers • Girls advocate for themselves and others, locally and globally • Girls educate and inspire others to act i l f l d k diff i h ld

    THE GIRL SCOUT LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCE

    “In Girl Scouts, leadership isn’t just about building future leaders – it’s about building girl leaders for today.” Kathy Cloninger, former CEO, GSUSA

    The Girl Scout Leadership Experience identifies three keys to leadership:

    Discover – Girls understand themselves and their values and use their knowledge and skills to explore the world. Connect – Girls care about, inspire, and team with others locally and globally. Take Action – Girls act to make the world a better place. As girls take part in Girl Scouts we will be able to review the outcomes, and the signs of those outcomes, to gauge the benefits of the experience.

    Our Long-term outcome: Girls will lead with of courage, confidence, and character, to make the world a better place.

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    THE PLANNING PROCESS A girl and an adult are in partnership when they work together to complete a task, resolving issues, or plan an activity. There are three processes that should be considered when planning. Under each, give an example of how you might use that in your troop meeting:

    • Girl Led – This is just what it sounds like – girls play an active part in figuring out the what, where, when, how, and why of their activities. They lead the planning and decision-making as much as possible as they prepare to become active participants in their local and global communities. Example:

    • Learning by Doing – A hands-on learning process that engages girls in continuous cycles of action and reflection that result in deeper understanding of concepts and mastery of practical skills. As they participate in meaningful activities and then reflect on them, girls get to explore their own questions, discover answers, gain new skills, and share ideas and observations with others. Example:

    • Cooperative Learning – Through cooperative learning, girls work together toward shared goals in an atmosphere of respect and collaboration that encourages the sharing of skills, knowledge, and learning. Working together in all-girl environments also encourages girls to feel powerful and emotionally and physically safe, and it allows them to experience a sense of belonging even in the most diverse groups. Example:

    Adults foster girl/adult planning by: • Asking questions, rather than providing answers. • Guiding, rather than leading. • Advising, rather than judging. • Helping a girl to think through a decision, rather than deciding for her.

    Girl Scout Daisies

    The leader’s

    Leader’s Role

    Girl Scout Brownies

    role changes

    Girl Scout Juniors

    as the girls grow in

    Girl Scout Cadettes

    decision making skill,s

    Girl Scout Seniors and

    Ambassadors

    Girl’s Role

    maturity, responsibility,

    and confidence.

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    Girl planning is fundamental to Girl Scouting, yet so often when we ask girls what they want to do, we hear the same old things: camping, crafts, parties, skating. Here are some practical ways to discover what girls want. 1. Brainstorming. Open up the group; any and all ideas are game; no one is allowed to say

    anything negative about any ideas. Record all suggestions. After the session is over (about two minutes), evaluate them. Sometimes even the way-out ones are feasible.

    2. Have an idea box, dream box, wish box, - your basic suggestion box with a new title. 3. Unfinished sentences - try having them finish:

    If I could do anything, I’d . When we go camping, I like best. If we had $100 to spend, I’d like to . .

    I wish I knew how to .

    I wish we could go to . Have them complete the Unfinished Sentences worksheet on the following page. .

    4. Lists. Ask your girls to list 20 things they like to do. 5. Keep your ears open for “I wish . . .” and “What if . . .” 6. Use bulletin boards, posters, learning centers to spark interest. If they’re really

    interested in a poster, they’ll be interested in investigating what it’s about. 7. Evaluate constantly by asking “Did you like ? Would you do it

    again? Would you like to learn more? What was the best part about ? 8. Use girls’ answers as possible ideas. Evaluations can be springboards.

    Determining Girls’ Interests

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    Name: Things I would like to do this year:

    Places I would like to go this year:

    Some things I would like to learn this year:

    Badges I would like to work on this year: My favorite activities are:

    My favorite sport is Someday I would like to be If I had one wish it would be My pets are I have sisters and brothers. I am the (circle one) oldest youngest in-between

    Unfinished Sentences

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    My favorite school subject is The school subject I like least is The thing I do best is The thing I like best about myself is The thing I would most like to change about myself is My best trait is

    Girl/Adult Planning in the Meeting Place

    In your own words, define girl/adult planning as it relates to Girl Scout Juniors.

    Name two (2) benefits girls will experience by actively participating in girl/adult planning. 1. 2. List two (2) things you (as the leader/advisor) can do to encourage the girls in your troop to take the lead on planning activities for the troop. 1. 2.

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    GSUSA Program Resources The Journey Books are the core of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. In addition, badges are available for girls to discover and explore their many interests. Here is a brief overview of the resources: Agent of Change This powerful journey is filled with ceremonies and circles, real-life heroines, and special new characters, including a fashion-savvy spider named Dez. Along the way, girls learn how their own power combines into team power and then moves out to become community power (kind of like how Dez weaves her web from the inside out). The journeys’ centerpiece is a comic story of girl heroines who will inspire the real-life Girl Scout Juniors as they take action to improve their own community. Get Moving! Girls explore the energy inside them, the energy use in their places and spaces, and the energy of getting themselves from here to there. A new comic story, “Vamos Ya!” will inspire the action (walking school bus, anyone?) and Dez, the fashionista spider, is back with some wit as she tries to figure out life “off the grid.” Along the way, Juniors can earn Energize, Investigate, and Innovate awards! aMUSE In aMUSE, Juniors gain an understanding of just how limitless their potential can be as they try on a range of roles - real and creative- that the world offers. In doing so, they learn about people and the power of real-life action and leadership.

    JOURNEYS - EXPLORING THE GIRL BOOK Using a Junior Journey book, please answer the following questions.

    1. Who will girls “meet” on the journey (fictional, historic, or real life)?

    2. What is one of the steps girls will do to Take Action to change the world?

    3. How is Girl Scout history, tradition, or ceremony incorporated into the journey?

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    JOURNEYS EXPLORING THE ADULT BOOK

    On a journey one should have a roadmap, a plan, and some tools to make a success of the trip. Using the adult book for one of the Journeys, identify

    where you find these tools.

    1. How will you know how this journey ties to the National Leadership Outcomes?

    2. What information do you have about the awards the girls will earn?

    3. How will the “Sessions at a Glance” pages help you? 4. What is one role you will play in guiding girls on their “Take Action” project?

    5. What is one example of a tip or information you have about making this experience Girl Led?

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    The Girl Scout Junior Meeting

    In general, Girl Scout Junior meetings last 1 – 2 hours and meet once a week or twice a month. Because every girl is different, so is every troop. The most important thing is that your troop schedule is meeting the needs of the girls and their parents and that the interests of the girls are also being met. If your troop is working on a special project or badge, you may want to meet more frequently, at least temporarily.

    One of the biggest questions new Leaders have is “What do I do with the girls?” The answer is simple…ask the girls! Juniors are capable of making a lot of their own decisions! With so many Girl Scout resources available (not to mention trips, discussion topics, and service projects), you’re sure to find something that meets the needs and interests of all the girls in your troop! Your role as a Leader is to guide the girls through their journey and to encourage them to try new things. One way you can do this is by being organized! Having a plan for your troop meeting will help you and the girls navigate through the transitions of moving from one activity to the next. Here are some various troop meeting schedules that you may use throughout the year.

    1. All parts are used 2. Planning may take most of the meeting 3. A time when a meeting may be all activity: Field trip, guest speaker, special craft

    Sample Troop

    Meetings

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    Planning a meeting using the Journeys 1. Use the Meeting Planning Sheet found in the Evaluation Packet and plan a

    meeting using your Junior resources.

    2. After you have planned the meeting, choose one of the Journeys and complete the additional questions in the Evaluation Packet.

    3. Please return your meeting planning sheet with your completed Evaluation Packet.

    Troop Government

    It is important that as the girls in your troop/group develop and mature, they are encouraged to take on greater leadership roles. We refer to this as the “Girl/Adult Partnership”. While you, as the adult, are responsible for making many final troop/group decisions - -especially those concerning the safety and well-being of the girls, Juniors are capable of doing much of the planning and implementation of troop/group activities. There are three forms of Troop Government that are commonly used with Girl Scout Juniors. Read Letting Girls Lead in the Appendix for Troop Volunteers in Volunteer Essentials to learn about each of these forms of Troop Government and answer the following:

    1. The model of Troop Government in which girls elect a leadership team or steering committee is called ____________________________________________. 2. In the _______________________________ model of Troop Government, the troop has no formal government. The entire troop participates directly in the decision-making process. 3. When a troop divides into smaller groups called ____________________________, they are using the _____________________________ model of Troop Government.

    Girl Scout Junior Earned Awards

    When asked to identify Junior earned awards, most people will readily respond with “badges and patches”. While badges and patches do in fact represent the largest number of Girl Scout Junior earned awards, there are many others that are equally fun and challenging for your troop/group to earn. Using your essential resources, look up the following awards and give a brief description of these awards.

    Junior Aide Award My Promise, My Faith Journey Awards (for the Journey you are using) Summit Award Bronze Award

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    Money Matters It is the leader’s job to help girls see there are price tags on ideas and that part of their job is to investigate the cost of proposed activities. You, the leader, in collaboration with the troop, prepare the budget for the year, discuss it with the troop treasurer if you have one; either you or the treasurer presents it to the girls for their approval. For Your Guidance Anything that costs more than one week’s troop dues needs to be in a plan. As Juniors are deciding their weekly activities, tell them the amount of weekly troop dues. As you discuss detailed short-term plans on a monthly basis, have monthly troop income

    figures available. Include the girls in updating the income as dues are collected or money is earned. As you put plans on your calendar, note each item that costs more than one week’s dues with a $ symbol. Point out you can’t have $ signs too close together and expect to have money available from dues.

    Special events or projects should be carefully discussed for budget implications. Decisions to undertake costly projects should be made with sufficient time to secure the necessary funds.

    The budget should be reviewed with the girls on a regular basis. The parents and the troop committee should be updated for their information and support. The girls should have hands-on experience in:

    - Collecting and recording dues. - Making decisions on the use of available funds. - Accompanying the leader on trips to the bank. - Shopping for troop supplies and equipment.

    Please read Chapter 5: Managing Group Finances in Volunteer Essentia ls and also Council Policies (00-221) and answer the following questions.

    • If your troop plans a money earning activity and it is approved by your Service Unit Manager and Membership and Community Development Specialist to whom does the money belong?

    • List several examples of money-earning activities that are not appropriate for Girl Scout troops.

    • How many signatures must there be on the troop bank account and who should they be?

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    When planning Service Projects, involve the girls in the process. Ask them how they would like to help in the community or even better, how can they “Take Action” and engage the community in the project. Harvest for the Hungry is a council-wide service project. Information is available in the VRC. Check first with the organization or agency before starting the project. Make sure the project is appropriate for Girl Scout Juniors. Try to do a project where there will be a response, someone to thank the girls and let them

    know they are appreciated. Service projects are a good way to explore careers. If you have done something you and the girls are comfortable with, how can you share it as a

    service? Juliette Low was our first advocate, working to make things happen. Is there something your

    troop feels strongly about you would like to be an advocate for? Girl Scouts cannot solicit money for any other organization: however; they may provide service for that organization. Nursing Homes: Prepare songs and skits to entertain. Prepare gifts for patients. Collect materials that are needed for their therapy programs such as fabric, wool and craft supplies. Spend time reading to or writing for patients. Hospitals: Contact Director of Volunteers. Offer to make gifts for children who come to the clinic. Girls fourteen years and older can be Candy Stripers. Museums: Older girls can act as guides, help with younger children, clean up, and collect needed items. Day Care Centers or Nursery Schools: Prepare songs, puppet shows, skits to entertain or teach. Take children on nature walks. Find out if hand made toys are needed. Animal Shelters: Help to clean up, decorate, and distribute information. PTA’s/School or Church: Decorate facilities used by troop. Make meeting decorations or help serve at functions. Senior Citizen Groups: Plan an activity day which could include a sight-seeing trip, bowling, picnic, cookout, songs, dances or crafts. List some others that you think of:

    Hints for Successful Service Projects

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    Girl Scouts of all ages enjoy planning ceremonies. You can find many reasons to plan a ceremony. The ones that are remembered the most often have a theme, like nature, heritage, friendship, or peace. You can express the themes in many ways: through music, songs, stories, poetry, dance or light. Some ceremonies use common symbols such as a bridge for crossing over, a dove and olive branch for peace, and green plants for nature. We have found that troops/groups who hold ceremonies to recognize girls’ achievements have a greater girl retention rate. Please match up the corresponding ceremonies with the appropriate description.

    Fly-Up Ceremony

    Girl Scouts welcome someone into Girl Scouting for the first time.

    Rededication Ceremony

    Girl Scouts receive awards and other insignia.

    Girl Scouts’ Own

    Girl Scouts “move up” to the next level.

    Court of Awards

    Girl Scouts renew their dedication to the Girl Scout Promise and Law. This ceremony can take place at any time, but is usually held at the beginning or end of the year.

    Bridging Ceremony

    Girl Scout Brownies become Girl Scout Juniors.

    Investiture Ceremony

    A special ceremony created by a troop or group around a theme. The purpose is for girls and leaders to show how they feel about the theme. The ceremony may include readings, songs, poetry, and drama.

    Candlelight Ceremonies and Flag Ceremonies

    Can take place on their own, or can take place as part of another ceremony or celebration.

    Ceremonies

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    Leader: “Will the patrol leaders please come forward as I call each name?” If each patrol elected its own leader, one member of each patrol presents her new leader. If the entire troop elected the patrol leaders, the previous patrol leaders bring the new leaders forward. “All over the world among Girl Scouts and Girl Guides, there are patrol leaders just like you. This is one of the links in the chain of friendship between Girl Scouts and Girl Guides. We use the patrol system because it is one of the best ways for you to become both leaders and followers. “You have been selected to represent your patrol at Court of Honor meetings. As a patrol leader, you will conduct your patrol meetings and will take your patrol’s ideas and suggestions to the Court of Honor. You will take back all Court of Honor decisions. Yours is a big responsibility! Question to Patrol Leaders “Will you as a patrol leader, put your patrol ahead of yourself, and your troop ahead of your patrol, that we might have a better troop? If so, answer ‘I will’.” Question to Patrol Members “Will you pledge your support to your patrol leaders and give your ideas and suggestions so we can work together to have the best possible troop? If so, answer ‘I will.’” To the Patrol Leaders “Now you are officially patrol leaders. Wear these gold cords with pride and humility, and be ever mindful of the responsibility your patrol and your troop have placed on you.” To the Troop “Promises made and broken have been responsible for much unhappiness. In many aspects of life, a promise plays an important part. Solemnly and sincerely making a promise can be the beginning of understanding and assuming responsibility. Let us all make our Girl Scouts Promise, after which we will sing ‘When ‘ere You Make a Promise’.” Closing The Girl Scout Benediction “God bless the Girl Scouts and Girl Guides all over the world tonight (today), and help us keep the Girl Scout Promise and live by the Girl Scout Law. Goodnight (Goodbye), Girl Scouts!” Credit: Jorge Pahlow, GSCM Trainer

    Sample Patrol Leader Installation Ceremony

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    Girls and audience are in horseshoe formation or facing the front of the room. Color guard is at the door to the room. The caller is in the front of the room, either at the end of the horseshoe or facing the audience. Caller: “Color guard, attention.” Stand straight, ready to advance, bearer even with or slightly in front of guards. Caller: “Girl Scouts, attention.” Stand straight, no talking. “Color guard, advance.” Guard comes to front of room or to open end of horseshoe, facing the flag stand, if there is one, or audience if there is no stand. Caller: “Girl Scouts, the flag of your country. Pledge allegiance.” The caller leads the group in the pledge. The color guard stands silently, as their job is to guard the flag. The ceremony may also include the Girl Scout Promise and/or an appropriate song. Caller: “Color guard, post the colors.” The flag bearer steps forward and places the flag in the stand. If more than one flag, the American flag is placed in stand last. If bearer has trouble, guard helps her. If there is no stand, the caller says, “Color guard, present the colors.” Flag bearer takes one step toward the audience. The Pledge of Allegiance is said at this point if the flags are not posted. Caller: “Color guard, dismissed.” The color guard leaves the flag in the stand if there is one, saluting in unison when the flag has been placed in the stand. Then they leave the horseshoe formation. If there is no stand, they return the flag to where it is stored. Caller: “Girl Scouts, dismissed.”

    Indoor Flag Ceremony

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    ANSWER KEY: Ceremonies Matching Activity

    Fly-Up Ceremony

    Girl Scouts welcome someone into Girl Scouting for the first time.

    Rededication Ceremony

    Girl Scouts receive awards and other insignia.

    Girl Scouts’ Own

    Girl Scouts “move up” to the next level.

    Court of Awards

    Girl Scouts renew their dedication to the Girl Scout Promise and Law. This ceremony can take place at any time, but is usually held at the beginning or end of the year.

    Bridging Ceremony

    Girl Scout Brownies become Girl Scout Juniors.

    Investiture Ceremony

    A special ceremony created by a troop or group around a theme. The purpose is for girls and leaders to show how they feel about the theme. The ceremony may include readings, songs, poetry, and drama.

    Candlelight Ceremonies and Flag Ceremonies

    Can take place on their own, or can take place as part of another ceremony or celebration.

  • 20

    Girl Scout JuniorsHome StudyThe following resources are available to help you as a Girl Scout Junior Leader. You will need a copy of the essential resources to complete this Home Study Packet and answer the test questions. You will need one of the journey sets to complete thi...Program Resources for Girl Scout JuniorsEssential Resources for LeadersGSUSA Resources (Available in the GSCM Store)The Journey Materials are the Core of the Girl Scout program – you will need one of the journey sets to complete this home study.Adult Journey Guides – Agent of Change, Get Moving, and aMUSEGirl Journey Books – Agent of Change, Get Moving, and aMUSEGirls Guide to Girl Scouting for JuniorsGSUSA Website – www.girlscouts.org.GSCM ResourcesTroop/Group Resource Packet (Available through your Service Team or Membership and Community Development Specialist)Volunteer Essentials – available in your Troop Resource Binder or on our website (this is a GSUSA document customized for our council)Safety Activity Checkpoints – available on our website (this is a GSUSA document)GSCM website – wwww.gscm.orgFor additional resources, please visit Girl Scouts of Central Maryland’s stores, Juliette’s Closets, and the Volunteer Resource Center.

    DIRECTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE HOME STUDY1. Purchase or borrow the essential resources for Girl Scout Junior Leaders.2. Complete each section of the Home Study Packet.3. If you have any questions, please contact Adult Learning Services, Valerie Brooks, at [email protected] or 410-358-9711, ext. 220.4. After completing the home study, please complete the Evaluation Packet.5. Mail the completed Evaluation Packet to: (Please keep the home study packet for your use.)Adult Learning Services DepartmentGirl Scouts of Central Maryland4806 Seton DriveBaltimore, MD 21215You will receive certification from the Adult Learning Services Department within six weeks of receipt of the packet. Record the information on your Training Record (08-1423).OBJECTIVESPlanning a meeting using the JourneysSample Patrol Leader

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Girl Scout Juniors Home Study Girl Scouts of Central Maryland 4806 Seton Drive Baltimore, MD 21215 410.358.9711 1.800.492.2521 www.gscm.org Revised 6/2013
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