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Innovating Against Hunger

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ICRISAT Calendar 2013
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  • 2013 Calendar

    Innovating Against Poverty and Hunger

    www.icrisat.orgScience with a human face

    ICRISAT Offices:

    ICRISAT-Patancheru(Headquarters)

    ICRISAT-Nairobi (Regional hub ESA) Nairobi, Kenya

    ICRISAT-Bamako(Regional hub WCA) Bamako, Mali

    ICRISAT-NiameyNiamey, Niger (Via Paris)

    ICRISAT-BulawayoBulawayo, Zimbabwe

    ICRISAT-LilongweLilongwe, Malawi

    ICRISAT-MaputoMaputo, Mozambique

  • This calendar is an exhibition of images illustrating the impact of science-based agricultural innovations in improving livelihoods and attaining food and nutrition security of smallholder farmers in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

    Research for the poorResearch innovations can only impact poverty and hunger if they reach the farmer and are adopted by them. The calendar covers the research for development (R4D) initiatives of ICRISAT and partners in ensuring successful solutions to help poor farmers in Asia and Africa grow more and diverse food, sell surpluses at the market, have a harvest even when rainfall is unpredictable or scarce and resist pest attacks. The images take us from India to Mali, via the Ethiopian highlands, where farmers like Niruji, Temegnush and Bedilu, the faces of smallholder agriculture, show us what impact agricultural innovation has had on their farm and household food security.

    PartnershipICRISAT works closely with farmers, local governments, national research institutions, NGOs and the private sector to make innovations accessible even to remote farming communities. The farmer is fi rmly at the center of R4D initiatives which means that their feedback is integrated and successful solutions are more easily adopted by them. Best practice and tools are spread through communities via farmers, NGOs, extension workers, agricultural entrepreneurs and policy makers using creative approaches such as small seed or fertilizer packets, farmer-to-farmer videos and self-help group networks.

    Innovating Against Poverty and Hunger ICRISAT 2013 Calendar

    About ICRISAT

    The International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) is a non-profi t, non-political organization that conducts agricultural research for development in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa with a wide array of partners throughout the world.

    ICRISAT is headquartered in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India, with two regional hubs and fi ve country offi ces in sub-Saharan Africa. It is a member of the CGIAR Consortium.

    Our Vision: A prosperous, food-secure and resilient dryland tropics. Our Mission :To reduce poverty, hunger, malnutrition and environmental degradation in the dryland tropics.Our Goal: Partnership-based international agricultural research-for-development that embodies Science with a human face. Our Approach: IMOD Inclusive Market-Oriented Development

    Science with a human face A member of the CGIAR ConsortiumPhoto: Alina Paul-Bossuet (ICRISAT)

  • M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2728 29 30 31

    January 2013

    Science with a human face

    Bounty harvestHaving access to drought tolerant and high yielding chickpea varieties has led to bumper harvests for Ethiopian farmers. ICRISAT is working with national research and government partners to promote drought-tolerant chickpea varieties that also help diversify production and improve soil fertility.

    Photo: Alina Paul-Bossuet (ICRISAT

  • M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 2425 26 27 28

    February 2013

    Science with a human face

    Better lives through better seedsTemegnush Dhabi, a widow with six children, took part in ICRISAT research trials to test how well the drought and pest resistant varieties of chickpea grew in her fi elds. She chose to cultivate the successful seeds and has had high yields over the last four years.

    Photo: Alina Paul-Bossuet (ICRISAT)

  • M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 2425 26 27 28 29 30 31

    March 2013

    Science with a human face

    Meeting market demandImproved varieties (drought tolerant, high yielding, pest resistant) of leguminous crops are spread through local communities via farmers like Bedilu who has been trained by the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIARS) and ICRISAT to produce certifi ed seeds. He then works with neighboring farmers to demonstrate best farm management with these improved varieties.

    Photo: Alina Paul-Bossuet (ICRISAT)

  • M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 2829 30

    April 2013

    Science with a human face

    Photo: Alina Paul-Bossuet (ICRISAT)

    Improved varieties plus best practicesGebeyehu Melesse and his son sell chickpeas at a local market in Addis Ababa. Seed delivery systems are key to meeting increasing demand. A number of farmers have been trained by the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research and ICRISAT to multiply certifi ed seeds, spread them to farmers and demonstrate good crop management.

  • M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

    13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2627 28 29 30 31

    May 2013

    Science with a human face

    Empowering womenPriscilla Mutie from Muuni village in Eastern Kenya shells pigeonpea to get a better price at the market. Women make up the majority of smallholder farmers. Their role in increasing incomes and improving food security is vital and must not be neglected.

    Photo: Swathi Sridharan (ICRISAT)

  • M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

    10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 2324 25 26 27 28 29 30

    June 2013

    Science with a human face

    Small pack revolutionSelling improved seeds in small quantities makes high yielding seeds available to smallholder farmers, especially women. ICRISAT and donors have supported seed entrepreneurs to help the poor access technology that improves their yields.

    Photo: Alina Paul-Bossuet (ICRISAT)

  • July 2013

    Science with a human face

    M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 2829 30 31

    Saving and investingSelf-help groups enable women to access credit and adopt innovations. Niruji, on the left, got a loan from her group savings scheme to set up a tree nursery and invest in her fi elds.

    Photo: Alina Paul-Bossuet (ICRISAT)

  • M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

    12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 2526 27 28 29 30 31

    August 2013

    Science with a human face

    Orphan crops no moreOrphan or neglected crops like pearl millet can have a vital role in food security. ICRISAT and partners have developed varieties of pearl millet resistant to downy mildew, minimizing losses if a crop is infected by the fungus. In India, downy mildew resistant pearl millet has a high social impact as the food security of thousands of families depends on its harvests.

    Photo: PS Rao (ICRISAT)

  • M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2223 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

    September 2013

    Science with a human face

    Fighting afl atoxinAfl atoxin is a fungus that affects the health, harvests and incomes of smallholder farmers. ICRISAT supported the National Smallholder Farmers Association of Malawi (NASFAM) to use better and low-cost afl atoxin management techniques to supply high-quality peanuts to UK supermarkets and develop a booming fair trade business.

    Photo: ICRISAT

  • October 2013

    Science with a human face

    M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2728 29 30 31

    Worm powerImproving soil fertility through simple ecological methods such as vermicomposting, is an essential step to increase yields in a sustainable way. ICRISAT is working with the government, local farm centers, NGOs and farmers in many Indian villages to improve soil and water management and increase yields.

    Photo: Alina Paul-Bossuet (ICRISAT)

  • M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 2425 26 27 28 29 30

    November 2013

    Science with a human face

    Farmers on fi lmDigital Green helps women farmers develop short farmer-friendly fi lms to enable them to train others and improve extension services. ICRISAT helps in spreading successful research innovations on water, soil and crop management through communities by partnering with development organizations like Digital Green.

    Photo: Alina Paul-Bossuet (ICRISAT)

  • December 2013

    Science with a human face

    M T W T F S S M T W T F S S1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2223 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    Creating a better futureAgricultural innovations can make a big difference to peoples lives. The challenge is to ensure that these innovations are accessible and acceptable among communities, and that the impact is sustainable, creating better opportunities for the next generation.

    Photo: Swathi Sridharan (ICRISAT)

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