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Joint Response Plan (JRP) Implementation Update Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis | August-September 2021 SITUATION OVERVIEW All humanitarian activities resumed in the camps following directives issued by the Office of the Refugee Relief and Repatriation Commissioner (RRRC) on 9 September and 22 September, the latter specifically to reopen the Learning Centres. For Rohingya refugee children, this marked the first return to classes since March 2020. The humanitarian community gradually and safely scaled up activities with appropriate COVID-19 prevention protocols. Discussions to launch the Myanmar Curriculum Pilot are in their final stages, and the repair and re-opening of some Learning Centres continues. The roll-out of COVID-19 vaccinations for Rohingya refugees, aged 55 and above, under the Government’s National Deployment and Vaccination Plan was successfully completed. Meanwhile, efforts continued to respond to the aftermath of the significant flash floods and landslides in end-July, compounded by weather- related incidents during the reporting period. The resumption of protection activities has helped address critical needs in the camps, including in-person case management and referrals, counselling and psychosocial support, and the resumption of full registration activities. 2021 JRP KEY FIGURES FUNDING STATUS FUNDING BY DONOR 176M 65M 49M 36M 20M 16M 16M 10M 10M 51M USA Australia UK ECHO Japan CERF Canada Germany Private Others Funded $449M Funding gap $494M 48% Funded Refugee children are attending learning centres in the camps, safely with COVID-19 prevention protocols in place © ISCG
Transcript
Page 1: Joint Response Plan (JRP) Implementation Update

Joint Response Plan (JRP) Implementation Update

Rohingya Humanitarian Crisis | August-September 2021

SITUATION OVERVIEW All humanitarian activities resumed in the camps following directives issued by the Office of the Refugee Relief

and Repatriation Commissioner (RRRC) on 9 September and 22 September, the latter specifically to reopen the

Learning Centres. For Rohingya refugee children, this marked the first return to classes since March 2020. The humanitarian community gradually and safely scaled up activities with appropriate COVID-19 prevention

protocols.

Discussions to launch the Myanmar Curriculum Pilot are

in their final stages, and the repair and re-opening of some Learning Centres continues.

The roll-out of COVID-19 vaccinations for Rohingya

refugees, aged 55 and above, under the Government’s National Deployment and Vaccination Plan was

successfully completed. Meanwhile, efforts continued to

respond to the aftermath of the significant flash floods and landslides in end-July, compounded by weather-

related incidents during the reporting period.

The resumption of protection activities has helped

address critical needs in the camps, including in-person case management and referrals, counselling and

psychosocial support, and the resumption of full registration activities.

2021 JRP KEY FIGURES

FUNDING STATUS FUNDING BY DONOR

176M

65M

49M

36M

20M

16M

16M

10M

10M

51M

USA

Australia

UK

ECHO

Japan

CERF

Canada

Germany

Private

Others

Funded

$449M

Funding gap

$494M

48% Funded

Refugee children are attending learning centres in the camps,

safely with COVID-19 prevention protocols in place © ISCG

Page 2: Joint Response Plan (JRP) Implementation Update

JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

2

FUNDING COMPARISON WITH PREVIOUS YEARS

FUNDING BY SECTOR

Funding status reflects figures reported in Financial Tracking Service (FTS) as of 30 September 2021. These figures do not account for multi-year funding, pledges, or funding outside of the JRP

2.6M received

85M requested

3%

EDUCATION

37.2M received

247M requested

15%

FOOD SECURITY

25.4M received

135M requested

19%

HEALTH

2.8M received

42.3M requested

7%

NUTRITION

39.8M received

92M requested

43%

PROTECTION

11.2M received

112M requested 10%

SHELTER

and NFIs

7.7M received

94M requested

8%

SITE MANAGEMENT SITE

DEVELOPMENT

10.4M received

109M requested

9%

WASH

0M received

1.6M requested

0%

LOGISTICS

0.35M received

3.9M requested

9%

EMERGENCY

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

2.2M received

10M requested

22%

COMMUNICATION with

COMMUNITIES

8.2M received

10.3M requested

79%

COORDINATION

STAFF HEALTH

Page 3: Joint Response Plan (JRP) Implementation Update

JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

3

COVID-19 RESPONSE Across thirteen Severe Acute Respiratory Infection Isolation and Treatment Centres (SARI ITCs), 641 beds are

functional, and 241 beds are on standby. A gradual declining trend in bed occupancy rate was observed in August and September (from 55% to 37%). Among the admitted patients, the proportion of mild cases (~80%)

remained roughly the same. The percentage of moderate to severe cases increased in quarter three (~20%)

compared to the last two quarters in 2021. The Cumulative COVID-19 Case Fatality Rates amongst the Rohingya refugees remained at approximately 1% over the reporting period. The number of sentinel testing sites

increased from 38 to 41. In September, testing rates increased slightly compared to August, likely due to the recovery from the heavy monsoon rains and associated transportation and access constraints for patients.

A two-dose COVID-19 vaccination campaign for the Rohingya population aged 55 years and above in Ukhiya

and Teknaf Upazilas was completed on 23 September 2021. Seventy-seven percent of the target population

(33,3861 of 43,093 persons) were successfully vaccinated with two doses. The Government of Bangladesh is planning for further extension of vaccination to other age groups subject to the availability of vaccines.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS AND UPDATES BY SECTOR

FSS Dashboard

Funding received: USD 37.2M (15%)

Funding gap: USD 210M (85%)

• Funding gaps for the remainder of 2021 include projects for sustainable

resource management, self-reliance, and livelihoods activities for Rohingya refugees and host communities.

Achievements

• FSS continued its deduplication exercise,

which began in April 2020, to cross-check host community beneficiaries

receiving cash and voucher assistance and livelihood support interventions. In August and September, a total of 116,350 beneficiaries’

national identification numbers (NIDs) were cross-checked, and 3% were found to be duplicates.

• A scoping survey was developed to further understand partners’ livestock activities and needs, and to

support strengthened coordination of livestock interventions in the host community.

• FSS, WFP and FAO jointly organized two Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (MEAL) trainings, attended by a total of 98 participants from 57 partner organizations.

Challenges

• Partners experienced delays in carrying out activities due to government approval processes in the camps at various levels.

1 13,467 female and 19,919 male

868,970 refugees received regular food assistance on a monthly basis

in August and September. (OB1, IN1, monthly indicator)

87,367 refugee households received capacity building/self-reliance

support in August and September. (OB2, IN1, Monthly indicator)B(OB

In August and September, 42,850 host community households

received livelihoods and/or social safety net support. (OBJ3, IN1+2+3,

monthly indicator)

August-September achievement, gap against 2021 target

98% 2%

46% 54%

65% 35%

15% 85%

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JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

4

Health Sector Dashboards

Funding received: USD 25.4M (19%)

Funding gap: USD 109.5M (81%)

• Health partners do not have significant funding gaps for the remainder of 2021,

as a result of various factors including carry-over and re-allocation of funds, as

well as development funding and other funding sources not captured by JRP.

Achievements

• The International Coordinating Group (ICG) on Vaccine Provision approved the government application of a two-dose Oral Cholera Vaccine

(OCV) campaign for Rohingya refugees and host communities aged 1 year and above in Ukhiya and

Teknaf (approximately 1.4 million persons). The expected date for the first round of the campaign is 10 October, to begin with the Rohingya population in Ukhiya and Teknaf Upazilas for a first dose,

followed by a second dose after the necessary gap between doses. Subsequently this programme will cover the host community in Ukhiya and Teknaf.

• Ongoing Maternal & Perinatal Mortality Surveillance and Response in the Rohingya refugee camps with

collaborative efforts from the SRH Working Group and the health sector partners. During the time period (July, August & September) 24 maternal deaths were recorded and reviewed to respond to the factors responsible for the deaths.

Challenges

• Partners have identified the need to strengthen monsoon preparedness training for staff and improve

inter-sectoral coordination in various cross-cutting issues affected by monsoon rains, including drainage systems, communications, and transportation.

Shelter/NFI Dashboard

Funding received: USD 11.2M (10%)

Funding gap: USD 100.7M (90%)2

2 In addition to critical LPG funding gaps, some Shelter/NFI JRP activities are partially funded for the remainder of the year, including the

provision of household-level solar lights (USD 500,000 gap); NFI voucher system for Rohingya households (USD 2.16M gap); and

Shelter/NFI programmes (21.8M), but the gaps are not identified to be critical for the remainder of 2021, and would not be able to be

delivered within the year if funded at this time.

An average of 2.9* health consultations/person/year was achieved as of end-September 2021. (OB1, IN2)

641 functional beds at isolation and treatment facilities, including SARI ITCs as of end-September 2021 (target 600). (OB2, IN6).

100% households were visited every two weeks by community

health workers in August and September. (OB3, IN3)

Achievement as of end-September 2021, gap against 2021 target *Annualized figure for Rohingya refugees and nearby host population as of 30 September

2021

100%

100%

100%

5,627 households (HH) were assisted with emergency shelter support in August and September 2021. (OB1, IN1)*

*3% gap represents shelters not eligible for assistance (no damages qualified for

shelter material support), or material support distribution was restricted by CiCs.

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement

85% 12% 3%

10% 90%

19% 81%

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JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

5

• Funding shortfall for Liquified Petroleum

Gas (LPG) refills in 16 camps as of end-October 2021 continues. The replacement

of stoves that have reached their standard lifespan is also needed as is training for

Rohingya households on LPG safety (total

gap USD 5.7M). LPG is currently the most appropriate clean energy solution to meet

the cooking and nutritional needs in the camps. It prevents the use of firewood

that will have a devastating environmental impact and trigger protection issues.

Achievements

• 16,997 Rohingya households were

assisted with Transitional Shelter Assistance Phase 1 and 2, and repair and

maintenance, including support for improving shelter durability. To date, partners have reached 49,460 of the 169,654 households (HH) targeted in 2021.

• 652 mid-term shelters were built in camps 8E, 17, and 18. To date, partners have reached 4,723 of the 6,066 HH targeted in 2021.

• 236,159 LPG refills were provided to Rohingya refugees and 6,006 refills to host community households.

2,658 extremely vulnerable Rohingya HHs received porter support for LPG delivery.

Challenges

• The construction of double-storey steel shelters was placed on hold. and IOM and UNHCR have been

asked to reduce the size of the footing to 65cm x 65cm. Discussions with the authorities are ongoing to ensure that safety standards are maintained.

• Efforts need to be made to ensure that the limited funding available for shelter support is utilized in an

optimal manner. As part of these efforts, the new (10’x15’) shelter design should be used to replace shelters that were destroyed or damaged beyond repair, rather than currently functional shelters.

Across the last 3 years, 74% of the shelter assistance was repair, maintenance and reinforcing of the

existing shelters, while only 5% was new shelter construction (remaining 21% was emergency shelter assistance).

WASH Dashboard

Funding received: USD 10.4M (9%)

Funding gap: USD 99.3M (91%)

As of end-September, 81% of Rohingya HH had benefitted from

durable shelter materials (treated bamboo, steel shelters,

reinforced concrete posts), of a targeted 81% of the population in

need. (OB2, IN4)*

*71% represents cumulative achievement from Jan. 2020 – July 2021

437 refugees, including women, older people, and people with

specific needs, were involved in shelter activities in August and

September, reaching 100% of the annual 2021 JRP target (OB3,

IN2)

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021

target

71% 10%

64% 36%

9% 91%

972,438 people in the camps and targeted host community

reported having enough water to meet all domestic needs as of

end-September 2021. (OB1, IN4)

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021

target

78% 1% 20%

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JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

6

Achievements

• In the camps, 558 bathing facilities were

built (37 for persons with disabilities, 469

female-only), and 4,856 were upgraded; 628 latrines were built (25 for persons with

disabilities and, 255 female-only), 732 were upgraded, and 16,189 were repaired.

A gap analysis is currently underway to

identify progress against the total needs.

• In the host communities, 136 latrines, 58 bathing facilities, and 52 deep tube-wells

were constructed.

• 16,290 Rohingya women and girls received menstrual hygiene management

(MHM) kits in August and September. Of

the 216,038 women and girls in need, 62,111 have not yet been reached this year.

• In the fire-affected camps, 8E and 8W, six water distribution networks were affected, and two have

been repaired due to minor damages. The reconstruction of the remaining four water distribution networks is ongoing, with work expected to conclude by mid-November.

• UNHCR, Oxfam and MSF continued the construction of the Ukhiya Mega Fecal Sludge Treatment Plant

(FSTP), which began in December 2020 and is now 70% complete. It will serve approximately 180,000 people (Rohingya refugees and a small number of nearby host community members).

Challenges

• Partners are now facing a significant backlog of WASH construction in 14 camps to catch up due to the reduced services made available during the COVID19 restrictions. To meet the annual targets, 304 out

of 1,068 latrines, 231 out of 1,223 bathing cubicles, 8 out of 109 communal solid waste pits, and 4 out of 4 solid waste compost plants need to be constructed.

• The construction of Integrated Faecal Sludge Transfer Network (IFSTN) is pending approval.

• Access to the only Solid Waste Management Plant and one Faecal Sludge Management Plant will only

be possible once a pocket gate is installed in the perimeter fence in camp 16.

SMSD Incident Reporting Service Monitoring

Funding received: USD 7.7M (8%)

Funding gap: USD 86.5M (92%)

• Key funding shortfalls for the remainder

of 2021 include partially funded critical

projects for emergency preparedness and response (USD 18.3M gap), and site

development work to respond to monsoon damages and cyclone season

preparedness and response (USD 6M

gap). The overall emergency preparedness and site development

work includes drainage construction and

As of end-September, 92% of sanitation facilities (bathing cubicles

and latrines) were fully functional (target 90%). (OB2, IN4)

As of end-September, 57% of women and girls were accessing

MHM supply at least twice per year (target 80%). (OB3, IN3) (

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021 target

92%

48% 9% 23%

8% 92%100% of refugees live in camps where a multi-hazard emergency preparedness and response plan has been updated and tested. (OB1, IN2)

In August and September, 50% of site development and

improvement works were identified through community consultations

and/or referrals (target 50%). (OB2, IN2, monthly indicator)

Achievement as of July 2021, gap against 2021 target

100%

50%

Page 7: Joint Response Plan (JRP) Implementation Update

JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

7

desilting, stair construction, bridge construction, retaining walls and pathways

and soil stabilization, which indicated that significant funding would be required to mitigate the land to make it useable.

Achievements

• During the reporting period, a total of 44,026

Rohingya and Bangladeshi paid volunteers, including 33 persons with specific needs, were mobilized and engaged in various activities related to

camp infrastructure development. Activities included the construction and repair of 18,851 meters of pathways/ pedestrian/ vehicular roads, 1,868 meters of bridges, and 9,388 meters of staircases.

• The SMSD Sector continuously tracked daily incidents in the camps. A total of 387 incidents were

recorded including windstorm, slope failure and floods displacing a total of 7,863 individuals. In general,

a 60% reduction of incidents was observed, when compared with the last reporting period.

• The SMSD Sector has completed the dashboard for camp facilities mapping. The preliminary data for phase one of facilities mapping is available on the dashboard here.

Challenges

• Lack of land space for the displaced/ relocated families from the risk areas continue to affect the living

condition of the beneficiaries. The only space available is reserved or prioritized for the Shamlapur

residual caseload.

• There are persistent technical and cost-effectiveness challenges in mitigating/ improving land through soil stabilization.

Protection Service Mapping Dashboard

Funding received: USD 7.7M

Funding gap: USD 52.2M

• Funding is available for general protection activities until the end of 2021. However, there are funding shortfalls for specific critical activities related to the prevention of gender-based violence (USD 70,729) and

child protection work (USD 137,461) for the remainder of this year, mainly to step up individual case management and strengthen community-based protection systems.

20.5M received

40M requested 51%

GENERAL

PROTECTION

2.4M received

26M requested

9%

CHILD

PROTECTION

16.9M received

26M requested 65%

GENDER BASED

VIOLENCE

As of end-September, 60% of camps had operational camp

representation systems (target 60%). (OB2, IN2)

Achievement as of July 2021, gap against 2021 target

60%

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JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

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Achievements

• Community-Based Protection partners

continued to engage refugees through the Community Outreach Members

(COMs) and conducted 37,437 protection

awareness sessions, individually and in small groups, for 61,771 refugees3,

16,984 home visits and 2,053 monitoring assessments for 33,174 refugees to

identify, address or refer protection

priorities.

• 55 Protection Emergency Response Units (PERU) teams including 144 refugee

volunteers in 34 camps reached 60,855 individuals with different protection

interventions since beginning of the Monsoon season.

• PERU teams reached 4,302 (2,260 male,

2,042 female) vulnerable elderly persons with vaccination messaging and physically assisted 840 individuals with reduced mobility to join the vaccination centres.

Challenges

• Limited network connectivity impeded remote work modalities in the camps during the lockdown period.

The reduced humanitarian presence at the time

negatively affected the referral systems in place.

• Additional or expanded specialized partnerships for supporting persons with disabilities, elderly, and

gender diverse populations are needed to ensure full and equal coverage and access to essential services.

As a first step towards addressing this issue, an internal mapping was carried out by partners which

identified a lack of Age and Disability-specialized

actors in Camps 4E, 7, 16, 20, 20E, 23 and 25 to provide urgently needed support for persons living

with disabilities and older persons.

• The humanitarian community is continuing discussions on a streamlined and centralized reporting

channel with the authorities to ease the need for ad

hoc reports.

Child Protection (CP)

Achievements

• In August and September, 243 community child protection groups were established or

strengthened and 39 community-led

initiatives were implemented.

3 Including 321 older persons and 671 persons living with disabilities.

6,579 individuals were supported with legal aid and related services in August and September, including victims of trafficking and exploitation. (OB1, IN1)

3,954 community-led protection initiatives were supported by humanitarian actors in August and September. (OB2, IN1)

854 individuals (representing service providers and authorities) were trained on protection, including gender, in August and September. (OB3, IN3)

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021 target

62% 31% 7%

41% 11% 48%

21.7% 7.7% 70.6%

21,481 Rohingya and Bangladeshi adolescents (disaggregated by sex and disability) received services including resilience activities and the development of pre-vocational, life or peacebuilding skills in August and September. (OB4, IN1)

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021

target

40% 32% 29%

PERU Team in camp 1W assisting Elderly person to

reach the vaccination center in August 202 © Relief

International

Page 9: Joint Response Plan (JRP) Implementation Update

JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

9

• 25 Education Sector staff (19 male, 6 female)

were trained through a full-day CP virtual training. In collaboration with global experts,

Child Protection Sub-Sector (CPSS) organized a three-day violence prevention workshop for

19 partners (2 UN agencies, 8 Bangladeshi

NGOs, 9 INGOs), and training for CP focal points.

• In the host community, CPSS partners

focused on systems strengthening, particularly concerning case management

reaching 237 staff (119 male, 118 female).

• 7,306 host community adolescents were supported through CPSS activities aimed at building life skills and leadership.

Challenges

• While CP partners continue to prioritize outreach to promote male engagement, participation of male adolescents in relevant activities remains a challenge. Among the 21,481 adolescents who participated

in life skills and peacebuilding sessions, 10,991 were male and 10,490 were female.

• CPSS referral to other Sectors has been delayed in many cases, partly due to the absence of relevant service providers at camp-level, negatively impacting effective case management for children.

Gender-Based Violence (GBV)

Achievements

• 7,296 Rohingya and host community members were reached with structured

psychosocial support services,

psychological first aid and well-being sessions.

• Gender Equality Measure sessions

reached 1,433 adolescent girls including 12 with disabilities in the camps and host

community. The Girl Shine Life Skills

Curriculum reached 610 refugees (315 adolescent girls, 210 female caregivers

and 85 male caregivers) in the camps.

• 37,551 Rohingya and host community members were reached through GBV

awareness activities, including domestic violence and harmful discriminatory

gender norms, through door-to-door visits, group sessions at women and girl friendly spaces, and other outreach.

Challenges

• GBV prevention and response activities were temporarily suspended due to COVID restrictions. While they are back on track now, the closures resulted in a lack of surveillance that led to increased

vulnerabilities of women and girls who were confined to their homes where they faced greater risks of

intimate partner violence. Referrals to essential services decreased because women and girls were unable to seek services due to the lockdown restrictions and fear to be identified and stigmatized by

the community. This impacted severely access to legal services.

1,256 community activists were trained and engaged in GBV prevention strategies in August and September, using tested social change approaches in the camps and targeted host community. (OB5, IN1)

9,601 individuals in the camps and targeted host community benefited from structured PSS services in August and September. (OB5, IN2)

In August and September, 37% of the reported sexual violence cases

were referred and received medical care within 72 hours. (OB5, IN6,

monthly indicator)

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021 target

71% 5% 24%

50% 10% 41%

37% 63%

12,875 Rohingya and Bangladeshi girls and boys benefitted from age, diversity, and gender-sensitive structured and sustained, mental health and psychosocial support services in August and September. (OB4, IN3)

2,141 Rohingya and Bangladeshi girls and boys identified to be ‘at risk’ received specialized age and gender-sensitive child protection services in August and September, through individual case management to meet their unique needs. (OB4, IN4)

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021

target

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021

target

6.6% 4.6% 88.8%

10% 4% 86%

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JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

10

• Solar lighting towards the pathway of latrines and bathrooms were stolen or damaged in certain camp

areas. This has exacerbated risk of GBV during night-time and has further acted as deterrent on the mobility of women and girls.

Education Dashboard

Funding received: USD 2.2M (3%)

Funding gap: USD 82.4M (97%)

Achievements

• The Government of Bangladesh approved the re-opening of Learning

Centres (LCs) on 22 September 2021. 1,334 of 6,251 learning facilities were

opened as of end-September.

• The RRRC approved a sample-based

learner assessment to identify the current competencies of learners and

analyze the learning gaps/loss, to inform the review and redesign of educational content for use in the learning facilities. The assessment

commenced in September and is expected to be completed by the end of November.

• In the host community, 13,306 children (6,955 female, 6,351 male) received education and play

materials and supplies and 55,720 children (28,701 female, 27,019 male) received WASH items for preventing the spread of COVID-19.

• 323,518 Rohingya children (171,130 female, 152,388 male) and 55,720 host community children

(28,701 female, 27,019 male) were supported by School Feeding Programmes, which shifted to distribution at facilities with the re-opening of learning centres.

Challenges

• Permission to launch the Myanmar Curriculum Pilot (MCP) is pending although preparatory work is almost completed.

• Only 195 of 1,381 damaged LCs have been repaired due to restrictions in the camps until September.

Repair work is expected to scale up for the rest of the year, and partners are working to re-open the

remaining learning facilities as soon as possible.

Nutrition Dashboard

Funding received: USD 2.8M (7%)

Funding gap: USD 39.6M (93%)

9,121 malnourished Rohingya boys and girls under five and PLW

were reached with essential nutrition services in August and

September, reaching 54% of the annual 2021 JRP target. (OB1,

IN1+2+3)

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021

target

40% 14% 46%

As of end- September, 195 learning facilities in the refugee camps had

been rehabilitated/constructed. (OB1, IN4)

As of end- September, 13,306 crisis-affected host community and

Rohingya refugee girls and boys aged 3 to 24 years old had received

education and play materials, supplies, and equipment. (OB2, IN1)

As of end-September, 6,445 educators, managers, and planners had

been trained on crisis-sensitive planning, management, and coordination

for quality provision of learning opportunities for all learners. (OB3, IN2)

Achievement as of end September 2021, gap against 2021 target

3% 97%

3% 97%

100%

3% 97%

7% 93%

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JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

11

Achievements

• 8,963 children under five and pregnant and lactating women (PLW) were reached with essential

nutrition services in August and September, reaching 54% of the annual

2021 JRP target.

• 144,845 children benefitted from blanket

preventive nutrition supplementation programme, reaching 104% of the

monthly target.

• 8,453 caregivers of children under five and PLW received one-on-one and small

group infant and young child feeding in

emergencies (IYCF-E) counselling sessions, reaching 80% of the annual

2021 JRP target.

• In the host communities, 5,811 children under five and PLW received treatment

for severe or moderate acute malnutrition, and 13,385 adolescent girls

and PLW were reached with the anemia preventive programme.

• The first round of house-to-house Vitamin A supplementation (VAS) conducted in June 2021, reached

146,976 children (72,702 girls) 97 per cent of all refugee children aged 6-59 months in all camps.

• In September 2021, 97,830 children aged 24 to 59 months were provided deworming tablets reaching over 97 per cent of targeted children in all camps.

Challenges

• Until COVID-19 restrictions were lifted in September, the limited presence of the nutrition service

providers in the camps had significantly reduced contact between professional nutrition staff and the

Rohingya and host community members in need, negatively impacting the quality of nutritional care.

CwC Dashboard

Funding received: USD 2.2M (22%)

Funding gap: USD 7.8M (78%)

• Key funding shortfalls for the remainder of 2021 include under-funded community

engagement projects (total gap USD 2.1M) with the following activities: AAP capacity

development and assessments/analysis, development and dissemination of IEC

materials and other communications

activities, and operating information and feedback service centres/helps desks.

22% 78%

751,829 Rohingya refugees and host community members have

been reached through CwC services in 2021. (OB1, IN1)

As of September, 13 partner agencies/organizations were following

the common technical standards for Referral of Community Feedback.

(OB2, IN1).

90 individual agencies, Sectors and platforms have used services and

tools produced by CwC Working Group, reaching the 2021 JRP annual

target. (OB3, IN1)

, Achievement as of July 2021, gap against 2021 target

84% 16%

26% 74%

100%

8,410 caregivers of children under five and PLWs received one-on-

one and small group IYCF-E counselling sessions in August and

September in the Rohingya refugee camps, reaching 80% of the

annual 2021 JRP target. (OB2, IN1)

182,667 Rohingya and Bangladeshi boys and girls age 6-59 months

and PLW were reached with Blanket Supplementary Feeding Services

on a monthly basis in August and September. (OB2, IN3+4, monthly

indicator)

Jan-July achievement, August-September achievement, gap against 2021

target

60% 20% 20%

98% 2%

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JRP Implementation Update, August-September 2021

12

Achievements

• In August and September, a total of 274,988 Rohingya refugees and 143,654 host community members

were reached through different CwC interventions including 174,991 household visits/inter-personal

communication sessions, 25,899 loudspeaker miking events, 102,720 community consultations or awareness raising sessions, and other activities.

• 181 resources (printed materials, audio video) were developed and disseminated, reaching a total of

810 resources in 2021.

• A total of 1,070 Rohingya and host community members and 4,511 staff/volunteers were trained through 370 orientations.

Challenges

• Although the COVID-19 restrictions on activities were mostly lifted in September, partners experienced arbitrary restrictions by some camp-level authorities on particular community engagement activities.

Logistics Operations Overview

Funding received: USD 0M

Funding gap: USD 0M

• Critical funding needs are currently covered for the remainder of 2021.4

Achievements

• The Access Road Assessment (ARA)

continued; 15 camps remain to be assessed, and completion is expected by

end-October.

• The Gaps and Needs Assessment report has been finalized and will be available

on the Logistics Sector website. The

findings and recommendations obtained will support the 2022 Strategy, the JRP

and a revision of the Concept of Operations.

• Storage services provided by the

Logistics Sector in Balukhali, Leda and

Unchiprang hubs ceased on 30 September 2021. The Balukhali hub was

handed over to WFP, and Hi-Atlas will provide ongoing storage in Leda and

Unchiprang hubs to partners, on request and as available, until end-December

2021. Logistics Sector common storage

remains available in the Madhu Chara hub (2400 m2) .

4 JRP funding status does not reflect multi-year funding, pledges, and funds provided outside of the JRP.

As of September, 94% of storage service/transport requests were

delivered in full. (OB2, IN2, monthly indicator)

34 organizations used common logistics services in August and

September (OB2, IN3, monthly indicator)

As of end-September, 438 logistics staff had attended training

activities in 2021. (OB3, IN1)

Achievement as of September 2021, gap against 2021 target

94% 6%

100%

100%

Physical access issued experienced by partners during the monsoon

season were mapped by the Logistics Sector © Logistics Sector

0% 100%

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13

Challenges

• Encouraging more partners to train and report physical road access constraints in the camps into the LogIE platform has been challenging.

ETS Dashboard

sFunding received: USD 1.1 M (9%)

Funding gap: USD 2.8 M (91%)

Achievements

• To date in 2021, ETS has provided data

connectivity services to a total of 481 users from 12 NGOs and seven UN

agencies in 36 sites across three

operational areas – Cox’s Bazar, Teknaf, and Ukhiya.

• In August, the ETS Helpdesk set up a WhatsApp channel to provide a direct two-way line of communication for users to explain or report issues and for the ETS to inform users of maintenance

and outages. In Ukhiya and Teknaf operational areas, 5 sites were upgraded to use higher megabites per second and improve the speed of connectivity in those sites.

• 35 site visits were conducted to resolve network issues and address disruptions in data connectivity due to power outages, fibre cuts, and equipment damage.

Challenges

• Continued delays in obtaining approval for VHF and microwave frequencies, to import

telecommunications towers, and import and utilize VSAT and satellite phones has limited ETS activities.

• COVID-19 has continued to significantly impact activities, as staff in the Sector have fallen sick or been under quarantine during the reporting period.

• ETS conducted a needs assessment in early 2021 that revealed gaps in data connectivity in the camps

and the needs of specific organizations. ETS is now revisiting this assessment by reaching out to partners and surveying the camps for new data connectivity sites to fill the assessed gap.

Funding received (Coordination + Staff Health): USD 8.2M (79%)

Funding gap: USD 2.1M (21%)

931 users provided with security communications services in August

and September on a monthly basis. (OB2, IN1)

36 sites were provided with data connectivity as of September.

(OB2, IN2)*

Achievement as of July 2021, gap against 2021 target

*The target of this indicator was revised from 200 to 55 following a

review of the ETS strategy and capacity for 2021, acknowledging delays

in government approvals for key requirements (see below under

‘challenges’).

94.5% 5.5%

65% 35%

79% 21%

9% 91%

As of end-September, the ISCG and PSEA Network have facilitated

5 PSEA discussions at Sector/WG Coordinators and HOSOG level.

(OB1, IN7)

Jan-July 2021 achievement, August- September achievement, gap against

2021 target

66.7% 16.7% 16.7%

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14

Achievements

• JRP Funding Updates, camp-level 4Ws,

and dashboards on volunteer information

were issued to strengthen data analysis and information-sharing with relevant

stakeholders.

• ISCG is using the Cox’s Bazar Access Monitoring and Reporting Framework

(AMRF), to systematically capture and

code access issues according to global criteria to better analyze developing

trends and issues pertaining to humanitarian access.

• ISCG coordinated donor visits from the

United States, Norway and Sweden.

• ISCG, with the support of an independent

consultant began leading a consultative process to ensure that the current coordination systems are fit for purpose and ‘rightsized’.

• The Gender in Humanitarian Action (GiHA) Working Group and Gender Hub conducted a series of

trainings on gender issues, reaching nearly 100 humanitarian staff in Q3.

Challenges

• The humanitarian community continued to follow up on a number of challenges to implementing

partners including, but not limited to, challenges related to FD6/FD7 and visa processes, and a systematic process for improving coordination (planning, task division and information sharing) with the government.

Achievements:

• Through the UN’s Critical Health Services Support (CHESS) project, the Medical Treatment Facility (MTF)

continued provision of in-patient services related to COVID-19 through its commercial medical services provider, IQARUS.

• Sixteen NGOs that are UN partners have shown interest to utilize the services of the MTF.

As of end-September, 12 beds were operationalized at the MTF. (OB1,

IN3)

Achievement as of September 2021, gap against 2021 targets

100%

16 comprehensive 4W and other IM products were released in August

and September, which include disaggregated data to be used for

operational and strategic decision-making. (OB2, IN2)

In 2021, 18 donor and high-level visits to Cox’s Bazar and donor

events were supported or facilitated (target 6) (OB3, IN2).

Jan-July 2021 achievement, August- September achievement, gap against 2021

target

70% 30%

100%

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VOICES OF THE RESPONSE “Education is the thing that can realize real things. A student can learn both Burmese and English. If we go back to Myanmar we can speak Burmese. We will not face any problems. That is why education is very important to us.”

At just 23-years-old, Mohammad Yeasin has already impacted the lives of many Rohingya refugee children

in Bangladesh. Yeasin, a Rohingya refugee himself, is a learning instructor and spends his days teaching

English, Burmese and life skills at a learning centre in the Kutapalong camp.

He is helping shape the lives of the future Rohingya generation. “They want to study more. Also, they want

to learn the Myanmar curriculum. Myanmar curriculum is very important. They say one day we will go back to

Myanmar, that’s why we need the Myanmar

curriculum.” While learning centres recently reopened following a 18-month hiatus due to the COVID-19,

during the pandemic, Yeasin and other learning instructors like him helped refugee children continue learning, to the extent possible. “We supported the

caregivers to teach their children in the shelters. Weekly, we went to the caregivers’ home. We also gave the

materials to the students to study in their shelter.”

Yeasin also has dreams of his own. “I want to learn further education to change my future life. This is my main ambition. In my community most of the people are uneducated, I want to educate them. Then we can live

peacefully and then we can go to Myanmar peacefully.”

As of September, 34 camps had effective camp focal points and service monitoring in place as per Standard Operating

Procedures (SOPs).

As of September, 9 Sectors Gender and Inclusion Action Plans were developed, monitored, and implemented.

751,829 beneficiaries were reached through different community engagement initiatives as of September 2021.

From January to September, an average of 33,638 refugee volunteers were engaged through various initiatives on a

monthly basis.

69 Bangladeshi non-governmental organizations (JRP partners) were active in the response as of September 2021.

Achievement as of September 2021, gap against 2021 target

100%

100%

56% 44%

61% 39%

100%

Mohammad Yeasin teaching refugee children in a learning

centre in the refugee camps © ISCG

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SUPPORT TO HOST COMMUNITIES Through the Energy and Environment Technical Working Group (EETWG) partners have jointly contributed to

reforesting over 2,600 hectares of land in the host communities since 2018 and worked to establish tree nurseries that provide native seedlings for plantations both within and outside the camps. Over 60 community

nurseries and 10 permanent Forest Department nurseries have been established and host community members

have been trained in nursery management. In order to establish quality planting materials and native stocks, 12 Mother Tree Orchards and four Nursery Associations have been formed.

Mohammad Alamgir, a local Bangladeshi, first established his nursery in Ukhiya on 10 decimals (0.1 Acre) of

land. After the Rohingya influx in 2017, FAO developed a list of native site-specific species, and through EETWG,

encouraging organizations associated with restoration to use only native species. Alamgir then started to diversify his production with native species and established good linkages with all the nursery owners in his

locality and was later elected as the president of their nursery association. All nursery owners of his Upazila received trainings under the project. Alamgir sold saplings

worth BDT 3.0 million in 2020 and bought one acre of land, established a cattle farm, and constructed a semi-pucca

house. Now Alamgir produces saplings of about 50 species,

most of which are native species. Alamgir hopes to produce saplings worth BDT 4 lakh in his nursery this year.

“Thanks to the trainings, I know how to produce quality-

planting materials including establishment of mother trees,”

says Alamgir. “I have a treasure of germplasms of different fruit trees, and six permanent workers and about 10-15

female part time workers are earning their livelihood through my nursery”.

CROSS-CUTTING ISSUES

PROTECTION MAINSTREAMING - AGE, GENDER, AND DIVERSITY

The following activities played an important role in mainstreaming protection and AGD approaches in the Rohingya humanitarian response in August and September:

• CwC Sector Gender and Inclusion Action Plan5 was finalized with the support of GiHA Working Group.

• Health Sector initiated a Protection Mainstreaming training in September, with 20 participants in the

first batch of health partners.

• Protection Sector’s Mainstreaming Focal Points conducted trainings for 20 staff from the Health Sector, 25 colleagues from the Nutrition Sector, and 21 CwC WG partner staff. Topics included protection

mainstreaming, child protection, GBV, age and disability, gender diversity and PSEA.

• CPSS developed tip sheets on disability for child protection field staff through the CPSS Disability Steering Group. GBV and Child Protection developed the first draft of a joint SOP for a more coordinated

response to child and adolescent survivors of sexual and gender-based violence at field level. Child

Protection partners provided a 2-day workshop on GBV risk mitigation to 29 participants.

• Thirty-two GBVSS partner staff were trained on ‘Mitigating Protection and GBV Risks in WASH.’

• Nutrition Sector organized a gender training for 45 Nutrition Facility Supervisors, and an online training on Disability Inclusion for 45 Nutrition Facility Supervisors.

• Twenty-six Education Sector partners participated in a Child Protection training. The Education Sector

with support from CPSS and UNICEF revised the Code of Conduct for education staff to address child safeguarding (CSG) issues, and a CSG protocol was shared with all Education partners.

• 666 households with extremely vulnerable individuals (EVI) received both support with material

transportation and implementation of the repairs, and 2,659 households received porter assistance for

5 Sectors with established Gender and Inclusion Action Plans: Child Protection, Education, Food Security and Livelihoods, Health,

Nutrition, Shelter, WASH, Protection, and CwC.

Photo: Arafat Nursery, Cox’s Bazar. © FAO

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NFIs and shelter materials delivery. 205 older people and 232 women were involved in small scale works at the distribution points and construction sites.

• The WASH Sector worked in an ADG approach by continuing to make latrines gender-marked, recruiting

women hygiene promotion volunteers, addressing the needs of transgender individuals by providing MHM kits, and coordinating with the Protection Sector to ensure protection principles in WASH activities,

Newly designed inclusive WASH block are piloted in the camps, and community feedback on this has been taken to ensure that Gender, GBV, and Inclusion issues can be addressed appropriately..

PROTECTION FROM SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE (PSEA)

In August and September, membership of the PSEA Network increased from 40 to 52 agencies. The Network

rolled out a face-to-face ‘Saying No to Sexual Misconduct Training’ in English for PSEA Focal Points from 23 organizations; produced two ‘No Excuse to SEA’ posters and a pocket card which share the core principles and

contact information of PSEA focal points within organizations; collected beneficiary feedback for the first PSEA animation video; and progressed on a second animation video targeting younger children. To strengthen

complaint and feedback mechanisms (CFMs), the PSEA Network initiated a mapping study and a beneficiaries’

perception study of existing CFMs. PSEA Network provided PSEA training to the Protection Emergency Response Unit (PERU) Team Leaders to enhance their role in the prevention and response to SEA. ISCG developed four

‘action briefs’ on PSEA that cover issues such as safe reporting and follow up on SEA incidents, effective support to SEA survivors, trainings, capacity building and awareness raising on PSEA and learning and coordination on PSEA issues.

Other PSEA initiatives across various Sectors in the humanitarian response include:

• 35 CPSS partner staff received Safeguarding and PSEA trainings.

• GBVSS partners placed hotline numbers on the complaint mechanism signboards in the camps, and

conducted a training on PSEA, Safeguarding and GBV response to 80 staff (40 male, 40 female), and held PSEA awareness sessions for 62 staff, volunteers and guards (49 female, 13 male).

• The WASH Sector partners updated their policy guidelines and PSEA assessment in their interventions.

PSEA monitoring is included as a mandatory compliance in the intervention of WASH Sector.

• The CwC WG supported the PSEA Network with the dissemination of PSEA key messages, materials and training tools among partners of all Sectors.

ACCOUNTABILITY TO AFFECTED POPULATIONS

AAP activities across various Sectors in the humanitarian response include:

• 62 information service centres/info hubs and 77 help desks were operated.

• The SMSD Sector continued to maintain mobile and static complaints, feedback and response desks

operated by male and female staff. Information hubs and CFRM offices offer private rooms for confidential conversations, and CFRM staff and volunteers are trained on how to handle GBV disclosure,

safely refer GBV cases, and inform GBV survivors of available services.

• The Health Sector finalized its AAP framework.

• CPSS actors received feedback from children and caregivers both in-person and via phone. Community

child protection mechanisms, adolescent groups, and parenting sessions allow children and adolescents to provide feedback to Child Protection staff for action. A Referral Pathway update and sharing

workshop was conducted by GBV partners in Palongkhali Union, where 10 service providers from different organizations participated.

• All Nutrition Sector partners operated a complaint and feedback mechanism that focuses on the rights,

dignity and safety of the affected communities.

• A summary report of the FSS Protection and AAP survey was shared with the Sector partners, which

provides an overview of partners’ capacity to mainstream AAP and protection into their activities.

• UNICEF conducted a series of workshops with its implementing partners to exchange ideas and techniques on existing CFRM approaches, aiming to establish a harmonized feedback and response

system for WASH programmes.

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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE

ISCG’s EPR Unit has been actively preparing for the Cyclone Season and keeping the various agencies and

Sectors informed of weather updates and analysis. The EPR Unit holds bi-weekly Emergency Preparedness and Response Working Group (EPRWG) meetings with all stakeholders.

Recent and ongoing EPR initiatives, led by ISCG and various Sectors include:

• A series of Monsoon and Flood Safety Awareness trainings, conducted in partnership with MOAS,

targeting staff working in the camps, with a total of 118 U.N. Agency, NGO, and INGO participants.

• Cyclone Simulation Exercises with IOM in Teknaf and MOAS Fire Simulation Exercises.

• Ongoing revision of the 72 Hour Response Plan into a Multi-Hazard Response Plan.

• Thirteen mobile nutrition teams were mobilized for urgent development in case of severe damages.

• Protection Sector conducted a training for 51 Protection Emergency Response Unit team leaders, a

Flood Safety Awareness Training for 32 protection focal points. GBV partners distributed NFIs6 to women, girls, and LGBTI individuals affected by the monsoon.

• 15-day contingency stock dry food rations were made available by FSS.

• Education Sector DRMWG has revised and shared the key messages for common disasters.

• As per the needs of DPHE, WASH Sector developed and deployed assessment tools to partners within

24 hours for emergency response to the flood affected areas. WASH Sector prepositioned emergency WASH and MHM kits7.

• Shelter Sector partners provided emergency shelter assistance to 5,627 damaged shelters by the

monsoons.

• Generators, MSUs, prefabs, ablution units, tarpaulins, sandbags, ropes, car-kit as well as big wooden and steel boxes are available in the contingency stock for partners.

• GiHA WG coordinated and provided support to UNW sub-office and selected GiHA WG members in

consolidating information of the gender needs and responses to the Monsoon Flood Response.

• CwC partners reshared pre-developed key messages and IEC materials related to monsoon response.

ENVIRONMENT AND ECOSYSTEM REHABILITATION

The following activities were carried out by various Sectors to support the environment and ecosystem:

• Seven Energy and Environment Technical Working Group (EETWG) partners have been working to

reforest over 300 hectares of land in and around the camps during the 2021 planting season. Activities include riparian planting to protect water bodies and provide filtration for greywater, slope stabilization,

roadside erosion control, and homestead plantations. Since 2018, over 500 hectares of land have been reforested within the camps.

• Health care waste management SOPs were approved by the Government. Workshops and trainings

were conducted for 53 health facilities and 101 participants to implement the SOPs.

• WASH Sector is working on a multi-sectoral Sustainable Land Management and Environmental

Rehabilitation (SuLMER) activity in camp 1W and 2W.

• Red and green waste bins for inorganic and organic waste segregation were distributed at the household level in the camps.

• To prevent health risks and environmental pollution, three Decentralized Wastewater Treatment

Systems were created in the camps.

• The Logistics Sector is taking part in several working groups in order to assess and improve its environmental practices.

6 In total 7,682 dignity kits, 6,528 masks, 2,290 MHM kits, 1,120 sanitary napkins, 468 Thami sets, and 270 solar lamps were distributed

7 221 Tube-wells, 13 water-distribution network, 63 tap-stands, 1,824 latrines, 505 bathing cubicles, 18 FSMs were repaired. More than

1,117,224 Aquatabs, 4,266 jerrycans and 8,940 soaps have been distributed. 3 water trucking were conducted, 3,621 water points and

7,771 latrines have been disinfected and 1,494 handwashing devices have been installed in the host community. 8,724 households

received Aquatabs.

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ASSESSMENTS AND REPORTS Recent resources produced by JRP partners to inform the Rohingya humanitarian response:

• DPHE_WHO Water Quality Surveillance

• Material Recovery Facilities (MRF) Mapping Across all Camps_(September 2021)

• Water Networks Construction Status Mapping_(August 2021)

• FAO-WFP Joint Market Monitor (August 2021)

• Protection and AAP Survey Summary Report

• ETS August and September Situation Reports

• Shelter Performance Standard Assessment (September 2021)

Inter Sector Coordination Group (ISCG)

For further information, contact Julia Hanby: [email protected]

For contact details of key actors in the response, visit: humanitarianresponse.info/Rohingya


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