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The International Information & Library Review www.elsevier.com/locate/iilr Librarianship and information science in Nigeria 1966—1999. Authors A—M: subject headings national and government archives to withdrawals an annotated bibliography Sterling Coleman Jr.* Ralph B. Draughon Library, Auburn University, Digital Resources, Auburn, AL 36801, USA Summary This work is an annotated bibliography that consists of articles, books, conference papers, dissertations, reports, etc., published in various library and information science forums on the subject of librarianship in Nigeria. The goal of preparing this work is to provide a list of citations with abstracts that librarians, library students, and library scholars can use to perform research within this subject area to further the body of knowledge. The research methodology that was used to find these citations involved searching the database versions of ERIC, Dissertations Abstracts Online, and Library Literature within the online public access catalog of the Auburn University library system. It also involved searching the online databases of Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA), British Education Index, and Education Abstracts within the DIALOG database as well as the respective print copies of these resources. While this work is by no means an exhaustive analysis of the entire Nigerian library literature, it does strive to be comprehensive in terms of its treatment of this nation. All works cited in this text are alphabetically arranged based on the author’s last name from the letter A to the letter M and divided among a set of broad subject headings ranging from National and Government Archives to Withdrawals. The subject headings that are used are the Broad Subject Headings that are presently in use by Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA). In providing a citation for a non-English language work, the English equivalent of the title of that work will be given next to the non-English title. National and government archives 1. Iwueke, D. C. (1989). Archives collection at Nnamdi Asikiwe Library, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. COMLA Newsletter, 66,23. Analyzes the size, content and development of the Government Documents/Archives section of the Nnamdi Asikiwe Library at the University of Nigeria from 1982 to 1989. National bibliographies 2. Abimbola, S. O. (1976). National bibliography of Nigeria, past, present and future. Nigerbi- blios, 1 (4), 1012, 16, 1819, 22. Assesses the history, growth and development of the National Bibliography of Nigeria from 1950 to ARTICLE IN PRESS *Tel.: þ 1-334-844-1747; fax: þ 1-334-844-3148. E-mail address: [email protected] (S. Coleman Jr.). doi:10.1016/j.iilr.2004.02.001 The International Information & Library Review (2004) 36, 111140
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Page 1: Librarianship and information science in Nigeria 1966-1999 authors A-M: subject headings national and government archives to withdrawals an annotated bibliography

The InternationalInformation & Library Review

www.elsevier.com/locate/iilr

Librarianship and information science in Nigeria1966—1999. Authors A—M: subject headingsnational and government archives to withdrawalsan annotated bibliography

Sterling Coleman Jr.*

Ralph B. Draughon Library, Auburn University, Digital Resources, Auburn, AL 36801, USA

Summary This work is an annotated bibliography that consists of articles, books,conference papers, dissertations, reports, etc., published in various library andinformation science forums on the subject of librarianship in Nigeria.The goal of preparing this work is to provide a list of citations with abstracts that

librarians, library students, and library scholars can use to perform research withinthis subject area to further the body of knowledge.The research methodology that was used to find these citations involved searching

the database versions of ERIC, Dissertations Abstracts Online, and Library Literaturewithin the online public access catalog of the Auburn University library system. Italso involved searching the online databases of Library and Information ScienceAbstracts (LISA), British Education Index, and Education Abstracts within the DIALOGdatabase as well as the respective print copies of these resources.While this work is by no means an exhaustive analysis of the entire Nigerian library

literature, it does strive to be comprehensive in terms of its treatment of this nation.All works cited in this text are alphabetically arranged based on the author’s lastname from the letter A to the letter M and divided among a set of broad subjectheadings ranging from National and Government Archives to Withdrawals. Thesubject headings that are used are the Broad Subject Headings that are presently inuse by Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA). In providing a citation for anon-English language work, the English equivalent of the title of that work will begiven next to the non-English title.

National and government archives

1. Iwueke, D. C. (1989). Archives collection atNnamdi Asikiwe Library, University of Nigeria,Nsukka. COMLA Newsletter, 66, 2–3.

Analyzes the size, content and development of theGovernment Documents/Archives section of the

Nnamdi Asikiwe Library at the University of Nigeriafrom 1982 to 1989.

National bibliographies

2. Abimbola, S. O. (1976). National bibliographyof Nigeria, past, present and future. Nigerbi-blios, 1 (4), 10–12, 16, 18–19, 22.

Assesses the history, growth and development ofthe National Bibliography of Nigeria from 1950 to

ARTICLE IN PRESS

*Tel.: þ 1-334-844-1747; fax: þ 1-334-844-3148.E-mail address: [email protected] (S. Coleman Jr.).

doi:10.1016/j.iilr.2004.02.001

The International Information & Library Review (2004) 36, 111–140

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1973. Analyzes the impact that Nigeria’s legaldeposit system had on the growth of the NationalBibliography as well.

National libraries

3. Adeniji, A., & Issah, H. S. (1986). Nationallibrary of Nigeria: Objectives, functions,achievements. Libri, 36, 136–145.

Explores the role, function, public and technicalservices of the National Library of Nigeria. Com-pares and contrasts the National Library of Nigeriawith other national libraries in sub-Saharan Africaand in the developed world.

4. Adeyemi, N. M. (1972). The National Library ofNigeria and library development in Nigeria.Libri, 22 (1), 77–84.

Explores the bibliographical, research and profes-sional functions of the National Library of Nigeriawithin the context of the two laws that have helpedto shape its existenceFthe National Library Act of1964 and the National Library Decree of 1970.Examines the current overall status of librarianshipin Nigeria and the role that the National Library hasin its development as well.

5. Aguolu, C. C. (1980). The evolution of theNational Library of Nigeria: Antecedents, es-tablishment, and recent developments. Jour-nal of Library History, 15 (4), 393–426.

Examines the history of the creation of the NationalLibrary of Nigeria. Explores many of the challengesand opportunities facing the National Library inproviding public and technical services to itspatrons.

6. Aje, S. B. (1968). The National Library ofNigeria, Lagos. Nigerian Libraries, 4 (3), 79–83.

Highlights the history, development and activitiesof the National Library of Nigeria from 1964 to1968. Examines the positive impact that the libraryhas had on the growth and development oflibrarianship in Nigeria as a whole.

7. Aje, S. B. (1970). The place of the NationalLibrary in a multi-state federation with specialreference to Nigeria. Nigerian Libraries, 6 (3),170–177.

Examines the role that the National Library ofNigeria should have in providing library services in a

federated government within the context of othernational libraries in the United States, Egypt,Russia and the United Kingdom. Highlights theorganizational and financial problems and chal-lenges the Nigerian National Library faces ineffectively providing library services to the publicas well.

8. Ajewole, G. A. (1976). Controlling the objec-tives of the National Library. Nigerbiblios, 1(4), 20–21, 24.

Describes the importance of library staff in under-standing and supporting the objectives of theNational Library of Nigeria. Recommends effectiveways that these objectives can be communicated tothe staff in a positive way.

9. Antwi, I. K. (1990). The National Library ofNigeria: A case study of the Bauchi Statebranch. Aslib Proceedings, 42, 127–135.

Evaluates the role, function, and current status ofthe National Library of Nigeria. Assesses the abilityof the Bauchi State Branch of the National Libraryof Nigeria to serve as a center of bibliographiccontrol for the other public libraries in that part ofNigeria.

10. Bello, N. (1982). The 1970 Library Decree ofthe Federal military government of Nigeria,and its impact on the functions, develop-ment, and extension of the National Library.Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana University.

Examines the impact that the 1970 Library Decreeof the Federal military government of Nigeria hadon the public and technical services of the NationalLibrary of Nigeria. Analyzes the degree to whichthe role and development of the National Library ofNigeria was affected as well.

11. Bello, N. (1983). The 1970 Decree of theNational Library of Nigeria: A reassessment.International Library Review, 15 (4), 375–383.

Describes the impact that the 1970 Decree had onthe growth and development of the NationalLibrary of Nigeria. Examines areas of financial,administrative, and managerial concern that needto be addressed and reviewed to help improve thepublic and technical services of the NationalLibrary.

12. Bello, N. (1991). The importance of librarylegislation: A case of National Library ofNigeria. Pakistan Library Bulletin, 22, 1–4.

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Outlines the impact that library legislation has onimproving the National Library of Nigeria’s chancesto positively contribute to the development of thecountry and the operations of the government as awhole.

13. Dada, S. A. (1983). The National Library ofNigeria: A history 1964–1982. MLS thesis,Loughborough University of Technology.

Examines the history, growth and development ofthe National Library of Nigeria from 1964 to 1982.Analyzes the financial, managerial and administra-tive challenges and problems that the library hasfaced over the years and how these factors couldimpact the library’s future.

14. Enyia, C. O. (1998). National Library ofNigeria at 30: Its history and prospects forthe future. Journal of Government Informa-tion, 25 (2), 149–159.

Describes the history, growth and development ofthe National Library of Nigeria from 1964 to 1994.Describes some of the financial, organizational andadministrative challenges and problems that itfaces as well as its achievements and plans forfuture growth.

15. Fagbohu, M. E. (1979). National Libraryextension services at a glance. Nigerbiblios,4 (2), 17–18, 20–22.

Examines the extension public and technicalservices that the National Library of Nigeriaprovides to the library community.

16. Fagbohun, M. E. O. (1983). Reference andinformation services in the National Libraryof Nigeria. MLS thesis, Loughborough Univer-sity of Technology.

Explores the extent to which the National Library ofNigeria has fulfilled the goals of the NationalInformation Service (NATIS) in establishing andexpanding public and technical library servicesthroughout Nigeria.

Networks

17. Adedigba, Y. A. (1984). The design of alocal network for the agricultural re-search libraries in Ibadan, Nigeria. NigerianLibrary and Information Science Review, 2,13–27.

Assesses the current status of interlibrary co-operatives and networking among agriculturalspecial libraries in Ibadan, Nigeria. Analyzes thechallenges and problems confronting the develop-ment of these ventures beyond their presentstate.

18. Belleh, G. S. (1978). Towards a nationalbiomedical information network for Nigeria.International Library Review, 10 (2), 179–186.

Assesses the need and feasibility of establishing anational biomedical information network in thenation of Nigeria. Describes many of the challengesand obstacles that this information network couldface in terms of satisfying the information needs ofits users.

New and renovated buildings

19. Akhidme, J. A. F. (1979). The Kashim IbrahimLibrary building: Its genesis, progress andprospects. International Library Review, 11(1), 179–190.

Highlights the building and construction of theKashim Ibrahim Library. Analyzes many of thechanges that were made in the original design ofthe library and the financial, logistical, adminis-trative and organizational reasons for thesechanges.

20. Antwi, I. K. (1992). Focus on Abubakar TafawaBalewa University new library building. Li-brary Management, 13 (1), 22–26.

Examines the history and current status of theAbubakar Tafawa Balewa University library. Ex-plores the impact that the new library building willhave upon the library community.

Organisations

21. Aje, S. B. (1973). Presidential address. Niger-ian Libraries, 9 (3), 175–185.

Highlights the development and achievements ofthe Nigerian Library Association from 1962 to 1972.Examines the professional, economic and socialchallenges the association faces in terms of itsfuture growth.

22. Ajibero, M. I. (1996). News from Nigeria:Librarians’ Registration Council in Nigeria.

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Focus on International & Comparative Librar-ianship, 27 (3), 194–195.

Describes the history, role, function and duties ofthe Librarian’s Registration Council in Nigeria.

23. Bankole, B. S. (1968). You and the Associa-tion. Nigerian Libraries, 4 (3), 83–86.

Assesses the current status and image of theNigerian Library Association with respect to theNigerian government and libraries in general.Explores the need to have more librarians join theNigerian Library Association and take a more activerole in its operation.

24. Dipeolu, J. O. (1969) The role, structure andorganization of a library association in adeveloping country: The example of Nigeria.Nigerian Libraries, 5 (2), 37–43.

Assesses the role of the Nigerian Library Associationas a true professional association based upon RoyLewis and Angus Mande’s Six Attributes of aProfession. Describes the organizational structure,membership, leadership, and activities of theNigerian Library Association.

25. Maigari, J. A. (1991). History and develop-ment of the Nigerian Library Association: Thecase of the Kaduna State chapter. LibraryFocus, 9 (1–2), 1–11.

Examines the role, function, history and currentstatus of the Nigerian Library Association focusingupon the Kaduna State chapter. Describes thegrowth and development of the library organizationas well.

Other printed documents

26. Aderibigbe, M. R. (1983). Government pub-lications in Nigeria: Problems and prospects.Government Publications Review, 10 (3),263–268.

Analyzes the challenges and problems Nigerianlibrarians face in managing and circulatinggovernment documents. Offers advice on improv-ing the dissemination of this informationresource.

27. Aina, L. O. (1989). The use of patentliterature by Nigerian scientists. INSPEL, 23(3), 164–169.

Describes the distribution, frequency and patternof usage of patent literature by scientists inNigerian academic and special libraries.

28. Akande, S. B. (1983). Characteristics ofthe research literature used in medicalresearch in Nigeria. MLS thesis, LoughboroughUniversity.

Examines the results of a citation analysis study ofmedical research literature in Nigeria. Explores theorigin, frequency and publication pattern of thisfield of literature in Nigeria as well.

29. Alabi, G. A., & Aina, L. O. (1980). Governmentdocuments usage in an academic library:The case study from Ibadan University Library.Government Publications Review, 7A (4),333–336.

Examines the frequency and level of usage ofgovernment documents at the Ibadan UniversityLibrary by library patrons. Highlights those govern-ment documents that are used with the greatestfrequency.

30. Dina, Y. (1998). Legal information in Nigeria:An overview. Law Librarian, 29 (2), 119–120.

Provides a brief description of the Nigerian legalsystem. Describes the growth and development ofNigeria’s legal literature within that system interms of the information resources that are avail-able to users.

31. Erinle, E. K. (1991). A literature review ofwritten materials on legal deposit laws forNigerian libraries since 1950. African Re-search and Documentation, 57, 21–26.

Examines the literature that has been published onlibrary legislation and acquisitions as it relates tolegal deposit laws in Nigeria from 1950 to thepresent. Analyzes the role, function, and currentstatus of the University of Ilorin library as agovernment depository.

Periodicals and newspapers

32. Aina, J. O. (1988). An annotated list ofmagazines published in Nigeria. Serials Li-brarian, 14, (1–2), 145–156.

Provides an annotated list of Nigerian magazinescovering a wide variety of subjects ranging frombusiness to sports to economics as a resource that

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can be useful to other library systems in thedeveloping world.

33. Aina, L. O. (1987). Newspaper as a tool ineducational research in Nigeria. INSPEL, 21(3), 163–167.

Evaluates the usage of newspapers as educationalresearch tools by university students and scholars inNigeria.

Periodicals control

34. Brann, C. M. B. (1980). Gathering Nigerianserials. African Research and Documentation,24, 23–25.

Analyzes the role, structure and function of theNational Union List of Serials in Nigerian libraries.Describes many of the problems and shortcomingsof this list in terms of its functionality andcompleteness.

35. Edem, U. S. (1989). Serials acquisition andmanagement in Nigerian academic libraries:Implications for quality library services. In-formation Services & Use, 9 (3), 161–170.

Examines the methodology behind the acquisition,collection development, selection and manage-ment of serials in Nigerian academic libraries.

36. Fadiran, D. (1987). Classification and shelvingof periodicals in academic libraries in Nigeria.The Serials Librarian, 13 (1), 107–111.

Describes the results of a survey to determinewhich cataloging and classification arrangementwould be best to aid patrons in locating periodicalsand satisfying their information needs.

37. Ibrahim, J. L. (1984). Serials librarianship inNigerian university libraries: The experienceof a serials librarian. Library Scientist, 11 (2),80–85.

Analyzes the financial, staffing and organizationalchallenges and problems confronting the growthand development of serial collections in thelibraries of developing countries with an emphasison Nigeria.

38. Igbosuah, E. O. (1978). The Nigerian NationalSerial Data Centre. Nigerbiblios, 3 (3), 9–11.

Describes the role, function and duties ofthe Nigerian National Serial Data Centre (NSDS).

Analyzes the impact that the International SerialsData System (ISDS) and the International StandardSerial Numbering (ISSN) has on the functions of theNSDS.

Personnel management

39. Abifarin, A. (1997). Motivating staff in Niger-ian university libraries. Library Management,18 (3–4), 124–128.

Assesses the motivation level of librarians andlibrary staff at Nigerian academic libraries. Offerssuggestions to help motivate librarians and librarystaff to find intrinsic value in their work.

40. Abifarin, F. P. (1989) Recruitment, selectionand appointment of Nigerian university li-braries. African Journal of Academic Librar-ianship, 7 (1–2), 1–16.

Compares and contrasts the recruitment, selection,and appointment policies of the Federal universitylibraries and State University libraries in Nigeria.

41. Abifarin, F. P. (1992). Personnel attributes andjob satisfaction in Nigerian university li-braries. African Journal of Academic Librar-ianship, 10 (1–2), 19–25.

Describes the skills and personal attributes thatshould be exhibited in the performance of line workat Nigeria’s academic libraries. Provides manage-rial and financial suggestions to foster these skillsand attributes in academic library employees.

42. Abodunde, E. O. (1979). The annual perfor-mance evaluation report. Nigerbiblios, 4 (2),13–16.

Examines the structure and usage of the AnnualPerformance Evaluation Report as a tool forevaluating the work performance of librarians andother personnel in the Nigerian Public Service andthe National Library of Nigeria.

43. Adelabu, A. (1971). Personnel problems inNigeria’s university libraries: In search of arealistic solution. International Library Re-view, 3 (4), 355–363.

Analyzes the root issues behind the personnelproblems exhibited by library staff members andlibrarians in Nigerian academic libraries. Proposessolutions to effectively relieve these problems andempower the staff and librarians to improve thequality of their work.

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44. Adeniyi, C. I. (1983). Personnel problems inNigerian university libraries. MLS thesis,Loughborough University of Technology.

Examines the problems and challenges that Niger-ian academic libraries face in terms of staffing,management and duties performed by librarypersonnel.

45. Akinyotu, A. (1974). Scientific job allocationand staff deployment in libraries: A necessarystep towards professional recognition. Niger-ian Libraries, 10 (2–3), 131–140.

Analyzes the prospects and challenges of applyingscientific methodology to the administration andmanagement of libraries to increase the socialand professional prestige of Nigerian librarianshipas a whole. Emphasizes the importance of planningand clear role definition in terms of assessing whatduties need to be performed by librarians.

46. Aladejana, A. (1975). Scientific management:Staff performance appraisal techniquesFthecase for adoption in Nigerian libraries. Niger-ian Libraries, 11 (1–2), 55–63.

Explores the challenges and prospects of establish-ing a performance appraisal system for library staffworkers in Nigeria. Describes the negative impactthat a poorly developed appraisal process can haveon a library staff as well.

47. Antwi, I. K. & Bello, M. A. (1993). Motivationand productivity in academic libraries. Li-brary Management, 14 (5), 27–34.

Examines the administrative, organizational andmanagerial structure of the Abubakar TafawaBalewa University Library at Bauchi, Nigeria witha focus upon the motivation and productivity of thelibrary staff. Provides suggestions to better moti-vate the library staff.

48. Awuku, O. S. (1995). Productivity in universitylibraries of developing countries: a West andSouthern African perspective from Gambia,Nigeria, Zambia and Botswana. Library Man-agement, 16 (3), 24–33.

Compares and contrasts the motivating and pro-ductivity factors for library staff that exist amongacademic libraries in Nigeria, Gambia, Zambia andBotswana. Also examines the managerial style ofsome of these libraries as well.

49. Ejiko, E. O. (1990). Standards/guidelines forlibrary personnel of colleges of education inNigeria. Library Focus, 8 (1–2), 16–26.

Reviews the standards of practice that currentlyexist in academic libraries in Nigeria. Recommendsthe adjustment and application of similar standardsof practice for Nigerian teacher colleges.

Planning and design

50. Akhidme, J. A. F. (1977). The librarian andlibrary buildings in Nigeria. NLA Newsletter,63 & 64, 3–6.

Assesses the current status and lack of impactthat librarians have in the planning and designingof new library buildings in Nigeria. Describesthe tense social climate that exists betweenlibrarians and the library community they serveand highlights methods the Nigerian LibraryAssociation can use to improve this social atmo-sphere.

51. Alegbeleye, B. (1984). The application of theC. I. P. P. (context, input, process andproduct) model to archival planning. Archivesand Manuscripts, 12 (2), 136–146.

Describes the C. I. P. P. Model and its function withregards to measuring the usefulness of an archiveto its patrons. Examines the application of thisassessment model at the Methodist Church Archivesof Nigeria.

52. Amosu, M. (1974). On the planning of a newlibrary. Nigerian Libraries, 10 (2–3), 141–147.

Explores the potential advisory role that a librariancan take in the planning of a new library byexamining that which a librarian took in theconstruction of the library at the Medical Schoolof the University of Ibadan.

53. Balarabe, A. A. (1998). The Usmanu DanfodiyoUniversity Library building: Problems andprospects. Library Management, 19 (1),29–36.

Describes the planning, construction, growth anddevelopment of the Usmanu Danfodiyo UniversityLibrary building within the context of the overallconstruction and development of academic librarybuildings throughout Nigeria from 1960 to thepresent.

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54. Dim, P. T. (1983). National development plansand the integration of library planning in adeveloping country: Nigeria as a case study.Ph.D. dissertation, Loughborough Universityof Technology.

Examines the importance of national planning inthe development of librarianship in Nigeria. Ex-plores the role, function, and goal of the NigerianLibrary Association in terms of providing formal andinformal library education and training to all whoseek it.

55. Fatuyi, E. O. A. (1987). The plan, design andset-up of the Leather Research Institute ofNigeria (LERIN) Library. Library Focus, 5 (1–2),80–98.

Explores the role and professional relationship thatexisted between the architect and the libraryplanner in the design and construction of theLeather Research Institute of Nigeria (LERIN)Library.

Preservation

56. Alegbeleye, B. (1988). Newspaper preserva-tion and access with particular referenceto university libraries in Nigeria. Libri, 38,191–204.

Explores the history, growth, and development ofnewspapers as an information medium in Nigeria.Analyzes the administrative, financial, logisticaland environmental problems and challenges ofpreserving newspapers and providing equitableaccess to these resources for all library patrons.

57. Alegbeleye, B. (1996). A study of bookdeterioration at the University of IbadanLibrary and its implications for preservationand conservation in African university li-braries. African Journal of Library, Archives,& Information Science, 6 (1), 37–45.

Analyzes the current physical state of the Africancollection of the University of Ibadan Library.Provides recommendations to both conserve andpreserve collections in other libraries againstpossible physical deterioration.

58. Alegbeleye, G. O. (1988). The conservationscene in Nigeria: A panoramic view of thecondition of bibliographic resources. Restau-rator, 9 (1), 14–26.

Examines the role, function and current status ofthe library conservation scene in not only Nigeriabut also tropical countries as a whole. Providesrecommendations to help augment conservationefforts and preserve resource materials as well.

59. Alegbeleye, G. O. (1988). Newspaper preser-vation and access with particular reference touniversity libraries in Nigeria. Libri, 38 (3),191–204.

Describes the history, growth, development andcurrent status of newspaper publications in Nigeria.Analyzes the logistical, environmental, and finan-cial challenges confronting the preservation, con-servation and access to newspapers in Nigerianarchives and libraries.

60. Aziagba, P. C. (1991). Deterioration of libraryand archival materials in the delta regionof Nigeria. International Library Review, 23,73–81.

Describes the natural, environmental and artificialchallenges and problems that libraries and archivesare facing in conserving and preserving theirreading materials in the Delta region of Nigeria.Offers suggestions to alleviate the deteriorationand destruction of library and archival collections.

61. Dosunmu, J. A. (1989). Preservation andconservation of library materials in Nigeria:A new awareness. COMLA Newsletter, 64, 3–4.

Explores the need and feasibility of establishing apreservation and conservation program in Nigerianlibraries and archives. Analyzes the current statusof preservation and conservation efforts in theseinstitutions as well.

62. Ezennia, S. E. (1991). Biological factors inpaper deterioration in Nigeria. Library andArchival Security, 11 (1), 103–108.

Examines the challenges and problems related tothe biological deterioration of paper in the librariesand archives of the Anambra State, Nigeria.Describes the various methods that can be used toconserve and preserve reading materials in harshenvironments similar to the one in Nigeria.

63. Erinle, E. K. (1988). Problems of managingviable media resources in the University ofIlorin Library between 1977 and 1980. AfricanJournal of Academic Librarianship, 6 (1–2),13–21.

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Explores the challenges and problems that aca-demic librarians at the University of Ilorin Libraryface in conserving and maintaining non-printmaterials in their collection. Provides solutions toalleviate some of these problems and encouragethe growth and development of the collection.

64. Ezennia, S. E. (1989). The Harmattan andlibrary resources management in Nigeria: Anappraisal of the effects, problems and pro-spects; harmful effects of dry wind. Library &Archival Security, 9 (2), 43–48.

Describes the harmful impact that a dry, dessicat-ing wind called a harmattan has in increasing thedeterioration of reading materials in Nigeria.Analyzes possible environmental solutions thatcould be taken to reduce the effects of theharmattan upon library collections.

65. Ezennia, S. E. (1993) The struggle to preventmicroorganisms from devouring library re-sources in Nigeria. Library & Archival Secur-ity, 12 (1), 23–33.

Analyzes the impact that microorganisms have onthe deterioration of Nigerian library collections.Proposes a variety of chemical, physical andlegislative control measures to curtail the dete-rioration of these collections.

66. Ezennia, S. E. (1994). Problems of preserva-tion of library materials: The Nigerian experi-ence. Library & Archival Security, 12 (2),51–62.

Explores the natural and artificial preservationchallenges and problems that Nigerian librariesare experiencing with their reading materials.Provides suggestions to relieve the effects of someof these problems.

67. Ezennia, S. E., & Onwuka, E. O. (1995). Thebattle for preservation of library materials inNigeria: Focus on audiovisual materials andequipment. Library & Archival Security, 13(1), 29–39.

Describes the natural, environmental and artificialpreservation and conservation problems that Niger-ian libraries face with regards to their audio-visualcollections and equipment. Provides suggestions tohelp conserve and preserve audio-visual materialsin spite of their hostile environments.

68. Moses, S. E. (1979). Nigerian governmentposters: Visual records of people and pro-gress. Nigerian Libraries, 15 (1–2), 99–103.

Assesses the importance of government posters aseducational tools for the Nigerian people. De-scribes the role public libraries in Nigeria shouldtake in disseminating, preserving, and collectingthese posters as a future archival resource.

Printing, publishing and bookselling

69. Apeji, E. A. (1997). Developments in educa-tion, libraries and book publishing in Nigeria.Education Libraries Journal, 40 (1), 9–15.

Explores the interdependent relationship that ex-ists between the expansion of education, thegrowth of libraries and the rise of the bookpublishing industry in Nigeria. Examines the role,status, and function of Christian missionaries andforeign book publishers in creating and developingthis relationship.

Profession

70. Adelabu, A. (1984). Wanted: Research or-iented professionals in Nigeria’s academiclibraries to meet the changing demands andnew challenges in academia. African Journalof Academic Librarianship, 2 (2), 61–64.

Analyzes the role, function and current professionalstatus of academic librarians in Nigeria. Providessuggestions to increase the level of prestige andstatus of academic librarians in Nigerian society aswell as research topics they can develop to increasethe body of knowledge in librarianship.

71. Agada, J. (1987). Occupational choice and theassertiveness of librarians: A comparison ofbeginning students in undergraduate library,law, and liberal arts schools in Nigeria.Library & Information Science Research, 9(4), 305–325.

Compares and contrasts the level of academicassertiveness that exists between library sciencestudents at the undergraduate level and law andliberal arts students at the undergraduate level atAhmadu Bello University in Nigeria.

72. Agada, J. (1994). The librarian personalityand professional socialization: A longitudinal

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study of library school students in Nigeriaat Ahmadu Bello University. Journal of Educa-tion for Library and Information Science 35,83–97.

Examines the possible professional socialization oflibrarians into unassertive demeanors by engagingin a longitudinal study of librarians at Ahmadu BelloUniversity in Nigeria from 1983 to 1990.

73. Agidee, D. (1970). Legal provisions for librarydevelopment in Nigeria 1948–1968. NigerianLibraries, 6 (1–2), 53–64.

Analyzes the direct correlation that exists betweenthe establishment of laws for the development oflibrarianship in Nigeria and the actual developmentof the profession between 1948 and 1968. High-lights the important provisions of some of theselaws as well.

74. Aje, S. B. (1977). Career in librarianship.Nigerbiblios, 2 (1), 18–20.

Describes the current status, function and role ofthe library profession in Nigeria in an effort toattract more young people into choosing librarian-ship as a career. Provides suggestions to increase thenumber of young people entering the profession.

75. Bello, M. A. (1996). Choosing a career:Librarian? Librarian Career Development, 4(4), 15–19.

Assesses the reasons why people seek a career inlibrarianship in the country of Nigeria. Providessuggestions to improve public awareness aboutlibrarianship and the role, function and contribu-tions of the profession to Nigerian society.

76. Bozimo, D. O., & Mohammed, A. (1987). BLSproduct and the job market in Nigeria: Ananalysis of job advertisements. African Jour-nal of Academic Librarianship, 5 (1–2), 27–40,45–49.

Describes the creation of the Bachelor of LibraryScience program in Nigerian academia and itsrepresentation in job advertisements for theholders of BLS degrees. Also explores the reactionof librarians who are non-BLS degree holders tothose who are on a professional level.

77. Dawha, E. M. K. & Thambiah, R. S. (1994).Professionalism and librarianship in Nigeria.Annals of Library Science and Documentation,41 (3), 110–115.

Documents the history of Nigerian librarianship andthe growth of the library profession in Nigeria.Analyzes the growth and influence of the NigerianLibrary Association upon the library profession overthe last 30 years.

78. Iwuji, H. O. M. (1979). Professionalism oflibrarianship. Nigerbiblios, 4 (3), 9–11.

Describes the growth and development of profes-sionalism in Nigerian librarianship. Explores therole and function of the Nigerian Library Associa-tion in terms of increasing the level of profession-alism in librarianship.

Public libraries

79. Aboluwarin, A. (1998). The role of rurallibraries in information dissemination to Ni-gerian farmers. Rural Libraries, 18 (1), 36–43.

Examines the role, function and goals of publiclibraries in rural areas as it pertains to studying theinformation needs of their patrons. Describes thechallenges and problems that these libraries face intheir daily operations.

80. Adimorah, E. N. O. (1983). An analysis ofprogress made by public libraries as socialinstitutions in Nigeria. Unesco Journal ofInformation Science, Librarianship and Ar-chives, 5 (3), 160–167, 193.

Assesses the history of public librarianship inNigeria within the context of its positive andeducational impact upon Nigerian society. Exam-ines many of the financial, administrative, manage-rial and organizational problems confrontingNigerian public libraries.

81. Adimorah, E. N. O. (1993). Rural communityinformation systems and culture in Africa.Resource Sharing & Information Networks, 8(2), 91–118.

Reviews the extent of African public library systemsto provide both public and technical services thatcan meet the information needs of rural librarycommunities. Focuses upon the outreach efforts ofthe Imo State Library Board in Nigeria as a modelfor other African public library systems to follow.

82. Aje, S. B. (1963). Background, status andplans for library development in Nigeria. MA,thesis, University of Chicago.

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Analyzes the prospects and challenges of develop-ing a public library system in Nigeria. Assesses thecurrent social, cultural and educational level of theNigerian people in an attempt to design a publiclibrary system that can match their informationneeds.

83. Alafiatayo, B. O., & Aleraiye, J. T. (1987).Samaru Public Library: An example of auniversity public library service in Nigeria;financed and administered by the AhmaduBello University Dept. of Library Science.Information Development, 3, 36–39.

Describes the history, administration, managementand collection of the Samaru Public Library. Out-lines the role and function of this public library as atraining ground for library science students atAhmadu Bello University in Kaduna State, Nigeria.

84. Alegbeleye, G. O. (1986). The non-use ofNigerian public libraries by the silent major-ity: A historical survey and discursus. Libri, 36(3), 187–201.

Explores the economic, social and historical reasonswhy Nigerian public libraries are not being used bythe poor, the illiterate and the destitute. Describespossible solutions to establish outreach services tothis segment of the population and enfranchisethem with regards to learning and literacy.

85. Amaeshi, B. (1985). Public library purpose inunderdeveloped countries: The case of Niger-ia. Libri, 35, 62–69.

Compares and contrasts the role, function andpurpose of Nigerian public libraries before andafter independence as well as with other publiclibrary systems in Western countries.

86. Antwi, I. K. (1989). The development ofpublic libraries in Nigeria: The case of BauchiState Library Service. Aslib Proceedings, 41,285–293.

Describes the history, growth and development ofpublic libraries in Nigeria within the context of theBauchi State Library Service. Assesses the publicand technical services that these libraries offer topatrons as well as the challenges they face in theirdevelopment.

87. Anyim, J. C. (1972). Public libraries ascultural centres. Nigerian Libraries, 8 (1),15–19.

Assesses the prospects and challenges of convertingNigerian public libraries from reading centers thatcan only reach the literate portion of the popula-tion into cultural centers that can reach theilliterate as well.

88. Bankole, B. S. (1969). The public library inpost-war reconstruction and national devel-opment. Nigerian Libraries, 5 (1), 7–10.

Describes the current status of public libraries inNigeria prior to and after that nation’s civil war.Explores the prospects and challenges confront-ing the future development of these librariesand provides suggestions to help guide theirdevelopment.

89. Bello, A. A. (1994). The provision of publiclibrary services to Nigeria’s Federal CapitalTerritory, Abuja: A Proposal. Library Focus, 12(1–2), 147–160.

Describes the shift of the Federal Capital Territoryof Nigeria from Lagos to Abuja. Examines theimpact this move has had upon the library commu-nity and the need to create a library board to build,develop and maintain public libraries in Abuja,Nigeria.

90. Boman, D. D. (1988/1989). The impact ofpublic libraries in Nigeria. Library Focus, 6–7,47–68.

Examines the role, function and history of theNigerian public library system throughout the 20thcentury. Describes the challenges and problems thepublic library system faces in satisfying theinformation needs of their users and proposessolutions to deal with these problems.

91. Ekpong, J. B. (1975). Review of developmentin public libraries in Nigeria 1950–1970.Library History Review, 2 (3), 12–35.

Examines the history, growth and development ofpublic librarianship in Nigeria from 1950 to 1970.Provides suggestions to both increase and expandpublic library services throughout the country.

92. Ene, N. (1974). The place of libraries ineducational planning in Nigeria. NigerianLibraries, 10 (2–3), 169–174.

Explores the role and function that public librariesshould have in helping the Nigerian governmentboth plan and provide a quality education for itscitizens. Describes public libraries as entities that

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should promote literacy and supplement classroominstruction among other solutions.

93. Faseyi, J. A. (1968). New developments onthe Nigerian library scene: Public libraryservice in the former Northern Nigeria.Nigerian Libraries, 4 (3), 68–75.

Describes the history of the development of publiclibrarianship in northern Nigeria from 1952 to 1968.Highlights the causes behind the rise and fall of theNorthern Regional Library Service and its rebirth asthe State Library Service of Nigeria.

94. Ideh, E. J. (1978). The public library opera-tions. Bendel Library Journal, 1 (1), 20–21,23–26.

Explores the role, function and duties of a publiclibrarian in Nigeria. Also describes some of thesocial, economic, cultural and managerial chal-lenges and problems these librarians face as well.

95. Igbinosa, I. O. (1986). The public libraryservices in Nigeria: Need for information andreferral (I & R) service. Public LibraryQuarterly, 7, 63–71.

Describes the array of public and technical servicesprovided by the Nigerian public library to meet theinformation needs of their patrons. Defines therole, function and purpose of an Information andReferral Service (I & R) in a public library as well.

96. Igwe, P. O. E. (1989). Institutional libraries assurrogates for public libraries: An alternativeoption for developing countries with poorpublic library systems. Education LibrariesJournal, 32 (2), 44–52.

Analyzes the current status, growth and develop-ment of public library systems in Nigeria. Examinesthe obstacles and challenges confronting the rise ofNigerian public librarianship.

97. Masha, A.O., & Odeinde, W.A. (1977). Acentral library for Surulere soon. Nigerbiblios,2 (3), 7–9.

Describes a variety of plans by the authors toincrease the number of public and mobile libraries,aid staff retention, and build a central library atSurulere, Nigeria. Also analyzes the impact that arecruitment company could have on addressing themanpower shortage in Nigerian libraries.

98. Mohammed, Z. (1986). Public libraries andrural information services in Nigeria. LibraryFocus, 4 (1–2), 85–93.

Examines the history, problems and obstaclesconfronting the establishment of public libraryservices in the rural communities of Nigeria fromthe period of British colonial rule to the present.Proposes unconventional solutions designed tomeet the information needs of patrons residingwithin these communities.

Public relations

99. Aboyade, B. O. (1984). Shaping and image forthe librarian in Nigeria. In IFLA generalconference, 1984. Education and researchdivision. Section on library schools and othertraining aspects (proceedings). The Hague,Netherlands: International Federation of Li-brary Associations.

Examines the lack of a public image that librarianspossess as it relates to Nigerian society as a whole.Describes the impact that this absence of a publicimage could have on the future of the profession interms of training, education and recruitment.

100. Aguolu, C. C. (1986). The future of libraryand information science in Nigeria. Interna-tional Library Movement, 8 (2), 54–68.

Analyzes the need of Nigerian librarians to shapeand improve librarianship in their country byreemphasizing the social role of their professionin Nigerian society. Explores the need to trainfuture librarians to be more service-oriented indealing with the public.

101. Aina, J. O., & Obokoh, N. P. (1994). Librariesand librarianship as reflected in the Nigeriandaily newspapers. Third World Libraries, 5,24–29.

Highlights the results of a bibliometric study of sixEnglish-language Nigerian newspapers to determinethe extent to which they report on issues relatingto libraries and librarianship from 1989 to 1993.

102. Ajibero, M. I. (1987). Public relations andpublicity in Nigerian public libraries. LibraryFocus, 5 (1–2), 38–48.

Analyzes the current level of public relations thatexists between public libraries and the patrons theyserve. Examines a variety of issues that a public

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relations campaign supporting the use of theselibraries can focus upon to help foster publicawareness of the library’s role and function inNigerian society.

103. Akinnigbagbe, B. M. (1982). Image of thepublic librarian in Nigeria: Need for apragmatic change. Libri, 32 (2), 156–162.

Explores a series of public relations strategies thatNigerian public librarians can use to improve thepublic awareness of the services and resources thatthe library has to offer.

104. Akinpelu, G. O. (1980). Public relations inuniversity libraries. Bendel Library Journal,3 (1), 24–28.

Examines the lack of public relations campaigningthat Nigerian academic libraries have with thelibrary community as a whole. Encourages the useof bibliographic instruction to help educate librarypatrons about the resources that the libraryprovides and a public relations campaign to helpimprove the image of the academic library.

105. Azubuike, A. A. & Greaves, M. A. (1989). Thereference services of a research library.International Library Review, 21 (3),337–346.

Analyzes the need for academic libraries toadvertise their public services by examining thelevel of awareness students had in using the publicservices of the library at Ibadan University. Providessuggestions to better inform the library communityabout the library’s public services.

106. Daraman, M. D. (1995/1996). Public rela-tions activities in polytechnic libraries: Acase study of Kaduna Polytechnic Librarycomplex. Library Focus, 13–14, 22–29.

Analyzes the importance and impact of good publicrelations between the library and the librarycommunity as a whole. Describes the current statusof public relations programs at Kaduna PolytechnicUniversity Library complex as it seeks to meet theinformation needs of its users.

107. Egor, F. O. (1984). A preliminary study of theclientele structure of public libraries: BendelState Library, Benin City. Bendel LibraryJournal 7 (1), 46–57.

Describes the demographic makeup of adult pa-trons at Nigerian public libraries in Benin City.

Provides suggestions to increase the number ofpatrons using these library systems.

108. Emetu, A. N. (1995). Applying media toresearch and publications in library andinformation science. In Proceedings of theseventh national conference of the NigerianAssociation of Library and Information Edu-cators (NALISE) June 29–July 1994. Depart-ment of Library Science, Bayero University:Kano, Nigeria (pp. 45–48).

Examines the prospects and opportunities of usingthe media to make the public more cognizant aboutthe contributions of librarianship to Nigeriansociety in general.

109. Ezennia, S. E. (1993). Drug abuse and libraryresources in Nigeria: Problems and solutions.Library & Archival Security, 12 (1), 35–45.

Describes the current drug abuse situation thatexists in Nigeria including the types of drugs usedand profiles of drug abusers. Evaluates the role thatlibrarians could play in helping to control drugabuse in Nigerian society.

110. Gawdiak, N. A. (1990). Chief justice ofsupreme court of Nigeria visits Law Library:Nigeria collection contains valuable sourcesnot even available in his own country.Library of Congress Information Bulletin,49, 343.

Highlights a visit by the Chief Justice of Nigeria,Mohammed Bello, to the Law Library of the Libraryof Congress. Briefly describes the extent of the LawLibrary’s Nigerian collection and the Chief Justice’sinterests on this visit.

Publications

111. Alabi, G. A. (1978). A study of publicationsgrowth in Nigeria and the importance ofthese publications to the development of thecountry. Government Publications Review, 5(4), 455–460.

Explores the growth and development of the riseof English-language publications and the declineof local language publications in Nigeria from 1951to 1970. Evaluates the role and function ofNigeria’s libraries as the clearinghouses and dis-tribution centers of information for the librarycommunity.

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112. Edem, U. S. (1994). Academic qualifications:Their influence on publication output amonglibrarians in Nigerian universities. Annals ofLibrary Science and Documentation, 41 (4),135–141.

Analyzes the positive impact that a librarian’sacademic qualifications have on publication outputin Nigeria’s academic libraries. Examines a host ofinternal and external factors that also influencepublication output.

113. Edem, U. S. (1995). The gender factorin publication output of librarians inNigerian universities. African Journal ofLibrary, Archives, & Information Science, 5,pp. 25–30.

Examines the influence that gender has on thepublication output of librarians in Nigerian aca-demic libraries. Analyzes the impact that econom-ic, social and educational forces in Nigerian societyhave on publication output as well.

114. Edem, U. S., & Atinmo, M. I. (1994).Quantitative measurement of publicationoutput among librarians in Nigerian univer-sities. Annals of Library Science and Doc-umentation, 41 (2), 55–62.

Measures the quantitative output of librarians inNigeria’s academic libraries. Identifies both posi-tive and negative influences that are affectingpublication output and offers suggestions to in-crease publication productivity.

115. Edem, U. S. & Atinmo, M. I. (1995). Theinfluence of age and work experience onpublication output among librarians in Niger-ian universities. Annals of Library Scienceand Documentation, 42 (4), 142–151.

Explores the positive impact that age and workexperience have on the publication output ofacademic librarians in Nigeria. Provides suggestionsto both increase and enhance the publicationoutput of both experienced and inexperiencedacademic librarians.

116. Edem, U. S. & Atinmo, M. I. (1996). Librarydepartmentalizations: Their influence onpublication output among librarians in Niger-ian universities. Annals of Library Scienceand Documentation, 43 (1), 26–33.

Assesses the quantity and quality of publicationoutput by academic librarians in college, research,

and university libraries as well as in public andtechnical service departments within these librarysystems. This assessment covers the years of 1985to 1992.

117. Edem, U. S., & Lawal, O. O. (1999). Jobsatisfaction and publication output amonglibrarians in Nigerian universities. LibraryManagement, 20 (1), 39–46.

Examines the impact that extrinsic and intrinsic jobsatisfaction among Nigerian academic librarianshave on their publication output of scholarlymaterial.

Publications and databases

118. Aina, J. O. (1997). Usage of resources inthe Ilorin Branch of the National Libraryof Nigeria. Herald of Library Science, 36(1–2), 73–76.

Assesses the extent, degree, and level of usage ofgovernment publications at the Ilorin branch of theNational Library of Nigeria. Provides suggestions tofacilitate the usage of these materials, makingthem more accessible to the public.

119. Anigilaje, M. A. O. (1993). Universal avail-ability of publications and copyright laws:Research summary. Third World Libraries, 3,63–64.

Describes the impact that the Universal Availabilityof Publications (UAP) program had on the creationof national bibliographies and the implementationand enforcement of copyright laws in Nigeria.

Publishing

120. Afolabi, M. (1992). Productivity of journalswhich published Nigerian library literature,1910–1985. Annals of Library Science andDocumentation, 39 (4), 139–144.

Analyzes in a bibliometric study the overallproductivity of journals that published Nigerianlibrary literature from 1910 to 1985. Compares andcontrasts the output and influence of domestic andforeign periodicals in Nigerian library literature.

121. Agbonlahor, H. (1978). The librarian, thepublisher and the library. Bendel LibraryJournal, 1 (1), 17–18, 20.

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Explores the role, function and interaction oflibrarianship and the publishing industry in termsof improving literacy and book provision in Nigeria.

122. Bischof, P. B. (1991). Publishing and the booktrade in Sub-Saharan Africa: Trends andissues and their implications for Americanlibraries. Journal of Academic Librarianship,16 (6), 340–347.

Examines the growth and development of localpublishing in Nigeria and South Africa within thegreater context of sub-Saharan Africa as a whole.Describes the impact that these local publishingventures could have upon American libraries.

123. Iwe, J. I. (1991). Universal availabilityof publications in the developing world:Case of Nigeria. Information Development,7, 81–85.

Describes the role, function and mission of theUniversal Availability of Publications (UAP) programin providing universal access to reading materials inthe developing world. Explores the progress thisprogram has made towards achieving its goals inNigeria.

124. Jam, Z., & Ukeli, I. S. (1995). The publishingoutput of librarians in Benue State, Nigeria.African Journal of Library, Archives, &Information Science, 5, 47–54.

Analyzes the publication and output patterns oflibrarians in academic and public libraries locatedin Benue State, Nigeria.

125. Mohammed, Z. (1995). In Proceedings of theseventh national conference of the NigerianAssociation of Library and Information Edu-cators (NALISE) June 29–July 1994. Depart-ment of Library Science, Bayero University:Kano, Nigeria, (pp. 150–158).

Examines the financial, professional, organizationaland administrative obstacles to the production oflibrary literature by Nigerian academic librarians.Proposes solutions to deal with these problems aswell.

Publishing and bookselling

126. Formson, J. W. (1981). Solving our problemsat home: A librarian’s impressions of the Ifeinternational book fair. Zambia Library Asso-ciation Journal, 13 (1), 28–31.

Describes the positive impact that the Ife Interna-tional Book Fair has on the development, dissemi-nation and utilization of reading materials inNigeria. Also describes the manner in which thebook fair brings together readers, buyers, andpublishers from around the world.

127. Ifidon, B. I. (1994). Book scarcity in Niger-iaFcauses and solutions. African Journal ofLibrary, Archives, & Information Science, 4,55–62.

Evaluates the political, social and economic con-straints that are causing book scarcity in Nigerianlibraries, schools and daily life in general. Providessolutions to address this issue by public and privatesupport for book production and the publishingindustry.

128. Ifidon, B. I. (1995). Research summary:Variable book pricing in Nigeria. Third WorldLibraries, 6 (1), 39–40.

Explores the origins of a book-pricing problem inNigeria through a survey of local publishers andbooksellers. Provides recommendations for librariesto lessen the negative impact of this pricingproblem.

129. Ifidon, S. E. (1982). Selection of book deal-ers: A Nigerian university librarian’s dilem-ma. Library Scientist, 9, 14–25.

Explores some of the challenges and problems thatNigerian academic libraries must face in selectingbook dealers to supply their collections. Providessome solutions to deal with the negative aspects ofthe selection process as a whole.

129. Jegede, O. (1992). Book scarcity: Lawlibraries and the legal profession in Nigeria.International Information & Library Review,24 (3), 229–251.

Analyzes the social, political and financial reasonsfor the scarcity of books in law libraries in Nigeria.Describes the current efforts of local publishers toreduce the level of dependency of Nigerian lawlibraries upon foreign suppliers and increase thenumber of books in these libraries as well.

Reading

131. Abimbola, S. O. (1979). Lack of juvenilereading habits: Problems and possible solu-tion. Nigerbiblios, 4 (3), 17–20.

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Examines the social, psychological and physicalchallenges and problems interfering with thedevelopment of good reading habits among juve-niles in Nigeria. Proposes a solution involvinglibrarians, teachers and publishers working to-gether to create a positive climate that encouragesreading.

132. Agaja, J. A. (1992). Children’s use ofUniversity of Maiduguri Staff Primary SchoolLibrary. Education Libraries Journal, 35 (1),27–38.

Analyzes the information needs and reading beha-vior of children at the University of Miaduguri StaffPrimary School Library. Provides collection devel-opment recommendations designed to more closelyalign the school library’s collection to the informa-tion needs of its users.

133. Aghoja, J. O. (1979). Libraries and thepromotion of reading habits in children.Bendel Library Journal, 2 (2), 58, 60–62.

Assesses the ability of Nigerian public and schoollibraries to satisfy the information needs of theirpatrons within the context of the dictates of theNigerian National Policy on Education. Offerssuggestions to improve these public and technicalservices for library patrons.

134. Agumanu, J. N. (1980). Promoting readinghabits among students. Anambra/Imo StatesSchool Libraries Association Bulletin, 9 (2),43–49.

Analyzes the role and need of school libraries andpublic libraries to promote good reading habitsamong children at an early age. Provides sugges-tions to establish programs that are geared towardsthe encouragement of reading.

135. Agunwa, C. O. (1979). The organization oflibrary services for primary schools in Anam-bra State. Anambra/Imo States School Li-braries Association Bulletin, 8 (2–3), 58–64.

Examines the importance of reading among chil-dren in a primary school environment. Discusses therole, function and need for school libraries toemerge as a positive force for learning, growth anddevelopment in the lives of children in Nigerianprimary schools.

136. Bozimo, D. O. (1983). Reading interests andhabits of children in primary 4 to 6 inNigerian primary schools: A case study of

Ahmadu Bello University (ABU) Staff School,Zaria. Bendel Library Journal, 6 (1–2), 8–19.

Analyzes the reading preferences of children inNigerian primary schools. Outlines the importanceand impact that instructional reading and recrea-tional reading can have on the development ofreading skills and good reading habits amongprimary school children.

137. Jam, Z. (1996). Promoting reading amongchildren in Nigeria. African Journal ofLibrary, Archives, & Information Science, 6(2), 107–112.

Provides detailed suggestions for teachers andlibraries to support and promote good readinghabits among children in Nigeria. Recommendsthe implementation of a material policy by theNigerian government to create, support, andmaintain school librarianship and add it as anintegral part to the formal education of teachers.

Removals

138. Ifidon, S. E. (1979). Moving an academiclibrary. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 4(6), 434–437.

Describes the administrative, logistical, and finan-cial problems and challenges that confronted themoving of the Zaria branch of the Nigerian Collegeof Art, Science and Technology to the Ahmadu BelloUniversity in Nigeria.

Research

139. Abubakar, T. (1995). A study of the applica-tion of appropriate research techniques inMasters’ theses and dissertations in Libraryand Information Science: A case study ofA.B.U., Zaria. In Proceedings of the seventhnational conference of the Nigerian Associa-tion of Library and Information Educators(NALISE) June 29–July 1994. Department ofLibrary Science, Bayero University: Kano,Nigeria (pp. 70–75).

Analyzes the research methodologies used inmaster’s theses and dissertations in the Depart-ment of Library and Information Science at AhmaduBello in Zaira, Nigeria from 1980 to 1990. Providessuggestions for improving and enhancing the quality

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of library and information science research inNigerian librarianship.

140. Afolabi, M. (1997). The structure of influ-ence in library and information scienceresearch in Nigeria: Master’s and doctoraltheses from 1972 to 1992. World Libraries, 7(2), 93–112.

Evaluates the quantity and quality of theses anddissertations in the field of library and informationscience from 1972 to 1992. Explores the impactthat Nigerian library and information sciencedepartments have on the production of theses anddissertations as well.

141. Dosunmu, J. A. (1984). Definition and collec-tion of library statistical data: The Nigerianexperience. In IFLA general conference,1984. Management and technology division.Section on statistics (proceedings). TheHague, Netherlands: International Federa-tion of Library Associations.

Describes the National Library of Nigeria’s attemptto gather statistical data for research purposes.Also examines the control and standardization ofthis statistical data.

142. Ekoja, I. I. (1997). The funding of libraryresearch in Abubaker Tafawa Balewa Uni-versity, Bauchi, Nigeria. Focus on Interna-tional & Comparative Librarianship, 28 (2),96–101.

Describes the results of a survey of academiclibrarians at Abubaker Tafawa Balewa Universityin Bauchi, Nigeria on the subject of researchfunding. Also explores its positive and negativeimpact upon publishing in an academic environ-ment.

143. Ekoja, I. I. (1999). The funding of libraryresearch in Nigerian universities. LibraryManagement, 20 (6), 338–344.

Explores the positive and negative impact researchhas on publication output of Nigerian academiclibrarians. Identifies sources of research fundingand the level of satisfaction Nigerian librarianshave with their research funding as well.

144. Gruber, P., & Dosunmu, J. A. (1981). Inter-national Federation of Library Associationsannual conference. Papers of the manage-ment and technology division. Statisticssection (47th, Leipzig, East Germany, August

17–22, 1981). The Hague, Netherlands:International Federation of Library Associa-tions.

Describes the effort of the Nigerian Library Asso-ciation to record and compile statistics on Nigerianlibraries. Also examines Germany’s efforts tocompile and publish the results of library statisticsas well.

145. Mohammed, Z. (1995). Research in libraryand information science in a developingcountryFNigeria. Library & InformationScience Research, 17 (3), 295–303.

Analyzes the challenges and problems hindering thegrowth and development of library and informationscience research in Nigeria. Provides fiscal, admin-istrative and methodological solutions to remedythe lack of growth in library and informationscience research.

School libraries

146. Adekanmbi, A. (1998). Developing librariesin primary schools: Reflections of a practi-tioner in Nigeria. African Journal of Library,Archives, & Information Science, 8 (1),53–57.

Examines the challenges and prospects of establish-ing and developing school libraries in a primaryschool environment based upon the recollections ofthe author’s personal and professional experiences.

147. Adimorah, E. N. O. (1980). The need for theschool librarian. Anambra/Imo States SchoolLibraries Association Bulletin, 9 (2), 8–13.

Examines the role, status and function of schoollibraries in Nigerian primary and secondary schools.Describes the information needs of students andproposes solutions that school librarians can use tosatisfy those information needs.

148. Aguolu, C. C. (1975). Nigerian studies (1) Theschool library as an instrument of educationin Nigeria. International Library Review, 7(1), 39–58.

Examines the history and level of commitment thatthe Nigerian government has made in using schoollibraries as a vehicle for encouraging and fosteringthe development of education and literacy amongprimary and secondary school students. Brieflyhighlights international efforts in this area as well.

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149. Aigberua, S. A. (1979). The essence of schoollibraries. Nigerbiblios, 4 (3), 15–16.

Examines the role, function and status of schoollibraries in the Nigerian educational system. As-sesses the prospects and challenges of establishingcomparative instructional ventures between tea-chers and librarians in primary and secondaryschool systems.

150. Amucheazi, O. N. (1979). The history tea-cher and the school library. Anambra/ImoStates School Libraries Association Bulletin,8 (1), 27–32.

Examines the current status of the subject ofhistory as it is taught in Nigerian secondary schools.Describes the ways in which school libraries couldimprove the status of history in secondary educa-tion by engaging in collection development, selec-tion and acquisition geared directly to promotingthat subject.

151. Apeji, E. A. (1990). The development ofschool library services in Nigeria. Interna-tional Library Review, 22 (1), 41–51.

Assesses the need for school libraries to take amore proactive role towards enhancing and teach-ing critical thinking skills among primary andsecondary school students. Describes the currentfunding situation for school libraries and offersrecommendations to increase and improve thelevel of funding at these institutions.

152. Bello, N. (1984). Libraries and the newnational policy on education in Nigeria.Library Scientist, 11, 54–64.

Explores the role and function that school librariescan play in the successful implementation of theNigerian government’s new national educationpolicy. Provides suggestions to help improve thephysical conditions, public services, and technicalservices of Nigeria’s school libraries.

153. Chikwelu, G. A. (1979). U.P.E. and schoollibraries. Anambra/Imo States School Li-braries Association Bulletin, 8 (1), 23–26.

Explores the role and function of Nigerian schoollibraries in providing public and technical servicesto library patrons in the Universal Primary Educa-tion (U.P.E.) program.

154. Dike, V. W. (1979). The school library andmodern education. Anambra/Imo States

School Libraries Association Bulletin, 8(2–3), 76–83.

Examines the impact that Nigerian school librariescan have on the educational growth and develop-ment of students with regards to learning takingplace outside of the classroom. Reviews currenteducational methodologies that exist in Nigerianprimary and secondary schools.

155. Dike, V. W. (1995). Educational contributionsof the school library. Anambra/Imo StatesSchool Libraries Association Bulletin, 9 (2),14–22.

Examines the positive impact that school librariescan have upon shaping the lives of the studentswhom they serve by meeting their informationneeds and developing their sense of creativity.

156. Ejikeme, I. E. (1977). The role of statelibrary services in the development ofeffective school libraries. Nigeria, Anam-bra/Imo States School Libraries Association.

A keynote address given by the author that high-lights the current challenges and problems con-fronting school librarianship in Nigeria in its effortto combat illiteracy in children. Describes the rolethe government can take to aid Nigerian schoollibrarianship.

157. Ene, N. (1979). The emergence of a totalschool library service: The Bendel Stateexperience. Bendel Library Journal, 2 (1),29–32, 34–37.

Examines the rise, growth and development ofschool library services in Bendel State, Nigeria fromthe promotion of standard rote learning to thepropagation of independent learning among theirpatrons. Analyzes the role of school libraries in theeducational development of their patrons.

158. Fadero, J. O. (1968). Federal School LibraryService. Nigerian Libraries, 4 (3), 63–69.

Describes the history and development of theFederal School Library Service in Lagos, Nigeria.Highlights the size, content, and scope of thelibrary’s collection as well as the various public andtechnical services the library offers its patrons.

159. Fadero, J. O. (1968). Problems of librarydevelopment in Nigerian primary schools.Nigerian Libraries, 4 (2), 39–42.

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Examines the administrative, managerial, financial,organizational and personnel problems and chal-lenges that Nigerian school libraries on the primaryeducation level face in providing reading materialsto their patrons.

160. Fadero, J. O. (1970). The problem of unusedbooks in Nigerian school libraries. LibraryAssociation Record, 72 (5), 204–205.

Describes the educational, social and culturalfactors creating the preponderance of unusedbooks in school libraries in Nigeria. Compares andcontrasts these factors with conditions that exist inthe United Kingdom.

161. Fadero, J. O. (1975). School libraries inNigeria. Nigerian Libraries, 11 (3), 169–180.

Analyzes the rise, growth and development ofschool libraries in Nigeria from the early 1960s tothe mid-1970s. Describes the challenges andproblems these libraries face in providing publicand technical services to their patrons.

162. Fagbeja, O. (1993). Recent development inthe provision and development of schoollibraries in schools in Nigeria (1985–1990).Education Libraries Journal, 36 (1), 19–29.

Explores the history, growth and development ofschool libraries in Nigeria from 1985 to 1990.Describes the efforts of Nigeria’s universities,ministries of education, and professional associa-tions to improve school librarianship and developthese libraries as well.

163. Igwe, S. O. (1982). The school library inNigerian education: An analysis of issuesand problems. Bendel Library Journal, 5(1), 6–21.

Examines the symbiotic relationship that existsbetween schools and school libraries in Nigeria.Describes how both of these entities support andenhance the role of the other as they seek toeducate their patrons/students respectively.

164. Ita, N. O. (1969). Educational planning andschool library development in Nigeria. Libri,19 (4), 237–245.

Examines the history, role and current status ofschool libraries in Nigeria. Describes national,regional and international efforts to improve andexpand the facilities of these school libraries andhighlights the impact that public libraries, library

associations, and the government have on thedevelopment of school libraries as well.

165. Jam, Z. (1992). Centralized school librarymanagement system in Benue State. Inter-national Information & Library Review, 24(3), 253–268.

Analyzes the degree to which sixty school librariesscattered throughout Benue State, Nigeria arecentrally administered in spite of logistical, finan-cial and communicative difficulties. Describes thelevel of cooperation that exists among theselibraries in terms of collection development,selection and acquisition of library materials.

166. Kanu, E. N. (1979). Role of the library indeveloping creativity. Anambra/Imo StatesSchool Libraries Bulletin, 8 (4), 24–27.

Examines the potential role that school librarianscan play in the development of abstract andcreative thinking in Nigerian children. Exploresthe current status of school libraries and the rolethey play in helping to educate Nigerian students aswell.

167. Kolapo, O. (1982). School library provisionin Nigeria: Case studies of six secondaryschools in Oyo, Ondo and Ogun States.MLS thesis, Loughborough University ofTechnology.

Examines the current status and planning behindthe development of the formal secondary educa-tion system and school libraries in Nigeria. Analyzesthe shortcomings of these school libraries in termsof the provisions that go into their development.

168. Makinta, Y. (1993). The school library inNigeria: The need to develop reading cul-ture. New Library World, 94 (1109), 20–25.

Explores the possibility of enlarging the role andfunction of the school library to create and developlibrary literacy programs in Nigerian primary andsecondary schools. Analyzes the problems andchallenges school libraries face in instituting theseprograms and providing children’s literature.

Science, technology, medicine

169. Adamson, I. (1981). The size of science in theold Nigerian universities: A preliminaryanalysis. Scientometrics, 3 (4), 317–324.

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Describes the growth and development of sciencepublications at six Nigerian universities from 1970to 1979. Analyzes both internal and externalfactors that have positively and negatively im-pacted upon the growth of Nigeria’s scienceliterature at these institutions of higher learning.

170. Akhigbe, F. (1991). Factors affecting thedevelopment of medical librarianship as aspecialization in Nigeria. Bibliotheca MedicaCanadiana, 12 (4), 207–210.

Explores the growth and development of medicallibrarianship in Nigeria from the beginning of Britishcolonial rule to the present. Examines the positiveand negative impact that the Nigerian government,academic librarianship and library science schoolshave had on the development of medical librarian-ship as a profession.

171. Amosu, M. (1974). Medical library develop-ment at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria.Bulletin of the Medical Library Association,62 (1), 49–51.

Assesses the current state of medical librarianshipat the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Analyzes a setof financial, logistical and acquisitional factors thatdirectly impact upon the development of medicallibrarianship throughout Nigeria.

172. Awaritefe, M. (1979). Is the Nigerian medicallibrarian in dilemma? International LibraryReview, 11 (1), 175–178.

Examines the challenges and problems affectingthe role and function of Nigerian medical libraryservices. Proposes solutions that can alleviate someof the structural, managerial and administrativeshortcomings of these services.

173. Belleh, G. S. (1975). Medical librarianship inNigeria: A review of the literature andcomments on some problems and prospects.Bulletin of the Medical Library Association,63 (2), 199–208.

Examines the current status, growth and develop-ment of medical librarianship in Nigeria. Assessesthe organization and research concentrations ofthis literature and suggests improvements to raisethe stature of Nigerian medical librarianship to aneven par with other university programs.

174. Belleh, G. S. (1977). Hospital libraries inNigeria. Special Libraries, 68 (3), 122–126.

Explores the current status and development ofhospital libraries in Nigeria. Analyzes the financial,political and administrative problems and chal-lenges confronting the creation and developmentof these special libraries in hospitals.

175. Belleh, G. S., & Akhigbe, O. O. (1991). Theimpact of economic issues on Nigerian healthsciences libraries: Presented at the 1990 MLAconference. Bulletin of the Medical LibraryAssociation, 79, 288–294.

Describes the negative impact that Nigeria’s eco-nomic crisis had on the growth and development ofhealth science libraries in that country. Offerssuggestions in how health science librarians cantake a more active role in securing funding for theirlibraries and in advocating the usage of theirresources to the library community.

176. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1993). Information tech-nology and scientific and technical informa-tion in Nigeria: Revolution or evolution.African Journal of Library, Archives, &Information Science, 3 (2), 113–123.

Examines the current status and future develop-ment of information technologies in Nigeria.Explores the challenges and prospects confrontingthe creation and growth of the Nigerian nationalscientific and technological information (STI)system.

177. Enu, C. E. (1972). Nigerian library resourcesin science and technology and possibleavenues for library cooperation. NigerianLibraries, 8 (3), 143–156.

Examines the current status of Nigerian libraryresources as it relates to the provision of informa-tion in the fields of science and technology.Explores the need, challenges and future prospectsof library cooperation among special and academiclibraries in Nigeria.

178. Ephraim, P. E. (1992). A pragmatic approachto journal selection for African medicalschool libraries. Health Information andLibraries, 3 (4), 224–238.

Provides the results of a bibliometric surveydesigned to measure the level of usage of medicaljournals in Nigerian medical school libraries.Explores the implications of this research in termsof shaping collection development, acquisitions,selection, and weeding policies.

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179. Ephraim, P. E. (1993). Medical practice,research and training in Nigeria: The currentstate of interlibrary loan and documentsupply. Interlending & Document Supply, 21(3), 26–33.

Examines the challenges and problems facing thegrowth and development of interlibrary loancooperation and document delivery services inNigerian medical school libraries. Highlights thosenational and international library and non-libraryorganizations that are supporting the circulationand dissemination of medical literature throughoutNigeria as well.

180. Ephraim, P. E. (1994). A pragmatic approachto journal selection for African medicallibraries. African Journal of Library, Ar-chives, & Information Science, 4, 41–46.

Reports the results of a survey to determine whichmedical journals received the greatest amount ofusage among Nigerian medical school libraries as anaid for collection development, acquisition, andselection managers.

181. Fowowe, S. O. (1987). An appraisal oflibrary facilities and services at the medicallibrary of the University of Ilorin, Nigeria.Bulletin of the Medical Library Association,75, 39–41.

Examines the history, facilities, public and techni-cal services of the Medical Library of the Universityof Ilorin in Nigeria. Analyzes the financial andphysical challenges the library faces in terms of itsfuture growth and expansion of its services tolibrary patrons.

182. Ike, A. O. (1994). Overview of the situationin Nigeria with regard to science andtechnology. In G. P. Cornish & S. Gould,(Eds.), Interlending and document supply fordeveloping countries. IFLA Presession Semi-nar, Paris, August 1989. Boston Spa, WestYorkshire: IFLA, Programme for UniversalAvailability of Publications (pp. 143–145).

Discusses the current status of scientific andtechnological development in Nigeria within thecontext of information provision by academic andresearch libraries. Also examines the creation ofthe National Centre for Science and TechnologyProject (NCST) by the Nigerian government toaugment scientific development.

183. Ikpaahindi, L. (1981). An investigation intothe information gathering methods of Niger-ian veterinary scientists: A study withparticular reference to the National Veter-inary Research Institute, Vom. MLS thesis,University of Wales.

Analyzes the information needs of Nigerian veter-inary scientists as well as the shortcomings ofNigerian academic libraries in addressing theirpatron’s information needs.

184. Ikpaahindi, L. (1986). The relationshipbetween the needs for achievement, affilia-tion and power and frequency of use ofinformation sources and scientific produc-tivity among Nigerian veterinary surgeons.Ph.D. dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

Explores the correlation that exists between theneed for achievement and scientific productivityreflected in the use of information resources byNigerian veterinary surgeons.

185. Iroka, L. A. (1988). Hospital libraries inpatient’s education. International LibraryReview, 20 (1), 111–114.

Examines the current status, role and impact thathospital libraries have on patient education inNigeria in lieu of the limited number of hospitallibraries that exist.

186. Komolafe, H. O. (1994). Promoting Nigeria’shealth care delivery system through effec-tive library and information services. AfricanJournal of Library, Archives, & InformationScience, 4, 139–146.

Describes the role and function that librarianshipand information science have to play in order todevelop health care delivery systems in Nigeria.Assesses current efforts to establish a NationalHealth Management Information System to helpmake effective health care delivery possible.

187. Mabawonku, I. M. (1998). Health informationprovision to semi-urban people in Oyo State,Nigeria: What role for library and informa-tion centres? African Journal of Library,Archives, & Information Science, 8 (2),127–138.

Describes the role, function and current status oflibraries and information centers with regards tosatisfying the health information needs of theirlibrary communities in Oyo State, Nigeria. Also

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examines the role that health institutions and theNigerian Federal government take to meet theseneeds as well.

Scientometrics

188. Gupta, D. K. (1989). Scientometric studyof biochemical literature of Nigeria, 1970–1984: Application of Lotka’s Law and the 80/20 Rule. Scientometrics, 15 (3–4), 171–179.

Describes the results of a bibliometric analysis ofthe biochemical literature of Nigeria from 1970 to1984. Assesses the application of Lotka’s Law, the80/20 Rule, and the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test tothis literature as well.

Searching

189. Adedibu, L. O., & Adio, G. (1997). Informa-tion needs and information seeking patternsof medical students at Lautech, Ogbomoso.Aslib Proceedings, 49 (9), 238–242.

Assesses the information needs and the informationsearch patterns of medical students at LadokeAkintola University of Technology (Lautech) Ogbo-moso in Oyo State Nigeria. Describes the manner inwhich librarians try to meet the information needsof their patrons as well.

190. Aina, L. O. (1985). Information needs andinformation-seeking involvement of farmersin six rural communities in Nigeria. QuarterlyBulletin of the International Association ofAgricultural Librarians and Documentalists,30 (2), 35–40.

Assesses the information needs of farmers in ruralcommunities in Nigeria. Describes the information-seeking behavior of these individuals and addressesthe need to establish public libraries in rural areasto satisfy the information needs of those farmers.

191. Ajileye, E. O. (1984). User frustration inlibraries: A case study of University of IlorinLibrary. Bendel Library Journal, 7 (1), 33–45.

Explores patron usage of the library catalog and thelevel of difficulty involved in locating materials onthe shelves of the University of Ilorin Library.

192. Edem, U. S. (1993). Information needs andinformation seeking behavior patterns of

journalists in selected Nigerian towns. Jour-nal of Library and Information Science, 19(2), 1–14.

Examines the information needs and informationseeking strategies of Nigerian journalists. Advo-cates the creation and use of bibliographic instruc-tion and continuing education programs to improvetheir information seeking strategies and developtheir information needs.

193. Ikoro, O. B. (1992–1993). Library’s responseto information seeking behaviour of aca-demic staff and its implication for teachingand research in the College of Administrativeand Business Studies, Kaduna Polytechnic,Kaduna. Library Focus, 10–11 (1–2), 16–23.

Explores the information seeking strategies of theacademic staff of the College of Administrative andBusiness Studies (CABS) of Kaduna Polytechnic,Nigeria in an effort to aid librarians in providingbetter public and technical services to meet theiruser’s information needs.

Security

194. Abifarin, A. (1997). Library stock security:The experience of the University of Agricul-ture, Abeokuta, Nigeria. Library & ArchivalSecurity 14 (1), 11–19.

Explores the scope of the mutilation and theft oflibrary materials at the University of Agriculture atAbeokuta, Nigeria. Describes the security measuresthe library has in place to curtail these crimes andoffers suggestions to both expand and improvethese measures as well.

195. Adewoye, A. A. (1992). Librarians’ attitudestowards theft and mutilation of librarymaterials in academic libraries in Nigeria.Library Review, 41 (2), 29–36.

Describes the negative impact that the theft andmutilation of library books have on conservationand preservation efforts of library collections inNigerian academic libraries. Attempts to draw adirect correlation between librarian attitudes to-wards thefts and mutilation and the actual crimesthemselves.

196. Afolabi, M., & Nanna, V. E. (1990). Securityproblems and methods in six special li-braries. Library Focus, 8 (1–2), 27–40.

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Assesses security and environmental problems thatexist within six special libraries in Zaria, Nigeria.

197. Agboola, A. T. (1995). The new librarybuilding of the university of agriculture,Abeokuta, Nigeria. New Library World, 96(1122), 23–30.

Describes the history and construction of the newlibrary building of the University of Agriculture atAbeokuta, Nigeria. Analyzes the challenges andopportunities of managing, maintaining and provid-ing security for this new facility.

198. Alafiatayo, B. O. (1986). Reader malprac-tices in Nigerian university libraries. LibraryFocus, 4 (1–2), 51–69.

Examines the origin and extent of patron malprac-tices against Nigerian academic libraries. Describespossible solutions to prevent these offences fromrecurring and future offences as well.

199. Alegbeleye, B. (1990). Disaster control plan-ning in Nigeria. Journal of Librarianship, 22(2), 91–106.

Compares and contrasts the level of preparationamong Nigerian academic libraries to engage indisaster control planning and handle natural andartificial disasters should they occur.

200. Antwi, I. K. (1989). The problem of librarysecurity: The Bauchi experience. Interna-tional Library Review, 21 (3), 363–372.

Analyzes the efforts of a Nigerian academic libraryto recover stolen books from library patrons andinstall preventative measures to reduce thechances of future theft or mutilation of readingmaterials.

201. Bello, M. A. (1998). Library security, materi-als theft and mutilation in technologicaluniversity libraries in Nigeria. Library Man-agement, 19 (6), 379–383.

Examines the negative impact that stealing and thevandalism of reading materials has had on theability of Nigerian academic libraries to provideinformation to their respective communities. De-scribes the financial and psychological factors thatlead to the theft and mutilation of these readingmaterials.

202. Eyitayo, S. A. (1996). Securing your systemagainst virus attack: The experience of

a medical library in Nigeria; Universityof Ibadan. Information Development, 12,215–217.

Describes the impact that computer viruses canhave upon the operations of a medical library inNigeria. Highlights some of the software defensesthat can be installed into a computer system toprotect it against viruses.

203. Ezennia, S. E., Onwura, E. E., & Onyekwelu,V. C. (1996). Antisocial acts in libraries:The Nnamdi Azikiwe University library’sexperience. Library & Archival Security, 13(2), 19–31.

Analyzes the causes behind the theft, mutilationand vandalism of reading materials at the NnamdiAzikiwe University Library. Provides suggestions forpreventing future anti-social behavior and punish-ing those that participate in these destructive acts.

Special subject libraries

204. Adedigba, Y. A. (1985). Forestry researchersas information users in Nigeria. InformationDevelopment, 1 (4), 229–233.

Analyzes the formal and informal information needsof forestry research scientists in Nigeria. Providessuggestions to improve the acquisitions, selection,and collection development policies of speciallibraries directly associated with forestry research.

205. Adefolaju, P. I. (1983). The use of agricultur-al libraries in Nigeria: A case study of aresearch institute. Nigerian Library andInformation Science Review, 1 (1), 82–86.

Assesses the usage and availability of researchmaterials in the Nigerian Horticultural ResearchInstitute library in meeting the information needsof its patrons. Analyzes the acquisition, selection,weeding and collection development scope of theselibraries’ technical services as well.

206. Adimorah, E. N. O. (1977). Agriculturallibrarianship, documentation and informa-tion science in Nigeria. International LibraryReview, 9 (4), 413–428.

Explores the history, current status, growth anddevelopment of special librarianship in Nigeria as itrelates to agriculture. Examines the problems andchallenges this branch of librarianship faces in

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terms of funding, recruitment and the provision ofpublic and technical services to patrons.

207. Aguolu, I. E. (1997). Factors affecting thedevelopment of academic law libraries inNigeria. International Journal of Legal In-formation, 24 (2), 148–160.

Describes the historical, political and financialforces that have created both challenges andopportunities for the growth of academic lawlibraries in Nigeria.

208. Aina, L. O., & Adedigba, Y. A. (1995). Thedevelopment of agricultural information inNigeria. Ibadan: Third World InformationServices, (pp. 83–107).

Analyzes the challenges and opportunities con-fronting the development of agricultural librariesand information systems in Nigeria. Providessuggestions to aid agricultural libraries in over-coming the fiscal, structural and institutionalchallenges hindering the growth of these speciallibraries.

209. Akintunde, S. A. (1990). Towards a history offaculty–library relations in the University ofJos. African Journal of Academic Librarian-ship, 8 (1–2), 27–34.

Documents the history of the subject librariessystem at the University of Jos in Nigeria. Highlightsthe professional relationship that exists betweenthe teaching staff and academic libraries at theuniversity.

210. Akintunde, S. A. (1995). The status ofbroadcasting libraries in Nigeria (A studyof Bauchi and Plateau States). InternationalInformation & Library Review, 27 (3),283–293.

Describes the current status, facilities, public andtechnical services of broadcasting libraries inNigeria. Examines the financial, environmentaland political challenges and prospects of theirfuture growth and development as well.

211. Awosika, D. (1986). Administrative librariesand universal availability of information:Comments from a developing country.Inspel, 20 (2), 98–107.

Describes the history, role and function of admin-istrative libraries as the distributors of informationfor the Nigerian library community. Analyzes the

role these libraries play in regional and interna-tional cooperative ventures as well as the govern-ment’s role as a guarantor for the universalavailability of administrative information.

212. Fasanaya, J. O. (1980). Trends in speciallibrarianship: The Nigerian experience. Ni-gerian Libraries, 15 (3), 22–36, 83.

Compares and contrasts the growth and develop-ment of special librarianship in the United King-dom, the United States and Nigeria. Examines thecurrent status of Nigerian special libraries and theirprospects for future growth.

213. Goddard, S. (1980). Establishing a libraryservice for the Nigerian Institute of Ad-vanced Legal Studies. African Research andDocumentation, 23, 10–13.

Examines the challenges and prospects of establish-ing a law library in a developing country by usingthe creation of the law library at the NigerianInstitute of Advanced Legal Studies as a case study.

214. Ibekwe, G. O. (1988). The present con-straints to the realization of the role ofNigerian agricultural libraries in food pro-duction, and prospects for fulfillment. Quar-terly Bulletin of the InternationalAssociation of Agricultural Librarians andDocumentalists, 33 (3), 121–133.

Assesses the role, function and current status ofagricultural special libraries in Nigeria. Classifiesthese libraries into sub-categories based upon thetype of services they provide and the patrons whoseneeds they serve.

215. Ifebuzor, C. C. (1984). Law collection in theUniversity of Benin Library. The Law Librar-ian, 15, 14–16.

Describes the history, growth and development ofthe University of Benin Library in Nigeria. Highlightsthe creation, size, content and organization of thelaw collection at that academic library.

216. Ifebuzor, C. C. (1987). Wanted: Standards foracademic law libraries in Nigeria. The LawLibrarian, 18, 81–86.

Analyzes the need for the establishment andapplication of library standards to the academiclaw libraries in Nigeria. Describes the collectionsize, content, staffing and spacing of legalmaterials in Nigerian law libraries and compares

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them to the standards that exist in Westernnations.

217. Ifebuzor, C. C. (1988). Centralization versusdecentralization of law librarians and lawlibrary services in Nigerian universities. LawLibrary Journal, 80, 605–617.

Examines the pros and cons of centralizing anddecentralizing public and technical services in lawlibraries located in Nigerian universities.

Stocktaking

218. Akhidme, J. A. F. (1985). The status ofreference books in the social sciences inKashim Ibrahim Library Ahmadu Bello Uni-versity, Zaria. Library Scientist, 12, 79–89.

Examines the collection size and content ofreference books in the social science section ofthe Kashim Ibrahim Library at Ahmadu BelloUniversity in Zaria, Nigeria to determine itsapplicability in meeting the information needs ofthe public.

219. Apeji, E. A. (1990). Nigerian journals asmajor sources of information to researchersin Nigeria. African Research and Documenta-tion, 52, 1–9.

Describes the results of a citation analysis study ofNigerian journals to determine the usage, publica-tion pattern, and foci of these literary works.Explores ways to improve and increase the usage ofthese journals among Nigerian researchers.

220. Awogbami, P. A. (1995). An assessment of theresearch-level literature resources for agri-cultural biology in a Nigerian university. NewLibrary World, 96 (1119), 32–33.

Highlights through citation analysis the collectionsize, currency, and academic content of theagricultural biological literature in the Library ofthe Faculty of Agriculture at Ibadan University inNigeria.

221. Aziagba, P. C. (1991). Stock evaluation anduser needs. Annals of Library Science andDocumentation, 38 (3), 99–107.

Describes the results of a bibliometric study todevelop and enhance the collection at thePort Harcourt University Library in Nigeria by

determining which science periodicals have under-gone the greatest amount of use.

222. Aziagba, P. C. (1993). Scientific journalselection based on the study of a localjournal. Information Processing & Manage-ment, 29 (1), 83–93.

Provides the results of a bibliometric study of theNigerian scientific journal Nigerian Journal ofMicrobiology to aid librarians in the acquisitionand selection of reading materials for their respec-tive scientific collections.

223. Gojeh, L. A. (1990). Stocktaking in publiclibraries: The case of the Library Boardof Kaduna State. Library Focus, 8 (1–2),145–155.

Explores the procedural, administrative and man-agerial aspects of stocktaking at the Library Boardof Kaduna State in Nigeria. Provides suggestions forimproving stocktaking procedures and policies in aneffort to make the system more efficient.

Technical services

224. Abubakar, I. (1971). Annual lecture: Thelibrary and the computer (given to theninth annual conference, Nigerian LibraryAssociation, 1971). Nigerian Libraries, 7 (3),101–111.

Describes the role and impact that computers canhave upon the daily operations of the public andtechnical services of Nigerian libraries. Examinesthe changes and improvements that automationcan bring to the selection, acquisition, catalogingand bibliographical aspects of library services.

225. Aderinto, M. A. (1983). Centralised technicalservices procedures in Oyo state polytechniclibraries: Ibadan Polytechnic experience.MLS thesis, Loughborough University ofTechnology.

Describes the history and current status of publicand technical services at the Ibadan Polytechniclibraries in Oyo State, Nigeria. Analyzes the abilityand feasibility of those libraries to provide techni-cal services that can meet the information needs oftheir patrons.

226. Agaja, J. A. (1992). The Nigerian law ofdefamation and its impact on libraries. ThirdWorld Libraries, 2 (2), 20–27.

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Highlights the impact that a series of Nigerian lawsoutlawing the distribution of any publications thatpromote character defamation could have on theacquisition, collection development and selectionpolicies of Nigerian libraries. Also examines theliability of libraries if they are found to have theseillegal materials in their possession.

227. Aziagba, P. C. (1996). Survey of personneland operations in libraries: A case study fromRivers State of Nigeria. Annals of LibraryScience and Documentation, 43 (2), 69–75.

Expands the scope of a previous case study thatexplores the role and function of academic, publicand special libraries in the management, acquisi-tion and work related duties of their respectivelibraries in the Rivers State of Nigeria.

228. Husain, S., & Anjum, A. (1983). Cataloguingpractice in some Nigerian university li-braries: A case study. Bendel Library Jour-nal, 6 (1–2), 50–59.

Examines the problems and challenges facingtechnical service units in Nigerian academiclibraries in terms of cataloging, classification andpersonnel issues.

User services

229. Adediran, B. O. (1974). Centralization ofuniversity library services: Some compellingfactors in Nigerian Universities. College &Research Libraries, 35 (5), 360–363.

Evaluates the challenges and prospects of consoli-dating and centralizing the public and technicalservices of Nigerian academic libraries.

230. Agbemetsi, K. (1981). Library provision inSokoto. Bendel Library Journal, 4 (2), 48–57.

Examines the current status of public and technicalservices in eleven academic and public libraries inSokoto, Nigeria.

231. Aguolu, C. C. (1978). Information resourcesin Nigerian higher education: Problems ofdevelopment and growth. Libri, 28 (1),21–57.

Examines the current status, growth and develop-ment of public and technical services in Nigerianacademic libraries. Explores the importance ofthese libraries to increase and expand their

resources to meet the information needs of theirlibrary patrons.

232. Ajibero, M. I. (1995). User expectations fromNigerian university libraries services in the21st century. Public & Access Services Quar-terly, 1 (2), 33–49.

Analyzes the current status of public and technicalservices at academic libraries in Nigeria. Recom-mends the acquisition of new information technol-ogies that can increase the depth of the libraries’collection and expand the reach of the library’spublic services.

233. Antwi, I. K. (1990). Promoting the effectiveuse of library resources: An overview of theexperience of Abubakar Tafawa Balewa Uni-versity Library, Bauchi, Nigeria. AfricanJournal of Academic Librarianship, 8 (1–2),19–26.

Describes the public and technical services offeredby the Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Libraryin Bauchi, Nigeria to satisfy the information needsof the library community.

234. Antwi, I. K. (1990). The contribution ofAbubakar Tafawa Balewa University Library,Bauchi, to library development in Nigeria.Education Libraries Journal, 33 (4), 41–53.

Describes the history of the Abubakar TafawaBalewa University Library in Bauchi, Nigeria withinthe context of the academic library’s support forthe educational role of the institution. Examinesthe public and technical services that the academiclibrary offers to its patrons as well as the role thelibrary played in the creation of the NationalDocumentation Center for Science and Technology(NADICEST).

235. Anyakoha, M. W. (1981). Reference servicefor schools. Anambra State School LibrariesAssociation Bulletin, 10 (2), 16–21.

Provides suggestions to aid Nigerian teachers andlibrarians in addressing reference questions, per-forming bibliometric instruction and indexing lit-erature for patron use.

236. Dike, V., & Amucheazi, N. O. (1997).Information for all: Resource generationand information repackaging in NigerianSchools. In Lighthall, L., & Haycock, K.(Eds.), Information rich but knowledge poor?Emerging issues for schools and libraries

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worldwide. Research and professional pa-pers presented at the annual conference ofthe International Association of School Li-brarianship held in conjunction with theAssociation for Teacher-Librarianship in Ca-nada (26th, Vancouver, British Columbia,Canada, July 6-11, 1997). Seattle, WA.:International Association of School Librarian-ship.

Examines the current state and accessibility ofinformation in Nigeria with regards to thenation’s oral and written traditions. Assesses therole, function, and duty of Nigerian libraries toprovide public and technical services to makeinformationFregardless of its formFaccessiblefor all.

237. Enwonwu, R. C. (1973). The role of Nigerianpublic libraries in adult education. UnescoBulletin of Libraries, 27 (6), 331–334.

Examines the role, function and position thatNigerian public librarians need to take to provideand improve adult education services and combatilliteracy in the rural areas of Nigeria.

238. Igwe, U. O. (1986). Planning library exten-sion services in Nigeria. Library Scientist, 13,19–34.

Analyzes the importance of developing extensionand outreach services in Nigerian public libraries asa way to improve literacy and the dissemination ofinformation. Examines the problems and obstaclesconfronting the expansion of these services as well.

239. Iwe, J. I. (1994). Responding to informationneeds of Nigeria’s university communities inthe 1990s. African Journal of Library,Archives, & Information Science, 4, 63–67.

Examines the ability of Nigerian academic librariesto make their collections more accessible, theirresources more subject specific, and to engage incooperative ventures with other academic librariesin an effort to satisfy the information needs of theirrespective library communities.

User training

240. Adedigba, Y. A. (1990). User education inresearch institutes’ libraries in Nigeria.Quarterly Bulletin of the International Asso-ciation of Agricultural Librarians and Doc-umentalists, 35 (2), 73–76.

Examines the need for Nigerian academic librariansto create bibliographic instruction programs to aidstudents and researchers in effectively and effi-ciently using the public and technical services thelibrary offers. Explores the reasons why theseprograms cannot be found in all academic librariesin Nigeria.

241. Adeoti-Adekeye, W. B. (1997). The need foruser education in secondary school librariesin Nigeria. Library Review, 46 (8), 586–592.

Analyzes the need to establish bibliographic in-struction programs in secondary school libraries inNigeria. Describes the role that librarians andteachers should take to encourage the establish-ment of those user education programs in theirschools.

242. Aguolu, C. C. (1982). The education oflibrary users in Nigerian universities. Educa-tion Libraries Bulletin, 25 (3) (No.75) 20–29.

Examines the need, depth and extent of biblio-graphic instruction in Nigerian universities, focus-ing upon the benefits that such instruction canprovide to the academic library community. It alsoanalyzes growing trends in Nigerian universitiesthat have a direct impact upon the role andfunction of the Nigerian academic library.

243. Aguolu, C. C. (1983). The education oflibrary users in Nigerian universities, II.Education Libraries Bulletin, 26 (1), 1–13.

Analyzes the importance of bibliographic instruc-tion as it relates to the mission of academiclibraries and their host institutions. Assesses thedevelopmental changes that are on-going at Niger-ian universities and their impact upon bibliographicinstruction as well.

244. Ahmed, B. (1997/1998). Evaluation of usereducation programme in selected polytech-nic libraries in Nigeria. Library Focus, 15–16,61–72.

Describes the results of a questionnaire and surveythat explores the impact that bibliographic instruc-tion has upon aiding students in effectively usingthe library and its resources. Also examines thefactors that negatively impact upon the quality ofthese bibliographic instruction programs as well.

245. Akinyode, S. A. (1984). User education ina Nigerian university library: Its problemsand prospects in Ibadan University Library.

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Nigerian Library and Information ScienceReview, 2, 109–124.

Addresses the current status and history of biblio-graphic instruction at the University of IbadanLibrary. Evaluates the need, structure and functionof these bibliographic instruction courses as theyeducate users about the various services that thelibrary has to offer.

246. Edem, U. S., & Lawal, O. O. (1996). Towardsimproved user education programs in Niger-ian university libraries: Findings of a 1992/93survey. African Journal of Library, Archives,& Information Science, 6, 31–36.

Analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of the usereducation program at Nigerian academic librarieswith regards to providing effective bibliographicinstruction to first year students. Describes theimportance of such programs in familiarizing uni-versity students with the public and technicalservices provided by the libraries.

247. Muottoh, O. C. A. (1982). A critical andcomparative evaluation of user educationtechnique used in academic libraries withspecial reference to their suitability in thecontext of Nigerian university libraries.Ph.D. dissertation, London University.

Assesses the effectiveness of bibliographic instruc-tion programs in Nigerian academic libraries withregards to their ability to educate users in terms offinding information in the library. Analyzes thepresent instructional strategies academic librariansuse to deliver bibliographic instruction to aid theirpatrons in finding materials.

Users and user services

248. Abah, A. A., & Jimoh, A. (1995/1996).Students use of college library: FederalCollege of Education, Okene. Library Focus,13–14, 30–42.

Describes the level and rate of usage of the FederalCollege of Education’s library resources by studentsand members of the academic staff. Analyzes usersatisfaction with the public and technical servicesoffered by the library and provides suggestions toimprove these services.

249. Aboyade, B. O., Idachaba, F. S., Williams, S.K. T., Russell, H., & Lawani, S. M. (1981).Education and training for library and

information services in a predominantlynon-literate society with particular refer-ence to agricultural and rural development.The Hague: FID.

A collection of papers presented at the FID/Education and Training Committee meeting inIbadan, Nigeria in May 6–9, 1981. Explores thecurrent status and need for improving and expand-ing library and information public services to meetthe growing information needs of illiterate patronsin rural settings.

250. Adaramola, E. S. (1989). Non-print mediaservices in Nigerian libraries at the cross-roads. Audiovisual Librarian, 15, 151–154.

Highlights the current status of non-print mediaservices in libraries throughout Nigeria. Exploressome of the financial problems that these servicesface in terms of acquiring new and maintaining oldmaterials.

251. Adio, G. (1993). The use of the IITA library bythe agricultural scientists of the Universityof Ibadan. Quarterly Bulletin of the Inter-national Association of Agricultural Informa-tion Specialists, 38 (1), 27–32.

Highlights the results of a user survey of the libraryat the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture(IITA) at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria todetermine what resource materials were used andthe strategies patrons employed to find theinformation they needed. Analyzes the currentstatus of the public and technical services offeredby the IITA library as it pertains to satisfying theinformation needs of their users as well.

252. Aina, J. O. (1996). The role of the library inthe provision of higher education to thehandicapped in developing countries. Jour-nal of Educational Media and LibrarySciences, 33 (4), 339–406.

Examines the current status of special services toaid handicapped library users in gaining access toacademic libraries in the developing world with anemphasis on Nigeria. Provides recommendations toimprove these special services and expand them toall library systems throughout the country.

253. Aiyepeku, W. O. (1982). Mapping the infor-mation environment of policy-makers: Someempirical findings from Nigeria. SocialScience Information Studies, 2 (2), 79–91.

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Analyzes the conceptual differences in the transferand dissemination of information that exists be-tween Nigerian librarians and government policymakers. Examines ways in which this conceptualdifference can be used for the benefit of all.

254. Ajala, I. O. (1997). Use of the Universityof Ibadan Library resources by graduatestudents. Library Review, 46 (5–6), 421–427.

Measures the extent and usage of public andtechnical services at the University of Ibadanlibrary by graduate students. Provides ideas toboth improve and develop these services incooperation with other academic, special andpublic libraries.

255. Akintunde, S. A. (1995). Coping with in-creased enrollment in Nigerian technologicaluniversities’ libraries; Presented at theIATUL seminar, Sheffield, England, July1994. IATUL Proceedings New Series, 4,262–267.

Addresses the impact that an increase in enroll-ment at Nigerian technological universities willhave upon the provision of public and technicalservices by the respective academic libraries ofthese institutions.

256. Alao, I. A. (1998). Students and library bookborrowing in an overseas university. LearningResources Journal, 14 (3), 71–72.

Explores the results of a study that attempts toanalyze book-borrowing patterns among studentsat the University of Ilorin. Offers suggestions tohelp improve the users’ ability to locate andretrieve library materials that they need.

257. Atinmo, M. I. (1979). Public and schoollibrary services to the physically handi-capped in Nigeria: An evaluation. Interna-tional Library Review, 11 (4), 441–449.

Examines the extent and depth to which publiclibraries and school libraries have developed theirpublic resources to aid the physically handicappedin satisfying their information needs in Nigeria.Proposes solutions to remedy those areas wherethese libraries fall short in providing suitable aid totheir handicapped patients.

258. Atinmo, M. I. (1983). Library services to thevisually handicapped in some Western Eur-opean countries and the possible relevance

of their experience to a country like Nigeria.IFLA Journal, 9 (1), 39–43.

Recounts the author’s experiences in surveying thepublic and technical services for the visuallyimpaired in the libraries of five Western Europeancountries. Also examines both the strengths andweaknesses of these services in Nigerian libraries.

259. Atinmo, M. I. (1984). Special problems ofblind children and libraries in Africa withparticular reference to Nigeria. In: Patte, G.& Hannesdottir, S. K. (Eds.), Les enfants(The children). Munch: K.G. Saur.

Defines the role, function and current status ofpublic and technical services for blind children inNigerian public and school libraries. Explores theneed for libraries to improve and develop theseservices for the physically challenged.

260. Ayalogu, M. C. (1988). Meeting the readingneeds of the blind in Nigeria: Problems andchallenges. Education Libraries Bulletin, 31(2), 7–13.

Examines the financial, logistical, managerial andtechnological problems of Nigerian libraries face inmeeting the information needs of their blindpatrons. Explores the history of education for theblind in Nigeria and examines the library’s role inits development as well.

261. Aziagba, P. C. (1991). Library use of finalyear undergraduates under stringent condi-tions at the University of Port Harcourt.Library Review, 40 (5), 5–11.

Assesses the extent to which the academic libraryat the University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria caneffectively satisfy the information needs of itspatrons in spite of environmental disasters andfinancial cutbacks by the Nigerian government.

262. Baldwin, C. M. (1973). Implications of oraltraditions for Nigerian library service. MAthesis, University of Chicago.

Explores the traditional role of library services inNigeria weighed against the need to provide libraryservices to those who are illiterate. Examines theresources that can be used to support the oraltradition of the Nigerian people within the contextof the library’s traditional role.

263. Bilesanmi, S. A. (1990). Use of the librarycatalog by students at Ogun State University,

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Nigeria. Library Resources & Technical Ser-vices, 34, 505–508.

Evaluates the frequency and manner in whichstudents at Ogun State University in Nigeria usethe library catalog. Provides suggestions to helplibrary students improve their usage of the librarycatalog as well.

264. Boman, D. D. (1987). Library and informationservices in Kaduna State Library Board.Library Focus, 5 (1–2), 49–67.

Analyzes the degree of satisfaction that libraryusers have in the public and technical services ofthe Library Board of Kaduna State. Explores thoseinternal and external factors that positively andnegatively impact upon user satisfaction with theLibrary Board.

265. Bozimo, D. O. (1986). Basic library knowl-edge and extent of previous library useamong Nigerian university freshmen: A pre-liminary study at Ahmadu Bello University.Library Focus, 4 (1–2), 22–41.

Assesses the degree and depth of user familiaritywith the library’s collection and public services.Provides suggestions to reshape the bibliographicinstruction programs at Ahmadu Bello Universitylibrary into a discipline-specific program.

266. Daniel, C. T. (1987). Library and informationservices for the rural population in Nigeria.Library Focus, 5 (1–2), 11–23.

Describes the nature and characteristics of theNigerian rural population in terms of being a viablepart of the library community. Outlines the role,function and duty of the rural library in satisfyingthe information needs of those users.

267. Daniel, J. O. (1983). The relationship be-tween methods of instruction and frequencyof library use by students and faculty inthree universities in Nigeria. Ph.D. disserta-tion, University of Michigan.

Explores the nature of a correlation that existsbetween the teaching methods used by instructorsand the frequency with which students and facultyuse libraries in three Nigerian academic libraries.Also examines student and faculty attitudes to-wards using the academic libraries to satisfy theirinformation needs.

268. D !ecor, S. K. (1989). Attitudes and percep-tions of student patrons: Library of theRivers State University of Science and Tech-nology, Port Harcourt. International LibraryReview, 21 (3), 373–385.

Evaluates the information needs and user attitudesof student patrons at the Rivers State University ofScience and Technology library at Port Harcourt,Nigeria.

269. Ejiko, E.O. (1990). The use of formalinformation sources in physical science re-search in Nigerian universities. InternationalLibrary Review, 22 (3), 149–161.

Explores the extent to which Nigerian academiclibraries are able to meet the information needs ofphysical scientists by supplying primary journals fortheir research. Describes the shortcomings of thesecollections and the alternatives that researchersare taking to satisfy their information needs.

270. Enyi, V. F. (1984). The role of public librariesin the education of children in Nigeria withparticular reference to Benue State. Ph.D.dissertation, Loughborough University ofTechnology.

Examines the current status and ability of Nigerianpublic librariesFparticularly in Benue StateFtomeet the information needs of children. Analyzesthe impact that a change in the administrative,managerial and organizational structure of publiclibrary systems might have towards enhancingthose public services for patrons.

271. Fadayomi, J. A. (1998). OPAC use in a newlyautomated library in Nigeria: Fear andhopes: University of Ilorin Library. Program-Automated Library and Information Sys-tems, 32 (2), 151–156.

Describes the problems and challenges that areconfronting library patrons in the use of onlinepublic access catalogs (OPAC) at the University ofIlorin Library in Nigeria.

272. Gwabin, J. N. (1986). User satisfactionsurvey of Kaduna State library services.Library Scientist, 13, 71–78.

Analyzes the level of patron satisfaction with thepublic and technical library services provided bythe Kaduna State Library. Describes many of thechallenges and problems this library system faces in

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providing information resources to satisfy theirpatrons’ information needs.

273. Ikpaahindi, L. (1982). Journal use by Niger-ian veterinary practitioners: The NationalVeterinary Research Institute. QuarterlyBulletin of the International Association ofAgricultural Information Specialists, 27 (4),116–121.

Analyzes the situation patterns of staff members atthe National Veterinary Research Institute (NVRI) inNigeria in their usage of veterinary journals andperiodicals.

274. Kalu, W. J. (1981). Developing library re-source materials for the handicapped inschools. Anambra State School LibrariesAssociation Bulletin, 10 (2), 56–59.

Provides suggestions on ways in which Nigerianschool librarians can aid handicapped children insatisfying their information needs. Examines var-ious public and technical services that would haveto be changed or adjusted to better facilitate thehandicapped.

275. Marama, I. D. (1998). Use of the technolo-gical university library by international

students. International Information & Li-brary Review, 30 (2), 87–96.

Assesses the linguistic problems and challengesthat Nigerian academic libraries face in tryingto meet the information needs of internationalstudents from various parts of the developingworld. Focuses on the situation that currentlyexists between the Abubakar Tafawa BalewaUniversity (ATBU) Library’s provision of serviceto international students and their ability to usethese resources to satisfy their informationneeds.

Withdrawals

276. Dike, A. D. (1992). Scarcity of tertiary booksin Nigeria: A threat to academic excellenceand suggestions for action. Journal ofLibrarianship and Information Science, 24,79–85.

Analyzes the political, social and economic chal-lenges that are creating a scarcity of books inacademic libraries. Proposes solutions to thesechallenges that librarians can use to help buildand maintain their respective library collections.

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140 S. Coleman Jr.


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