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Loveland herald 120215

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Watching video of the liberation of a WWII con- centration camp sent a 14- year-old Kristin Rutter running to the bathroom to be sick. She wanted noth- ing to do with the Holo- caust. “As a kid, I was really turned off to it,” Rutter said. “I went and got sick and they had to stick me in the hallway. I couldn’t han- dle it. So I never touched it again after that.” Viewing images of peo- ple being herded like cattle with blank stares and ema- ciated bodies - the survi- vors - not to mention the mass graves filled with those who did not survive turned Rutter away from the subject then. In July the Little Miami High School teacher joined a group of Holocaust educa- tors (Jews and non-Jews) for an educational ex- change and 18-day trip to Cincinnati, Poland and Is- rael. It changed her. “It was very much a se- ries of blessings in my life; a series of things I didn’t expect in my life,” Rutter said. Rutter was teaching at St. Margaret of York Catholic School in Deer- field Township last year, but starts this school year at Little Miami. She loves school, loves to learn, and planned to take a class dur- ing the summer. If she was going to spend the summer learning, she wanted it to be something interesting and useful. She chose an intensive, early morning to late day, week-long course on the Holocaust at the Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education. Rutter was completely ignorant on the subject and knew she had to teach it. She found her- self sitting at a table with a survivor. “Every single day was very intense,” she said. “They had so much infor- mation it was like drinking from a fire hose.” Teaching the Holocaust is life-changing journey for Kristin Rutter THANKS TO KRISTIN RUTTER Kristin Rutter with a Polish Christian woman who rescued Jews during the Holocaust. Chuck Gibson [email protected] THANKS TO KRISTIN RUTTER The statue is Janusz Korczak, a teacher who cared for an orphanage, followed the children to their deaths in a concentration camp despite a chance to escape he didn't leave the kids. See HOLOCAUST, Page 2A PHOTOS BY CHUCK GIBSON FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS Customers will still find the familiar tools and hardware they need at Loveland Hardware-General Store. Loveland Hardware is changing. The name has changed. It is now Loveland Hardware - General Store. The look has changed, and material sales manager Neal Oury said it should even “feel” different. Oury grew up in Loveland, has spent his whole life in Love- land; his dad walked to work right there in the heart of Love- land. He has fond memories of walking into the general store and Rohlke’s feed store. “I remember coming here when I was a kid,” Oury said. “You’d walk in and get that kind of old world feel. I wanted to bring that old world feel back.” Dale Eads challenged Oury to boost the business when he hired him. He quickly cleared out items which hadn’t sold in two years or even one. Space opened up for new general household items. New develop- ment across the street inspired them to “gear-up” for the people Fond memories inspire General Store for Loveland Chuck Gibson [email protected] This photo of the old Turner Grocery and Brock Hardware in the same building around 1900 hangs on the wall at Loveland Hardware - General Store. See STORE, Page 2A L OVELAND L OVELAND HERALD 75¢ WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2015 BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS Your Community Press newspaper serving Loveland, Miami Township, Symmes Township Vol. 97 No. 27 © 2015 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED News .......................... 248-8600 Retail advertising .............. 768-8404 Classified advertising ......... 242-4000 Delivery ........................ 576-8240 See page A2 for additional information Contact us NOTHING CRUMMY ABOUT THIS CAKE 9A Rita shares yummy brunch ideas YOUR ONLINE HOME Find local news from your neighborhood at Cincinnati.com/ communities
Transcript
Page 1: Loveland herald 120215

Watching video of theliberation of a WWII con-centration camp sent a 14-year-old Kristin Rutterrunning to the bathroom tobe sick. She wanted noth-ing to do with the Holo-caust.

“As a kid, I was reallyturned off to it,” Ruttersaid. “I went and got sickand they had to stick me inthe hallway. I couldn’t han-dle it. So I never touched itagain after that.”

Viewing images of peo-ple being herded like cattlewith blank stares and ema-ciated bodies - the survi-vors - not to mention themass graves filled withthose who did not surviveturned Rutter away fromthe subject then. In Julythe Little Miami HighSchool teacher joined agroup of Holocaust educa-tors (Jews and non-Jews)for an educational ex-change and 18-day trip toCincinnati, Poland and Is-rael. It changed her.

“It was very much a se-ries of blessings in my life;

a series of things I didn’texpect in my life,” Ruttersaid.

Rutter was teaching atSt. Margaret of YorkCatholic School in Deer-field Township last year,but starts this school yearat Little Miami. She lovesschool, loves to learn, andplanned to take a class dur-ing the summer. If she wasgoing to spend the summerlearning, she wanted it tobe something interestingand useful.

She chose an intensive,

early morning to late day,week-long course on theHolocaust at the Center forHolocaust and HumanityEducation. Rutter wascompletely ignorant on thesubject and knew she hadto teach it. She found her-self sitting at a table with asurvivor.

“Every single day wasvery intense,” she said.“They had so much infor-mation it was like drinkingfrom a fire hose.”

Teaching the Holocaustis life-changing journeyfor Kristin Rutter

THANKS TO KRISTIN RUTTER

Kristin Rutter with a Polish Christian woman who rescued Jews during the Holocaust.

Chuck [email protected]

THANKS TO KRISTIN RUTTER

The statue is Janusz Korczak, a teacher who cared for anorphanage, followed the children to their deaths in aconcentration camp despite a chance to escape he didn't leavethe kids.

See HOLOCAUST, Page 2A

PHOTOS BY CHUCK GIBSON FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Customers will still find the familiar tools and hardware they need atLoveland Hardware-General Store.

Loveland Hardware ischanging. The name haschanged. It is now LovelandHardware - General Store. Thelook has changed, and materialsales manager Neal Oury said itshould even “feel” different.

Oury grew up in Loveland,has spent his whole life in Love-land; his dad walked to workright there in the heart of Love-land. He has fond memories ofwalking into the general storeand Rohlke’s feed store.

“I remember coming herewhen I was a kid,” Oury said.“You’d walk in and get that kind

of old world feel. I wanted tobring that old world feel back.”

Dale Eads challenged Ouryto boost the business when hehired him. He quickly clearedout items which hadn’t sold intwo years or even one. Spaceopened up for new generalhousehold items. New develop-ment across the street inspiredthem to “gear-up” for the people

Fond memories inspireGeneral Store for Loveland

Chuck [email protected]

This photo of the old TurnerGrocery and Brock Hardware in the

same building around 1900 hangson the wall at Loveland Hardware -

General Store.

See STORE, Page 2A

LOVELANDLOVELANDHERALD 75¢

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2015 BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Your Community Press newspaperserving Loveland, Miami Township,Symmes Township

Vol. 97 No. 27© 2015 The Community Press

ALL RIGHTS RESERVEDNews ..........................248-8600Retail advertising ..............768-8404Classified advertising .........242-4000Delivery ........................576-8240

See page A2 for additional information

Contact usNOTHINGCRUMMY ABOUTTHIS CAKE 9ARita shares yummy brunchideas

YOUR ONLINEHOMEFind local news fromyour neighborhood atCincinnati.com/communities

Page 2: Loveland herald 120215

2A • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015 NEWS

LOVELANDHERALD

NewsRichard Maloney Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7134, [email protected] Marika Lee Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7577,[email protected] Sheila Vilvens Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7139, [email protected] SchroederReporter . . . . . . . . . . . . .768-6967, cschroeder@community-

press.comMelanie Laughman Sports Editor . . . .768-8512, mlaughman@communi-

typress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter . . . . . . .576-8255, [email protected]

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[email protected]

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Circulation Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7110, [email protected] Pam McAlister District Manager . . . . .248-7136, pmcalister@community-

press.com

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Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other

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Find news and information from your community on theWeb

Cincinnati.com/communities

Calendar ............8AClassifieds ............CFood .................9APolice ................ 9BSchools ..............7ASports ................1BViewpoints ........10A

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HolidaySeason

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New for the

Personalized Maple Serving Trays & Lazy Susan Centerpiece

Gilson’s Next Day Engraving! who will live there.“There is nowhere down

here in Loveland you can gobuy a bar of soap, papertowels plus hardware,grass seed and everythingelse we have,” Oury said. “Isaid we’re going to becomea general store.”

It was May 2015, by lateJuly and August householditems began filling the twomain aisles. There are pa-per towels, cleaning prod-ucts, TP, trash bags, washerand dryer products. Newproducts like unique soaps -already a hot seller - can-dles, quality pet food, dogtreats, and compostingcrocks. The hardware isstill there along withfriendly workers willing tohelp with a new store mot-to.

“We’re here to assistyou,” Oury said. If they

don’t have it, they’ll custommake it for you.

“Now we have repeatcustomers coming in; kindof a place to come.”

That is the “old world”feel Oury is going for; peo-ple coming back in some-times just to say hi, or playa game of checkers on thechecker board barrel.

Check them out onlineat:www.lovelandhardware.com, or just stop in to say hi.

PHOTOS BY CHUCK

GIBSON FOR THE

COMMUNITY PRESS

The transitionfrom hardwareto general storefilled this aislewith householdcleaningproducts.

StoreContinued from Page 1A

Entrance to Dale EadsLoveland Hardware - GeneralStore in Loveland.

Rutter became fascinated,kept going back for more, andhad one of the speakers from theJewish Federation of Cincinnatitalk to her students. Everyoneshe met was nicer than the last.She was invited to be part of theeducational exchange tripthrough the Jewish Federation ofCincinnati. “Partnership2Ge-ther” in July. The point was tocreate an international collabo-ration of teachers teaching theHolocaust. Eight Holocaust edu-cators from Israel and Cincinnatimade the trip - three were Chris-tian the others were Jewish.

“In early July, the Israeliteachers came to Cincinnati,”Rutter said.

Then they went to Polandwhere they visited the concen-

tration camps.“We went to Majdanek, which

I had never heard of as an Amer-ican,” Rutter said, “10 timesmore scary than Auschwitz. Itwas horrifying. Majdanek wasreally hard.”

Rutter expected it to be diffi-cult, but felt honored to witnessit. The Holocaust became veryreal to her. The experienceshowed her the victims werepeople, not piles of bodies. Shesaw more than the horrors, shesaw the courage and hope in therescuers she met. Like the storyshe heard of a woman who threwrocks and insults at the men be-ing marched into the camps, butthe rocks were potatoes dis-guised so she could get themfood. A choice many made to docourageous acts.

“My students asked me ques-tions I couldn’t answer when itcame to the Holocaust,” Ruttersaid. “It’s a human story, it’s a hu-

man issue. It is not history. Geno-cide is happening in our world to-day. How do you use the informa-tion for the good?”

Through the exchange pro-gram, Rutter has found a way toanswer the questions her stu-dents ask. It is using the testimo-ny of survivors, telling the facts,and finding openings for discus-sion. Those Holocaust educatorsmade more than an 18-day jour-ney together; they formed realfriendships and the foundation ofcollaboration for the future.

“You give the kids facts andyou let them debate,” Ruttersaid. “It teaches compassion, itteaches empathy. At the end ofthe day, I want to help my stu-dents be good people. This is oneway that is very effective and ex-citing for the kids, and ultimatelyhopeful.”

More at: www.jewishcincinnati.org/connect/partnership2gether.

HolocaustContinued from Page 1A

Great Parks of HamiltonCounty is hosting its annualwinter bird count on Satur-day, Dec. 12, from 8 a.m. to5:30 p.m.

Keeping track of birds thatmigrate or stay in the parksfor the winter helps to pro-vide important data about avi-an population trends.

Those who are interestedare asked to pre-register theirlocation at www.greatparks.org to ensure enough volun-teer group leaders are avail-able at the parks, includingSharon Woods. The count willconclude with a final tally atWinton Centre in WintonWoods at 4:15 p.m. There is nofee to participate.

A valid Great Parks ofHamilton County motor vehi-cle permit ($10 annual or $3daily) is required to enter theparks. Armleder and Fern-bank parks are cooperativeventures with the CincinnatiPark Board. A motor vehiclepermit is not required.

Additional information isavailable at www.greatparks.org or by calling 521-7275.

Help countwinter birds atSharon Woods

THANKS TO GREAT PARKS OF HAMILTON

COUNTY

Great Parks of Hamilton Countyinvites the public to help spotand count birds, like thisrufous-sided towhee, at localparks.

Page 3: Loveland herald 120215

DECEMBER 2, 2015 • LOVELAND HERALD • 3ANEWS

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Joanna Reese per-formed with Acting Upfor the first time as a castmember of “Guys andDolls” in September atMason High School.

Reese may be new tothe Acting Up cast, but thecast was not new to her.Especially her fellowLoveland kids, Cole Han-kins, Brighton Hummerand Dean Parker. She’sbeen to about every showher “Three Musketeers”have performed in Love-land and Mason.

“I call them role mod-els,” Reese said about thethreesome she also refersto as the Three Muske-teers. “They always helppeople. It doesn’t matterwhat role they have, theywill help anyone.”

All three are seniors atLoveland High School.They were joined in thecast by fellow Lovelandstudents Margaret Eilert,Kaylee Michael, RachelIngal and Abbey Hickey.Reese has grown upwatching their shows. Shehas been especially im-pressed with how thethree seniors have shonethe spotlight on others.

“Like one show withCole,” she said, “he wouldmove around on stage,then stop at a random per-son and let the spotlightbe on that person, even ifit was ensemble. It was areally cool experience. Helet other people have thespotlight.”

Hankins will be rightback in the spotlight play-ing the role of Nathan De-troit. This is the beginningof that senior year swansong of shows for him.Like the other Lovelandkids, he went right fromauditions for the LovelandHigh School fall show(”Cinderella”) to his re-hearsal with Acting Up. Itis kind of a strange feelingfor him to be that olderperformer the youngerkids are looking to forguidance.

“It’s weird,” he said.“When I started this, likeas a freshman, you alwayslook up to the seniors. Ididn’t even know it. It’s

like a silent leadership . . .you just do it. You don’t letyourself slack off. It’s im-portant. You are a rolemodel. You do your best. Iwas once that kid.”

As Nathan Detroit, hesaid his voice would prob-ably be the most annoyingthing in the show. JoannaReese was watching andlearning how he works tocreate his character andthat annoying voice. DeanParker played Nicely-Nicely Johnson, a happy-go-lucky character wholoves to eat and gamble.He didn’t know the impacthis performances havehad on Reese.

“I just remember whenI was younger I wouldlook up to people like thattoo,” Parker said. “I neverwould have thought nowI’m the role model here.It’s a confidence booster.It’s nice to know we’re do-ing a good job.”

Reese has knownBrighton Hummer sinceshe first moved to Love-land from Atlanta in 2004.He never really thoughtabout how the years havepassed since a middleschool hobby has evolvedinto his senior year andbeing an example for oth-ers.

“It used to be just ahobby,” Hummer said. “Iforget how old we’re get-ting and that people lookup to us now. It feels likewe’re passing on the torchto the next generation.”

One of those to whomthe torch has been passedis Loveland junior AbbyHickey. In just her secondshow with Acting Up, sheplayed Martha in the mis-sion band for “Guys andDolls” She really enjoysthe scene with straight-laced Sarah - leader of themission band - gets drunkbut bad-boy Sky Master-son ends up helping Sarahstraighten up. Hickeysaid the audience will finda lot of great subtle com-edy.

“Outside of the actualshow, I just really likehanging out with all thecast,” Hickey said. “It’s areally cool atmospherecause everyone is goodfriends. It’s just fun tocome here.”

Loveland kidsrole models inActing Up’s‘Guys n Dolls’Chuck [email protected]

CHUCK GIBSON FOR THE

COMMUNITY PRESS

The Acting Up castrehearses “Luck BeA Lady” whichthey’ll perform inthe Sept. 25-27presentation of“Guys and Dolls” atMason High School.

CHUCK GIBSON FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Loveland kids Joanna Reese, Dean Parker, Margaret Eilert,Brighton Hummer, Abby Hickey, Kaylee Michael, Cole Hankinsand Rachel Ingal have a strong presence in Acting Up’sproduction of “Guys and Dolls” Sept. 25-27 at Mason HighSchool.

Page 4: Loveland herald 120215

4A • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015 NEWS

Feel the magic of the holiday season at Sharon Woods.Enjoy family-friendly entertainment and meet Santa Claus!

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Branch Hill-GuineaRoad closedbeginning two moreweeks

Branch Hill-GuineaRoad, from Branch Hill-Miamiville to BranchHill-Loveland, is closed inboth directions throughFriday, Dec. 18, weatherpermitting. A detour willbe in place that directstraffic from Branch-Hill

Guinea Road to WardsCorner Road to I-275 toLoveland-Madeira Road.

Crews in this area areworking on replacementof an underground stormpipe, which requires a fullclosure of the road in theproject area. Followingthe closure, the road willreopen in both directionsand then constructionwork will resume in thespring to complete the

project. Clermont County Engi-

neer Pat Manger said thatthe Branch Hill-Guineadrainage improvementsare a significant safetyimprovement and an im-portant component of up-grading the infrastruc-ture in this area.

“This work will pro-vide an updated drainagesystem that will not onlyserve to move water more

efficiently away from theroadway, but will alsoeliminate the sharp dropsand deep ditches along theroadside,” Manger said.“In addition, Branch Hill-Guinea will be widenedbetween Branch Hill-Mi-amiville and Branch Hill-Loveland Road, and pavedshoulders will be installedthat will improve safetyfor all traffic travelingthrough this portion ofBranch Hill-GuineaRoad.”

“We have completedthe work that necessitat-ed a closure on a separatesection of Branch Hill-Guinea Road on sched-ule,” Manger continued.“But during the course ofthat work, a section of theunderground pipe was

seen to be in a conditionthat warranted immedi-ate repair. This upcomingclosure is being promptedby the necessity of fixingthat pipe now, rather thanwaiting until spring asoriginally anticipated.”

Manger added thatthroughout the course ofthis work, the ClermontCounty Engineer’s Officehas maintained closecommunication with theLoveland City School Dis-trict and the school dis-trict will accommodatethe closure through mod-ified bus routing as theyhave done over the courseof previous closures in theproject area. The City ofLoveland has also workedclosely with the Engi-neer’s Office to ensure the

disruption to local trafficis as minimal as possible.Local law enforcementwill continue to assisttraffic during peak hoursthroughout the closureperiod.

‘Legacy of Courage’authors hold booksigning

The authors of “Legacyof Courage: True Storiesof Honor Flight Veter-ans,” Cheryl Popp and Pe-ter Bronson, are holding abook signing 11 a.m. to 2p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5, atthe Lunken Airport Ter-minal, 262 Wilmer Ave.

Popp is a SymmesTownship resident and di-rector of Honor Flight Tri-

BRIEFLY

See BRIEFLY, Page 5A

Page 5: Loveland herald 120215

DECEMBER 2, 2015 • LOVELAND HERALD • 5ANEWS

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Joint Problem, Sprain,Concussion or Pain?We’re right in your neighborhood and on the sidelines.UC Health is more than advanced orthopaedics. We’re part of the

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State. Bronson is a Love-land resident and giftedand experienced writerwho serves as a contribut-ing editor for Cincy Maga-zine, is owner of ChilidogPress LLC, and is a formercolumnist and editorialpage editor of the Cincin-nati Enquirer.

In addition to Popp andBronson, a few veteransfeatured in the book willalso be present to signautographs and talk. Hon-or Flight merchandisewill be on sale as well.

Christmas displayat museum

The Greater LovelandHistorical Society Mu-seum’s annual ChristmasDisplay continuesthrough December.

Featured this year areeight cases of crèchescenes from around theworld, on loan from Grail-ville, and a unique exhibitof antique dolls, a recentdonation from a local resi-dent.

For the children, Rich-ard Shaver will run his Li-onel Train and the mu-seum is decorated fromtop to bottom with threetrees and much more.

The museum is openSaturday and Sundayfrom 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. andduring the week by ap-pointment. Call 683-5692.

Woman’s Club’sChristmas LunchDec. 8

The final event for 2015for the Loveland Woman’sClub will be its annualChristmas Luncheon Par-ty Tuesday, Dec. 8, atO’Bannon Creek Country

Club. According to chair-person Pat Furterer, costof the event is $20 and res-ervations need to be madewith her by Dec. 3.

Luncheon choices arefish, pork, chicken or veg-etarian and the price in-cludes salad and dessert.There will be a cash baravailable. Reservationscan be made by callingFurterer at 683-9687. Theclub is at 6842 state Route48 (Oakland Road).

Members are asked tobring gifts for residentsat the Loveland Care Cen-ter. Suggestions aresweatpants, sweatshirts,lotion, perfume, socks,jewelry, etc. These can bewrapped, but markedmale, female or generic.There will also be a dona-tion collected for Love-land Interfaith Effort atPrince of Peace churchand the amount will bematched by the club.

This is the last meetingof the year. Next meetingscheduled for the club is 1p.m. Tuesday, March 8.

Give a child a bookthis season

Give a new book to achild this holiday season.

The Clermont CountyPublic Library is hosting“The New Year, NewBook” donation drive togive a new book to localchildren in foster care.

Visit the branch near-est you, pick an ornamentfrom the Giving Tree, buythe book and return it un-wrapped. Clermont Coun-ty Children’s ProtectiveServices employees willdistribute the books.

“Our mission at the li-brary is to inform, engageand inspire,” said Chris-tine Wick, library direc-tor. “Books can inspirechildren to use their cre-

ativity, engage them innew experiences and in-form them about their fa-vorite topics. We want toencourage children byshowing them books aregreat way to discover newthings.”

Several years agowhen the library did thebook drive, “you don’tknow how excited thechildren were, from age 2or 3 all the way up to teens,to get new books,” saidSanna Gast, administra-tive supervisor for Chil-dren’s Protective Ser-vices. “Most of the timeour kids get used thingsand it just really made abig difference.”

Donations will be ac-cepted through Dec. 31.For more information,visit clermontlibrary.org,or call a branch library.

BrieflyContinued from Page 4A

Page 6: Loveland herald 120215

6A • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015 NEWS

The Hamilton CountySheriff’s Office is gearingup to offer its Citizens’Academy in AndersonTownship.

The 12-week course isalso open to SymmesTownship residents. Al-ready, four Symmes resi-dents and eight Anderson

residents have signed up,District Five Cpl DaveBoiman said.

This is the fourth acad-emy. The first was in 2004.The second in 2007 and an-other in 2012. All havebeen offered in AndersonTownship, where Boimanis assigned.

“I’ve always had an in-terest in them and Ithought it was a good op-

portunity to do one,” Boi-man said of the first acad-emy. After the proper ap-provals were received,Boiman worked to createthe curriculum. He’squick to point out that hedidn’t write the program.There are many citizenacademies offered na-tionwide from which ma-terial can be borrowed.

Boiman said he’s a

strong believer in theacademy’s benefits. It’san opportunity for mem-bers of the community tosee how the sheriff’s of-fice operates and gain abetter understanding oflaw enforcement than isoffered on the news,movies or televisionshows.

District Three Com-mander, Lt. Chris Kette-man agreed with Boimanand is pleased that mem-bers of the Symmes Town-ship Board of Trustees aresupportive of participa-tion in the academy.

Academy participantswill gain a better under-standing of what police of-ficers are up against ev-ery day, he said.

“It says a lot when wehave these two entities,Symmes and Andersontownships, partner tomake this happen,” Kette-man said. “It’s great forthe citizens to be able to doit.”

The program has open-ings for a total of 30 par-ticipants. During theacademy they will learnabout the roles and re-sponsibilities of sheriff’sdeputies and the dangersand stresses inherent inthe job of law enforce-ment. Topics covered in-clude the history of theSheriff’s Office, patrol,criminal investigations,community policing andspecialized units. Acad-emy instructors are de-partment personnel andcivilian guest speakers.

Participants must be atleast 21 years old, have avalid driver’s license andbe able to pass a criminalhistory check. This acad-emy is open to Andersonand Symmes townshipresidents. The class willbe offered 6-9 p.m.Wednesday nights, Jan. 6-March 16, at AndersonCenter, 7840 Five MileRoad. Applications are be-ing accepted. For infor-mation or an application,call or email Cpl. Boiman,(513) 688-8400, [email protected].

Citizen’s Academy open to Anderson, Symmes Twp. Sheila A. [email protected]

THANKS TO CPL. DAVE BOIMAN

Members of the 2012 Hamilton County Sheriff's OfficeCitizens' Academy.

Assistant City Man-ager/Finance DirectorCorey Schmidt is leavingthe city of Loveland to be-come the city manager ofMarlette, Michigan.

“I have had a great ex-perience working for thecity of Loveland. The op-portunity in Michigan is achange to get closer to myfamily and my wife’s fam-ily,” Schmidt said.

Councilwoman AngieSettell said she workedclosely with Schmidt as amember of the finance

committee. “(Schmidt) has made a

major impact on Love-land’s city administration

with hisability toquicklygrasp is-sues andtake initia-tive tosolvethem. His

organizational and com-munication skills alongwith his congenial cus-tomer service personalityserved the city well,” Set-tell said.

Schmidt started withthe city as a managementfellow in 2012. He servedas a management analystand the assistant to thecity manager. He wasmade the assistant citymanager/finance directorwhen the city combinedthe positions after formerFinance Director TomVanderhorst left the city.

“He started as a man-agement fellow and Ithink even back then thecity knew they had some-thing really special withhim. He just picks upskills so easily and reallystrives with them. It is nota burden for him to havesomething put on him,”City Manager Dave Ken-nedy said.

Schmidt also handledthe duties of the part-timehuman resources directorafter the former one re-tired and did much of theIT work for the city. Ken-nedy said the city is hiringa finance director. Kenne-dy said he will be takingon Schmidt’s other re-sponsibilities.

“For me personally Idon’t know who I wouldhave come in here anddone everything withouthim being here. He was al-ways there with me, help-ing me out. But I have cer-tainly learned more sincethen and we feel it is bet-ter to have it as just asstrictly finance directorposition,” Kennedy said.

Kennedy said he andmost of the city hoped thatSchmidt would stay inLoveland, but knew hewanted to be closer to hisfamily in Michigan.

“The city of Marlette isreally getting a talentedperson. He has a lot ofskills that a communitylike that can really use.He will really make an im-pact. I has been an hon-ored to work with him,”Kennedy said.

Want to know moreabout what is happeningin Loveland? Follow Mari-ka Lee on Twitter:@ReporterMarika

Administrator is leaving LovelandMarika [email protected]

Schmidt

» The eighth annual“Holiday Turkey Initia-tive” has set a goal to dis-tribute 150 turkeys — 50each to the Shelter House(formally the Drop InCenter), the Over theRhine/Walnut Hills Kitch-ens and The Joseph Housefor the Homeless Veter-ans

The projected cost of$4,050 ($27 per bird). Taxdeductible receipts willbe provided to individual,corporate and organiza-tional donors in January.

The birds are bought,at a discount, deliveredand stored at the Over theRhine Kroger store, 1420Vine St., for pick-up by thethree recipient organiza-tions.

Cash and personalchecks, payable to RalphDi Fulvio C/O HTI, are ac-ceptable. Corporate andorganizational checks canbe made payable to Krog-er. Kroger does not acceptthird party checks.

Mail checks to RalphDi Fulvio, 889 Fenchurch

Court, Cincinnati OH45230.

» For many families inCincinnati there is no ex-tra income to buy a wintercoat.

The local chapter of St.Vincent de Paul’s “5 CaresCoat Drive” helps ensurethat no one in our commu-nity goes without properprotection against thecold winter. This year,Statements in Hair salon,13 Village Square in his-toric Glendale, is partici-pating as a drop-off loca-tion for the drive.

In addition to new orclean, gently used coats,hats, gloves and scarves,Statements is also collect-ing new, unwrapped toysfor St. Vincent de Paul.

Through Dec. 9, dona-tions may be dropped offduring Statements openhours, which are Tuesday,9 a.m. to 8 p.m., andWednesday – Saturday, 9a.m. to 5 p.m. For more in-formation visit State-ments in Hair on Face-book or call 513-772-7262.

HOLIDAY GIVINGOPPORTUNITIES

Page 7: Loveland herald 120215

DECEMBER 2, 2015 • LOVELAND HERALD • 7A

SCHOOLSSCHOOLSACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS CommunityPress.com

LOVELANDHERALDEditor: Richard Maloney, [email protected], 248-7134

Loveland Early ChildhoodCenter

» First-grade students got their mo-tors running at Loveland Early Child-hood Center when COSI (Center of Sci-ence and Industry) brought its newesttraveling program, “The Incredible Hu-man Machine,” to Loveland.

This innovative, interactive programstimulated the imaginations of studentsby comparing the inner working of thehuman body to an engine.

“We were thrilled to be a part of one ofthe newest offerings from COSI, whichis a long-standing student favorite,”LECC Principal Kyle Bush said. “We of-fer a huge thank you to our supportivePTA for sponsoring this incredible pro-gram annually.”

“The Incredible Human Machine” isone of six traveling science demonstra-tions from COSI.

Loveland Elementary School» Loveland Elementary School stu-

dents have entered into a new learningexperience – using Skype to connectwith the Yellowstone National Park Mu-seum to learn first-hand from scientistswho work there about the animals thatlive there and the amazing geology ofthis national treasure.

“The students had been learningabout animal adaptations in science, andthey also read about Yellowstone Nation-al Park and its geology in their text-books,” teacher Laura Johnstone said.

She teamed with fellow teacher Jenni-fer Stroup and innovative instructionalcoach Susan Craig to put together a planto utilize district technology to expand

the lesson...all the way to Cody, Wyoming– home of the museum.

“It was a learning experience for usbecause the rangers added so manymore details to the topics we had beenteaching the students,” Johnstone said.“After the Skype session we were able todiscuss what the students learned fromthe rangers, and we also saw how excitedthe students were to be on a virtual fieldtrip.”

“This – this is what we mean when wetalk about using technology to enhancethe learning that takes place in our class-rooms,” Principal Jennifer Forren said.“This is amazing. It was exciting for boththe students and the teachers – and wesimply couldn’t have done it without thesupport Mrs. Craig provided. It sincere-ly opens up the world of learning for ourstudents.”

“One of our goals of providing univer-sal access to technology tools across theLoveland City School District is to helpredefine the learning experiences thatour students have access to,” LovelandDirector of Technology David Knappsaid. “What Mrs. Johnstone and Mrs.Stroup have created with their Yellow-stone Skype session does just that. Whatan enriching opportunity

Loveland teachers have created forour students to virtually connect withscientists from across the country.”

“We’ve already planned another vir-tual field trip,” Johnstone said. “We aregoing to Skype with a sea turtle hospitalin Florida.”

The Skype session complements les-sons the students are currently engagedwith on sea turtles.

Loveland High School» Loveland High School senior Jona-

than Reese was awarded a 2015 Studentsof Integrity (SOI) Scholarship.

The Better Business Bureau awardsthis annual scholarship to recognize highschool students in BBB’s 20-county ser-vice area who demonstrate superior eth-ical reasoning skills.

Reese was selected for serving asboth the INTERalliance chapter presi-dent at LHS and the director of engineer-ing for the STEMs for Youth Program,and for his work on a mission trip to Hon-duras three years ago – when he volun-

teered his time to dig latrines, mudhouses, and – as it happened – find hiscalling.

“The people there were absolutelyamazing,” said Reese. “They were doinggreat things, and they didn’t have thethings we consider necessities here. Iwondered what would happen if youwent there and brought them some ofthose tools. It’s what inspired me to gointo electrical engineering.”

“Jonathan is able to use his skills tohelp others hone theirs,” said JamieHamilton, LHS guidance counselor. “Heis a really great young man, and we areabundantly proud of all he has accom-plished in our Loveland community andbeyond.”

» The Loveland High School March-ing Band earned a superior rating at theOhio Music Educators Association StateMarching Band Finals Nov. 7 at the Uni-versity of Dayton Welcome Stadium.

This is the second consecutive yearthe marching band has achieved the toprating at this contest.

“I am extremely proud of how far theband progressed this year,” Band Direc-tor Geoffrey Miller said. “We selected amore difficult show with more challeng-ing music and movements and still per-formed at the highest level. The studentshave been working on creating this showsince August, and the staff has been de-signing this show since last November,so everyone was very excited to see howincredible the final product turned out. Icouldn’t be more pleased with the band,and I am excited to start planning nextyear’s journey.”

In order to qualify at the State March-ing Band Finals, the marching band re-ceived a superior rating at a local con-test.

Loveland Middle School

» Several Loveland Middle Schoolstudents for being selected as part of the2015-2016 Ohio Music Educators Associ-ation District 14 Junior High School Hon-or Band.

“Mrs. Melissa Dennedy and I are veryproud of these fine young musicians,”music teacher Chris Huening said.“They are not only incredibly talented,but are also hard workers who will con-tinue to achieve great things. It is alwaysgreat to be a part of such a fantastic mu-sic program. It's amazing to look at theresults and see that of the 24 middleschools represented, only four havemore students involved than we do hereat Loveland.”

The OMEA District 14 Junior HighHonor Band members from Loveland in-clude:

Seventh-grade: Declan Fuchs, eighthchair clarinet; Jack Ellis, first chair tuba;Weston Manske, fifth chair alto saxo-phone, and Caleb Herbon, eight chairtrumpet.

Eighth-grade: Ella Kiley, sixth chairclarinet; Jack Armstrong, first chairtrombone; Jack Portune, seventh chairpercussion, and Jett Stevens - eighthchair percussion.

SCHOOLS NOTEBOOK

THANKS TO HEATHER HIGDON

Loveland Early Childhood Center students enjoy one of six new traveling sciencedemonstrations from COSI.

THANKS TO HEATHER HIGDON

Loveland Elementary School students talkdirectly with experts at the YellowstoneNational Park Museum during a Skypesession.

THANKS TO HEATHER HIGDON

Several Loveland Middle School students forbeing selected as part of the 2015-2016 OhioMusic Educators Association District 14 JuniorHigh School Honor Band. From left: JettStevens, Jack Portune, Jack Armstrong,Weston Manske, Caleb Herbon, Jack Ellis,Declan Fuchs and Ella Kiley.

THANKS TO HEATHER HIGDON

Loveland High School student Jonathan Reeseduring his mission trip to Honduras.

SAINT URSULA ACADEMYThe following area students have earned honorsfor the first quarter of 2015-2016:

FreshmenFirst Honors - Melina Canter, Grace Gruppo, CassidySerger, Mary Spaeth, Kathryn Suddendorf.

Second Honors - Lillian Stark.

SophomoresFirst Honors - Rosemarie Bingham, Chloe Bruegge-man, Madalyn Canter, Sarah Fagan, Lillian Gruber,Hannah Klopfenstein, Kathryn Miller, LaurenRuesink.

Second Honors - Josephine Blome, MadeleineGerding, Makenna Jordahl, Magdalena Meyer,Hailey Portmann.

JuniorsFirst Honors - Mary Berns, Maura Mittermeier.Second Honors - Madeline Brennan, Taylor Mor-

gan.

SeniorsFirst Honors - Megan Brinkworth, AlexandraBurbick, Grace deJesus, Rachel Fagan, HaleyJordahl, Hannah Portmann.

Second Honors - Madeline Leesman.

SAINT URSULA ACADEMY HONOR ROLLS

Moeller NationalMerit Semifinalists

THANKS TO TERESA MEYER

Moeller High School National MeritSemifinalists, John Quehl of Loveland, left,and Alec Bayliff of Indian Hill.

Page 8: Loveland herald 120215

8A • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015

THURSDAY, DEC. 3Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, 7010Miami Ave., Check websitecalendar for details. $10 percreator. Add $5 for drop off ofages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

Draw and Sketch 101, 5:20-6:50p.m., Creativities, 7010 MiamiAve., Come learn the basics ofsketching and drawing with ourtalented instructors. For 9 andup. $179. Registration required.272-1500. Madeira.

EducationNovel Writing in Community:NaNoWriMo Meets WWf(a)C,7-9:30 p.m., Women Writing fora Change, 6906 Plainfield Road,National Novel Writing Month(NaNoWriMo) is motivationalmovement of writers working tocomplete novel draft in just 30days. Ages 18 and up. $90.Registration required. 272-1171;bit.ly/nanof15. Silverton.

Exercise ClassesImagination Yoga Classes,10:30-11 a.m., Blue Cocoon, 9361Montgomery Road, Uses age-appropriate activities and ad-venture themes to guide chil-dren through yoga class. Ages3-6. $12.50. Registration re-quired. Presented by Imagina-tion Yoga. 791-1089; www.imag-inationyoga.com. Montgomery.

ShoppingHoliday Packages, 10 a.m. to 9p.m., Kenwood Towne Centre,7875 Montgomery Road, OldGuest Services Kiosk, InsideCheesecake Factory Entrance.Special visits from Rosie, Gapper,Mr. Red, Mr. Redlegs, and yourfavorite radio personalities.Holiday packages and Kids Clubmemberships available. Present-ed by Cincinnati Reds. 745-9100.Kenwood.

FRIDAY, DEC. 4Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

Exercise ClassesYoga Teacher Training andWellness School, RYT 200,5:30-8 p.m., Yoga Fit Boutique,10776 Montgomery Road,Well-rounded Yoga AllianceApproved course will teach youhistory and philosophy, anato-my, Thai Yoga, Ashtanga, Hatha,Rocket, Jaba, and Restorativeyoga so you are prepared toteach whichever style resonates.Ages 13-99. $2300. Registrationrequired. 237-5330;www.want2gofit.com. Syca-more Township.

Holiday - ChristmasVictorian Holiday Village,6-8:30 p.m., Ohio NationalFinancial Services, One FinancialWay, Greater Cincinnati tradi-tion features variety of holidayactivities. Houses decorated withholiday scenes, thousands oflights and free family entertain-ment. Through Dec. 11. Free.794-6100; www.ohionation-al.com. Montgomery.

ShoppingHoliday Glam, 6-9 p.m., Mitch-ell’s Salon, 5901 E. GalbraithRoad, Event is free with coatdonation to St. Vincent de Paul.Includes swag bag, boutiqueshopping, drinks, light bites, andone-on-one image consultingwith expert stylists. Free. Pre-sented by Cincy Chic. 793-0900;HG16.eventbrite.com. Kenwood.

Holiday Packages, 10 a.m. to 9p.m., Kenwood Towne Centre,745-9100. Kenwood.

SATURDAY, DEC. 5Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 2 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

Craft ShowsShowcase of Arts, 10 a.m. to 5p.m., Woman’s Art Club CulturalCenter, 6980 Cambridge Ave.,The Barn. Ornaments, jewelry,soaps, ceramics, paper creations,paintings, stained glass andmore. Treats, holiday music,wood toys, knit wearables, andfresh holiday wreaths. BenefitsThe WACC Foundation. Free.272-3700; www.artatthebar-n.org. Mariemont.

Drink TastingsCincy Wine Wagon WineryTour, 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.,Maggiano’s Little Italy, 7875Montgomery Road, Meet atrestaurant bar, then head toValley Vineyards, Vinoklet andHenke Wineries. Approximately5 hour tour. Wine and snacks ateach location. Ages 21 and up.$75. Reservations required.Presented by Cincy Wine Wag-on. 258-7909. Sycamore Town-ship.

Exercise ClassesYoga Teacher Training andWellness School, RYT 200, 9a.m. to 5 p.m., Yoga Fit Bou-tique, $2300. Registrationrequired. 237-5330;www.want2gofit.com. Syca-more Township.

Holiday - ChristmasVictorian Holiday Village,5-8:30 p.m., Ohio NationalFinancial Services, Free. 794-6100; www.ohionational.com.Montgomery.

Holiday in the Village, 5-7p.m., City of Montgomery,Montgomery Road, Tour Mont-gomery and visit holiday stopslike North Pole Workshop,Snowman Station, WinterWonderland and VictorianHoliday Village. See website formore information. Free. 891-2424; www.montgomeryo-hio.org. Montgomery.

Enchanted Holiday Party, 1-4p.m., Girls’ World, 7819 CooperRoad, Treats, face painting,princess visits, fashion show,photo booth, fun crafts, shop-ping and more. Benefits AubreyRose Foundation. $5. Regis-tration recommended. 984-4475; www.girlsworld.com.Montgomery.

Literary - CraftsStar Wars Countdown, 2-4p.m., Madeira Branch Library,7200 Miami Ave., Crafts, gamesand special visits from 501stLegion and Cincinnati CircusCompany. Free. 369-6028.Madeira.

ShoppingHoliday Packages, 10 a.m. to 9p.m., Kenwood Towne Centre,745-9100. Kenwood.

SUNDAY, DEC. 6AuditionsCatch Me If You Can, 7-10 p.m.,Madisonville Recreation Center,5320 Stewart Road, Bring sheetmusic in proper key (accompa-nist provided) of one Broadwaystyle song with minimum of16-32 bars clearly marked todemonstrate best vocal range.Also have second choice ready.Wear proper shoes and attirefor dance audition. Ages 18 andup. Free. Registration recom-mended. Presented by ShowbizPlayers Inc.. 325-7842;www.showbizplayers.com/auditions. Madisonville.

Craft ShowsShowcase of Arts, noon to 5p.m., Woman’s Art Club CulturalCenter, Free. 272-3700; www.ar-tatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

Exercise ClassesYoga Teacher Training andWellness School, RYT 200, 9a.m. to 5 p.m., Yoga Fit Bou-tique, $2300. Registrationrequired. 237-5330;www.want2gofit.com. Syca-more Township.

Home & GardenWoodland Vistas LuxuryTownhomes Open House, 1-3p.m., Woodland Vistas LuxuryTownhomes, 5983 WoodlandLane, Tour contemporary fur-nished model by John HueberHomes. Free. 703-2353. EastEnd.

Music - ChoralHolidays in Harmony, 3-5 p.m.,Montgomery PresbyterianChurch, 9994 Zig Zag Road,Community chorus under direc-tion of Dan Krueger performsselection of seasonal piecesincluding both classic and con-temporary holiday music. Re-

freshments follow. Free. Pre-sented by Jubilant Singers.739-9768. Montgomery.

Music - ClassicalBlue Ash Montgomery Sym-phony Holiday Concert: TheBells of Christmas, 7-9 p.m.,Montgomery Assembly of God,7950 Pfeiffer Road, Joint concertwith Cincinnati Choral Society,Cincinnati Collaborative RingingProject and UC president andcello soloist Santa Ono. Free.Presented by Blue Ash/Montgo-mery Symphony Orchestra.549-2197. Montgomery.

ShoppingHoliday Packages, 10 a.m. to 9p.m., Kenwood Towne Centre,745-9100. Kenwood.

Youth SportsCincy Swish Basketall Train-ing, 5-8 p.m., Mariemont HighSchool, 1 Warrior Way, Maingym. Grades 2-4 boys and girls5-6 p.m., grades 5-6 boys andgirls 6-7 p.m., grades 7-8 boysand girls 7-8 p.m. Ages 2-8. $20.Registration recommended.Presented by Cincy Swish Basket-ball. 484-0526; cincyswish-basketball.com. Mariemont.

MONDAY, DEC. 7Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, noonto 3 p.m., Creativities, $10 percreator. Add $5 for drop off ofages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

AuditionsCatch Me If You Can, 7:30-10p.m., Madisonville RecreationCenter, Free. Registration rec-ommended. 325-7842;www.showbizplayers.com/auditions. Madisonville.

Cooking ClassesDo Ahead Brunch Celebrationwith Diane Phillips, 6:30-8:30p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344Montgomery Road, DianePhillips shows how to createmid-day celebration that ismade almost entirely ahead,with just last minute pop intooven for some dishes. $70.Reservations required. 489-6400;www.cookswaresonline.com.Symmes Township.

Basic Cooking Skills Work-shop, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Peachy’sHealth Smart, 7400 Montgo-mery Road, Recommended forbeginner who is tired of diningout, ordering or heating frozennot so healthy dinners andeager to create own meals butunable to due to lack or trainingor experience. Ages 18 and up.$250 for 5-week class. 315-3943;www.peachyshealthsmart.com.Silverton.

Exercise ClassesYoga for Teen Girls, 4-5 p.m.,Woman’s Art Club CulturalCenter, 6980 Cambridge Ave.,Great introduction for youngwomen grades 8-12 to explorewhat yoga has to offer. Bringown mat. No cell phones permit-ted. $80 for 8 weeks. Regis-tration required. 760-2552;karenjohnsyoga.com. Marie-mont.

Literary - LibrariesPreschool Storytime, 10-11a.m., Loveland Branch Library,649 Loveland-Madeira Road,Enjoy books, songs, activities,crafts and more, while buildingearly literacy skills. For pre-schoolers and their caregivers.Ages 3-6. Free. 369-4476;www.cincinnatilibrary.org.Loveland.

Toddler Storytime, 11 a.m. tonoon, Loveland Branch Library,649 Loveland-Madeira Road,Encourage emerging languageskills with books, rhymes, crafts,music and fun. For ages 18-36months. Free. 369-4476;www.cincinnatilibrary.org.Loveland.

ShoppingHoliday Packages, 10 a.m. to 9p.m., Kenwood Towne Centre,745-9100. Kenwood.

TUESDAY, DEC. 8Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

Creativities DIY Studio Class-es, 3:45-5:15 p.m., Creativities,7010 Miami Ave., Signature classmixes fine arts with building,sculpting, thinking, recycling,stitching and other creativemeans to envision and makereally cool things. Ages 6-8. $179for 7-week session. Registrationrequired. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

Arts and Creativities Classes,5:20-6:50 p.m., Creativities, 7010Miami Ave., Signature classmixes fine arts with building,sculpting, thinking, recycling,stitching and any other creativemeans to envision and makereally cool things. Ages 8-12.$179. Registration required.272-1500; www.artsandcre-ativities.com. Madeira.

Literary - LibrariesTeen Club, 3:30-5 p.m., DeerPark Branch Library, 3970 E.Galbraith Road, Teens have funwith simple science experiments,play board games, participate in“make & take” activities, craftsand other engaging activities.Ages 10-18. Free. 369-4450;www.cincinnatilibrary.org/branches/deerpark. Deer Park.

Family Storytime, 6:30-7:30p.m., Loveland Branch Library,649 Loveland-Madeira Road,Families with young childrenenjoy stories, songs, rhymes andcraft. Free. 369-4476. Loveland.

Literary - Story TimesReading and Rhyming Time,1:30-2:30 p.m., Madeira BranchLibrary, 7200 Miami Ave., Pre-schoolers enjoy story timefollowed by early literacy gamesand activities. Ages 3-6. Free.369-6028. Madeira.

ShoppingHoliday Packages, 10 a.m. to 9p.m., Kenwood Towne Centre,745-9100. Kenwood.

Support GroupsOvereaters Anonymous,7:30-8:30 p.m., MontgomeryAssembly of God, 7950 PfeifferRoad, Welcome to anyonewanting to stop eating com-pulsively. No dues or fees. Notaffiliated with any public orprivate organization, politicalmovement, ideology or religiousdoctrine. Ages 18 and up. Free.Presented by Greater CincinnatiIntergroup Overeaters Anony-mous. 528-2275; cincin-natioa.org. Montgomery.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9Art & Craft ClassesMadeira Creativity Lab, 3:30-5p.m., Madeira Branch Library,7200 Miami Ave., Some basicinstruction plus your creativityequals amazing results. Ages12-18. Free. 369-6028. Madeira.

Creativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

Designing for Your AmericanGirl Doll, 4:45-6:15 p.m., Cre-ativities, 7010 Miami Ave., Learnto design, build, sculpt, paint

and stitch everything fromfurniture to food for your doll!.Ages 7-10. $179. Registrationrequired. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

Cooking ClassesPerfect Party Food with DianePhillips, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Cooks’Wares, 11344 MontgomeryRoad, Tips and tricks of dishesthat can all be made ahead oftime and designed to be servedbuffet style. Includes easy deco-rating and bar tips. $70. Reserva-tions required. 489-6400;www.cookswaresonline.com.Symmes Township.

Literary - BookstoresEducator’s Warehouse Sale,3:30 p.m., Joseph-Beth Ware-house, 5030 Oaklawn Drive,Free. Presented by Joseph-BethBooksellers-Crestview Hills.859-912-7860. Oakley.

Literary - LibrariesToddler Playdate, 11 a.m. tonoon, Loveland Branch Library,649 Loveland-Madeira Road,Meet new friends and socializethrough unstructured play. Toysprovided. For ages 18 months-4years. Free.369-4476; www.cin-cinnatilibrary.org. Loveland.

SchoolsCoffee Social with Casey, 9a.m., Children’s Meeting HouseMontessori School, 927 O’Ban-nonville Road, Parents of pre-schoolers learn about Mon-tessori philosophy, tour 7-acrecampus and visit classrooms.Free. 683-4757; on.fb.me/1VcIlPj.Loveland.

ShoppingHoliday Packages, 10 a.m. to 9p.m., Kenwood Towne Centre,745-9100. Kenwood.

Support GroupsAl-Anon Meeting, noon to 1p.m., Good Shepherd LutheranChurch Kenwood, 7701 Ken-wood Road, Room 101. Fellow-ship of relatives and friends ofalcoholics who share theirexperience, strength and hopein order to solve common prob-lems. Ages 18 and up. Free.Presented by Kenwood Al-AnonFamily Group. 947-3700. Ken-wood.

THURSDAY, DEC. 10Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

Draw and Sketch 101, 5:20-6:50p.m., Creativities, $179. Regis-tration required. 272-1500.Madeira.

Holiday - ChristmasVictorian Holiday Village,6-8:30 p.m., Ohio NationalFinancial Services, Free. 794-6100; www.ohionational.com.Montgomery.

Literary - LibrariesTeen Writing Club, 6 p.m.,Loveland Branch Library, 649Loveland-Madeira Road, Forteen writers interested in meet-ing other writers or looking forfeedback from others. Ages12-17. Free. 369-4476; www.cin-cinnatilibrary.org. Loveland.

ShoppingHoliday Packages, 10 a.m. to 9p.m., Kenwood Towne Centre,745-9100. Kenwood.

FRIDAY, DEC. 11Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

Holiday - ChristmasVictorian Holiday Village,6-8:30 p.m., Ohio NationalFinancial Services, Free. 794-6100; www.ohionational.com.Montgomery.

ShoppingHoliday Packages, 10 a.m. to 9p.m., Kenwood Towne Centre,745-9100. Kenwood.

Montgomery Under One Roof,4-8 p.m., Blaine’s Fine Men’sApparel, 9407 MontgomeryRoad, Complimentary refresh-ments, swag bag, 5-minutemassages and variety of Mont-gomery-based businesses withpop-up shops under one roof.Bring a Toys for Tots donationand get 10 percent off purchaseat Blaine’s. Free. Presented byCincy Chic. 791-9970; www.cin-cychic.com. Montgomery.

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

ABOUT CALENDARTo submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in

and click on “submit an event.” Send digital photos to [email protected] along with event information.Items are printed on a space-available basis with local eventstaking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publicationdate.

To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

FILE PHOTO

Susan McDonald stands in front of a little post office that is part of Ohio National’s annualVictorian Holiday Village display. The Victorian Holiday Village at Ohio National FinancialServices, One Financial Way, Montgomery, features variety of holiday activities. Houses aredecorated with holiday scenes, thousands of lights and free family entertainment. The village isopen 6 to 8:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4, Thursday, Dec. 10, and Friday, Dec. 11, and 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.,Saturday, Dec. 5. Admission is free. Call, 794-6100; visit www.ohionational.com.

PUZZLE ANSWERS

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B A A L E A S E C O D A E S EO V A R Y E S T I G O R N A S T YB E Y O N D T H E T I M E L I M I TI R O N E R S S A R A N A U T O B O TE T U I A D S W A G O N D I N E R O

S C R U B S E M I S Z E N E RW E N T T O O F A R R E C K L E S S L YA L C O A P I S A N S H E A RR I A L T O S E D A N E L S A P E DS E A D U C K D I R A C E S O B E S O

Y E A R B O O K P H O T O G R A P HS T O A T I O N S I P O D A R N SP O I T A S K B A L E R E S LI L L K E P T V I O L I N S N I F F SN E M O N O T A G O O D B E T V I A LA D E N E F I L E H O A R Y E S S OL O N G A F T E R A G R E E S H O T

Page 9: Loveland herald 120215

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An ounce of prevention is worth a poundof cure. Especially when it comes to leav-ening baked goods during this super busyholiday season.

That’s why I’m reminding you again tocheck your leavening agents. For bakingpowder, stir a teaspoon or so into 1/4 cupwarm water. It should fizz up right away. Ifnot, toss it.

To test leavening power in baking soda,stir a teaspoon or so into 1/4 cup of vinegaror lemon juice. It should also fizz up rightaway.

Stir a packet of yeast in very warm water witha pinch of sugar to feed it. If it’s good, it will bub-ble/foam after a few minutes. I store my yeast inthe freezer for longer shelf life.

Readers want to knowWhat’s that white coating or speckling on my

chocolate?The whitish layer/speckling is what is known as

“chocolate bloom.” There are two types: fat andsugar bloom.

Fat bloom is caused when chocolate is exposed

to high temperatures and then allowed toreset, or is not tempered properly. Thecocoa butter melts and separates, thenrises to the surface creating a whitish“bloom.”

Sugar/speckled bloomChocolate looks speckled rather than

whitish. Caused by an excess of moisturethat makes the sugar crystallize.

Store in cool place to avoid bloom.

Using bloomed chocolateYes, it’s safe. It may not have the “snap” and

silky-smooth texture of tempered chocolate, butthe flavor is still good.

Difference between bitter, bittersweet,semisweet, milk and white chocolate.

Check out my Abouteating site.Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator,

Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional andauthor. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com.Email her at [email protected] with“Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line.

Savory, sweet bacon, coffee cake for brunch

Savory and sweet bacon for brunch

This is a good recipe for brunch since it’s yummy warm or roomtemperature. The cayenne gives it punch; the sugar lends a mellowsweetness. Use high quality, thick cut bacon for best results.

1 pound thick cut bacon

Mix:

1/4 cup brown sugar, packedScant 1/2 teaspoon ea. cayenne and black pepper

Preheat oven to 350. Lay bacon in single layer on sprayed sheet.Rub a bit less than half the sugar mixture on top. Bake in mid-

dle of oven about 15-20 minutes. Turn over and sprinkle with rest ofmixture. Bake until crisp, about 15 minutes. Drain on paper towels.

Lois Boekley’s Crumb Coffee Cake

Brunch is a popular way to entertain during the holidays.Here’s a recipe from reader Lois Boekley, who treasures her family’sgenerational recipes. Lois said: “I got the recipe from my grand-mother many years ago, and tweaked it to make it my own. I haveshared this cake with many people over the years to welcome newneighbors, for potlucks, and for friends who are under the weath-er.” Lois’ tip on not over mixing the batter results in a more tender,nice textured, cake.

3 -1/3 cups all purpose flour2-1/4 cups sugar1-1/2 teaspoons cinnamon1/2 teaspoon nutmegPinch salt18 tablespoons salted butter or margarine1 cup buttermilk1 teaspoon baking soda2 eggs

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Grease and flour two 9-inch roundor two 8-inch square pans or one 13 X 9-inch pan.

Combine the flour, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt.Using a pastry blender cut in the butter or margarine. (This

can also be done in batches in a food processor.)Remove 2 cups of the mixture and set aside.Stir the baking soda into the buttermilk. Immediately add the

buttermilk mixture and the eggs to the remaining crumb mixture.Mix only until the mixture is evenly moistened; do not over mix.The batter will be lumpy.

Transfer the batter into the prepared pan(s). Sprinkle with thereserved crumb mixture.

Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean,about 25 to 30 minutes for the 8- or 9-inch cakes or 30 to 35 min-utes for the 13 X 9-inch cake. Cool on a wire rack.

Note: This cake is best served warm. Reheat individual por-tions in the microwave oven.

THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Lois Boekley’s crumb coffee cake can be made for a variety of occasions.

Rita HeikenfeldRITA’S KITCHEN

Page 10: Loveland herald 120215

Nov. 25 question

Would you feel safe travel-ing to Europe in light of theParis attacks? What would ittake to make you feel safethere?

“Had this question beenasked even two years ago myanswer would have been a sim-ple ‘sure.’ However, in light ofthe ever-increasing audacity ofradical Islamist groups (yesObama, you should use that la-bel), I would be extremely un-comfortable traveling inEurope with that all too identifi-able dark blue passport. It is ashame that so many innocentshave been killed in such violentmanners. It is a shame that ittakes events with the magni-tude of 9/11 or Paris or London

trains or US embassies or hotelsin Mali to wake more of theworld up to the ever-increasingthreat radical Islamists insist isgood religion. It is a shame thatwe can’t all just learn to getalong with each other. It will bea real shame if we end up nextNovember with another weaksympathizer living at 1600Pennsylvania. Let us hope anpray for real leadership toguide us through and beyondthe terrorism quagmire.”

M.J.F.“I would not feel safe travel-

ing to Europe or for that matterany other foreign country ex-cept Canada. I have felt this waysince 9/11 and these terrorist at-tacks such as Paris reconfirmmy fears. Europe is being overrun with refugees from the Mid-

dle East. Odd how so many aretrying to get out of these Mus-lim countries; yet they are notheaded to Dubai or Qatar. GoFigure!”

T.D.T.

CH@TROOM

THIS WEEK’SQUESTIONWhat is your favorite Christ-mas song? Which artist’sversion do you prefer?Bonus question - Do you havea “favorite” Christmas sweat-er? Tell us the story behind it,and email us a photo.

Every week we ask readers aquestion they can reply to via

email. Send your answers [email protected]

with Ch@troom in the subject line.

10A • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015

VIEWPOINTSVIEWPOINTSEDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM Cincinnati.com/communities

LOVELANDHERALDEditor: Richard Maloney, [email protected], 248-7134

LOVELANDHERALD

Loveland Herald EditorRichard [email protected], 248-7134Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-FridaySee page A2 for additional contact information.

7700 Service Center Drive, West Chester, Ohio, 45069phone: 248-8600email: [email protected] site: Cincinnati.com/communities

A publication of

As a financial profes-sional, I never thought I’dencounter anything thatpeople fear as much astaxes, but alas, I have…FAFSA.

For those of you whohave not yet sent a childoff to college, FAFSAstands for the Free Appli-cation for Federal Stu-dent Aid. The purpose ofFAFSA is to determinethe expected family con-tribution (EFC), which is theamount of money a family willhave to pay for college for thecurrent academic year beforethey can be considered forneed-based financial aid. EFChas four components - parentincome, parent assets, student

income and studentassets.

Historically, afamily would com-plete this form forthe first time in Jan-uary of their stu-dent’s senior year inhigh school, usingtheir prior year fed-eral tax returns toreport parent andstudent income. Thistimeline will hold

true for families of currenthigh school seniors, who willcomplete FAFSA for the firsttime this coming January,using their 2015 tax returns todetermine their financial aideligibility for the 2016-2017academic year, which will be

their freshman year in college.Although guidance counsel-

ors typically start engagingstudents in the preparing-for-college process quite early intheir high school careers (asearly as freshman year), par-ents will often avoid consider-ing how they will pay for ituntil senior year, when FAFSAis looming.

The U.S. Department ofEducation recently announcedsweeping changes to thisschedule, which now makes itimperative for parents of ju-niors and sophomores to startplanning for the paying-for-college process. The firstchange moves the filing fromJanuary back to October,meaning parents of current

high school juniors will filetheir first FAFSA in October2016 (rather than January2017). The second change re-quires families to report in-come from their “prior prior”year tax return, so families ofjuniors will use their 2015 taxreturns (rather than 2016) toreport income, even thoughthey won’t head off to collegeuntil the fall of 2017. Familiesof current sophomores will usetheir 2016 tax returns to com-plete FAFSA in October 2017,for the 2018-2019 academicyear.

These changes are impor-tant for two reasons: 1) theymore closely align the finan-cial aid process with the col-lege application and admission

process, and 2) they affordfamilies an earlier opportunityto plan for how they will payfor college and more impor-tantly, more time to strate-gically minimize their Expect-ed Family Contribution.

Current statistics show that89 percent of families whoapply for financial aid willreceive it, so don’t delay ineducating yourself about theprocess, and how to positionyour family for maximumeligibility.

Jodi Eramo is a CPA and acollege funding specialist atSummit College Funding inLoveland. Call 891-6050 forinformation on our next free,educational seminar, or forhelp with FAFSA.

Upcoming changes to the FAFSA form

JodiEramoCOMMUNITYRECORDER GUESTCOLUMNIST

As a concerned Christian, Iwas saddened by the tragicdeath of unarmed black youth,

TimothyThomas in2001 by a whiteCincinnatipolice officer(who was ac-quitted ofcharges ofnegligenthomicide).

I was alsodisturbed bysubsequentrioting thatcaused $3.5

million in damages to innocentproperty owners, and another$2 million in damages to cityproperty (i.e. the taxpayers asinnocent victims).

I welcomed the Neighbor toNeighbor (N2N) groupsthroughout the city formedwith an eye to peaceful racialreconciliation and attended anumber of the 2001 and 2002Milford N2N meetings. What Iwitnessed at these meetingsquickly caused me to quit:white-bashing by some blacksin attendance and white guiltby some whites. To me, focus-ing the discussions on “whiteprivilege” and “white racism”did not seem healthy or help-ful.

The reader might recall the

Washington, D.C., Beltwaysniper killings in October 2002,where two African Americanmen shot and killed 10 peoplewhile wounding another three.Even though these criminalswere caught in the act, andwere eventually tried and con-victed, some of the attendeesat the final Milford N2N meet-ing I attended expressed out-rage that black men had beencharged, claiming that “onlywhite men commit serial mur-der.”

These N2N members sawthe arrest of Lee Boyd Malvoand John Allen Williams as acase of “racial profiling.”

Many Americans are con-cerned that the Obama Ad-ministration is planning toimport tens of thousands ofSyrian “refugees” into theUnited States despite the Di-rector of the FBI admittingthat it is “impossible” to vetthese people. An estimated 97percent of the “refugees” areMuslim, while only 3 percentare Christian or other faiths. Inthe light of thousands of terror-ist incidents worldwide com-mitted by Muslims since 2001,is it sensible for Americans toprofile incoming Muslimswhen we don’t know who theyare?

President Obama claimsthat to deny Syrian Muslims

entry into the United Stateswould be a “religious test” anda “betrayal of American val-ues.” Interestingly, Beltwaysniper Williams in 1987 joinedthe Nation of Islam andchanged his name to John Al-len Muhammad. Besides kill-ing 10 in the Washington, D.C.,area, Muhammad was respon-sible for the murder of 14 oth-ers.

Some Milford N2N mem-bers are still busy inferringdiscrimination in hiring by theCity of Milford and by theMilford Exempted VillageSchool District.

“We are truly concernedabout all the many racial is-sues,” said Charlene Hinners.What issues, I ask.

Apparently Hinners agreeswith President Obama’s chargelast summer that “racism is inAmerica’s DNA,” and SupremeCourt Justice Anthony Kenne-dy’s claim in the 2015 FairHousing decision that evenneutral, “colorblind” actionscan easily produce unequal,racist results.

Nonsense, unfair to Amer-ica and Americans. I call onthe city and school district tohire the most qualified candi-dates, regardless of race.

Randy Kleine is a residentof Milford.

Milford schools: Hire the mostqualified, regardless of race

RandyKleineCOMMUNITYRECORDER GUESTCOLUMNIST

If it is true that peopleoften only read the first fewlines of an article, then let me

say it rightup front.There is nomanna fromheaven.There are nosweepstakesyou win overthe phoneand have tosend your lifesavings toget, ever.And, that

kind, sweet convincing voiceon the other end of the phoneline is, no doubt, sitting in ahuge call center in anothercountry, meeting quotas andcelebrating the victory whenyou are Scammed out of ev-ery cent you worked hard tosave for so many years.

You may think this couldnever happen to someone youknow, even a parent, but itoften does and goes unreport-ed to authorities and, espe-cially, to adult children. Iftold, adult children respondwith disbelief, anger anddismay toward the parentwhen they cannot believe thata smart parent could havefallen for such a thing. Frank-ly, there is no degree of intel-lectual or socio-economicboundaries that differentiatethose who are scammed byrelentless con thieves. Fallingprey is easy.

In many cases, hardwork-ing retired Americans havelost upwards of more than$100,000 before realizingthere is no gold at the end ofthe rainbow; that everythingthey have worked for is gone.I am aware of situationswhere an older adult has notonly lost his/her life savings,but ended up in foreclosureon a home that had been paid-off years before.

A common scam is the“You won the lottery” scam,wherein the person answer-ing the phone is told that hejust won $1.3 million (or an-other random amount) andafter much hoopdilah of con-gratulations and celebration,the caller indicates that you

are, however, responsible forthe taxes; but, they will evensend you a check to cover thetaxes. You get the check, cashit at your bank and by thetime it gets to the other coun-try and it returns to yourbank noting “no such ac-count,” you’ve already sent aboatload of cash to them.

One call that recentlycame to my home was fromsomeone purporting to befrom the U.S. Treasury; notunlike the IRS call, insistingthat I return the call and thatit was of dire importance. Idid not. If you return the call,they get your personal in-formation - like birth dateand Social Security number -and, threaten that you owethe government money, and ifyou don’t send it immediately,you will be arrested.

I am always amazed thatthe “grandson/daughter”calling from another countryis used so often. The callerindicates that he/she is yourgrandson/daughter, startingwith “Grandma?” and theresponse is “Trevor, Trevor, isthat you?” Of course, thisperson is now “Trevor” andbefore you know it, you’vewired $20,000 into anothercountry to get him out ofprison, and he has beggedyou not to call his parents.

It is the holidays. Let’s bethankful for all we have, butdiligent in protecting it. So,hang up the phone. Generally,the caller moves on to thenext potential victim andwon’t waste time with you.Occasionally, they can bethreatening and persistent.Do not let them hang up thephone on the other end of theline and laugh to their friendsin the call center that theyscammed another trustingAmerican. Please share thismessage with every personyou know and care about inhelping them to protect theirhard-earned savings.

Cindy Gramke is the exec-utive director/CEO of Cler-mont Senior Services. Ideasand comments can be direct-ed to Cindy at [email protected] or contactthe agency at 724-1255.

It’s the holidayseason, time forscammers to appear

Cindy GramkeCOMMUNITYRECORDER GUESTCOLUMNIST

Page 11: Loveland herald 120215

DECEMBER 2, 2015 • LOVELAND HERALD • 1B

SPORTSSPORTSHIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL CommunityPress.com

LOVELANDHERALDEditor: Melanie Laughman, [email protected], 513-248-7573

5067CINADV (10/15)

Top of their gameMarc Galloway, MD, Head Team PhysicianMatthew Busam, MD, Assistant Team Physician

MercyMovesYou.com

Boys basketball

» The Loveland High School men’svarsity basketball team opened its sea-son with a 70-48 victory at Harrison onSaturday, Nov. 29, as a part of the MercyHealth Tipoff Classic.

Down early to the Wildcats, the Ti-gers, under new head coach Rob Reis,nailed five treys in the first half to claim

a slim three-point lead at the break. Com-ing out of the locker room, the Tigers’ de-fensive intensity picked up, limiting theWildcats to only 20 second half points.The Tigers saw strong contributionsacross their lineup, including eight play-ers in the scoring column. Drew Plitt ledLoveland with 20 points on 8-11 of shoot-ing, along with Brady Funke’s threetreys and 16 points, and Mitch Robin-son’s 10 rebounds and 5 assists. Next upfor the Tigers is Little Miami.

- Submitted

» CHCA defeated Dohn Community75–34 Nov. 28. Erik Kohlan, Blake South-erland and Cory Combs all reached dou-ble figures in points.

Girls basketball» Lakota West defeated Mount Notre

Dame 64–43 Saturday last week.» Loveland continued its fast start

with a 44–28 win against Anderson Nov.28. The Tigers improved to 3-0 with thewin.

» Ursuline thumped Ponitz 83–17 Nov.

28. Five players were in double figuresfor the Lions.

ACC honors Fry» The University of Notre Dame Ath-

letics Department announced that Ursu-line Academy graduate Sam Fry becamethe first second-team All-Atlantic CoastConference selection in school history.

According to the release, Fry leadsthe Irish in kills, kills per set, solo blocks,block assists, total blocks, blocks per setand points.

SHORT HOPS

Nick [email protected]

Loveland swimming is led by juniorCourtney Mennen. She earned honor-able mention All-ECC honors and quali-fied for districts in the 100 yard back-stroke. Senior Emily Michelfelder andsophomore Emma Blackburn will alsolead the Tigers. The experience gainedby underclassmen competing at dis-tricts last year in relays should pay offthis season.

Loveland’s boys team is led by seniorRyan Mesmer and juniors Mitchell Lai-fook and Vaughn Richter. That trio com-prised three fourths of the Tigers’ 200yard and 400 yard freestyle relay teamslast season.

The Tigers have a deep diving squad,with Liz Bender, Sarah Sheeler, JoeCarver, Max Daugherty, Ryan Drapeau,Alex Scharfenberger. Sheeler is theteam’s lone senior and captain. Scharfen-berger narrowly missed qualifying fordistricts last year.

“I have a young team this year that isloaded with talent,” said Loveland divingcoach Lisa Werwinski.

Moeller finished second in the statelast year, behind only Greater CatholicLeague rival St. Xavier.

The Crusaders return all but twomembers of that Division I state runner-up team. Jacob Peloquin placed fifth inthe state in the 100 yard butterfly andseventh in the 100-yard backstroke.

Cooper Hodge finished fifth in the200-yard individual medley. Both areback for their senior season. Senior DanNyberg and juniors Austin Theobald andWill McCullough also return.

Peloquin, a Miami University com-mit, and Hodge, a University of Wiscon-sin commit, will anchor the Crusaders’relay teams. Expectations will be highfor this team in 2015-2016.

Last year, head coach Gary Toner saidhe expected his Cincinnati Hills Chris-tian Academy boys team to make dis-tricts for the first time in eight years.

J.P. Pancioli and Ryan Hunt helpeddeliver on that goal. This year, Toner andthe Eagles are likely looking for repeatappearances at the district meet as wellas adding some fresh faces to the mix, ifnot state qualification.

Hunt and Pancioli can return this sea-son along with a host of other swimmersincluding Jake Koopman, Connor Shee-hy and Dominic Rottman.

The Enquirer tabbed CHCA as one ofthe area’s teams to watch in Division IIagain this season.

Last season, Toner said his freshmenclass was the best he’s ever had.

Anna Van Jura and Sydney Day wereamong those freshmen who could con-tribute immediately. And they did so asdistrict qualifiers.

Hope Whiteside and Rachel Haslemwere in the district mix as well.

Toner is likely hoping a few morefaces join them in district waters thisseason.

St. Xavier High School’s swim teamhas, for a long time, held the state podi-um in a stranglehold. The Bombers havecultivated and sustained one of the mostimpressive programs the area has everseen.

Last season, St. Xavier won its sev-enth consecutive Division I state cham-pionship (36th all-time) and the Bombers

return buses full of top-tier talent in thewater.

The Bombers also rotated the coach-ing carousel this year. Longtime headcoach Jim Brower moved from the head

Loveland Tigers returndistrict swimming qualifiers Nick Robbe and Adam TurerCommunity Press staff

THANKS TO LOVELAND SWIMMING AND DIVING

Loveland coach Jaclyn Jones sent several swimmers to the Southwest Ohio district meet last season. Among the Tigers participating were, front:Kendall Wheeler, Hannah Bashardoust, Reagan Patton, Courtney Mennen, Ashley Day and Emma Blackburn; back, Ryan Mesmer, BobbyOberholzer, Mitchell Laifook, Vaughn Richter and Scott Kendrick.

GEOFF BLANKENSHIP/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Moeller’s Jacob Peloquin placed fifth in the state in the 100-yard butterfly and seventh in the100-yard backstroke last season.

NICK ROBBE/COMMUNITY PRESS

St. Xavier’s 400 freestyle relay, includingreturners Matt Slabe and Grant House, wonstate last season.

See SWIMMERS, Page 2B

Page 12: Loveland herald 120215

2B • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015 LIFE

position to an assistant, to make way forformer assistant Tim Beerman to takeover as head coach. Beerman was previ-ously a head coach at Ursuline Academy.

Junior Grant House is without ques-tion the fastest swimmer in state. Househas already won four individual statechampionships (two as a freshman, twoas a sophomore), and he’s helped on anumber of state championship relayteams. Last year, he won the 100 and 200freestyle races at state.

Senior Matt Slabe, also an individualstate qualifier, swam on the 400 freestylerelay team that won a state title last year.Junior Luke Sobolewski’s another expe-rienced swimmer who won a state titleon the 200 medley relay last year. JuniorCharles Leibson was an individual statequalifier in two races last year, and justfinished helping the Bombers win a wa-ter polo state championship. SophomoreJustin Grender was another differencemaker at state last year, as was sopho-more Nicholas Perera.

Beerman has also been very im-pressed by freshman Jake Foster.

Mount Notre Dame is led by GraciDoll, Corinne Herwitz, Amanda Puthoff,Annie Kruspe and Kate Van Den Brink.

The Lady Cougars will field a deeperand more experienced squad in coachPete Wagner’s second season at MND.That depth is bolstered by the addition ofsome swimmers who returned to thesport to compete for the varsity team af-ter taking some time off from competi-tion.

“This team is well-rounded and com-prised of swimmers that are committedto the sport and not afraid to work hard,”said Wagner. Grace Menke earned diverof the year honors in the GGCL last yearas a freshman.

St. Ursula, with its young talent androster laden with state swimmers, is ex-pected to be one of the city’s best againthis season.

However, the Bulldogs aren’t the onlyGGCL team with talented youngsterswho earned state experience. The girlsoff Pfeiffer road might have somethingto say about that.

Ursuline, like its rival, sent numerousswimmers to Canton’s waters.

Julia Moran advanced in the 100 and200 freestyle races. Rollie Grinderjoined her in the 200 and swam the 500freestyle along with Christine Van Kirk.

Caroline Blood represented the Lionsin the 100 backstroke and Laura Morrisswam the 100 breaststroke.

All five can come back this season andhelp Ursuline compete for its third Divi-sion I girls state title in four years.

SwimmersContinued from Page 1B

THANKS TO HEATHER HIGDON

Loveland Middle School congratulates the cross country program after both the girls afirst at the ECC meet Oct. 13, at Landen Park. Bothteams also placed second at the All-City Meet at Colerain High School on Oct. 19. The two teams, combined of seventh- and eighth-graderunners, went on to participate at the Ohio Middle School State Meet at Groveport Madison High School Oct. 25. The girls placed fourth andthe boys placed fifth.

Loveland Middle Schooltakes cross country title

There are 15 girls, grades 3-5, whoparticipated in the Girls on the Run(GOTR) program at St. Columban.

GOTR inspires girls to be joyful,healthy and confident by using a fun, ex-perienced-based curriculum, which cre-atively integrates running.

The Girls on the Run lessons encour-age positive emotional, social, mentaland physical development.

On Nov. 5, the girls participated in a“Practice 5K” (3.1 miles), many of themrunning this distance for the first time.

The event started outside the cafeteriadoors and the girls ran eight laps aroundthe school and church parking lot follow-ing the freshly painted Bobcat pawprints.

The Practice 5K was meant to be justlike a real race - the girls wore race shirtsand bibs, there was a water station, andfamily, friends, teachers and parish stafflined the course to cheer them on. A feweven ran with them.

“This race wasn’t about winning orplacement, it was about running yourown pace and enjoying the running expe-rience,” Coach Linda Zierolf said.

“We wanted the girls to feel the exhil-aration of crossing that finish line ontheir own terms.”

Fifth grader Jane Walulik summed itup best when she said: “It didn’t matterthat I finished towards the end of thegroup. I feel great!”

The girls, as part of their GOTR learn-ings, wanted to give back to their com-munity, so they used this event to collectcanned goods to donate to the Hunger inOhio project. In total, they collectedabout 40 cans.

Girls on the Run givesColumban kids

healthy experience

PROVIDED

There are 15 girls, grades 3-5, participating in the Girls on the Run program at St. Columban.

The Community Press

The following Moeller High Schoolathletes signed national letters of intentto play college sports recently.

Nick Bennett has committed to playbaseball at the University of Louisville,where he will play for head coach DanMcDonnell. Nick was a pitcher for theCrusader 2015 State ChampionshipBaseball Team and was named FirstTeam All GCL.

Nick Byrnes, a senior at ArchbishopMoeller High School, has committed toattend Ohio University as a member ofthe baseball program. Nick will play forhead coach Rob Smith. Byrnes was a

member of the 2015 State ChampionshipBaseball Team.

Alec Graves has committed to playbaseball at Walsh University, where hewill play for head coach Tim Mead. Alecplayed shortstop and third base for theCrusader 2015 State ChampionshipBaseball.

Cameron Junker has committed toplay baseball at the University of NotreDame under the direction of head coachMik Aoki. Cameron is a right-handedpitcher at Archbishop Moeller.

Nate Georgeton, a senior at Arch-bishop Moeller High School, has com-mitted to attend Northwood Universityas a member of the basketball program.

Nate will play for head coach Jeff Reke-weg.

James “Jake” Kevin Fox Jr. has com-mitted to golf for the University of Cin-cinnati under head coach Doug Martin.Jake has maintained a 4.0 GPA and is amember of the German Honors Society.He was named 2014 GCL Co-Player of theYear, 2014 GCGCA Player of the Year,2014 Enquirer Player of the Year, mem-ber of the 2014 State Championshipteam, medalist in 2015 Westerville Cen-tral LaSalle Invitationals, two-time All-State player, 2015 State Runner-up, 2015Ohio Junior Am Champion, and 2nd low-est career average at Moeller.

Cooper Hodge has committed to

swim for the University of Wisconsin un-der head coach Whitney Hite. Cooperwas named Seven Time All American, isMoeller’s school record holder, andmaintains the record for Fastest 200Breaststroke in the country for his age.

Jacob Peloquin has committed toswim for Miami University under headcoach Pete Lindsay. Jacob has main-tained a 3.5 GPA with first and secondhonors, is a Moeller Mentor Group Cap-tain. He was named four time All Amer-ican, Rookie of the Year, MVP, District2015 100 Fly and Back Champion. He wasranked 36th in 100 and 70th in 100 Back inthe Country as an All American for the2014-15 high school season.

Eight Moeller athletes sign national letters of intentThe Community Press

SYMMES TWP. – Cincinnati HillsChristian Academy junior Rachel Has-lem’s journey to selecting cross countryas her sport might not be as long as thecourses she runs, but it is as winding.

She chose swimming prior to herdays at CHCA. Then, she was a volley-ball player as a freshman, but wasn’t en-tirely enamored with it. As part of off-season workouts, student-athletes canparticipate in triathlons, where running

is a significant part of the race. It’s herethat the freshman Haslem found shehad an affinity for it.

“It started with running five minutesat a time, then moved to 5Ks and onfrom there,” Haslem said. “J.P. Pancioli(one of the boys team’s top runners) andI took a liking to it, found out we weren’thalf bad at it and both ended up joiningthe team.”

She fell fast and hard for the sport.In the summer before sophomore

year, she sent an email to coach StephenCarter announcing her intention to join

the program. She and Carter joke abouthow formal that email was now.

Her skills certainly aren’t a laughingmatter though.

“Our boys and girls teams run to-gether during practice and I usually runwith them,” Carter said. “Two runs intopractice, I hear footsteps behind me. Ifigured it was one of the guys, so I ran alittle harder. Still hearing the footsteps,I looked back and there was Rachel. Shecaught up to me and eventually passedme.”

CHCA’s Haslem locks in on cross countryNick [email protected]

Page 13: Loveland herald 120215

DECEMBER 2, 2015 • LOVELAND HERALD • 3BLIFE

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Page 14: Loveland herald 120215

4B • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015 LIFE

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First Church of Christ,Scientist, Anderson

Township7341 Beechmont Avenue

(Near Five Mile Road)Email: [email protected]

231-1020christiansciencecincinnati.com

Sunday Service & Sunday School10:30 a.m.

Wednesday Testimonial Meeting7:30 p.m.

In Church Reading Rm/BookstoreOpen after all services.

Downtown Reading Rm/Bookstore412 Vine Street, Cincinnati

Open Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

First Church of Christ, Scientist3035 Erie Ave 871-0245Sunday Service and Sunday

School 10:30amWednesday Testimonial Meeting

7:30pmReading Room 3035 Erie Ave

Experience the Light and Sound of God

You are invited to theCommunity HU Song

2nd Sunday, 10:00 - 10:30 amECK Worship Service

11:00 am - NoonSecond Sunday of Each MonthAnderson Center Station

7832 Five Mile RoadCincinnati, OH 45230

1-800-891-7713EckankarOhio.org

Worldwide1-800 LOVE GODECKANKAR.org

3850 E. Galbraith,Deer Park

Next to DillonvaleShopping Ctr

www.TrinityCincinnati.org791-7631

Worship Service - 10:00AMSunday School - 10:15AM

PastorCathy Kaminski

Sharonville United MethodistTraditional worship services at 8:15am & 11:00amContemporary worship service at 9:30amFaith development opportunities for all ages!3751 Creek Rd. 513-563-0117www.sharonville-umc.org

www.stpaulcumc.org

SUNDAY MORNINGS8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Traditional Worship

9:30 a.m. Contemporary Worship

9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.Sunday School

Nursery care at all services.

8221 Miami Road(CORNER OF GALBRAITH)

513-891-8181

7515 Forest Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-231-4172 • www.andersonhillsumc.org

3 Contemporary Worship Servicesin our Contemporary Worship Center

2 Traditional Worship Services in our Newly Renovated Sanctuary

Children’s programs and nursery & toddler care available at 9:30 and 11:00 services.

Plenty of Parking behind church.

SUNDAY9:30 & 11:00

SUNDAY8:15 & 11:00

SATURDAY5:30

TRADITIONAL WORSHIPSunday 8:30 & 11 am

CONTEMPORARY WORSHIPSunday 9:30 & 11 am

681 Mt. Moriah Drive • 513.752.1333

mtmoriahumc.org

Active Youth • Outreach • Fellowship

Music Ministries • Bible Studies

Ark of Learning

Preschool and Child Care Ages 3 through 12

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 a.m.Sunday School: 9:45 a.m.

Epiphany United Methodist Church Welcomes You!

Weekend Services:Saturday: 5pm

Sunday: 9am and 10:30am

Child care and Christian Education for all ages available

throughout the weekend.

Dr. Stephen Swisher, Senior Pastor

6635 Loveland-Miamiville Rd. 45140(513) 677-9866

www.Epiphanyumc.org

Rev. Brian K. Brown, Senior Pastor

Sundays9:15am &10:45am

Building HomesRelationships

& Families

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp.513-231-4301

Sunday Worship: 9:00 & 10:15 AM withChildrens Ministry & Nursery

PASTOR MARIE SMITHwww.cloughchurch.org

Come, connect, grow & serve

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142WWW.COS-UMC.ORG

Traditional Worship8:20AM & 11:00AM

Contemporary Worship 9:40amSunday School (All ages)

9:40 & 11AMNursery Care Provided

Reverend Jennifer Lucas, Senior Pastor

Connections Christian Church7421 East GalbraithCincinnati, OH 45243

Phone: 513-791-8348 • Fax: 513-791-5648

Jeff Hill • Ministerwww.connectionscc.org

Worship Service 10:30am Sunday School 9:15 am

,&$)%+ !-"" * ##-"" %'('$$"#" +( '*!&%,% -,&)(

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MADEIRA-SILVERWOODPRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

8000 Miami Ave. 513-791-4470www.madeirachurch.org

Sunday Worship9:00 am - Contemporary Service

10:00am Educational Hour11:00 am - Traditional Service

LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN

CHURCHA Loving, Praying, Caring Church

Join us for Sunday Services

Sunday School .........9:15 - 10:00amWorship Service .....10:30 - 11:30amFellowship ........................... 11:30am

360 Robin Av (oL Oak St) Loveland OH

683-2525www.LPCUSA.org

Service DirectoryCALL: 513-421-6300TO PLACE YOUR AD

Hillside Bible ChurchDonations of new coats forchildren ages 6 to 12 years arebeing accepted at the churchfrom 9:30 a.m.to 10:30 a.m.Sunday mornings through Dec.6.

Sunday school is 9:30 a.m.Worship service is 10:30 a.m.

The church meets at ReceptionsEvent Center, 10681 Loveland-Madeira Road, Loveland.

LovelandPresbyterian ChurchA weekly Community Fit Club isoffered at 7 p.m. Mondays. No

Epiphany UnitedMethodist ChurchAdvent series “Under Wraps” isexploring the four characteris-tics of God described in the OldTestament: expectant, danger-ous, jealous, faithful.

Contemporary services are 5p.m. Saturdays, and 9 a.m.Sundays. Traditional service is10:30 a.m. Sundays.

The church is at 6635 Loveland-Miamiville Road, Loveland;677-9866.

equipment is needed. Classeswill be in Nisbet Hall.

Worship times are: 9:15-10 a.m.,Sunday school; 10:30-11:30 a.m.,worship; and 11:30 a.m., fellow-ship.

The church is at 360 Robin,Loveland; 683-2525; [email protected];www.lovelandpresbyteri-anchurch.org.

Loveland UnitedMethodist ChurchSaturdays 5:30 p.m. – Contempo-rary service with a coffee caféstyle.

Sundays 9 a.m. – Traditional

worship with music featuringour chancel choir, bell choirsand other musical ensembles.

Sundays 10:30 a.m. – Contempo-rary service with music providedby a praise band.

The church is at 10975 S. Leba-non Road, Loveland; 683-1738;www.lovelandumc.org.

Northstar, ACommunity of GraceWorship times are 9 a.m. and 11a.m. Sunday mornings.

QUEST children’s ministry andthe junior high ministry (grades5-8) are available at bothcelebrations.

The church is at 11020 S. Leba-non Road, Loveland.

Prince of PeaceLutheran ChurchAdvent Mid-week Service andMeal will be offered Wednes-days, Dec. 2, 9, and 16. Meal isat 6:15 p.m.; prayer service is at7:15 p.m..

Intergenerational Advent Activ-ities - During the season ofAdvent: Dec. 6, 13, and 20,regular Sunday School andAdult Education will pause forfour weeks.

Worship services are 5 p.m.

Saturdays and 8:45 a.m. and 11a.m. Sundays. Child care isavailable during the Sundaymorning services for childrenup to 3 years of age.

The church is at 101 S. LebanonRoad, Loveland; 683-4244;popluther.org.

SycamorePresbyterian ChurchSunday worship services are at9:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.

“Did Christmas Change theWorld?” “Can How we Cele-brate Christmas Make a Differ-ence to the Lives of Others?”Explore these and other ques-tions in an interactive dis-

cussion led by Pastor EliotWinks, at 9:15 a.m. Sundaysthrough Dec. 20.

The next new member class is8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sat-urday, Dec. 5, in the chapel. Tosign up or for more informa-tion, call the church office ore-mail [email protected].

Advent study: “DiscoveringChristmas Carols” is planned for7 p.m. Thursdays, Dec. 3, 10 and17, in room 120; or 10:45 a.m.Sundays, Dec. 6, 13 and 20, inthe music room. Sign up in thecafe or online at sycamorechur-ch.org.

RELIGION ABOUT RELIGIONReligion news is published at no charge on a space-

available basis. Items must be to our office no later than 4p.m. Wednesday, for possible consideration in the follow-ing edition. » E-mail announcements to [email protected], with “Religion” in the subject line. » Fax to 248-1938. Call 248-8600. » Mail to: Loveland Herald, Attention: Andrea Reeves,Religion news, 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170, Love-land, Ohio 45140.

Page 15: Loveland herald 120215

DECEMBER 2, 2015 • LOVELAND HERALD • 5BLIFE

FREEDELIVERYwithin 30miles

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POWER EQUIPMENT529 Ohio Pike (Beechmont Ave.) 513-528-8044www.hondaeastpowerequipment.com

The continued theft of personal infor-mation by identity thieves has led the In-ternal Revenue Service to put in placetougher safeguards for the 2016 tax fil-

ing season.IRS Commissioner

John Koskinen says, “Weneed the public’s help. Weneed people to join with usand take an active role inprotecting their personaland financial data fromthieves.”

The IRS says its clearincreasingly sophisticat-ed identity thieves arebuying and selling exces-

sive amounts of personal financial dataon the black market. They use this datato file fraudulent tax returns using vic-tims’ names and Social Security num-bers.

People like Sandie, of Cincinnati, whowrote me, “Identity issue with IRS hold-ing up 2014 refund payment that could beused toward eye transplant medications.Calls to IRS since May to no avail, justextend refund date with another ex-cuse.”

It took eight months and a lot of workwith the IRS before Sandie finally gother refund. That’s a little longer thanusual because the IRS says the averagewait time to get things cleared up is sixmonths.

Then there’s Douglas, of Cincinnati,who wrote me, “My wife and I are beingthreatened by the IRS. Someone used mySocial Security number in 2013 and owesthe IRS. They filed their return in Marchof 2014 – we filed in April, 2014 and re-

ceived a notice that we had filed twice.”Douglas says matters got a lot worse

recently.“We received a certified mail stating,

‘Notice of intent to seize your state taxrefund or other property’ if we fail topay…We are shocked that the IRS cancontinue to harass us for debt that we’renot responsible for. They’ve never evenshown us the tax return showing that weowe them money for 2013. As a matter offact, our legitimate 2013 tax returnshows that they owe us for that year.”

Iput Douglas in touch with the IRS taxadvocate who was able to sort throughthe fraud. He has now been credited forthe money he paid and received refundchecks for 2013 and 2014.

The IRS its important to protect yourpersonal information by having securitysoftware on your computers and beingaware of phony emails and phone scams.

For the 2016 tax filing season therewill be new standards for logging onto alltax software products including mini-mum password requirements, new secu-rity questions and standard lockout fea-tures.

For the first time, refund fraud vic-tims will be able to request a copy of thefraudulent tax returns filed by crookswho used their stolen identities. The IRSsays there will be partial or full redac-tion of information on those tax returnsto protect additional possible victims.However, it says, there will be enoughdata for consumers to determine howtheir personal information was used.

Howard Ain appears as the Trouble-shooter on WKRC-TV Local 12 News.Email him at [email protected].

Identity thieves causingproblems with IRS, taxpayers

Howard AinHEY HOWARD!

AARP created Life ReimaginedCheckups for people who want help fo-cusing on what really matters to them sothat they can gain a greater sense of ful-fillment and reach their full potential.

Free checkups are being held in De-cember at these libraries:

» Dec. 10, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., North Cen-tral Library branch, 11109 HamiltonAve.;

» Dec. 14, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., SymmesTownship Library branch, 11850 EnyartRoad;

» Dec. 19, 11a.m. to 1p.m., Madeira Li-brary branch, 7200 Miami Ave., Madei-ra.

The checkups are open to the public atno charge but registration is required.RSVP online at www.aarp.org/cincinnatior call toll-free 877-926-8300.

Life Reimagined checkups help people reach potential

Page 16: Loveland herald 120215

6B • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015 LIFE

Amber Hunt | The EnquirerConsumer Watchdog Reporter

Amber Hunt, The Enquirer’s consumer watchdogreporter, and The Enquirer Call For Action team

of trained volunteers are available to work for you.Specializing in mediation services, we’ll help

you resolve consumer issues and get youresources that will help in the future.

Call 513.768.8833 between 11:00a.m. and 1:00p.m.

Monday through Friday to speak to a volunteer.

Or, go online at Cincinnati.com/CallForActionto submit a consumer complaint.

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Page 17: Loveland herald 120215

DECEMBER 2, 2015 • LOVELAND HERALD • 7BLIFE

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Cannot be combined with any previous sale and quotes. Not valid with any other oXers or discounts. OXer expires 12/12/15.*APR is 26.9% if not paid within 12 months from the date of installation. Some minimums and restrictions may apply. Commercial sales excluded.

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Page 18: Loveland herald 120215

PHOTOS THANKS TO LISA MAUCH

Loveland resident Emma Steiner received aKindle Fire HD as the kids grand prize winnerat the Loveland Branch Library during the2015 Summer Reading Program.

Loveland resident Henry King received aNabi 2 as the preschool grand prize winnerat the Loveland Branch Library during the2015 Summer Reading Program.

Winningreaders

8B • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015 LIFE

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Page 19: Loveland herald 120215

DECEMBER 2, 2015 • LOVELAND HERALD • 9BLIFE

Join Paul Dehner Jr.,Paul Daugherty, a guest,plus other Enquirer Sportspersonalities at Moerlein Lager House.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8 AT 7PM

WATCH ALONG AT: Cincinnati.com

LOVELANDIncidents/investigationsCapiasReported at 100 block of S.Lebanon Road, Nov. 9.

Criminal mischiefReported at 100 block of Fall-enoak Court, Nov. 7.

Domestic violence-knowinglyReported at 900 block of Mar-bea Drive, Nov. 8.

Illegal manufacture of drugsor cultivation of marijuanaReported at 900 block of Mar-bea Drive, Nov. 8.

Obstructing official businessReported at 100 block of KarlBrown Way, Nov. 7.

Re-cite other departmentReported at 100 block of W.Loveland Ave., Nov. 5.

Theft - pettyReported at 100 block of GlenLake road, Nov. 4.

Underage consumption

Reported at 900 block of Mar-bea Drive, Nov. 8.

MIAMI TOWNSHIPIncidents/investigationsBreaking and enteringLeaf blower taken from Dr. MillsMower Service; $280 at Wolf-pen Pleasant Hill, Nov. 1.

BurglaryPlay Station No. 3 taken; $500 at900 block of Ohio 28, Nov. 1.

iPad and charger taken; $400 at6300 block of Branch Hill Mi-amiville, Nov. 3.

Reported at 800 block of Car-penter Road, Nov. 3.

Criminal damageFront door damaged at 900block of Klondyke Road, Nov. 1.

Disorderly conductTwo females involved in a fightat Live Oaks at BuckwheatRoad, Nov. 6.

Domestic violenceReported at 1200 block of Peb-

ble Brooke Trail, Nov. 1.Reported at 5900 block ofMeadow Creek, Nov. 4.

Drug instrumentsNon-breather, possible heroinoverdose reported (revived) at300 block of Tarkington, Nov. 1.

Hypodermic needle and spoonlocated in vehicle at 400 blockof Tarkington Lane, Nov. 3.

Drug instruments,paraphernaliaItems located at 6000 block ofMelody Lane, Nov. 5.

Drug instruments,paraphernalia, marijuana Items located in vehicle at 900block of Ohio 28, Nov. 5.

Felonious assault,aggravated robberyMale was assaulted and wallettaken during a drug deal atarea of Pebble Brooke andBrightwater Circle, Nov. 1.

Marijuana possessionFemale juvenile possessedmarijuana at Live Oaks atBuckwheat Road, Nov. 5.

TheftMoney lost through a phonescam; $1,640 at 900 block ofMurle Lane, Oct. 31.

Phone scam reported at Circle K;$1,817 at Ohio 28, Nov. 1.

Bike taken at Frisch’s lot at Ohio28, Nov. 1.

Bottles of liquor taken fromMeijer; $25 at Ohio 28, Nov. 2.

Medication taken at 5800 blockof Highview Drive, Nov. 2.

Tools taken; $1,960 at 400 blockof Loveland Miamiville, Nov. 2.

A Tablet taken from vehicle;$200 at 6000 block of WindyHollow Court, Nov. 2.

iPod taken; $200 at 5700 blockof Cromley Drive, Nov. 2.

Gasoline not paid for at United

Dairy Farmers; $36 at BranchHill Guinea Pike, Nov. 3.

Wallet taken at Queen CityLaundry at Ohio 28, Nov. 4.

Personal property taken at 1000block of Klondyke, Nov. 4.

Bracelets taken; $3,750 at 600block of Doe Run, Nov. 5.

Gasoline not paid for at UnitedDairy Farmers; $65 at BranchHill Guinea Pike, Nov. 5.

Chain saw, etc. taken fromLowe’s; $768 at Romar Drive,Nov. 6.

SYMMES TOWNSHIPIncidents/investigationsIdentity theftReported on 10000 block ofSomerset Drive, Aug. 18.

Theft$300 removed from 3900 blockof Grovernorshill Drive, Aug. 12.

Checks removed from 11000block of Windy Hill Court, Aug.

20.

POLICE REPORTS ABOUT POLICE REPORTSCommunity Press publishes incident records provided by

local police departments. All reports published are publicrecords.

To contact your local police department: » Loveland, 583-3000» Miami Township, 248-3721» Symmes Township, 774-6351 or 683-3444

George WilliamEddy

George William Eddy, 85, ofLoveland died Nov. 5.

Survived by wife, Virgie (neeAlford) Eddy; children SharonTrout and Vicki (Vernon) Wat-son; grandchildren April (Troy)Thomas, Bryon Powers andAshley Watson; great-grand-children Lainey Thomas, EdenThomas and Caleb Powers;

siblings Jack, Jerry, Byrd andRonnie Shepherd, Peggy Wheel-er and Linda Eldridge; and manynieces, nephews and friends.

Preceded in death by siblingsWilma Laws and Brenda JoHowell;parents Elva (nee Fee)Shepherd and Herman Eddy;and step-father, Albert Shep-herd.

Services were Nov. 11 atLoveland Park Baptist Church,Loveland.

DEATHS

Loveland919 Mohican Drive: Cox, ShelbyJ. & Michelle L. to Diamonds InThe Rough Investments LLC;$49,900.

469 Nimrod Blvd.: Heinrich,Mark & Jane Ann to Hines,Steven D. & Kelly S.; $241,500.

209 Sioux Drive: Synergy SuccessGroup LLC to Hempstead, JoyceA.; $92,500.

1812 Stockton Drive: Rohr, KevinM. to Brunck, Curtis M.;$165,000.

Symmes Township9299 Gourmet Lane: Ryan,Robert R. & Hilda A. to Taylor,John R. & Meredith A.;$230,000.

11159 Loveland Trace Court:Kohn, Chase M. & Michelle toPinsel, Daniel & Linda;$603,800.

9947 Mistymorn Lane: Williams,Timothy & Fiona Susan toKhatana, Anup; $857,500.

11123 Montgomery Road: 11123

Montgomery LLC to GallentineInnovations LLC; $550,000.

11619 Rich Road: Mattes, Karl J.& Barbara E. Friedhoff toWalker, Chris & Mary; $275,750.

8585 Twilight Tear Lane: Haup-stein, George & Karin G. toWeinstein, Sheldon & Wainne;$625,000.

11990 Weeping Willow Court:Gupta, Rupesh K. & AashviniBelosay to Winkle, Andrew S. &Emily M.; $279,900.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

ABOUT REALESTATETRANSFERS

Information is providedas a public service by theoffice of Hamilton CountyAuditor Dusty Rhodes.Neighborhood desig-nations are approximate.

The Certificate ofAchievement for Excel-lence in Financial Report-ing has been awarded toGreat Parks of HamiltonCounty by the Govern-ment Finance OfficersAssociation of the UnitedStates and Canada for itscomprehensive 2014 an-nual financial report.

The Certificate ofAchievement is the high-est form of recognition in

the area of governmentalaccounting and financialreporting, and its attain-ment represents a signifi-cant accomplishment by agovernment and its man-agement.

The GFOA is a non-profit professional associ-ation serving approxi-mately 17,500 govern-ment finance profession-als with offices in Chicagoand Washington, D.C.

Great Parks achievesexcellence infinancial reporting

PROVIDED

Great Parks Deputy Director/CFO Rebecca McDonough andFinancial Manager Thomas Lowe accept the Certificate ofAchievement in November.

Page 20: Loveland herald 120215

10B • LOVELAND HERALD • DECEMBER 2, 2015 LIFE

FOUR-LETTER WORDSBY ALEX VRATSANOS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

No. 1129

RE

LE

AS

E D

AT

E: 12/6/2015

ACROSS

1 Key word #15 Plants with

intoxicating leaves10 Mosque no-no15 Key word #219 Bon ____20 Songwriter

Carmichael21 Minor snafu22 Capital known for 300

years as Christiania23 Ill-fated seducer

in “Tess of the D’Urbervilles”

24 1-Across + 15-Across26 Erupt27 What a driverless car

drives29 Pageant V.I.P.s30 Like some soldiers

in the American Revolution

32 Farmyard call33 You may leave when

it’s up34 Endnotes?35 Portland, Ore.-to-

Boise dir.36 Egg producer38 The “e” of i.e.39 ____ Olshansky, first

Soviet-born N.F.L. player

41 Villainous43 1-Across + 122-Across48 Workers on the board49 It covers everything

quite clearly

50 Decepticon’s foe in “Transformers”

54 Sewing case55 Clio nominees57 S.U.V. alternative59 Moolah60 Bench warmer62 Final Four round64 ____ cards (items

used in ESP tests)65 1-Across + 125-Across70 15-Across +

122-Across72 Acronym on the S&P

50073 Galileo, by birth75 Take off, as a heavy

coat?76 Venice tourist

attraction78 S.U.V. alternative80 Golfer Ernie81 Acted like85 Goldeneye or

harlequin87 Paul who won a Nobel

in Physics89 1962 Paul Anka hit91 15-Across +

125-Across94 Coat fur97 Ammonium and

others98 Subj. for Bloomberg

News99 Puts in stitches, say100 Food that’s an

anagram of 98-Across

101 Washing the dishes, e.g.

103 Plantation device105 Subj. with many

irregularities

106 Shabby108 Sound in “Eleanor

Rigby” and “Yesterday”

110 Disdainful sounds113 “Little” visitor to

Slumberland, in old comics

114 122-Across + 125-Across

117 Holder of small doses

118 Former British crown colony in the Mideast

119 TurboTax option120 As old as the hills121 Petro-Canada

competitor122 Key word #3123 Looking for124 Go well together125 Key word #4

DOWN

1 California resort town2 V, in physics3 1997 Samuel L.

Jackson film4 Pilaflike product5 Pot user?6 Tic-tac-toe failure7 “Understand?”8 Fellow students,

generally9 Brings together10 “Hook” role11 Successes in the

game Battleship12 Sister brand of

Phisoderm13 Elation14 It helps you get ahead

15 Pardner’s mount16 Glimpses17 Orioles’ div.18 He played Chaplin in

“Chaplin”25 Date28 QB Bobby who

purportedly put a curse on the Detroit Lions

31 Germophobe’s need33 Doesn’t pursue34 Mustard, but not

ketchup: Abbr.36 Stage prize37 Old TV adjustment:

Abbr.39 Radiologist, e.g.40 Biological blueprints42 Makes up (for)44 Lucius’s son, in Harry

Potter45 Fancy marble46 Fidelity offerings, for

short47 Political insults, so to

speak51 Uncle ____52 Hershiser who was

Sports Illustrated’s 1988 Sportsman of the Year

53 Major ally?56 Islamic mystics58 Place for a bust60 Figurine61 Stemming from63 Archenemy of

Mattel’s He-Man65 General interests?66 Author Wiesel67 Tournament

organizer since ’3968 “Ha! I was right!”

69 Says, “Read you loud and clear … over,” say

71 Rope in

74 Informer, informally

77 South American tuber

79 Recharge midday

81 Sandpaper and such

82 Creatures that may live inside oysters – hence the name

83 Cable’s ____ Classic

84 Springfieldexclamations

86 Male lead in Disney’s “Frozen”

88 Messy food order at a carnival

90 Witty Nash

92 ____ choy

93 Common wedding- reception feature

94 Kind of column95 “Holy ____!”96 J. Paul Getty and

others102 Literally,

“breathless”103 [You stink!]104 Ho hi107 Beast on Skull

Island, informally108 Low-lying area

109 Robert who oversaw the acquisitions of Pixar, Marvel and Lucasfilm

110 Ophthalmologist’sconcern

111 Burkina ____ (African land)

112 Vending machine feature

115 Small songbird116 Burns’s “before”

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22

23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30 31

32 33 34 35

36 37 38 39 40 41 42

43 44 45 46 47

48 49 50 51 52 53

54 55 56 57 58 59

60 61 62 63 64

65 66 67 68 69 70 71

72 73 74 75

76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84

85 86 87 88 89 90

91 92 93

94 95 96 97 98 99

100 101 102 103 104 105

106 107 108 109 110 111 112

113 114 115 116 117

118 119 120 121

122 123 124 125

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWERS ON PAGE 8A

5QT Oil & Filter Change$21.95

Most vehicles. Some restrictions apply.Expires 12/31/15.

CAR GOT THE SHAKES?CompleteFrontEndAlignmentService

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MoreArrivingDaily! Friendly&CourteousSalesSta¬! AppraiserOnSiteForHighest TradeAllowance!

LATEMODELS2013HyundaiElantraGT .......................................$13,988Red, Rear Spoiler, 5 Speed, Leather, New Tires2011ToyotaCamrySE ...........................................$14,988Red, Sunroof, Alum.Whls, PW, PL, CD2011BuickLaCrosseCXS.......................................$18,988White, V6, Leather, Sunroof, Alum.Whls, Nav., VeryNice!2015Chrysler200Limited ....................................$18,988Black, Sunroof, Alum.Whls., PW, PL, 16KMi., Bal. ofWarranty2012CadillacCTS....................................................$20,988Black, V6, AWD, Leather, Alum.Whls., LowMiles2012CadillacCTSLuxury.......................................$22,988MochaSteel, Sunroof, AWD, Leather, PW, PL, #F81912013CadillacATSAWD ...........................................$22,988Silver, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Alum.Whls, Beautiful Luxury Sedan!#F8137

MINIVANS2008DodgeGrandCaravanSXT ..............................$7,972Silver, V6, Stow-N-Go, PW, PL, CD, Great Family Vehicle, #F81262008Chrysler Town&CountryTouring ...................$7,988White, V6, Stow-N-Go, PW, PL, CD, Ready for Fall Vacation2011DodgeGrandCaravanExpress .....................$12,575Blue, V6, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, CD, #E80492013DodgeGrandCaravanSXT.............................$16,972Silver, V6, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, CD, Alum.Wheels, #F80462014Chrysler Town&CountryTouring .................$23,488Grey, V6, Leather, DVD, Perfect for Vacation!#E8143

TRUCKS&SUVS2005CadillacEscaladeAWD .................................$14,488Blue, V8, Leather, Sunroof, ChromeWheels, 3rdRowSeat2009DodgeRam1500QuadCab..........................$15,488Red, 4x4, SLT, Hemi, PW, PL, ChromeWhls2009DodgeRam1500QuadCab..........................$20,988Hemi, 4x4, ChromeWhls, PW, PL, Center Console, TowPkg, #F82042012Ram1500QuadCab4x4..............................$22,988Silver, 20” ChromeWheels, PW, PL, Exceptionally Clean!#F82052011ChevroletSilverado1500ExtCab ...............$24,9754x4, V8, Auto, A/C, Chrome Tubes, Bedliner, 38KMi, Nice Truck, #F81322012FordF-150XLTSuperCab .............................$24,9834x4, Red, V6, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Bedliner, #F81412013DodgeRam1500Express ...........................$27,988CrewCab, 4x4, Hemi, ChromeWheels, Side Tubes, Excellent Cond.

HARDTOFINDMODELS2008ChryslerSebringLimited ................................$9,988Hard TopConvertible, Red, Leather, V6, ChromeWhls, Sharp2010KiaSoul ..........................................................$12,772Silver, Auto, A/C, PW, Alum.Wheels2010ToyotaRav-4..................................................$14,995Blue, AWD, PW, PL, LowMiles, Excellent Condition2009DodgeChallenger R/T...................................$14,995Silver, Sunroof, Leather, Hemi2013HondaAccordCoupeEX-L.............................$20,985Brown, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Sunroof, Leather, 14,900Mi, 1Owner, LikeNew!

BUDGETBUYS2004ChryslerSebringConvertible .........................$4,882V6, Alum.Whls, LowMiles, Auto, A/C, #F81671994LincolnMarkVIII ..............................................$6,488OneOwner, All Original Leather, V8, LowMiles, VeryRare!2005DodgeCaravanFXT..........................................$6,488V6, Auto, A/C, QuadSeats, EverybodyRides!2008DodgeCaliber...................................................$6,988Black, Auto, A/C, LowMiles, Excellent Condition, EasyOnGas!2007PontiacG-6 ......................................................$6,988Silver, V6, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Priced to Sell!2009ChevroletCobalt ..............................................$7,995Coupe, Grey, Auto, A/C, 60KMiles, Great School Car!2007JeepCompassSport........................................$8,475Auto, A/C, PW, PL, CD, Sunroof, Great School Car!2011DodgeCaliber...................................................$8,988Black, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Alum.Whls, Great School Car, #F81212006ChevroletEquinoxLT ......................................$8,988AWD, V6, Auto, A/C, PW, PL2009DodgeJourneySXT..........................................$8,995Red, AWD, V6, Auto, A/C, Sunroof, #F81252006MiniCooperConvertible .................................$9,988Dark Silver, Auto, A/C, AlumWhls, PW, PL, Power Top, VeryHard To Find!2004MiniCooperS ...................................................$9,988Yellow, 6 Spd, Sunroof, PW, PL, Sharp FunCar!

JOEKIDDAUTOMOTIVEFallClearanceSale!WeMust Sell 100Vehicles

by12-15-15!

1065OHIOPIKE•513-752-1804JUST 3 MILES EAST OF I-275, EXIT #65OPEN MON-THU 9-8 FRI 9-6 SAT 9-5:30www.joekiddauto.com

2012HondaCivicLX

$12,988Silver, Auto, A/C, 38KMiles, PW, PL,

29MPGHwy,#F8181

2007JeepWranglerUnltd$18,9954x4Sahara, 6 Cyl, Auto, A/C, BeReady forWinter! #F8213

A/C, Be#F8213

Silver, Auto

Page 21: Loveland herald 120215

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OPENSAT - SUN

12-5Oaks of

West ChesterMLS#1462547

8961 Oakcrest Way, 40069 l $599,900• 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, chef’s kitchen & sunroom

• Owner’s suite with luxury spa bath• Finished lower level

• Approximately 5,221 sq. ft. of living space• Minutes from great shopping

Move-inReady!

(513) 494-0112

ANDERSO N-1BR, stove, re-frig, extra clean, quiet 3 fam.Lg gar. $625+ $625 dep. 1 yrlese. 513-283-4604

ANDERSON TWP.SEM MANOR

Large updated apts. for Se-niors 55 & older or handicap-ped or disabled. Rent subsi-dized. Laundry on site, hair

salon, cable, nr busline, activ-ities, small pets ok. 513-474-5827 or tty 800-750-0750.

Cincinnati Low Income Apartments.Section 8. Very nice West side loca-tions. 2-3 BR Equal OpportunityHousing. 513-929-2402

Mariemont- 2 Family, 1BR,porch, pvt entrance, eqpt kit,lndry, yard, water pd. N/S.$565. 513-984-3897

MILFORD- SEM VillaRent subsidized.

Voted Best of the EastSenior apts. 55 + older Or

mobility impaired.Immed. occup. Newly reno-vated apts. Secure building.

Service CoordinatorVisiting physicians.

513-831-3262tty 1-800-750-0750

Milford VillageSpacious, 1BR, updated,

redecorated, quiet, clean,ht/wtr pd, wooded setting,

walk to stores, $695.513-519-8512

Mt Carmel 1 br $450Wmsbrg 1-2br $425+Eqpt Kit. New crpet.

283-5569/528-2632

Mt. Washington - 1 & 2BRs,1BA, on busline, hdwd flrs,lndry on site, wtr incl,window a/c units, 513-313-2709

NORWOOD--Fully Furnished.Clean, TV w/cable.

1 person. Non-smoker.$100+dep. 513-731-4008

TAYLOR MILL -O X F O R DHILLS 1&2BR apts.2 Mo. FreeRent on a 1 Year Lease$570/mo up to $830/mo.Dep Special! $210 859-431-5754

Batavia- 2 BR, 1.5 BA, eqptkit, LR w/WBFP & cathedralceil, balc, w/d hkup, waterfurn. $650-700 + dep 513-658-5766, 513-831-5959

BEECHMONT- NR 275.Luxury 2-3BR townhome.2.5bath, eat-in-kit, w/d hkup,pvt patio, 1-2 car att gar, FP,From $925. 513-943-7800

EASTGATE NR- 2 BR, 2.5 BA,full bsmt, $825/mo. or withgarage $950/mo. 3 BR $1195.513-752-2888

Cherrygrove - 3BR, 2BA, LR,FR, half basement, 2 car car-port, lg fenced yard. no pets.$1000/mo. Call 513-553-1555

EASTGATE- Newly renovated3BR, fenced yard, $800+secdep. Call 513-753-4693

FAIRFAX- 2 & 3 br brickcolonial, eqpt kit, full bsmt, 1car gar, $950/mo. + dep. 513-831-5959, 658-5766

L O V E L A N D - 9993 UnionCemetery Rd. 2.6 Acres se-rene country setting. Freshlypainted, new carpeting, 3BR, 2 BA Cape Cod, lg deck,all new kit appls, $950 mo. +$950 sec. dep. 513-206-2684

PLEASANT RIDGEEng Tudor. 2.5 Bed. 2 Bath,

Fin. Bsmt. 1 Car Gar.$1050+Util. 513-777-0470

Hunt/rec - SE Indiana- 4 ac,pole bldg, creek, priv., lg

timber, lg camper w/utils,$38k. 812-216-7562

DEPENDABLE, honest &hardworking with referen-ces. Home health aide withover 30+ years experience.

incl. dementia &alzheimers. Available 24/7.

Call 513-658-1413,513-704-5551.

SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN

YMCA needs chilcareworkers for before school,during school, and afterschool hours. Must be 18with high school diplomaor GED. Apply online at

myy.org or email resumeto mevans@

cincinnatiymca.org

Child Care CenterHyde Park Area

Needs two experiencedcaregivers to assist with

infants, toddlers orpreschoolers

5 days a week. FT/PT.AM/PM. Must have HS

diploma or GED.513-631-2095.

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE

Cincinnati Officewww.hiscjobs.com

513-333-0563Weekend Positions

Guaranteed Hour Positions$10 per Hour and $11 per Hour

Positions

Bodyman & PainterSmall Auto Body Shop in searchof a combination Bodyman &Painter. Must be a self-starter,experienced in the field for at

least 5 years, and have reliabletransportation and references.

Qualified applicants only:apply at 291 Harmon Ave.

Lebanon or call 513-932-3551between the hours 8-12 and 1-5

Ask for Don Thomas.

Chemical TechnicianCincinnati Tri-County Area

Coatings Company seeks motivatedindividual for mixing and blendingwater based coatings. Knowledgeof chemistry a plus. Must be ableto lift 50 lbs.Technical backgroundA PLUS! Many benefits and good

starting wage. Must passbackground test.

E-mail General Manager [email protected]

The Cincinnati Enquirer has carrierroutes available in the following areas:

CentralSt. Bernard @ Walnut Hills @ Wyoming @ Avondale

EastAmelia / Batavia @ Bethel @ Brown County @ Goshen @

Hyde Park @ Madeira/Indian Hill/Milford/Loveland @ Montgomery / Silverton @ Oakley

WestColerain Twp. @ Groesbeck

Monfort Heights @ NorthsideWestern Hills / Westwood @ Wyoming

NorthFairfield @ Liberty Township @ Maineville @ Middletown

@ Morrow Mason @ Sharonville South Lebanon@ West Chester

KentuckyCold Spring @ Crescent Springs

Edgewood ErlangerFlorence / Burlington

Independence / Taylor MillPark Hills / Ft. Mitchell

Union @ Walton / Verona @ WarsawIndianaSt. Leon

Must be 18 with a valid drivers license and proof ofinsurance. If interested please call: 513-768-8134

Direct SupportProfessional

8-10 FT/PT staff needed forEast and West Side grouphome locations. 2nd , 3rdand weekend shifts. NeedHS diploma or GED, validOhio driver’s license andgood driving record. Paid

training provided.Apply in person at

CORE, Inc. Tri CountyParkway, Cincinnati, OH

45246 EOE

Heavy Equipment /Rock Drill Mechanic

Location: Williamsotwn, KY. Weare looking for a positive,

hardworking individual that is ateam player and works well withothers. Applicant must be wellversed in diesel and hydraulic

functions. 5+ years’ experience insimilar work. Must be able to work

flexible hours and holidays when needed. Benefitsinclude competitive hourly rate,

401(k) plan, health insurance. EOE

Email resume to [email protected]

JANITORIALPart time evening cleaner

needed in theMason/Kings Island areaSunday-Thursday after

6pm. 2-3 hours per clean.Call 513-315-0218

JANITORIALPart time evening cleanerneeded in the Milford areaM,W,F after 6pm. Approx

4 hours per clean.Call 513-553-6757

JANITORIALPart time evening cleanersneeded in the Sharonvillearea Mon-Fri after 5pm.

Approx. 5 hours per clean.IDEAL FOR COUPLES!

Call 513-315-0218

Landscape Laborers - Temporary,full-time 2/1/16-10/31/16. 30 jobsw/ GroundSystems, Inc., Blue Ash,

OH & Hebron, KY & job sites inBoone(KY), Kenton(KY),

Butler(OH), Clermont(OH),Hamilton(OH) & Warren(OH)

cntys. Use hand tools/equip. Laysod, mow/trim, edge, plant,

water, fertilize, dig, mulch & rake.Entry lvl; req’s suprvsn. No exp

req’d/will train. Lift/carry 50 lbs.,when nec. Post-accident & emplyr-

pd pre-employ drug & alcoholtest req’d. 40 hr/wk 7:30 AM-4 PMM-F. Sat./Sun. work req’d, when

nec. Wage is no less than$12.04/hr (OT varies @ $18.06/hr).Raise/bonus at emplr discretion.Transport (incl. meals &, as nec,

lodging) to place of employprovided or paid to wkrs residingoutside normal commute distance

by completion of 50% of jobperiod. Return transport provided

or paid to same wkrs if wkrcompletes job period or isdismissed early. Wkrs are

guaranteed offer of 3/4 of workhrs each 12-wk period. Tools,

supplies, equip, & uniformprovided at no cost. Emplr

provides incidental transport btwjob sites. Interview req’d. Email

resume [email protected] or

apply at: Ohio Means JobsCincinnati-Hamilton Cnty, 1916Central Pkwy., Cincinnati, OH

45214, (513) 946-7200.JO#3065888.

NOW HIRING

Property DamageInspectors

No Experience Required In-house training

provided Must have car

Call Bert 888-386-5551

WE HAVE MULTIPLE OPENINGS

No Experience NeededFull Training provided

Looking for MotivatedIndividuals to Start

ASAP

Call 513-906-4462

Group Home Manager

Group Home Manager needed.Work with people who have DD.Responsible for staff and servicedelivery supervision. Successful

applicant will have goodmanagement, organizational andpeople skills. 2-3 years supervisory

experience required.Intensive training and close supervision to start. Must

have diploma/GED, valid license,good driving record. Good

benefits and work atmosphere.Apply in person or send

resume toCORE, Inc. Tri County Parkway,

Cincinnati, OH 45246,Attention: Beth EOE

FLORAL DESIGNERExperienced Designer with flower

shop background. Creative,outgoing person. Good customer

service skills and attention todetail. Familiar with Point of Salesystems. At least 26 years of agewith good driving record. 30+

hrs/wk. Call Jackie: 513.520.9449

ROUTE SALESThe Schwebel Baking Company

is seeking experienced,aggressive, self-starters for its

Route Sales team in ourCincinnati, OH location.

This is a full-time position that isresponsible for selling andmerchandising Schwebel’scomplete line of quality

products to existing and newaccounts while driving aSchwebel’s bread truck.

Route Sales Representative’shours of work vary by assigned

route. Competitive base pay andcomprehensive benefits based onbread route sales. Great benefitspackage after probation period.

"**Please note that this jobprofile is not meant to be all

inclusive of the responsibilities ofthis position; individuals may

perform other duties as assignedor required.**

If interested, please apply onwww.schwebels.com/careers

or send a resume [email protected]. Please put

"Cincinnati Route Sales" inthe title."

RN’s needed for skilled focused, transitional care environment.

Must possess strong clinical, customer service &

organizational skills.Exp preferred. Competitive salary.

Health Insurance $98/mo.

Apply online to Apply online to join our team!join our team!

NursesFull Time, Part Time, PRN

2nd & 3rd Shift

www.carespring.com/employment

Looking for energetic, experienced and caring nursing assistants to join a great team!

We offer competitive wages, 8 & 12 hr shifts.

Health insurance $98/mo.Must be State Tested.

Apply online to Apply online to join our team!join our team!

Nurse AidesFull Time, Part Time, PRN

2nd & 3rd Shift

www.carespring.com/employment

AUCTION NOTICERt. 52 Ripley, OH.

Buying or Selling Call Today!Sun. Dec. 6th 10:00

Inspection Sat. 5th 10:00New Building Material +

Incl. Lg. Amount of Hardwood Flooring- Kitchen Cabinets-Lumber- Metal Roofing- Ins. Board- Windows- Doors- Trim-

Tile- Laminate Flr.- Area Rugs- More- LongabergerBaskets - Tables full of Closeout Items- 25 Christmas Trees

in Box- Rough Sawed Lumber some 20” Wide- SportsMemorabilia - Coins- Antiques- Collectables- Appliances-

Used Furniture- New Washer & Dryers- Church Pews-Apollo Choppers Rolling Chassis-

Call or See Web for List & Terms- 1st Time BuyersCash or Check w/Bank Letter of Credit-

Last Auction we Sold for 6.5 HoursTowler’s Auction ServiceRandy Myers Auctioneer

513-315-4360Towlersauctioninc.com

PUBLIC AUCTIONREAL ESTATE - ANTIQUES - FURN. -

CHINA - OLD COINS INCLUDES GOLD- TOOLS. SAT., DEC. 5 TH. 10:30 A.M.

10365 CURT LN., MONTGOMERY,OHIO 45242. REAL ESTATE - (6) RM. -(3) BEDROOM BRICK SELLS AT 12:00NOON W/OWNERS CONFIRMATION

- TERMS $5,000.00 DOWN NONREFUNDALE - CO OP BROKERS -NORTH STAR REALTY - COMEY&SHEPHERD. TERMS - CASH OR

CHECK W/PROPER I.D..LOOK ON OUR WEB SITEFOR LG. AD W/PHOTO’S -

WWW.COXAUCTIONEERS.COM.AUCTIONEERS - JAMES COX - 513-

889-0500 - DELBERT COX - 513-738-3475 - C - 513-255-3200.

FOOD AVAIL.

DriverMulch manufacturing company

looking for Class A CDL driver with2 years dump trailer experience.Class B Driver for straight truck

deliveries. Wage based onexperience, 2point limit, M-F.

Please email resume to:[email protected]

513-831-0060

DRIVERS$3,000.00 Orientation CompletionBonus! Dedicated, Regional, OTR& Point to Point Lanes! Great Pay,

(New hires min 800.00/wk)! CDL-A 1yr. Exp. 1-855-314-1138

DRIVERSCDL-A, 1 yr. Guaranteed Home time.$1250 + per wk. & Benefits. MonthlyBonus program usually $500-$650.

No-Touch. 855-454-0392

Drivers CDL-A: LOCAL Lawrenceburg, IN!!Regional & OTR Home Weekends!

Sign-On Bonus!! Excellent Pay,Benefits! Drue Chrisman Inc.:

1-855-506-8599 x103

Childcare Teacher- Fairfield,OH, Part and Full time posi-tions. Become a part of ateam of teachers providingthe best start to a life-longjourney of learning to thechildren, families, and com-munity we serve. With acommitment to promotingthe quality of learning withthe individual child in mind.,(513)275-1269

KILL BED BUGS! Buy HarrisBed Bug Killers/KIT CompleteTreatment System.Available:Hardware Stores, The HomeDepot, homedepot.com

Professional Driver WantedFor Chrysler 300/Honda

Odyssey, Must BePre-Approved With UberSubject to Background/Criminal Record Check

859-322-1211

AUCTIONDEC. 5, 2015 9:30 A.M.

LOCATION:3760 WHEAT RIDGE RD.,WEST UNION, OH 45693

INSIDE AMISHCOMMUNITY BUILDING

ANTIQUESVISIT auctionzip.com #4988

for full list & pictures.AUCTIONEER:

HERBERT ERWIN937-544-8252

GREAT BUSINESS OPPTY.-Large store or office space,Mt. Carmel area, most utilsincl. 513-314-9230

ONSITE REAL ESTATE

THURSDAY EVEDEC 10 @ 7:00 PM3607 CRAWFORD ST.NEWTOWN, OH 45244

2144 sf home in the Village of Newtown,4 bdrms, 2.5 bths, 0.24 acre corner lot,built in 1997. PID # 5010006004700.

HIGHEST BID WILL BE PUT ON CONTRACT

AUCTION

SempleSells.com

Go to Website for Preview Info.Brent Semple, Auctioneer513.724.1133

Greenhills Shows Open Every Weekend

StartingSat Dec. 5th Sun Dec 6th, Flea Market on SaturdaysAntique Show on Sundays

Dealer costs: $15-$20 a table. FREE adm & park-ing. Food avail. 9am-4pm.

American Legion Hall,11100 Winton Rd.,Call 513-825-3099 For reservations

Full length Revillon ranchmink. $12,000 new. Asking$1,950. Call 513-818-8086

Firewood- Premium seas-oned hardwoods, $90 ½cord.

Includes delivery513-633-8339

New oil tank. 275 gal. Used 1season. Orig $800, will sellfor $400. 513-225-7416

Beautiful, like new, full din-ing rm set manufactured byone of America’s finest furni-ture makers: American ofMartinsville. Please call 513-602-9998

BEDROOM --4 pc Queen,$900; Rolltop desk, $500.

Various other items.513-247-9159

Corner computer desk,chests of drawers, entnmtcenter, oak desk, asst chairs,reducing furniture inventory,$10-50. Make offer. 513-851-2674 [email protected]

SC O O T E R - -Victory Series. Neverused. Car carrier included. Orig$3000, sacrifice $1800. 513-382-8364after 6pm.

#1 ALWAYS BUYING-RetiredVet pays top cash for anti-ques and vintage items. Sin-gle item or complete estate513-325-7206

#1 BUYER OF WWI, WWII, Civil War & Vietnam

US, German, Japanese &Special Forces

MILITARY RELICSWill consider any militaryitem depending on type,

condition & history. [email protected]

Don’t Let Other AdsFool You.

Call 513-309-1347

BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS &CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES,ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B &REGGAE 513-683-6985

JOBS HOMES RIDESPETS &STUFF

Toplace your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifiedsClassifiedscincinnati.com

CHECKOUTCLASSIFIEDonline at cincinnati.com

DECEMBER 2, 2015 μ NORTHEAST - COMMUNITY μ 1

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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OFFICIAL PUBLICATION

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONCASH PAID for unopenedunexpired Diabetic Strips. Upto $35 per 100. 513-377-7522

www.cincytestrips.com

I BUY OLD ELECTRONICS: StereoEquip. Radio speakers guitar amp.

Records (513) 473-5518

Kindergarten Teaching Ma-terials, New teacher is seek-ing out Kindergarten teach-ing materials. If you’re a re-tired primary grades teacherand are willing to sell yourmanipulative, learning cen-ters, and other items. CallLiz, up to $100.(937)474-1160 [email protected]

Ohio Valley Veneer Cashbuyers of Standing Timber.Specializing in walnut, ash &hard maple. FREE estimates.Must be at least 15 ac ormore. Cut on shares also.Don Dewey 740-357-4008

WE ARE LOCAL COLLECTORSLOOKING FOR OLD TOYS- ES-PECIALLY STAR WARS! Wepay CASH for toys made inthe 1980s, 70s, 60s and earli-er, and can come to YOU!Buying STAR WARS, Trans-formers, GI JOE, Alien,M.A.S.K., He-Man, and mostother action figure-relatedtoys older than 1994. WEARE LOOKING FOR EX-KENNER and HASBRO EM-PLOYEES who have uniqueitems like service awards andpre-production items likeprototypes, quote or packag-ing samples, catalogs, paintguides, sculpts or molds.Have a Kenner EmployeePhone Book? We give youup to $300 Cash for it! WEARE BUYING ALL YEARLONG, so please save this adfor when you clean out yourgarage, closet, or attic! Wewill pay thousands of dollarsfor the right items. Call ortext 513.477.2557 or513.324.6563 or email us at [email protected]. We can meet within 24hours in most cases. Pleaseleave a voicemail if we don’tanswer.

AKC French Bulldog pups,Male and Female,$1700.00, 8 weeks, creamand brindle, 1st shots andwormings, 2 females (brin-dle) and 1 male (cream)available, POP can deliver(740)289-9625 [email protected]

Brittany pups-2 females, 11wks AKC reg, vet ckd, shots,tails docked, dew claws re-moved. $600. (859)[email protected]

CAVALIER KING CHARLES -A.K.C. World’s most undis-covered dog. Amazing, lov-ing lap dogs. Have all colors.Some ready now. Rest readyXmas. $1000. Call 513-404-1622

Cavapoo-$500, 8 month oldMale, Black, Very friendlyand great w/kids. 1st yearshots complete, incl: cratefood, toys 513-240-3883

GOLDEN DOODLE F1B -puppies, standard,

male/female, POP, vetchecked. 513-553-1674.

goldendoodlevalley.com

Jack Russell - 8 weeks old,cute & small, 1st shots &wormed, dew claws re-moved, tails docked, lots ofcolor. $250. 513-625-9774

Manchester terrier puppies -AKC, 3 sets of puppy shots,vet checked, POP. Call 513-683-1866

Sphinx cat - neutered, 12mos old, good w/kids & oth-er pets, for more info 765-238-0810 [email protected]

Westie- CKC, Ped champs, M& F, $650-725, 8 wks, papers,POP, shots, small, does notshed. 513-827-7744, 513-284-2487. [email protected]

Buying All Vehicles Not Just Junk $200-$2000and more. Fair cash price,quick pickup. 513-662-4955

BUYING TOYOTAAND MERCEDES

Most years & models;need service records,

fair prices paid.Paul Padget’sVintage Sales

(513) 821-2143 Since 1962

NISSAN Versa ’10. 40 mpg,96K mi, 5 spd, 4 cyl, FWD,winterized, good in snow, dkblue, mint cond, $5500/OBO.Hurry won’t last! 513-885-2222

Toyota Camry XLE ’04 - 100kmiles, black, very good cond,lthr seats, 4cyl, sun rf, htdseats. $6650. Call 859-468-4616

1 9 3 0 ’ s & up Muscle Cars,Classics & Vettes wanted.Paying Top Market Value513-500-1828

1 BUYER OF OLD CARSCLASSIC, ANTIQUE ’30-40-50-60-70s,Running or not.

513-403-7386

LEGAL NOTICE The following legislation has been adopted by Loveland’sCity Council:2015-83 Resolution approving the release of the Perform-ance Bond for infrastructure for the White Pillars Subdivi-sion 2015-84 Ordinance to make revisions to appropriations forexpenditures of the City of Loveland, State of Ohio, duringthe fiscal year ending December 31, 2015 2015-85 Ordinance providing for the issuance of $550,000 ofspecial obligation renewal notes by the City of Loveland,Ohio, for the purpose of property acquisition, and providingfor the pledge of revenues for the payment of such notes 2015-86 Ordinance amending the salary ceilings and au-thorized positions of non-union City employees for 2016 2015-87 Ordinance amending Loveland Code of Ordinan-ces Chapter 111 Schedule of Fees, Fines, and other charges2015-88 Ordinance authorizing all actions necessary to sup-port the continuation of a governmental Natural Gas Aggre-gation Program with Opt-out provisions pursuant to Section4929.26 of the Ohio Revised Code, directing the City Manag-er to extend the supply agreement with Interstate Gas Sup-ply, Inc. to continue a Natural Gas Aggregation Programbeyond march 31, 2016, when the current supply agreementends 2015-89 Ordinance assessing liens for unpaid utility billson property in Clermont County owed to the City for Love-land and declaring an emergency 2015-90 Ordinance assessing liens for unpaid utility billson property in Hamilton County owed to the City of Love-land and declaring an emergency

Misty Cheshire,Clerk of CouncilCity of Loveland

The above listed legislation is available for inspection atthe City Manager’s office, 120 West Loveland Avenue, Love-land, Ohio during normal office hours. 891512

PUBLICATION OF LEGISLATION

On September 8, 2015, the Council of the Village ofNewtown passed the following legislation:Resolution #35-2015 appointing the Mayor as the OfficialRepresentative for the State Capital Improvement ProjectFunding.On September 22, 2015, the Council of the Village ofNewtown passed the following legislation:Ordinance #13-2015 approving and establishing rules andregulations for Lake Barber.Ordinance #14-2015 increasing the rate of pay for employeeCharles Morgan.Ordinance #15-2015 appointing John Knuf as Street Commis-sioner and Cemetery Sexton for the Village.Ordinance #16-2015 establishing the salary for the newlyhired Maintenance Supervisor/Street Commissioner/Cemetery Sexton.Resolution #36-2015 approving change order #5 for the con-tract with John P. Tumlin & Sons in the amount of $1,320.Resolution #37-2015 approving change order #6 for the con-tract with John P. Tumlin & Sons in the amount of $2,640.Resolution #38-2015 approving a contract with the Cincin-nati Museum Center for a loan of a mammoth tusk.The complete text of the legislation may be obtained orviewed at the office of the Fiscal Officer of the Village ofNewtown, 3537 Church Street, Newtown, Ohio 45244. 878099

In accordance with the pro-visions of State law, therebeing due and unpaid charg-es for which the undersignedis entitled to satisfy an own-er and/or manager’s lien ofthe goods hereinafter descri-bed and stored at the UncleBob’s Self Storage location(s) listed below. And, duenotice having been given, tothe owner of said propertyand all parties known toclaim an interest therein,and the time specified insuch notice for payment ofsuch having expired, thegoods will be sold at publicauction at the below statedlocation(s) to the highestbidder or otherwise disposedof on Monday, December 21,2015 @ 1PM 2950 RobertsonAve Cincinnati OH 45209 513-631-0290

Anthony Palmenter 1212 Corbett Ave

Cincinnati, OH 45208Clothes/TV/Furniture

Aaron Rayford1872 Kinney Ave

Cincinnati, OH 45207Household Goods/Furniture,

TV/Stereo Equipment

Keli Swejkar4508 Sycamore Rd

Cincinnati, OH 45236Household Goods/Furniture,TV/Stereo Equipment, Tools/

Appliances, Landscaping/Construction Equipment

Catherine Williams221 Harvey Ct Cinti,OH 45217Household Goods/Furniture

876664

Public Hearing NotificationThe Clermont County Boardof Developmental Disabili-ties will hold a public hear-ing on Tuesday, December 8from 4:00-5:00 p.m. to re-ceive input from interestedindividuals that will be con-sidered in the developmentof the 2016 Annual ActionPlan. A draft copy of thisplan will be available to thepublic prior to the hearingand will be posted on theClermont DD website (www.clermontdd.org). If you can-not attend the meeting butwish to provide comments/feedback for the 2016 Annu-al Action Plan, you may doso by calling (513) 732-4921or by sending an e-mail to [email protected]. TheClermont County Board ofDevelopmental Disabilitiesappreciates the input it re-ceives each year; it contin-ues to be a pleasure to serveindividuals with develop-mental disabilities in ourcommunity. 854563

LEGAL NOTICESYMMES TOWNSHIP,HAMILTON COUNTY

The regular December 1,2015 meeting of the Board ofTrustees of SymmesTownship, Hamilton County,Ohio has been canceled andre-scheduled for Tuesday,December 8, 2015 at 7:00p.m. This meeting will beheld at the Township Admin.Bldg., 9323 Union CemeteryRoad.Carol A. SimsFiscal Officer 846808

FORTRESS CASTLE, LLC.Self-Storage

1233 Castle DriveMason, OH 45040

(513) 398-1515 Fax: (513) 398-2631

CARRIE M BUNTAIN,LAST KNOWN ADDRESS7324 BARRETT RD, WESTCHESTER, OH BIN C11.STEPHANIE WARD, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 6772BUTLER WARREN RD,MASON, OH BIN C31.DERIK D RAPIER, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 5378DOGWOOD CIR S, MASON,OH BIN D25. KENNETHLEE CHAPPELL JR, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 312 SBROADWAY ST,LEBANON,OH BIN F27 & H46/47. STE-PHANIE R SLOAN, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 928CAMBRIDGE DR, MASON,OH BIN F29. TERRIEDELATTE, LAST KNOWNADDRESS 7545 MANSIONCIRCLE UNIT D, MASON,OH BIN H34/35. SANDY LWYNN, LAST KNOWN AD-DRESS 6695 S BROOK-VILLE PIKE LOT 7, WESTCOLLEGE CORNER, INBIN N24. JONATHAN AWATKINS, LAST KNOWNADDRESS 1490 OLD 122 RD,LEBANON, OH BIN P07.YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-FIED THAT YOUR PER-SONAL PROPERTY NOWIN STORAGE AT FOR-TRESS CASTLE STORAGEIN MASON, OHIO MAY BEOBTAINED BY YOU FORTHE BALANCE DUE PLUSALL OTHER EXPENSESWITHIN 15 DAYS OF THISNOTICE OR THE PROPER-TY WILL BE SOLD ATPUBLIC SALE. THE LASTDAY TO OBTAIN YOURPROPERTY IS D E C E M -BER 17, 2015 BY 8:30 AM(EST) . AUCTION TO BEHELD AT 9:00 AM (EST);THURSDAY, DECEMBER17, 2015, AT 1233 CASTLEDRIVE, MASON, OH. 888400

FORTRESS CASTLE, LLC.SELF STORAGE

697 STATE ROUTE 28MILFORD, OH 45150

(513) 831-9150FAX: (513) 831-9154

PATRICK MURPHY, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 11 ROBBIE RIDGE #11, MILFORD, OH. BIN 4,5,6. THO-MAS FINN, LAST KNOWNADDRESS: 5881 WADE RD.,MILFORD, OH. BIN 8,9.EMILY SHANNON, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 7833YMCA RD. CINCINNATI,OH. BIN 22. JAMES HEL-TON, JR., LAST KNOWNADDRESS: 608 COMMONSDR. MILFORD, OH. BIN34,35. AMY BECK, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 1031STATE ROUTE 28 APT 1,MILFORD, OH. BIN 153.REBECCA DeLONG, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 29CEMETERY RD, MILFORD, OH. BIN 154,155.BRITTANY CATAURO,LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:6066 ST. RT. 132, GOSHEN,OH. BIN 171. TYLER ANDTROY BROWN, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 2997 US50, BATAVIA, OH. BIN203,204,205. CASSANDRAMARES, LAST KNOWN AD-DRESS: 900 MOHAWKTRAIL APT 9, MILFORD,OH. BIN 224. JOHNHOEFKER, LAST KNOWNADDRESS: 506 MAIN ST,MILFORD, OH. BIN 230.JESSICA RAVENSCRAFT,LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:5805 HUTCHINSON RD. BA-TAVIA, OH. BIN 234. STE-PHANIE ZAPF, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 6 CHA-TEAU PL. APT 5.MILFORD, OH. BIN 246.YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-FIED THAT YOUR PER-SONAL PROPERTY NOWIN STORAGE AT FOR-TRESS CASTLE STORAGEIN MILFORD, OHIO MAYBE OBTAINED BY YOUFOR THE BALANCE DUEPLUS ALL OTHER EX-PENSES WITHIN 15 DAYSOF THIS NOTICE OR THEPROPERTY WILL BESOLD AT PUBLIC SALE.THE LAST DAY TO OB-TAIN YOUR PROPERTY ISDECEMBER 16TH, 2015 BY8:30 AM (EST). AUCTIONTO BE HELD AT 9:00AM(EST); WEDNESDAY,DECEMBER 16TH, 2015 AT697 STATE ROUTE 28,MILFORD, OH. 888486

HANDOUT THECIGARS!Celebratewith aannouncement.

VISITCLASSIFIEDSonline at cincinnati.com

UPDA

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ALL

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NOW THAT’SREFRESHING.

THE NEWS ISALWAYS CHANGING.SO AREWE.VISIT US ONLINE TODAY

GOT EXTRASTUFF?

VISITCLASSIFIEDSonline at cincinnati.com

Put it up for sale.

Great Buys

Garage Salesneighborly deals...

ANDERSON-“ Rummage Sale Friday,December 4th, 9AM to 2PM and Sat-urday, December 5th, 9AM to Noon,Comboni Mission Ctr, 1318 Nagel Rd(behind post office). $6.00/bag:Christmas items, furniture, collecti-bles, clothing and household items.”

Crestview Hills, KY - 2740Mansion Pl. Short notice -Sunday only sale! 12/6 -10am-5pm. Contents of 2stry home 7 basement.Sterling, 3 sets of china,hummels, costume jewelry,cut glass, figurines, furs,signed artwork, dining rmtbl & china cabinet, pictures,desk, couch, rocker recliners,misc tbls & chairs, lamps,coffee & end tbls, credenza,books, records, electronics,full & twin beds, metal shelv-ing, book shelves, lots ofmisc. Too much to list, allpriced to sell. Info & picshsestatesales.com or 859-468-9468. Dir: Dixie Hwy toLookout Farms Dr. to Man-sion Pl.

Ft. Wright, KY - 1420 EastHenry Clay Ave. 12/4 & 12/5,Fri - 9a-4p. #’s @ 845am. Sat9a-4p. Contents of 2 stryhome & basement. Sterling,costume jewelry, jewelrychest, full beds, dressers,chest of drawers, nightstands, book shelves, rocker,corner shelf, coffee & endtbls, couch, chairs, dining &kitchen tbl, china hutch,server, old cabinets, lamps,pictures, mirrors, micro-waves, entertainment center,records, washer, dryer, pow-er & hand tools, patio furn,heavy duty sewing mach, lotsof misc. Too much to list, allpriced to sell. Info & picshsestatesales.com or 859-468-9468. Dir: Kyles Ln toEast Henry Clay Ave.

GLENDALE-- 60 yrs of accumulatedtreasures incl: roll top desk, woodenfile cab, dictionary stand, 4 diningchrs, rocking chr, comp desk, refrig,Cuisinart, Weber grill, cookbks, beersteins, ext ladder, elect saw, misctools, much more. Sat Dec 5th, 9am-4pm. 24 Brandywine Dr.

P i e r c e Twp-Moving Sale,903 Winged Foot Way, Fri: 8-5, Sat: 8-5, pool tbl w/acces.,pub tbl w/4 chrs, airhockey,slot machine, pokertbl, chess tbl,dining rm set,bed rm set, 2 display cabi-nets, gas pressure washer,Roseville pottery, BB cards,die cast cars many moreitems all high quality Dir:Legendary Run Clermont Cty

Garage & Yard SaleVISIT: cincinnati.com/classifiedsTO PLACE YOUR AD

GOTEXTRASTUFF?VISITCLASSIFIEDSonline at cincinnati.com

Put it up for sale.

House cleaning - years of ex-perience. Take pride in work.Reliable & honest. Referen-ces. 513-313-5349

HANDYMANNo job too big or small incl.electrical. Call Bob & com-

pare. 513-248-2130

CE-000

0634

989

High & Hard to ReachFREE ESTIMATES

Fully Insured777-8719

Int/Ext.Painting

A & J Tree RemovalBrush Removal & Fire Wood.Fully Insured. 513-325-5172

CHECKOUTCLASSIFIEDonline at cincinnati.com

CALL: 513-421-6300TO PLACE YOUR AD

Service Directory

DECEMBER 2, 2015 μ NORTHEAST - COMMUNITY μ 3

Page 24: Loveland herald 120215

ONLYCARS.COMHELPS YOUGETTHE RIGHTCAR,WITHOUTALL THEDRAMA.

4 μ NORTHEAST - COMMUNITY μ DECEMBER 2, 2015


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