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M.ARCH STUDIO HANDBOOK 2016-17 Queens University Belfast Architecture School of Natural and Built Environment M.Arch Programme Directors: Gary A. Boyd and Colm Moore
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Page 1: M.ARCH STUDIO HANDBOOK - Queen's University · PDF fileM.ARCH STUDIO HANDBOOK. 2016-17 Queens University Belfast Architecture. ... beginning of M.Arch I and then again at the beginning

M.ARCH STUDIO HANDBOOK

2016-17Queens University BelfastArchitectureSchool of Natural and Built EnvironmentM.Arch Programme Directors: Gary A. Boyd and Colm Moore

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NOTE: This handbook is designed to provide information for the students enrolled on the M.Arch Architecture Programme and as such it is a guidance document of the University. While we have tried to make the information contained in the handbook as accurate as possible, the University reserves the right to revise, alter, or discontinue courses of study, and to amend the statutes and regulations at any time without notice. Students are advised to consult the relevant sections of the University Regulations – please refer to the following link:

http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/media/Media,408970,en.pdf

This handbook is also be available on the School web pages at www.qub.ac.uk/schools/NBE and is also available in alternative formats on request, including large print, Braille, tape, audio CD and Daisy CD. For further information, please contact the University’s Publications and Website Unit on +44 (0)28 9097 5332.

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CONTENTS

04Facilities

05

06

07

Support

Health & Safety

Appendix

01Introduction

02

03Communication

Assessment, Marking, Awards

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01Welcome to the M.ARCH Programme in Architecture at the School of Natural and Built Environment at Queen’s University Belfast. Whilst it will be of most benefit to those joining the course, it is also intended as a reminder and update for all students on the programme. You will have separately received documentation from the University relating to regulations, support services and other information. These introductory notes are offered as a simple guide to the Programme. They are intended to highlight important aspects and to indicate how to obtain more information. The complete regulations are contained in the General Regulations, University Calendar available for consultation in the Science Library or on the Queen’s website at: www.qub.ac.uk/calendar or specific enquiries may be made in the School’s General Office in the David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road. Queen’s University has offered degrees in architecture since 1965 when the Department of Architecture was founded within the Faculty of Applied Science and Technology. Architectural education in the QUB School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering has a longstanding tradition in advancing and teaching interdisciplinary design with emphasis on technology and culture. It is has many international links allowing students to study abroad and excellent relationships with the profession and the building industry in general.

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Architecture currently occupies 15 Chlorine Gardens and the David Keir Building on Stranmillis Rd. All written correspondence must be sent to the address below:

Architecture, School of Natural and Built EnvironmentQueens University, BelfastDavid Keir BuildingStranmillis RoadBelfastBT9 5AG

Tel: (028) 90974006 (direct line to the School Office). The University emergency number is extension 2222e-mail: [email protected] page: www.qub.ac.uk/schools/NBE

Photo: Gary A. Boyd - ArcSoc Lecture by Alan Jones

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Image: ‘Elevation Study’

by Pippa SouthallMArch 2

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INTRODUCTION to the Master of Architecture (M.ARCH) Programme

The Master in Architecture (M.ARCH) is a two-year full-time taught postgraduate programme recognised as meeting Part II examination and membership requirements of the RIBA and ARB: it is the second level towards becoming a chartered architect. This post-graduate programme is designed to allow students to develop their individual skills, knowledge, and sensibility in architecture, and provides support for students to determine the direction of their own education through their choice of dissertation, electives, and thesis subject.

The M.ARCH programme at Queen’s is focused on the perception, physicality, and built reality of space and the programme’s particular identity stems from its context within Belfast and Northern Ireland – a city and region with a strong background in artefact, its production and physicality. That identity is further reinforced by Architecture’s placement within the School of Natural and Built Environment at Queen’s with its very significant close relationship with industry. The Centre for Built Environment Research is the vehicle for architectural research within the school providing a multi-disciplinary platform within an international network. This is a studio-based programme, underscoring design and design processes as the core concerns. The two–year programme comprises four semesters. The staff cohort represents a wide spectrum of significant professional and academic experience and interests, and is supported by inputs from a variety of academics, practitioners, and consultants from beyond Queen’s to provide a further dimension to a stimulating educational environment.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS

The M.ARCH postgraduate programme aims to equip the graduate with the attributes, knowledge and skills that provide the foundation for a career as an architect providing students with the opportunity to develop the following abilities:

- to evolve a developed personal attitude to the discipline and practice of architecture.- to demonstrate a high level of intellectual rigour, creative design, communication, artistic and technical ability.- to develop a critical interest and enthusiasm for the subject, its culture and cultural context, history and related areas.- to understand the cultural, social, economic and physical environments within which they will work and live- to function as a useful team member in professional contexts.- to respond, with initiative, to changing concerns in the industry at home and abroad.- to achieve a level of excellence in that which they undertake.

The M.ARCH Programme Specification establishes the RIBA/ARB Part 2 criteria as being the minimal educational criteria which apply to this Programme. You are advised to refer to the criteria at;

http://www.architecture.com/Files/RIBAProfessionalServices/Education/Validation/RIBAValidationCriteriafromSeptember2011Parts1,2 & 3.pdf

Please also refer to the Programme Specification which is an appendix to this document.

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M.ARCH COURSE STRUCTURE

In line with other QUB postgraduate courses, the M.ARCH Programme in Queen’s has a modular structure organised across two Stages (years). One academic year, e.g. Stage 5 (M.ARCH 1), consists of 120 credit units, across 2 semesters. Students must complete all of the Stage 5 (M.ARCH1) modules successfully before undertaking any of Stage 6 (M.ARCH 2). Not withstanding the distinct structure of the different Stages and Modules, the M.ARCH programme is delivered as an integrated programme characterised by semester.

M.ARCH MODULES

STAGE 5

Module Code Credits Co-ordinator ARC7022 30 MArch Studio 1 Gary A. Boyd ARC7023 30 Technology Dissertation Nuala FloodARC7017 30 Humanities Dissertation Agustina Martire ARC7016 30 MArch Studio 2 Gary A. Boyd

M.ARCH DEGREE CLASSIFICATION

When you have successfully gained 240 credit units in approved modules, (120 in each of the two years), you are eligible for the M.ARCH degree award. The calculation for the award classification is based on the following weightings for those students first enrolled in the M.ARCH Programme from 2010 onwards:

Stage 5 33%

Stage 6 66%

STAGE 6

Module Code Credits Co-ordinator

ARC7018 10 Studio as Laboratory Gary A. BoydARC7019 20 Thesis Project I Gary A. BoydARC7020 60 Thesis Project II Gary A. BoydARC7021 30 Thesis Research Gary A. Boyd

ARC7027 Professional Skills Module not active until 2017

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M.ARCH STAFF

We pride ourselves on having the strongest possible team teaching at postgraduate level, with backgrounds in both theory and practice.

Studio is divided up into five thematic studio groups which collectively encompass a broad range of approaches to architectural design. Each led by a pair of tutors, the groups also feature an external ‘consultant’ who will contribute to teaching at strategic moments throughout the programme. The focus of the M.Arch is to investigate and develop the relationships between critical practice, design and research in the making of architectural proposals. The thematic groups, therefore, will reflect the expertise and preoccupations of the tutors and consultants involved. Accordingly, the briefs developed and the work produced become a collaborative investigation between practitioners, students and academics into some of the spatial issues affecting the production of the built environment, both on this island and elsewhere. Students will be offered a choice of unit at the beginning of M.Arch I and then again at the beginning of M.Arch II, their thesis year. It is imagined that they will choose a different group each year to make the most of the breadth and the depth offered by the unit system. Choices will also be offered for the humanities and technologies dissertations.

Studio themes 2016-17 (titles are provisional)

Edge and Thickness Economy intermodal Making Belfast Without Precedent

Michael McGarry and Rachel Delargy Colm Moore and Tom O’Brien

Gary Boyd and Greg KeeffeAlan Jones, Agustina Martire and Theo Dales

Ruth Morrow and Robert Jamison

TIMETABLES

The Year Map gives the overall structure of the two semesters and the timing of events like crits. This document is continually revised throughout the year to reflect any unavoidable changes to programme etc. It is available on QOL.

Please also note the weekly timetable:Tuesday Studio (all year)Wednesday Humanities Dissertation (all year)Thursday Studio and Technology Dissertation (all year)

For information about the general university calendar see:www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/AcademicStudentAffairs/AcademicAffairs/SemesterDates/SemesterDates2013-14/

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02Staff will make every effort to inform you about what is happening in the School and will use a variety of media to keep you up to date with any on-going developments in your modules or other learning opportunities. Information will be made available to students through the following formats: Queens Online and QUB Email. The School makes extensive use of Queen’s Online (QOL) to make available learning resources and will be a first line of communication with students via e-mail and broadcast messages. You should make yourself familiar with this system as soon as possible and contact a member of staff if you require any further guidance on using the system. Please note that it is your responsibility to regularly check your QUB email account for messages from staff. There are also notice board areas in the design studios where information about reviews, upcoming lectures may be posted. Again it is your responsibility to regularly check these notice boards.

School Website and Architecture Blog: The School Website is a critical information resource for students. Please consult for information on undergraduate modules, staff research interests and teaching, and up-to-date notices: www.qub.ac.uk/schools/NBE. Architecture also has its own Blog – please follow it online at http://blogs.qub.ac.uk/architecture/. The QUB M.ARCH facebook page is a very useful site to browse past student works, and stay in touch with the broader community of QUB students and graduates.

Written communication: the School may write directly to you in certain instances. It is therefore critical vital that your recorded contact details are kept up to date.

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Image: ‘ Jobcentre - A Typological Study’

by Emma Campbell - MArch 2

1800

3000

1450

1200

1800

450

1000

staff safe room

1450

2800

glazed public privacy screen

public waiting zone

public concourse

screen break for staff discourse

calendars,diaries,lists

forms,leaflets,rotas,

booth numbers

a. nino allocation line - three way call with an interpreterto get national insurance numberb. stepni - arrange interpreter for JSA appointmentc. call security to halt aggressive behaviour

customer zone - chairs angled inwardsfabric screens between for audio privacy

lockable storage

lockable storage

no english = telephone interaction

job search kiosk=reduction of advisory staff

lockable storage

ticket number called

ticket number flashes

desk acts as a barrier between staff and public

deep desks provide additional security

Welcome

Wel

com

e

Jobs & Benefits

cctvin

operation

no smoking

children shouldbe supervised

at all times

If you need assistanceplease ask

here

The newstate

pension iscoming

please take a ticket and

have a seat

2200mm high metal and barbed wire fensebeside pedestrian pathway, with in builtmetal gates open between 10-4:30pm forPUBLIC entrance ONLY

Physical disconnection between street andbuilding

security at entrance, deep desk to buffer interface with the public

rounded traffic mirrors to anticipate public movement

shelving disguises other staff members behind

welcome desk with metal bars to increase depth between staff and public.

Staff stand to greet, sitting down they are unseen

universal access desk

Welcome

1000

visual connection between security checkpoints

surve

illanc

e

5-20 minute wait

1200

500

screen bulk

heating and air-conditioning controlled in external central office.

Ring centre to put heating on

600mmx600mm ceiling tilessoft spot lighting in bulk headed areas

1:20 detail of jbo desking system

8-15 appointments daily for social fund

support,interpreter,agent,relative,peer decision maker,

representativecolleague,advisor

dissected jobcentre

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Event (re)AnimationPlan

1:200

By developing a grid from both Donegall Street and North Street a natural order of the infrastructure becomes apparent and thoroughfares similar to entries of Commercial Court and the Cathedral Quarter, allowing for the public space to be carved out of the centre of the scheme whilst giving a sense of square and piazza to be created and to provide a tangible link to the unsuccessful Writers’ Square. By creating new life to the area, Writers Square will develop and start to flourish due to the increase of pedestrian traffic. To maximise the pedestrian flow, Donegall Street from the Cathedral will become pedestrianised, this creates a

safe and connected streetscape for the Cathedral Quarter.

This thesis is a study of events; what an event is, and how to develop architecture to setup events. A scheme has developed that works with the nuances and idiosyncrasies of the site; by using the history of where the city has come from, and where it is heading. I have developed a site specific collection of buildings

that collaborate with one another, growing roots into the urban realm of the Cathedral Quarter.

Alongside this collective of buildings that act as one and adding a deeper level of civic infrastructure to the area, I have looked at how the facade can set up the rhythm of a space, due to the iterative and fragmented nature of the building. By providing a rigid structural system the spaces within can become useful;

spaces can evolve, develop and take on a new life and program, within the infrastructure provided.

Image: Event (re)Animation

by Mark GloverMArch 2

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FEEDBACK FROM STUDENTS

Your views on the programme are important in order to help us develop the programme to its full potential; there are a number of ways for you to provide feedback.

Talk Directly to Staff. In particular your Module Coordinators (i.e. the person responsible for an individual module of study) and/or the Programme Director (i.e. the person with responsibility for the M.ARCH) or other members of the School staff named in this handbook – If you feel that something is wrong or malfunctioning, tell us directly.

Talk to SSCC representatives. Each Stage nominates representatives to the Staff Student Consultative Committee. Please make sure you know who represents you on SSCC and make sure they know your views. Evaluation Questionnaires are handed out on the completion of each Semester to allow you to give feedback on each module. This is an important part of the annual cycle of the course. Your constructive feedback helps us develop modules year on year.

TEACHING METHODS

The course divides into two main forms of teaching. Design Studio Modules and Taught Modules (with Critique and the Study Trip as essential components of the Design Studio).

The Design Studio accounts for majority of the curriculum of the M.ARCH Programme. It is a creative, productive space where learning from lecture courses can be tested and applied. The Design Studio is structured around a series of projects varying in complexity and length. Some projects will be carried out in groups, others as individuals. Teaching and learning relies on a combination of small group discussion and one-to-one tutorials. Much is learnt though discussion with your peers, both within your own stage and others. Your time in the Design Studio should be used either to work on the projects or reflect on the project through discussion.

Taught Modules include formal and interactive teaching methods. Most courses are supported by substantial notes and back-up material normally made available on Queen’s Online (QOL). However you will also (unless told otherwise by staff) be required to take notes and make annotated sketches of the lectures you attend. Module hand-outs will give you a list of essential and/or recommended references. Managing your timetable to allow for ‘library’ time is critical as reading in, around and about your architectural preoccupations will infinitely enrich them.

Critique is a core process in the development of an architect. This will occur in small informal groups or in a more formalised review session. You should come prepared to reviews, having adequate means to communicate your design ideas (drawing, models, photomontage, film etc.) and having identified areas that you wish in particular to have feedback on. Ask someone else to take notes on your behalf so that you leave the review with a clear list of issues that you can address.

The structured Study Trip occurs in as part of the ARC7022 MArch Studio 1 Module in Stage 5 (MArch1). Attendance on the Trip is a compulsory component of the Module. Students are required to financially contribute to study visits. Study Trips are a highly valuable way for students to witness first hand the ideas and discussions that arise in lectures and design studio. A protocol for Study Trips is appended.

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Image: Stef Helm - MArch 2

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Image: Stef Helm - MArch 2

‘Design is not just what it

looks like and what

it feels like. Design is how

it works...’

Steve Jobs

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FEEDBACK TO STUDENTS

As the practice of architecture is not an exercise in certainty, but rather one governed by the architect’s own position which is in constant development, the formation of a student’s own well-informed judgement is one of the main educational goals of the M.ARCH programme. The studio is structured to facilitate a range of opportunities for students to engage with tutors to receive feedback and input into their project and work methodologies. Important in any of these conversations is for the students to understand that it is up to them to decide the way forward that is appropriate to them, and to their work. It should be noted that in the M.ARCH it is assumed that a certain level of ability has been built up during the year out and in Part 1 education, and so feedback will not necessarily be directed towards the specific resolution of aspects of the project, but will also be about what the overall position your work is adopting.

VERBAL FEEDBACK: DESK CONVERSATIONS

These will typically involve one tutor engaging with a single student or a very small group of students. Here the role of the tutor member is to provide a supportive sounding board to help the students progress their project. Key to these conversations being useful is the students having enough information to adequately describe the ambition and direction of the project, both in model and drawn form. These however, can be very much sketch or incomplete in nature. While these conversations are not marked, nor do they form any formal part in assessment, they do form a critical part of the educational programme for the year and persistent absences will be noted. They are also a useful part of identifying problems early and in avoiding more serious problems when it comes to assessed parts of the course.

VERBAL FEEDBACK: GROUP DISCUSSIONS

These will typically involve one or more tutors and a group of 5 or more students. In these situations it is imperative that students lead the discussions, there is no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ position, rather a debate in an open manner with the tutors providing their input when required. Similar to desk conversations these act as sounding boards for a body of work across several students, or to discuss an issue or skill. Again they do not form a formal part of assessment but do form a critical part of the educational programme for the year and persistent absences will be noted.

VERBAL FEEDBACK: OTHER DISCUSSIONS

There are a range of other discussions that may occur on a studio day, with tutors available. Students should be comfortable approaching them for a brief word if the tutor is free. These conversations are best if the student has a specific concern or question that they need discussed.

VERBAL FEEDBACK: REVIEWS

Reviews are structured to provide a formal and public discussion of work. Tutors and critics will respond in an objective and critical manner to the work presented. Reviews therefore provide an opportunity for the school to air and discuss a student’s overall direction and progress as well as that of the course as a whole. While the conversations concerning a student’s own work are clearly important and students should make arrangements to note the major points of the discussion, the review is a day-long event such the most useful conversations may not only be the ones that specifically refer to your own work, but also those that concern other students and so you should listen in to as many reviews as possible. Attendance at these events is mandatory, as is complying with submission requirements set by the programme.

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VERBAL FEEDBACK: INTERVIEWS

Periodically tutors may arrange private interviews with a panel of 2 or more tutors. These allow for a private conversation to take place that will typically not deal with the specifics of a student’s project work, but rather their education as a whole. In general, except where specifically noted, the student should not prepare specific work for these interviews, but may be asked to bring a sample of work from the semester. These interviews are not assessed, and as such are a good forum to air concerns.

WRITTEN FEEDBACK

The formation of a student’s own well-informed judgement is one of the main educational goals of the Post Graduate programme. As such it is not the practice at post-graduate level to give specific written feedback on a student’s project work. If there are specific concerns arising about progress during a semester written feedback may be provided to raise concerns with the student.

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Image: Stefan DowneyMArch 2

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03Assessment occurs through a variety of methods in architecture. Specific methods of assessment are chosen to suit the learning outcomes of the module and the nature and balance of the assessment is outlined in each of the module guides. Lecture-based modules may be assessed through course work, take-home examination or formal examination or a combination of these. In the case of studio-based modules the marks allocated to component projects within a module are roughly proportional to the time allocated to each project, although individual work is normally weighted more heavily overall than group work. Students are normally required to attain a pass for each individual project within the module in order to pass the module overall. The pass mark at postgraduate level is 50%. Provisional indicative marks for assessed work are generally issued for first semester modules in January and the marks for all modules in the stage are finalised at the External Examination Board Meeting at the end of the second semester.

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PORTFOLIOS and PROCESS

Becoming an architect requires you to understand, analysis and develop robust design processes – particularly your own. Design Modules will therefore assess not only the product but also process for the design project; therefore process work should be edited, collated, and kept. Research and sketchbooks must be retained and submitted within the portfolio at the end of the semester, alongside your final work. Your Module Coordinators and studio tutors will give you guidance on the portfolio submission. Failure to submit design process work will result in studio project work being assessed on only a proportion of the available marks.

MARKING SCALES FOR QUB AS A WHOLE AT POSTGRADUATE LEVEL

Module Descriptor Mark Band Criteria

A (Outstanding) 80-100 Thorough and systematic knowledge and understanding of module content; Clear grasp of issues involved, with evidence of innovative and original use of learning resourcesKnowledge beyond module content Clear evidence of independence of thought and originality Methodological rigour High critical judgement and confident grasp of complex issues

Originality of argument

A (Clear) 70-79 Methodological rigour Originality Critical judgement Use of additional learning resources

Methodological rigour

B 60-69 Very good knowledge and understanding of module content Well argued answer Some evidence of originality and critical judgement Sound methodology Critical judgement and some grasp of complex issues

Extent of use of additional or non-core

learning resources

C 50-59 Good knowledge and understanding of the module content Reasonably well argued Largely descriptive or narrative in focus Methodological application is not consistent or thorough

Understanding of the main

issues

Fail at Masters level (Diploma)

40-49 Lacking methodological application Adequately argued Basic understanding and knowledge Gaps or inaccuracies but not damaging

Relevance of knowledge

displayed

Fail 0-39 Little relevant material and/or inaccurate answer or incomplete Disorganised Largely irrelevant material and misunderstanding No evidence of methodology Minimal or no relevant material

Weakness of argument

1

2345

1234

1

2345

1234

1234

1

2345

Determinator (within Grade band)

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*module content should be interpreted as the topic or area of research being undertaken in the study in keeping with the learning outcomes for the module. The above criteria can be applied to both taught modules at M-level and the M-level dissertation (ignoring reference to module content).

** Pass threshold for the MArch programme is 50%.

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MARKING CONSIDERATIONS FOR STUDIO MODULES

M.ARCHdistinction

70-100 Outstanding work/presentation in every regard, showing exceptional command of the material required.Demonstrates a very high level of analysis, full referencing, extensive evidence of a wide knowledge of the subject, and innovative and original conclusions/design proposal. Consists of a cogent and informative presentation that makes a largely original contribution to the discipline in a way that is supported by evidence and communicates to a peer audience.Embodies complete command of the chosen method, extensive use of research and precedent and contains a sophisticated and critical knowledge of its context, both physical and social.Ambitious, encompassing risk and conscious of its value to the subject area.

Exceptional command of the material required

M.ARCH 60-69 Responds effectively to the project set, showing a firm knowledge of the subject and displaying a well-rounded understanding of the issues involved. Sophisticated and partly original presentation, with a critical awareness of the relevant context, both physical and social. Well presented with an understanding and use of presentational possibilities and extensive use of research and precedent, with evidence of the value of this to the subject area. Theoretical material is well represented and communicated, and of relevance to the analysis and content of the project.

Integrated critical awareness of

relevant context

M.ARCH

50-59 Work which is more descriptive than analytical and prosaic rather than inventive. While information is provided, it is not always relevant to the question.Demonstrates a basic understanding of the subject.Displays a sound understanding of critical analysis, and makes reference to the relevant issues in a well considered form.Work is well presented in a clear and consistent manner.Conscientious but not especially deep or broad research is evidenced, displaying knowledge of its contexts.Theoretical material is relevant and has been assimilated into presentation. Displays understanding of the subject, with argument supported by evidence.

Sound understanding of

critical analysis

Marginal fail

40-49 Little relevant material given and approach and design is muddled and incompleteLittle critical analysis and reflection – displays some competence but lack originality or consistency.Absence of consideration of context.Presentation lacks evidence of a review of the relevant sources.Presentation poorly resolved and fails to communicate the issues that have been addressed. Theoretical material lacking or of no relevance.Depth and breadth of the content of the work is insufficient.

Basic understanding of subject displayed

Module Descriptor Mark Band Criteria

Determinator (within Grade band)

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Fail

39 and below

Basic knowledge level insufficient.Little or no critical analysis and reflection. Displays some competency but lacks originality or consistency.Absence of knowledge or understanding of contextual issues.Lacking in evidence of review of relevant sources.Presentation poorly resolved and fails to communicate the issues that have been raised.

Absence of knowledge of

context.

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>68m

700700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

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>68m

700700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

700700

Image: ‘Irrigation

by Jacob Thompson MArch 2

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RETENTION OF SUBMITTED WORK

Students should note that all work produced in any medium remains the property of the University, but may eventually be returned to the author. Most work is normally returned by the end of an academic session but may be retained for exhibitions, quality assurance purposes or professional accreditation board visits.

EXTERNAL EXAMINERS AND PUBLICATION OF MARKS

The University appoints External Examiners to monitor the procedures and standards in the course. These examiners normally visit the School in the week after the formal examination/assessment period of the second semester. All students must be available during these periods and you are advised to note the particular days when you are require to attend. At the end of each semester marks for the modules/half modules are sent to the University Examinations Office. These are then displayed against your anonymous examination code number on the University web site.

RESIT EXAMINATIONS

Re-sits examinations are available at the end of the academic year (August) regardless of the semester in which modules were taken. Please note that re-sits are capped at pass threshold mark of 50%. As the summer re-sit is untutored and without access to many facilities normally afforded it is only offered to students who in the view of the school can be envisaged successfully completing the module in the allotted time.

COMPENSATION

Compensation procedures that apply in Queen’s at undergraduate level are not available in the M.ARCH programme – all modules must be passed.

PREREQUISITES

A prerequisite is a module, which must be passed before a student will be permitted to register for another specified module. All Stage 5 (M.ARCH 1) Modules are prerequisites for each of Stage 6 (M.ARCH 2) Modules. These are detailed in the Module Guides.

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Image: Exploded Axonometric

Chris MunnsMArch 2

Exploded Axonometric 1:200

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ATTENDANCE, ABSENCE AND ILLNESS

A core part of the course is the use of the studio as the shared space for exchange of knowledge between students and staff. It is a forum where skills and advice are pooled amongst a student cohort and should be actively engaged in whether there is formal studio time programmed or not. If used in this manner your education can only benefit – you should be open to the possibility that you will learn more from your fellow students than from staff. However, in this matter attendance/non attendance is a matter for individual students to decide. While we strongly advise that the studio be availed of and observe that students, on non-programmed days, who engage in this fashion typically prosper, we do not enforce this.

For days where studio/workshops/lectures etc. are set you are reminded that you have enrolled on a fulltime course and are required to be in attendance at the University throughout each semester and for whatever additional time is required by the programme of study e.g. External Examinations, Study Trips.

You are required to notify the School of any absence from examinations and compulsory components of the course (including studio project work key dates and submissions) and to submit medical certificates or other evidence of extenuating circumstances to the General Office within three days of returning to your studies. A threshold of 75% attendance applies below which any submission for project work made may be classed as a non-submission. You are reminded that attendance records are kept for all key dates and submissions.

An excerpt from the University Regulations governing absence and late submission is appended to this handbook Appendix A. From this you should note that you may provide self-certification for absence up to 5 working days due to illness using forms available from the University Health Service (e.g. for missing a tutorial session). Absence from an examination or in architecture from a compulsory course work component such as a design review/crit (class examination) or project submission session is, however, a serious matter and illness must be certified by a medical practitioner or the University Health Service (also note that self-certification is not acceptable in cases of late submission). You must hand in the medical certificate (addressed to the Faculty Office) to the General Office. Do not hand such certificates to your tutor. Mentioning to a tutor that you have been ill is not sufficient. Medical certificates must be submitted within 3 days of returning to studies. Beyond these 3 days, retrospective medical certificates are not acceptable. The Examination Board cannot make allowances for illness unless medical certificates have been handed in before the Board meets.

LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSESSED COURSEWORK

You must submit assessed work by the deadline designated by the relevant module Co-ordinator. Non-attendance at class examinations and non-submission of project or coursework will be treated as an absence.

Assessed coursework submitted after the deadline (Late Submissions) will be penalised at the rate of 5% of the total marks available for each working day late up to a maximum of five working days, after which a mark of zero shall be awarded. Where the assessed work element accounts for a certain proportion of the module mark, the 5% penalty will apply to the assessed element mark only and not to the overall module mark.

NB: This system is not meant to be punitive; it is based on experience and designed to be fair to students who organise their time properly.

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However, due to the nature of studio work assessment, i.e. through the review/ crit system, it will not be possible to assess studio work that is submitted late, until the end of the semester. Exemptions shall be granted only if there are extenuating circumstances, and where the student has made a case in writing within three working days of the deadline for submission. Applications for exemption from penalty must be made using the Application for Exemption from Penalty Form as attached (Appendix B) and is also obtainable from the School Office.

USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

It is the responsibility of students to plan ahead in order to meet hand-in times. Submissions are currently received only on paper and to a recognised scale, unless otherwise agreed with staff in advance of submission. Staff are not able to assess or tutor work on a laptop or computer display. In relation to hand-ins, the failure or non-functioning of computers, printers or related equipment is not a valid excuse for late submission, whether this equipment is privately owned, commercially available, or belongs to the University. You are reminded that it is Queen’s policy that deadlines for submissions cannot be extended for any of the above or similar reasons and that normal late penalties will apply.

Students are urged to keep regular back-ups of digital work, run up-to-date virus and worm protection software, have a personal firewall, be careful about downloading and opening attachments, anticipate running out of printer paper or ink and plan adequate time for queuing for printer or other services. Wireless Internet access is possible for Queen’s staff and students throughout the buildings and Design Studios. Queen’s uses a secure network, so you will need to download access software before you get connected. Any issues with hardware or software within the School should be directed to David Houston Tel.: 9097 4741.

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PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is defined as follows: to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source. This existing source may be the work of others submitted without appropriate acknowledgement, or the writer’s own previously submitted work. This includes auto-plagiarism (to use excerpts from your own previous work without appropriate acknowledgement) and self-plagiarism (to submit a piece of work more than once, e.g. one which has been previously submitted for a different assignment). It is an academic offence for students to plagiarise. Resources about referencing and essay writing, as well as workshops and one-to-one support are available from the Learning Development Service. Definitions and procedures for dealing with academic offences can be found in the University’s http://www.qub.ie/directorates/AcademicStudentAffairs/AcademicAffairs/GeneralRegulationsUniversityCalendar2013-14/RegulationsforPostgraduateStudents/

DEGREE PLUS

Degree Plus is a unique and innovative programme which allows Queen’s students to gain accreditation for skills and experiences developed outside of their academic programme. Students may register for the programme at any time during their academic career but must have submitted evidence for the award of Degree Plus by 1 April in the year they hope to graduate. Successful completion of the programme provides students with the award of Degree Plus on their transcript. Any extra-curricular activities which enables the development of academic, personal, career or employability skills may be included, e.g. volunteering, involvement in a club or society, completion of an additional course or programme, summer experience or working part-time. The award may be obtained in two different ways: either by undertaking a programme which is fully accredited through Queen’s, or by combining two experiences and presenting evidence on a Degree Plus application form. Visit the website for further details: http://www.qub.ac.uk/degreeplus

ERASMUS

The Erasmus Programme is the vehicle under which study aboard occurs and is generally available in the second (spring) semester of M.ARCH 1. The M.ARCH staff assess the suitability of the institutions in respect of architectural education under the following headings:

- Academic reputation of the host institution within their respective countries.- Confirmation that the modules on offer are at a level and content comparable to those in the M.ARCH Programme. - Confirmation that the modules on offer form part of a Programme that is professionally accredited within the host nation in accordance with Article 46 of Directive 2005/36/EC. - Timetabling compatibility.

Individual Erasmus placements are authorised following an evaluation of the academic record of those interested, and an interview between the candidate, the M.ARCH Coordinator, and the School’s Erasmus Liaison Officer. In advance of the interview, candidates are asked to write a personal statement as to the relevance of the Erasmus programme to their overall all academic, professional, and personal development. In practice the placements are made available only to those students with an academic achievement within the top 20% of their cohort and are considered sufficiently mature to benefit from the particular opportunity.

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LibrarySection

1:50

The library is a series of staircases rising up through a void in the centre of the building, the start and termination of the stairs change per floor naturally creating movement for the building for the corridors of books, linking reading bays that punch into the central void. The facade alternates allowing the placement and distribution of literature but also by mirroring on the inside creates a continually changing array of shadows within the building giving a presence of life to the

library and the emotive feeling of it being more than a building, an institution.

The corridors of books that line the building, open into communal reading spaces to allow and encourage the sharing of a spoken word exchange of knowledge. This delicately paired with the individual reading booths, that give a special sense of place by hanging in the central void, create a special atmosphere for learn-

ing and create a peaceful transient collection of spaces within the busy city.

Image: ‘Library’

by Mark GloverMArch 2

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PRIZES AND AWARDS IN MARCH

The McMullen Architectural Systems Prizes for Architectural Writing

Founded in 2008 these prizes are donated annually by McMullen Architectural Systems, the specialist façade contractor whose headquarters are in Moira, Northern Ireland. The prizes are a £200 prize to a student enrolled on the BSc Architecture undergraduate course and a £300 prize to a student enrolled on the MArch / BArch postgraduate course. The prizes are awarded annually, on the recommendation of the examination board, to the student with the best piece of extensive architectural writing submitted as part fulfilment of the course.

Prize: Cheque

The John Trewsdale Memorial Prize

Background: This prize is in memory of Dr. John Trewsdale, a member of staff in Architecture who lectured for many years on the subject of building physics and environmental design.Wording: Best piece of scholarly work relating to technology.Judging: Module coordinators make nominations with Examination Board agreeing final outcome.

Prize: Cheque

Queen’s University RIBA Dissertation Prize Nomination

Judging: Module coordinators make nominations with Examination Board agreeing final outcome.

The Metal Technology Bursary

Wording: Best overall performance in studio (D&C 1, D&C 2 and Technology) at PG1 levelNomination / judgement: An arithmetical calculation by the examinations officer.

Prize: Cheque

Concrete Society Prize

Most innovative use concrete in a PG final year design project.Judged by the Concrete Society.

Prize: Cheque and invitation to Concrete Society dinner.

The Royal Society of Ulster Architects: Silver Medal

This medal is for the best studio project at final year of Part 2 in either QUB or UU.Nominations from each school are judged by a panel formed by the President of the RSUA.The best in each school normally becomes the nomination from each school for the RIBA Silver Medal (London).Judging: External expert panel determines Best in School and recipient of Silver Medal.

Prize: Medal and financial contribution towards RIBA Silver medal submission.

Irish Wood Marketing Federation Competition

Background: This prize is funded by Timber NI.Wording: Awarded to the best and most innovative use of timber in a PG2 design project.Judging: External expert panel

Prize: Cheque and nomination to Irish Wood Marketing Federation All Ireland

Opus Awards: Nomination

A Dublin based architectural design awards programme. Normally one or more Part 2 final year students are nominated.

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PRIZES AND AWARDS IN MARCH

04Facilities; personal equipment, use of studios/access to buildings, the library, school facilities- workshop, computers, printing & scanning, audio visual production.Image: ‘Belfast Lough’

by Jacob Thompson MArch 2

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PERSONAL EQUIPMENT

You are advised to consider acquiring your own A1 drawing board as well as computer at the start of your studies. Experience shows that by the end of the course most students either own a computer or have ready access to one. We strongly suggest you speak to other students about their own laptops and to staff who teach and/or support IT in the school (your year leader will guide you towards the relevant staff). It is also suggested that you acquire your own camera and tripod. Remember that security in University premises cannot be guaranteed, so any valuable equipment should not be left unattended. For more information on buying a laptop through Queen’s please visit this link:

http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/InformationServices/Services/WiFi/RelatedServices/BuyingaLaptop/

USE OF STUDIOS/ACCESS TO BUILDINGS

You will be required to attend the studios in the David Keir Building. Access to both Buildings is between 8am and 11pm. Outside these hours you will be asked to leave by QUB security. Playing music in any of the work spaces is not permitted, so if you wish to listen to music please use a personal stereo. Mobile phones should be switched off in the studio and only used outside the building. Power tools, solvent-based adhesives and paint aerosols must not be used in the Studio and will be confiscated. Smoking or the consumption of alcohol is not permitted in the studios at any time.

THE LIBRARY

The library at Queen’s is located in College Park behind the administration building and adjacent to Botanic Gardens. As well as books and journals to support the teaching programme, the Library has collections of reference books, slides, trade and technical literature, bibliographies and Irish material. Off prints and books recommended by staff for stock are listed in the catalogue and undergraduates can borrow up to ten books for two weeks at a time. The Science Library is open from 8.30 am to 10.00 pm Monday to Thursday, 8.30 am to 8.30pm Friday, 10.00am – 5.30pm Saturday and 12 noon – 5.30pm Sunday during semesters. Summer Vacation hours and Extended Hours are found on the library web page. Students needing help in the use of the Library should consult the Architecture and Planning Library staff at the third floor help desk. Do not write in Library books, even with a pencil. Do not turn down corners of pages or damage or mark the books in any way.

SCHOOL FACILITIES: COMPUTERS

The School has a policy of integrating as much as possible the use of computers into coursework and provides computing facilities in each of the studios. These computers generally support word processing, spread-sheet, database, 2-D drawing, 3-D modelling, building technology and building performance analysis programs plus access to the Internet, scanners, printers and plotting facility. Students also have access to the NI Technology Centre where Windows Workstations running AutoCAD and AutoCAD AEC are available.

SCHOOL FACILITIES: WORKSHOP

Specialised Workshop facilities are available in the school for model-making, including manual and power equipment as well as Laser cutters that allow for detailed and highly accurate cutting operations. Located in the basement of the David Keir Building, the workshop is operated and supervised by a specialized technician and a member of staff. The use of equipment is bookable in agreed time slots throughout workdays and must be arranged in advance. The workshops are equipped with hand tools

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and workspace for basic model-making, woodworking and montage. All students working within the workshop(s) are under the direct supervision of the specialised technician and according to the university’s accessibility, security and health and safety regulations. The power tools/equipment in certain workshops can only be used by the technician and s/he may provide general assistance, depending on time available. Nominal fees may be charged for the use of certain facilities and are orientated to the on-going service and maintenance of the respective equipment. The workshop allows for 5 operations to take place at a time, and has a manual assembly workspace for up to 8 students. Coats and safety glasses are provided and must be worn at all the times during working within the workshop(s). Refer to Appendix E. Please also see the Health and Safety section of this document.

SCHOOL FACILITIES: PRINTING AND SCANNING

IT facilities are located in the DKB studios between the spaces dedicated to Years 1 and 2 of the M.ARCH. These are to be used by M.ARCH students only as it is your responsibility that these facilities are in a good working order. No 15 Chlorine Gardens has also PCs available to Year 1 and Year 2 of the BSc course. Similarly, BSc Year 3 have a dedicated suite with PCs and printing and scanning facilities in their DKB Studio. Currently you are required to provide your paper and ink in order to use the plotters. You also need to use your own A3 and A4 paper in order to print documents. There are more IT facilities accessible to Architecture students in room DKB/01/033. IT facilities at the McClay Library are also accessible. You can print your documents in Copy/Print rooms beside the lift entrances in the upper floors of the building and in the Extended Hours Study Room. Colour printing is available on all floors. If you wish to scan documents and extracts from publications, a desktop scanner and PC can also be found on each floor. Please use these facilities responsibly.

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05SUPPORT SERVICES: PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

As a Masters programme, the clear assumption is that you are self-motivated to develop your own position within the discipline and profession of architecture. Some modules and semesters assume a higher level of self-direction and you should avail of those opportunities to experiment and take calculated risks. In a Masters programme the teaching staff are there to provide support for students who will have previously acquired essential design skills – in that way the role of staff is distinctly different to that at undergraduate level. For both lecture based modules and Design Studio it is should be self-evident that much of your learning and skill development occurs away from the formalised areas of the course. Learning from your peers is particularly relevant at postgraduate level. Equipped as you are with core design skills, knowledge, and intellectual capacity, the Design Studio becomes the venue for discussion, mutual support, stimulation, and discovery.

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Photo: Alan Jones

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PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING AND PERSONAL TUTORING

Personal Development Planning (PDP) is a process of reviewing and planning your own development. You will be encouraged to take control of your learning needs by reflecting on your personal performance and the feedback you receive. An electronic portfolio (e-folio) is provided in Queen’s Online to help you set out plans and personal goals to improve your academic performance and enhance your employability. Research suggests that students who engage with PDP are better equipped to study and develop their professional skills and experiences than those who do not. You should also look at the PDP webpage in the Student Gateway

PDP is a very helpful process to assist you in identifying what study- and skills-related changes you need to make to be even more effective as an undergraduate. Don’t forget it’s not just about helping you study throughout your course, but it will also help you develop skills for all aspects of your life at Queen’s and beyond.

STUDENT SUPPORT AND DEVELOPMENT

The University takes the view that all aspects of student life offer opportunities for learning and development. Schools work closely with student support services and the Students’ Union to support your personal development planning, providing a range of academic and personal support services and developmental opportunities during your time at Queen’s. Support and development opportunities for students are offered through your academic School, as well as centrally in the Student Guidance Centre, International and Postgraduate Student Centre and the Students’ Union. If you are not sure where to go when you have a question about any element of University life, ask one of the Information Assistants in the Student Guidance Centre or International and Postgraduate Student Centre – Don’t drop out – drop in!

We want you to do well during your time at Queen’s and all these services are here to help you. Staff and Sabbatical Officers have a long and successful history of supporting students in a range of situations; so do not hesitate to ask for help. Every year we come across students who wish they had asked for help sooner, so take their advice and come and speak to one of the support services listed here. And if you are not sure which service to go to, come tothe Student Guidance Centre and speak to one of our friendly Information Assistants who will be able to point you in the right direction.

STUDENT GUIDANCE CENTRE

The Student Guidance Centre (SGC) is on University Road, above the Ulster Bank, Post Office and The Bookshop at Queen’s. It brings together a number of support services that help guide and assist you throughout your time at Queen’s. From managing your student record, developing your academic and employability skills and offering advice and assistance for times when you may feel under pressure, all services work together to ensure you have an enjoyable student experience. Services located in the SGC include:

Careers, Employability and Skills, Centre for Educational Development, Counselling Service, Disability Services, Income and Student Finance, Learning Development Service, Science Shop, Student Services and Systems (Student Records and Examinations, Qsis)

The Centre holds information and resources for a range of services both on- and off-campus.Not sure who to ask? Information Assistants on the first floor will help you with all your queries about the University, from getting a new student card, to where to submit a form, or taking advantage of specialist advice from one of the services. The Centre also offers a comfy seating area, internet access,

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coffee, newspapers to read and laptops that you can borrow for use within the Centre.Student Guidance CentreUniversity TerraceT: +44 (0)28 9097 2727E: [email protected]://www.qub.ac.uk/sgc

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SUPPORT

International Student Support is based on the ground floor in the International and Postgraduate Student Centre. The team aims to support, guide and advise international students, enabling them to maximize their student experience at Queen’s. Core services include advice on student-related visas and immigration issues; welcome and orientation; general support and advice; and cultural awareness training.

T: +44 (0)28 9097 3899E: [email protected]://www.qub.ac.uk/isso

INTERNATIONAL AND POSTGRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE

The International and Postgraduate Student Centre (IPSC), along with the Student Guidance Centre and the Students’ Union, forms a proactive and comprehensive support and services infrastructure for the student body. Located close to The McClay Library, the Centre provides dedicated support to, and is a hub for many aspects of information, advice and guidance for international and postgraduate students. Students have the opportunity to meet and socialise with their peers from other Schools and disciplines in a welcoming and relaxed environment. Wireless access to the University network is provided throughout the Centre. The Postgraduate Student Centre located on the first and second floors serves as a focal point for the postgraduate community, complementing the facilities and services currently provided by our academic Schools. The Centre delivers the Postgraduate Skills training programme for research students, which offers an extensive range of workshops, courses and seminars alongside numerous supported, student-led initiatives. Additionally, postgraduate research students can access one-to-one guidance and advice in areas related to careers, employability and personal effectiveness, and all postgraduate students can access tailored information and advice on a range of postgraduate issues. The second floor of the building provides dedicated study and social space for postgraduates. This includes a computer facility offering 50 networked computers with black and white and colour printing, scanning and photocopying facilities. The second floor also houses the Postgraduate Students’ Association (PGSA), which represents the interests of all postgraduate students in the University and co-ordinates a number of research related and social events throughout the year.

Opening hours for postgraduate students are 9:00am–10:00pm Monday–Friday.Postgraduate CentreInternational and Postgraduate Student CentreT: 028 9097 2585E: [email protected]://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/aboutus/ipsc

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INFORMATION FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS (NON-EU/EEA/SWISS NATIONAL)

All the services listed in this guide are equally available to international students and staff are happy to support you during your time at Queen’s. In addition, the International Students Support Office (ISSO) has staff specifically trained to provide advice, support and guidance for international students.

The staff in the ISSO is the only staff in the University who are permitted to provide advice or guidance on immigration/visa matters. The ISSO is located in the International and Postgraduate Student Centre (IPSC). We offer a wide range of services including confidential advice on immigration, problems affecting your studies or personal concerns. We provide information on matters relating to arriving in the UK, opening a bank account, police registration, healthcare and doctors, safety and security, working in the UK, driving in the UK, activities in the University, local activities and events, travel, British culture, local shops and services, facilities for families. More general support is provided to help with settling in the UK, life in Belfast, academic life and study methods, homesickness and culture shock and schools and childcare.

It is very important that international students meet the conditions of their visa while they live in the UK. This means that if you have a job you must not work more hours than you are permitted. If you want to work (paid or unpaid) you should make an appointment with the ISSO to discuss what you are allowed to do in the UK.

The UK has introduced new immigration rules called the Points Based System. This affects both you and the University. The University has a number of obligations to meet for the UK Border Agency, which include (but are not restricted to) keeping copies of your immigration documents, monitoring your arrival/enrolment and you attendance. The International Student Handbook contains a list of the recording and reporting obligations that must be carried out by the University. If you have any questions about these please contact the ISSO.

You can contact the ISSO at [email protected] with any questions, enquiries or to make an appointment. Alternatively you can drop into the IPSC where we will be delighted to meet you and help with any problems you may be having. When you attend an appointment at the ISSO you should always bring your passport with you.

International Student Support OfficeInternational and Postgraduate CentreGround FloorT: +44 (0)28 9097 3899E: [email protected]

STUDENTS’ UNION ADVICE CENTRE – ACADEMIC, WELFARE AND FINANCIAL SUPPORT

University life can throw up all sorts of interesting situations and challenges. Sometimes you may not know exactly what to do about them and may want some advice. That’s what the Students’ Union Advice Centre is there for. The Centre employs three Advisers dedicated to providing all Queens’ students with free, confidential, independent and accurate advice.

The Financial AdviserAdvises on grants, loans, fees, Support/Hardship Funds, the financial aspects of repeating years and course changes, Social Security Benefits and other general financial issues.T: +44 (0)28 9097 1049

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Education and Welfare AdviserAdvises on accommodation, including Queen’s accommodation, private landlords, deposits, repairs, checking leases/contracts. Brian also covers academic issues, including representation at Progress Committees, complaints and appeals.T: +44 (0)28 9097 1135

Money Management AdviserAdvises on debt; this includes overdrafts, credit cards, loan agreements, arrears of payments, negotiating with creditors and any other debt issues. Guidance on budgeting and money management is available and students do not need to be in a ‘crisis situation’ in order to seek advice.T: +44 (0)28 9097 1166

CAREERS AND EMPLOYABILITY

Careers, Employability and Skills offers a range of facilities to help students develop their career potential. These facilities include:

Guidance on a drop in or appointment basisAccredited employability programmes and workshops www.qub.ac.uk/careers > Careers ProgrammesEvents such as careers fairs and business insights www.qub.ac.uk/careers > Events CalendarGraduate jobs, placement opportunities and work experience vacancies www.qub.ac.uk/careers > VacanciesPart-time work on and off campus through the Student Jobshop www.qub.ac.uk/careers > VacanciesIt is never too early to start thinking about how you can use your time at Queen’s to enhance your employability and develop your career. Come in and speak to us.

Careers, Employability and SkillsStudent Guidance CentreUniversity TerraceBelfastBT7 1NNT: +44 (0)28 9097 2770E: [email protected]://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/careers

PAID EMPLOYMENT AND PART-TIME WORK

A high percentage of students work part-time whilst completing their degree. There are a number of good reasons for doing this as part-time work can help you:

Develop valuable employability skills that will impress future employersGain experience and a greater understanding of the workplaceAccess and develop networking opportunitiesHelp financially during your studiesRegister with the Student Jobshop to access a range of opportunities and fairly paid part-time jobs at http://www.qub.ac.uk/careers > Vacancies.

Please note: the University strongly recommends that students do not exceed 15 hours part-time work per week as there is strong evidence to show that significant levels of part-time work can affect degree outcomes.

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PAID EMPLOYMENT AND PART-TIME WORK FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

International Students may have prohibitions or restrictions on working in the UK. It is very important that you confirm you have a legal right to work and if you do have the right to work, that you don’t exceed the permitted hours. If you want to work, you must bring your visa to the International Student Support Office where your visa will be checked to confirm whether or not you can work and if you can, how many hours you are allowed to work.

T: +44 (0)28 9097 3899E: [email protected] http://www.qub.ac.uk/isso

STUDENT CARE

The University is committed to supporting the attainment and success of its students. Through its Student Care Protocol, staff work with students to identify appropriate actions and support either within or external to the University, to help students through the array of difficulties they may encounter during their time as a student. No issue is too small to raise with the helpful support team. If you are worried about your studies, or a personal issue affecting your studies, you can contact any of the University’s support team, including:

Staff in your School (Adviser of Studies, Personal Tutor, module or year co-ordinator) ChaplainsStaff in the Student Guidance Centre (Counsellors, Information Assistants, Learning Support Tutors, Careers Advisers, Disability Officers)Community Youth Workers in the halls of residenceStudents’ Union Advice Centre or Sabbatical OfficersYour GP or other health professional

For information about the range of support available to students, visit the Student Gateway website http://qub.ac.uk/studentinfo

Any queries may be sent to the Student Guidance Centre by emailing: [email protected]

ANTI-BULLYING AND HARASSMENT POLICY

The University’s Student Charter, its Policy on Equality and Diversity and its Student Anti-bullying and Harassment Policy make reference to working in a learning environment which is free from harassment including discrimination, victimisation and bullying, and expects individuals to treat fellow students, staff and visitors equally and respectfully. In line with its regulations the University will take disciplinary action against students who cause distress by comments made about others, whether said or in writing. This includes comments written in the public domain, for example on social networking sites.

CHAPLAINCIES

Currently 17 faiths and denominations are represented at the University. Our work is varied and far-reaching, but we always hope to offer a warm welcome, support and advice (spiritual and otherwise) to all members of the University community. Each of us is committed to playing a constructive and beneficial role in the building up of the individual person and of the University community. The Chaplaincies website is the best source of information:

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http://www.qub.ac.uk/chaps

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Disability Services provides support to students with a wide range of disabilities including mental health difficulties and dyslexia. If you have a disability or acquire a disability whilst studying at Queen’s, we can help arrange academic and personal support to meet your individual needs.

Disability ServicesStudent Guidance CentreUniversity TerraceBelfast BT7 1NNT: +44 (0)28 9097 2727E: [email protected] http://www.qub.ac.uk/disability

COUNSELLING

Whilst we hope your time at Queen’s is transformational, there may be times when you find things difficult for a range of reasons. Queen’s students can access support and advice of a counsellor. Staff are friendly, approachable and experienced in dealing with a wide range of issues that students have to face at University and in their personal lives. Don’t leave things until the problem escalates; speak to them at the earliest opportunity. Emotional distress and difficulty can seriously impede your ability to study effectively. Counselling can support you in managing your difficulty so that your studies do not suffer unduly, and help you gain new perspective when looking at a range of options. Counselling is free and confidential to any student of the University, and can range from a five-minute chat to a series of 50-minute sessions. Counsellors are professionally trained and accredited and are bound by the Code of Ethics of their professional body, the BACP.

Appointments are available 9am – 9pm Monday to Friday and 9am – 2pm on Saturday.

Counselling ServiceStudent Guidance Centre and 84 University Street, as well as regional centres throughout Northern IrelandT: 0808 800 0016 (freephone from landline and mobile)24 hour telephone counselling: 0808 800 0002 (freephone)E: [email protected] http://www.qub.ac.uk/counselling

FINANCE

The Income and Student Finance Office provides advice on course tuition fees, including the assessment and collection of fees. If you have any concerns about your fee assessment speak to staff in the office who have experience in advising student on these matters. They administer a range of bursaries and student support and hardship funds, to help students in financial difficulty, which do not need to be repaid. They also provide a finance function for the University’s Clubs and Societies.

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Image: ‘The Story’

by Jacob Thompson MArch 2

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Student Finance and FeesStudent Guidance CentreUniversity TerraceBelfast BT7 1NNT: +44 (0)28 9097 2767E: [email protected]://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/finance

The Students’ Union Advice Centre also has two members of staff who provide advice and guidance on personal finance, debt management, income maximisation and applying for bursaries. They can see students between 9.30am – 4.30pm, Monday – Thursday and 9am – 3pm on Friday. If you can only come outside of these hours, they will do their best to accommodate you.

HEALTH CENTRE

Students with a Belfast address, even if they only live there during the week, are strongly encouraged to register with a General Practice (GP) surgery close to the University – although it must be within a 10 mile radius of your address. If you are ill and need a doctor’s note relating to your studies, you must see a GP as soon as possible – your School will have a policy indicating the length of time after your absence that a GP note must be submitted. It is also very important to be registered with a local GP surgery if you are suddenly and unexpectedly ill and require GP (non-emergency) attention. Students from within the United Kingdom can switch back to their ‘home’ GP during summer break. The University Health Centre (UHC) at Queen’s offers student-focused NHS services and University funded non-NHS services for Queen’s students. The UHC has extensive experience in the health needs of young adults and is made up of a friendly team who understand university life. International students in the UK for six months or more on a student visa are entitled to free NHS care and can also register with the practice. Visit our website or phone the Health Centre for more information on how to register.

LEARNING DEVELOPMENT SERVICE

The Learning Development Service is available to help you with academic skills. You can have a one-to-one appointment and/or attend a range of workshops on topics including essay writing, referencing, time management, presentation skills and preparation for exams. You can find out more on their website or by calling into the Student Guidance Centre to make a free appointment.

Learning Development ServiceStudent Guidance CentreUniversity TerraceBelfast BT7 1NNT: +44 (0)28 9097 2727E: [email protected]://www.qub.ac.uk/sgc/learning

COMPLAINTS AND APPEAL PROCEDURES

There are various complaint, appeal and disciplinary procedures to ensure that the University treats students fairly. These are detailed in the University Regulations on the QUB website. The first point of contact for a complaint would normally be the Stage Coordinator or Advisor of Studies.

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Image: ‘Dimension Construction Proportion’

by David McGennis MArch 2

Detailed section 1:30

Illustrating dimension construction & proportion

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“Architecture is, and always will be

concerned, roughly speaking,

with carefully balancing

horizontal things on top of vertical

things.”

Reyner Banham

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Image: ‘Bonded Warehouse’ by Jacob Thompson - MArch 2

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STUDY SUPPORT

Speaking to your Personal Tutor or Supervisor and using some of the material on the Student Gateway site can be helpful ways of supporting your studies. You may also benefit from more specific help. See the section on Learning Development Service for details on the support they can offer you. The Learning Development website also offers excellent resources on referencing, essay writing, time management and stress management, as well as a range of other topics that will help you in your studies.

LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES

The goal of Information Services at Queen’s is to provide the highest quality information resources and services to students and staff of the University. This commitment to quality is well illustrated by the building of The McClay Library, which blends the best features of a traditional library with the latest learning technologies to create a truly 21st-century environment for students and staff. There are also further libraries: the Medical and Healthcare Library (across four sites) and the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute Library (in the main building on the AFBI Headquarters site in Newforge Lane), as well as extensive online resources.Information Services also supports student computing, with student computing areas across the campus. The student computing web pages provide a range of information to support the use of computing in your studies; information includes the status of key computing services and computers currently free on campus, as well as information about accessing the wireless network, training and the virtual learning environment: http://www.qub.ac.uk/student

STUDENTS’ UNION

The Students’ Union offers a range of membership services including entertainment venues, food and other retail outlets, non-alcoholic study space in The SPACE, a student enterprise centre, the Students’ Union Advice Centre, clubs and societies, student volunteering, campaigns and representative work and much more. Every student of the University is automatically a member (which means there are about 20,000 members). Open 18 hours a day during term time, the Students’ Union welcomes over one million visitors every year. It is recognised by the University as the representative body of students and is run by elected full-time StudentOfficers (Sabbaticals) and student-centred staff. The Sabbatical Officers, management and staff, work with the student body to ensure the improvement of facilities and support services for students of Queen’s.

Queen’s Students’ UnionUniversity RoadBelfast BT7 1NFT: +44 (0)28 9097 3106E: [email protected] http://www.qubsu.org

If you do have financial pressures that mean you have to work more hours than is advisable, please come and talk to us. Both the Student Income and Finance Department in the Student Guidance Centre and the Students’ Union can give you advice on funds that are available to help students in your position. The Learning Development Service can also offer advice on time management.

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Image: ‘Secret Garden’

by David McGennis MArch 2

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LANGUAGE LEARNING

The Language Centre provides a wide range of language courses for all students. Classes, which usually last two hours, are held weekly and usually run for most of the academic year. Languages currently offered are: Arabic, Bengali, Chinese (Mandarin), Czech, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Greek (Modern), Hindi, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Sign Language, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Urdu. These are all taught at various levels ranging from beginners in all languages to advanced level in the more popular languages. These courses are accredited in line with the Common European Framework of Reference and a Language Centre Certificate is awarded for over 70 per cent attendance. Language Centre courses are included in the Degree Plus Award programme. A small administration fee is levied for each 16-week course.

Apart from the courses for non-specialists, the Language Centre now offers courses leading to a Certificate in Languages for Special Purposes. Specially designed computer-based courses are available in: French, German and Spanish for Business, Practical Irish, French, German, Spanish and Italian for Tourism and Leisure. These fully-accredited courses are available at beginners, intermediate and advanced levels. (French commences at post- GCSE level). Courses can be accessed using the Language Centre’s CAN-8 multimedia online system affording students the opportunity for guided autonomous learning alongside tutor-led sessions. The nature of these online courses means that students can study in their own time and at their own pace allowing them to ‘catch up’ or to progress at their chosen pace. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be awarded a Queen’s University Certificate in Languages for Special Purposes. An administration fee is levied for each module leading to the Certificate.

Apart from the formal language learning opportunities, the Centre also provides the opportunity for self-study language courses for use in its private study area. There is a growing library of resources in over 30 languages, available at various levels and in various formats ie books, videos, DVDs, tapes, CD-ROMs and self-study online courses. Carefully designed self-study packs are available in most languages. Software installed on the PCs includes dictionaries, grammar packages and interactive CD-ROM courses for all levels and in many languages. The Language Centre is open for private study and class teaching from 9am – 9pm Monday to Thursday and 9am – 5pm on Friday. Staff are available for guidance and assistance during opening hours. The self-study facilities are open during normal library hours.

For further information contact:The Language CentreThe McClay LibraryT: +44 (0)28 9097 6178E: [email protected]://www.qub.ac.uk/lc

JURY SERVICE

Students may be summoned for jury service during their time at the University. However, a prolonged period of jury service may be incompatible with full-time study, particularly when continuous assessment is a feature of the course. Students who are summoned for jury service must contact their Stage Co-ordinator to discuss the impact of this on their course. Student may seek excusal from jury service by contacting the Registrar’s Office, Lanyon Building, which will normally provide a letter in support of a request for excusal. Students seeking an excusal must contact the Registrar’s office and the relevant Court’s Office at the earliest opportunity, i.e. before the jury selection process begins. However, excusal is not a right and each application is reviewed on its merits.

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06HEALTH AND SAFETY

Personal safety & security Safety and model making Fire safety Grievances and complaints Disclaimer

Image: ‘Adaptive Diagnostics’

by Naomi Sheehan - MArch 2

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PERSONAL SAFETY & SECURITY

Very occasionally there are instances of vandalism and assault across the University Campus in the evening – please be careful coming and going especially after hours. Students are advised not to study alone in design studios in the evening. Some personal items go missing each year from both studios and lecture rooms. Students are reminded to keep their possessions under close guard at all times and should note that QUB insurance does not cover these losses.Please note: the Internal Emergency Telephone Number in QUB is 2222.

SAFETY AND MODEL MAKING

You will receive induction from the workshop staff on how to use cutting knives for models. If you miss the session please speak to Julian Rutzen, Architecture model workshop, [email protected] +44 (0)28 9097 4521.

You are only permitted to cut card in the design studios, all other materials must be used in the architecture workshop under Julian Rutzen’s supervision. When cutting card in the studios, you must first purchase and then always use a cutting mat.

The studios are supplied with first aid equipment. If however an accident occurs, including near misses, these must be reported to a member of staff and entered in the Departmental Accident Book- which is located in the SPACE General Office.

Please note the particular risks around cutting wire – you are only permitted to cut wire and other metals in the architecture workshop, and when doing so you must wear lab coat and safety goggles, both are available in the workshop.

Please see Health and Safety related guides and forms on the School Website (i.e. handbooks, risk assessments, forms) and specifically Appendix D: Health and Safety and Workshop Protocol .

FIRE SAFETY

The nature of the studio means that it is often an unsupervised workspace. It is absolutely imperative, therefore, that students take responsibility for fire safety within the studio as well as elsewhere in the building. A fire safety talk will be organised for the beginning of term. Appendix L contains a Fire Safety checklist. This will be pinned up in the studio. If the studio is not in a state of compliance with this checklist, tutorials and other forms of teaching will be suspended.

GRIEVANCES AND COMPLAINTS

We hope that we always deal fairly with our students, but if you are not satisfied by the way we have dealt with any issues or complaint, you may want to discuss the matter further with the module coordinator, then your Staff Student Consultative Committee (SSCC) representative or finally the Course Director. As a last resort, if you wish to proceed with a formal complaint against the School, you should do so either by writing to, or making an appointment with the Director of Education.

DISCLAIMER

Whilst every effort is made to make sure that the information given here is correct the School cannot be held responsible for any errors. If there is conflicting information the University Regulations take precedence.

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07APPENDIX A. REGULATIONS GOVERNING ABSENCE AND FAILURE TO SUBMIT ASSIGNMENTS DUE TO ILLNESS

B. APPLICATION FOR EXEMPTION FROM LATE ASSESSED WORK MARKS PENALTY

C. GUIDELINES FOR SCHOOLS ON EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES

D. HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES INCLUDING WORKSHOP PROTOCOLS AND FIRE SAFETY

E. STUDY TRIP PROTOCOL

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a.REGULATIONS GOVERNING ABSENCE AND FAILURE TO SUBMIT ASSIGNMENTS DUE TO ILLNESS

8.1 These are University regulations. Recognised colleges may have different rules governing absence because of illness, and students enrolled through recognised colleges should therefore check with the relevant collegeauthorities.

8.2 Short-term absence (up to five working days) but refer to 8.3 and 8.4 regarding any absence from examination or class test of failure to meet coursework deadlines. Self-certification of illness is permitted for an absence of up to five working days. Self-certification forms are available in the School Office and in each of the University and recognised colleges. Fully completed self-certification forms or medical certificates must be submitted within three days of returning to studies. Forms or certificates must be submitted to the Office of the School in which a student is enrolled. Consecutive self-certification is not permitted.

8.3 Absence of longer than five working days, absence from any examination or class test, or failure to meet coursework deadlines. Absence of longer than five working days or failure to meet coursework assignment deadlines or absence from any examination or class test counting towards a module mark must be covered by a medical certificate signed by a registered medical practitioner. Medical certificates must be submitted to the relevant School Office within three days of returning to studies. Medical certificates submitted after this period are not acceptable. (see also 8.4i, below)

8.4 General

During illness, and especially if they know that they are going to miss an assignment deadline or an examination because of illness, students should inform the relevant School Office in advance by telephone or letter of their enforced absence, either personally or, if too ill, via someone on their behalf.

The Head of the relevant School may require any student to be examined by the University’s Medical Officer.

Repeated self-certification may result in referral to the University’s Medical Officer.

i

ii

iii

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Photos: Michelle Reuter

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b.APPLICATION FOR EXEMPTION FROM LATE ASSESSED WORK MARKS PENALTY

QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY BELFAST, SCHOOL OF PLANNING, ARCHITECTURE AND CIVIL ENGINEERING

N.B. This form must be submitted within three days after the stated deadline for the assessed work.

Student Name:

Student Registration No:

Course:

Level/Stage:

Module code & title:

Assessed work Item:

Stated Deadline Date for Assessed work Submission:

Number of Days Late:

Assessed work signed in after the published submission deadline will be automatically penalised at the rate of 5% of the assessed mark awarded for each day late, up to a maximum of 5 working days late, after which a mark of zero will be awarded. NOTE: exemption from late penalties will be the exception rather than the rule. Please submit the originals of supporting documentation, e.g. medical certificates, etc to your School Office for record purposes. NB: Self Certification is not acceptable. Copies of supporting documentation should be attached to this form. You are advised to keep a copy of this form for your own records.Mitigating Arguments (detail below – additional sheets may be used)

Signed: _______________________________________Date: _______________

This form should be returned to the School Office within 3 days after the stated deadline for the assessed work submission.

OFFICAL USE ONLYDate received by School Office: ____________________________

Considered on: ________________________ by: ___________________(PLEASE PRINT NAME)

Decision (with reason): __________________________________________________________

Penalty (if any): ______________________________________________

Signed:______________________ Date decision communicated to student: ______________

Additional Comments: ____________________________________

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c.GUIDELINES FOR SCHOOLS ON EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES

IntroductionThese Guidelines, which apply to all students, are intended to provide guidance and practical advice to staff. They should be read in conjunction with the University’s Study Regulations paragraphs 1.2.12–1.2.17 2.1.7–2.1.12 and 2.2.26 – 2.2.34.

DefinitionExtenuating circumstances, for the purposes of assessment decisions, are defined as unforeseen factors, or factors outside a student’s control which have a negative impact on his or her performance. Chronic conditions for which students have received support and reasonable adjustments do not constitute extenuating circumstances, though a worsening of a condition may do so.

PrinciplesFrom time to time, circumstances arise which are outside a student’s control and which may prevent him or her from performing to full potential. Examples of such circumstances include:Significant illness or injury.Serious illness affecting a close family member.Bereavement.Unforeseeable or unpreventable events including family crisis, or major financial problems leading to acutestress.

Further examples of acceptable extenuating circumstances are attached as Attachment 1.When extenuating circumstances occur close to a student’s examination or an assessment deadline, the University will ensure that the student will not be disadvantaged, providing that his or her need is genuine, and that the correct procedures are followed. It is the student’s responsibility to submit evidence of extenuating circumstances, e.g. a medical certificate or a letter from their GP, which does not simply report the student’s circumstances, but verifies the circumstances, and/or provides a medical opinion. Extra marks will not normally be awarded to compensate for extenuating circumstances. Extenuating circumstances may be taken into account in a number of ways, e.g. permitting the student a further attempt to reach pass standard, or discounting the module or element in question for the purposes of calculating the overall mark. Requests for absence from an examination or an extension of a coursework deadline due to extenuating circumstances must be submitted as soon as possible (see Section 4, Procedure). The extenuating circumstances should be supported by the relevant documentation e.g. a medical certificate.

ProcedureThe student must follow the correct procedure to request absence from an examination or an extension to a deadline for an assessment. Evidence of extenuating circumstances must be submitted to the School Office, together with the appropriate form (attached as Attachment 2), normally within three working days of returning to study or, in the case of emergencies.

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Photo: Alan Jones and Students - Basel Study Tour

by Alan Jones

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which arose during examinations, normally within three working days of the date of the student’s last examination. If a student believes he or she is going to miss an assignment deadline or an examination because of extenuating circumstances, he or she should inform the relevant School office in advance by telephone or letter. If this is not possible, a third party should contact the School. Boards of Examiners are not obliged to consider any medical certificate or evidence of extenuating circumstances presented more than three working days after the last examination.

Request for a Concession When the performance of a student has been significantly affected by extenuating factors which the student could not have made available before the Board of Examiners reached its decision, the student may submit a request in writing to the relevant Head of School for a concession in connection with the assessment decision. Any such request will relate only to the consequences of the original assessment decision, and not the originalassessment mark. Students must submit such requests to the relevant Head of School within 10 working days of learning the assessment outcome, along with an explanation of why this information was not communicated to the Board of Examiners within the deadline for such submissions. Appropriate supporting evidence should be provided in all cases.In exceptional circumstances, the student may request a meeting with the Head of School or his or her nominee. If the Head of School or nominee agrees to the meeting, the student may be accompanied by a registered student of the University, including a Students’ Union Sabbatical Officer, or a member of staff of the University or University Chaplain. No legal representation shall be permitted. When a student who is not in good academic standing seeks a concession on the basis of extenuating circumstances, the case shall be dealt with by the appropriate School Student Progress Committee.

Reaching a DecisionIn cases where extenuating circumstances will not be considered by an SSPC or a Board of Examiners, the School should ensure the following criteria are met:That the extenuating circumstances are true. It is essential that the student submits as much supporting evidence as possible, including medical evidence or written confirmation of circumstances from the Personal Tutor, Adviser of Studies or relevant member of staff.That the extenuating circumstances constitute ‘good cause’, that the circumstances were outside the student’s control, and constitute a good reason for not taking the examination or submitting the assessment.That the extenuating circumstances would prevent him or her from entering the examination or completing the assessment by the deadline, or that the extenuating circumstances would have a significant adverse impact on the student’s performance in the examination or assessment.Provided that all these criteria have been met, the Head of School or nominee should notify the student of the outcome within 15 working days of receiving the request for a concession. The Director of Education is responsible for ensuring that the practice in relation to granting concessions is consistent throughout the School.

Possible OutcomesExtra marks should not normally be awarded to compensate for extenuating circumstances, but the following options can be considered:Permit the student a further attempt to reach pass standard.Discount the module or element in question for the purposes of calculating the overall mark.Permit the student to retake the module as a first attempt.Discount the entire year’s results and permit the student to re-take the full year’s assessment. This would apply only in exceptional circumstances.

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Request for an AppealIn the letter from the Head of School or nominee, the student should be advised that they have the right of appeal to the Central Student Appeals Committee. The appeal should be made within five working days of the date of the Head of School or nominee’s letter informing the student of the decision. The School should also send a standard email to the student’s University email address advising that a letter outlining the decision of the Head of School, or nominee has been forwarded by post, and instructing the student to contact the School Office if the letter has not been received within two working days of the email.

MonitoringA copy of the original request and confirmation of the outcome should be forwarded to the Chair of the Examination Board and the Director of Academic and Student Affairs.Extenuating CircumstancesThe following table provides a few examples of extenuating circumstances. It is a guide and is not meant to be prescriptive. Individual staff should continue to use their own judgment anddiscretion when deciding if an extension is warranted on the basis of the facts presented.

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Photo: Alan Jones

EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES

Normally Acceptable Notes

1 Death of a close relative orfriend

Close means parent or guardian; partner or spouse; child or sibling.

Where there is a demonstrably close relationship between the student and the deceased, a death certificate or a letter confirming the death from an independent person should be submitted.

2 Serious illness of student

An incapacitating illness or an on-going illness or medical condition.

This includes breaks and serious sprains to the normal writing hand/arm. Medical certification must be obtained, self certification is not acceptable.

3 Serious illness of a close relative

See notes at 1 above for definition of ‘close’

4 Hospitalisation A medical letter/certificate from the relevant hospital confirming the nature and severity of the student’s circumstances and the likely impact it has on the student’s ability to undertake formal assessment will be required.

5 Acute Personal/EmotionalCircumstances

The following will be required:• A medical certificate or letter from the appropriate medical professional; or• A letter from the University Counselling Service, or equivalent confirming the nature and severity of the student’s circumstances and the likely impact it has had on the student’s ability to perform as required.

6 Victim of Crime A written statement of events which is supported by written evidence from the police and/or appropriate medical professional or a letter from the University Counselling Service (or equivalent), will be required.

7 Financial Problems

Stress brought on by financial concerns. It is the student’s responsibility to maintain a proper balance between work and study.

8 Serious personal disruption

Divorce; fire; burglary; serious assault; jury service, serious childcare difficulties. Corroborating evidence must be produced.

9 Pregnancy A medical report from the student’s doctor or midwife must be provided in support of such grounds. This also includes the stages following childbirth. Pregnancy of a wife/partner would be acceptable in appropriate

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EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES Not Acceptable Notes

1 Social activities Hectic social life; parties; visits to/from friends.

2 Temporary self-inducedmedical conditions

Hangover; drug taking (excluding prescribed medication).

3 Minor ailments Coughs; colds; sprains (other than in the writing hand/arm).

4 Non serious personal and domestic disruptions which could have been anticipated orplanned

Moving house; weddings; holiday; failed transport arrangements.

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Photo: ‘ARCSoc Formal ‘ by Alan Jones

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QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY BELFAST EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES FORM

To be completed by the student and submitted to your School Office normally within three working days of returning to study, or if in the case of emergencies which arose during examinations, within three working days of the date of the student’s last examination. When the performance of a student has been significantly affected by extenuating factors which the student could not have made available before the Board of Examiners reached its decision, the student must submit a request in writing to the Head of School for a concession in connection with that assessment decision within ten working days of learning the assessment outcome. The decision on whether to attempt the examination or submit the assessed work, and the consequences of that decision, shall remain the sole responsibility of the student. All information provided will be respected by the University and treated in confidence.

To be completed by student:

Student name: ...................................... Student number: ............... School: ............................................ Course and year: ..............

Please indicate why the form is being completed by ticking the appropriate box or boxes:

… Explanation for absence from an examination/assessment… Claim for extenuating circumstances to be taken into account when an assessment has been attempted… Request for extension to coursework deadline beyond the end of the stage in which it is due… Request for extension to dissertation/project deadline… I confirm on behalf of the School that I have seen the above-named student regarding extenuating circumstances:

Yes/No:…………………………………………………………………… (signed by CourseConvenor/Personal Tutor or nominee)

Nature of circumstances:NB: Forms which are not fully completed and without the required documentary evidence will not be considered.

… Illness/Hospitalisation. Please supply medical evidence from appropriate medical adviser… Bereavement (death of close relative or friend). Please supply death certificate or supporting letter from an independent source… Family illness. Please supply medical evidence from an appropriate medical adviser… Victim of crime. A crime reference number plus any written evidence available from the police must be supplied… Acute emotional/personal circumstances Please supply a letter from the University Counselling Service or equivalent and/or medical evidence… Other. Please supply appropriate evidence to support your request.

The Regulations and Guidance available at http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/AcademicStudentAffairs/AcademicAffairs/GeneralRegulationsUniversityCalendar2013-14/RegulationsforPostgraduateStudents/ sets out full information on the type and quality of evidence required, and gives examples of circumstances not normally considered as acceptable reasons. (Please continue on a separate page if necessary)

Signed: .............................................. Date: .............................................

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d.HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES INCLUDING WORKSHOP PROTOCOLS AND FIRE SAFETY

Queen’s University of Belfast is committed to ensuring, so far as is reasonably practicable through best practice, the health, safety and welfare of its employees, students and others who may be affected by matters within its control.

The Senate of the University has ultimate responsibility for the Health and Safety Policy and for monitoring the effectiveness of supporting systems to ensure that it continues to represent best practice.

The Vice-Chancellor has executive responsibility for ensuring the implementation and monitoring of the Health and Safety Policy, including the provision of adequate resources and for ensuring that the University complies with all relevant statutory requirements and associated codes of practice.

Health and safety is an integral part of the management of the University’s undertakings. University Managerswill take all reasonably practicable steps to ensure, through the organizational structures, that :

• the risks to health and safety throughout its undertaking are properly assessed;• there are safe systems of work in place;• there is a safe environment in which to work;• staff, students and others are given adequate supervision, information, instruction and training in order to carry out their work and studies safely.

Staff and students have a duty to take reasonable care of their own health and safety and that of others who may be affected by their acts or omissions. Staff and student co-operation and commitment is essential to ensure successful implementation of the health and safety policy. Please refer to the Health & Safety Information provided by the School web pages, including Health & Safety Booklets, Forms and Guides at:

http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofPlanningArchitectureandCivilEngineering/AbouttheSchool/HealthandSafetyInformation/

Please ensure that you are aware and comply with the Official Access Times into School Buildings (incl. labs and studios) and associated access procedures/notification requirements. Also, ensure that any Health & Safety related incidents & accidents are reported to the responsible person such as laboratory coordinators or School Health & Safety representatives.

When provided with Health & Safety information as part of the activities carried out as part of the taught programme, ensure that you review, acknowledge and comply with the information provided.

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ARCHITECTURE WORKSHOP PROTOCOL

Introduction

This document should read with other University regulations and Safety Manuals that can be accessed online. Some parts of this manual are quoted from the University and the School’s

Key Personnel

Technician: Mr Julian Rutzen

First Aid

First Aiders currently available is Kenny MacDonald in the basement electronics lab / Eddie Moulds in MTS on the lower ground floor

Emergency Services Dial: 2222 or 9999First Aid Station: On workshop wall.Fire Alarms: On ceilingFire Blanket: Not available as not deemed necessary in this workshop.Fire Extinguishers: 2x (Red) on walls by entranceFire Hose: NoneEvacuation assembly area: Ashby car park, David Keir Building(Refer to the workshop plan displaying the location of fire exits, equipment and first aid box)

General Workshop Operations System

No student is allowed to carry out any activities in the workshop prior to induction by the workshop manager.Students have timetabled classes and “drop-in” access to this workshop. Out-of-hours work is not normally permitted. All these classes are supervised by the technician who will normally be present when the workshop is open.

The risk assessments performed on each of the following pieces of equipment and those pieces already mentioned in this document are displayed below. In addition to the perceived risk from each

Student Classes

Model-making, various materials, such as polystyrene, cardboard, plastics or timber, may be handled by students, but these are neither dangerous nor heavy. Students may use various tools whilst making their models both supervised and un-supervised, any such student will receive instruction in the correct use of any tools before they may be used.

Personal Protection

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Equipment Safety Category PPE Supervisor

Powered ToolsRouter A G, DM, CS, EP JRCircular saws A G, DM, CS, EP JRJigsaws B G, DM, CS SC JRDrills B G, DM, CS JRSanders B G, DM, CS JRGrinders A/B G, DM, CS, EP JRDremmel B/C G, DM, CS

General ToolsChisels B/C G, CS JRKnives B/C CS JRScrewdrivers B/C CS JRHammers B/C CS JRSaws B/C G, DM, CS JR

Responsibilities and Roles

Ensuring the Health and Safety of students is an integral part of all activities within the University and all students have a personal responsibility to help ensure that high standards of health and safety are achieved and maintained. Students’ responsibilities could be summarized as:

• To conform with health and safety procedures• To enforce health and safety procedures when in the laboratory• To be proactive about health and safety• To report health and safety breaches to the laboratory manager• To discuss with their supervisor of any issues associated health and safety as they occur and keep him fully informed. This includes but is not limited to:i. Possible laboratory procedure changesii. Health and safety breaches and concernsiii. Student and staff first aid concernsiv. To ensure that research is not undertaken without a fully signed COSHH formv. To carry out risk assessments

Workshop regulations

Health and Safety procedures are of paramount importance to the university and the school, and all students are requested to comply with the following regulations for the use of the workshop on daily basis:

• You are not allowed to carry out any activities in the workshop prior to induction by the lab manager• You must carry out appropriate risk assessments and have them signed prior to undertaking work in the lab• Do not use any tools or machinery if you have not previously been trained by the technician to do so. The use of all equipment should take place under the supervision of the workshop manager.• You must adhere to the health and safety regulations mentioned above regarding shoes, clothing and goggles (wherever required).• There should never be more than eight persons in the workshop at any one time, six bookable equipment places are available for sustained work and two floating spaces for preparation and post cutting use.• Sign up for the use of equipment only if you can guarantee attendance. For some equipment, £2 booking fee applies, such as the Laser Cutter. You must sign in and out in the workshop book.• Tidy up any mess you make. Put tools back from where you found them. Brush up any dust caused by using machinery. Basically please leave the workshop how you found it.• No food, drinks, or smoking are permitted in the workshop at any time.• Immediately report any accidents, spillages or breakages to the workshop manager.

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M.ARCH STUDIO FIRE SAFETY CHECKLIST

The management of a safe studio work environment is the responsibility of the student body. In particular the issues relating to fire safety should be our highest priority.Staff will check that the following points are in place every Tuesday and Thursday. No tutorials will take place unless the studios are compliant with this list.

Your co-operation in relation to this is appreciated.Gary A. [email protected]

All waste to be in bins provided for removal by cleaners

All additional materials to be stored neatly, away from escape routes.

All fire escape routes (between desks, along walls, to doors) to be unobstructed and present a 1050 wide passage at all times. No Trailing leads or other trip hazards

Models to be stored on desks or on the shelves provided

Fire Doors to Stairs to be closed, with no obstructions holding them open.

Lobbies beyond fires doors (top of stairs and corridor) to be free of all studio materials, waste or obstructions.

No obstructions to stand between doors and escape routes serving them.

No heat producing appliances or other devices likely to cause a fire present on the floor.

Fire Safety

Fire Load Minimisation 1

Fire Load Minimisation 2

Safe Passage 1

Safe Passage 2

Fire Doors 1

Fire Doors 2

Fire Doors 3

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e.STUDY TRIP PROTOCOL

STUDENT SAFETY AND BEHAVIOUR CODE

General behaviour and safety

Students are reminded that the Study Tour is exactly that and not a Hoilday. Students on study/ field trips are expected to behave in accordance with the University’s Student Charter, that is, in a responsible manner and ensuring that their actions do not have an adverse impact on the University’s reputation. Students should consider themselves to be ambassadors of the University.

Although no especially serious hazards are anticipated during the visit to XXXX, students should exercise care at all times, particularly when crossing roads and when travelling around the city and should never be out alone/unaccompanied at night. Students should also be aware that all large cities have their associated risks. It is expected that students will take all reasonable precautions to uphold their own personal safety and will not bring the University into disrepute through their conduct. You will be expected to act reasonably and politely to all staff and residents throughout the trip and particularly during visits to cultural and religious sites, which demand the utmost respect.

Participants must observe all instructions given by staff accompanying the party at all times and if staff feel that a student has acted unreasonably in any way they may refer the matter to the Head of School to be dealt with under the University’s disciplinary code for students (see http://www.qub.ac.uk/aco/quality/QualIndex.htm).

Medical Facilities and Insurance

Medical Care is routinely available in XXXX. You are strongly advised to investigate personal travel insurance and obtain a European Health Insurance Card (www.dh.gov.uk/ travellers). Please be aware that in the event of medical treatment you may need to pay up front at the point of treatment before you claim from your insurance. Please consider such potential costs when deciding what means of payment (credit cards etc.) to bring with you on the study trip.

Any student suffering from any medical condition that may affect his/her health while abroad with the party must inform staff prior to departure and as soon as possible if they fall ill during the visit. Drugs

It is very possible that illicit substances may be offered to you during your stay in XXXX. There is a strong correlation between drugs and crime and you will be placing yourself at increased risk of assault/mugging by entering into transaction with drug-dealers. Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of any drugs are severe, and convicted offenders can expect jail sentences and fines. Similarly, extremely stiff sentences are handed down to persons who attempt to smuggle drugs back into the UK.

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Alcohol

XXXX has a reputation for inexpensive alcohol and students may be tempted to over-indulge during their stay.While the School does not prohibit the consumption of alcoholic drinks, these should be taken only in moderation and never to the extent that it may hinder your attendance and attention during the organised proceedings the next day. More than any other thing, alcohol is the most likely contributory factor to unacceptable behaviour and potentially injury to students during the course of a field trip. It is the cause of noisy, boorish behaviour that is likely to cause offence both to other members of the party, to other hotel guests and staff, and to members of the public in general. Thus, displays of drunkenness will not be tolerated, and may result in exclusion from the field study activities and/or disciplinary action on return. [Note that late and non-attendance on any day without good cause will incur a mark penalty. Over-indulgence impacts on your ability to function fully during the field trip and is not considered “good cause”!]

Crime

Like many large cities, XXXX does have a certain level of crime and you should take reasonable precautions to protect yourself from robbery – these include keeping money/wallets/bags secure from pickpockets, not being flashy with money, mobile phones and camera equipment etc, avoiding unlit and quiet alleys and walking around alone at night. It is strongly recommended that you do not bring any expensive items on the tour with you. Criminal incidents are not that common, but help avoid them by keeping an eye out for each other. It is also recommended that you take a photocopy of your passport with you and keep this separate from your travel documents.

Hostel Rooms

As well as ensuring that you do not disturb other guests at night, please maintain your room in a respectable condition and particularly avoid any damage to hostel facilities. Remember that, even if you personally will probably not be returning to this hostel, we shall want to make further trips with future groups of students, and we therefore rely on maintaining good relations.Please note that if there are complaints from the Hostel regarding your behaviour during the visit, including night-time noise, the University may require you to immediately arrange alternative accommodation at you own expense.

Arrangements

Students must advise Module Coordinator of the following:• Flight dates and times, name of airline and flight numbers• Proof of individual travel insurance cover• Mobile telephone number• Details of accommodation if different to the organised accommodation

Module Coordinator will provide the following

• Details of rendezvous points at key points of each day, should individuals become separated (we actively follow up any student not attending)• Details of where class and staff are staying, staff contact numbers, and emergency contact at the University.• A briefing on health and safety issues / considerations

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Student’s Acknowledgment of Safety and Behaviour Code

XXXX Field Trip DATE

I, ....................................................................................... (insert full name), have read and understand the above hazards, behaviour code, and disciplinary guidelines. I undertake to follow the recommendations laid down, as well as any other instructions issued by staff during the course of the trip.

*I do not suffer from any medical condition that may affect my health during the trip, or

*I suffer from: ........................................................................................................................*(*Delete as appropriate).

(Signed): ............................................................................................................................... (Date): .........................................................................

Next of Kin DetailsName: .................................................................................................. Your Relationship: ...............................................................................

Address: ....................................................................................................................................

Telephone number for emergency contact: ...............................................................

Image: Pippa Southall

MArch 2

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“A building has at least two lives - the

one imagined by its maker and the life it lives afterward - and

they are never the same.”

-Rem Koolhaas

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f.STUDIO PROTOCOL

• Access to the design studio is only permitted between 07.00 & 22.00• You are not permitted into any other labs / rooms in the building• You must not wedge open entrance doors or fire doors in the building• Obey all safety signs and instructions• Familiarise yourself with emergency exits and evacuation procedures• Risk assessments must be carried out for any activity that could cause harm to staff, students or members of the public• Fire-fighting equipment should not be tampered with and kept free from obstruction• Do not leave water or other liquids on the floor.• Do not run in corridors, on stairs, or in laboratories• Keep working surfaces clean and tidy and ensure that floors are free of material at all times• Do not use corridors or staircases as storage areas. Safe access must be provided at all times.• Store heavy objects below shoulder height• Always switch off and unplug equipment before cleaning, adjusting or changing parts.• You are only permitted to cut card in the design studios, all other materials and equipment must be used in the architecture workshop under Sam Carson’s supervision. When cutting card in the studios, you must first purchase and then always use a cutting mat.• You will receive induction from the workshop staff on how to use cutting knives for models. If you have not received induction to the workshop it is your responsibility to inform the Stage Coordinator.• The studios are supplied with first aid equipment. If however an accident occurs, including near misses, these must be reported to a member of staff immediately.• If you notice any of the first aid equipment running low in supply please inform the Stage Coordinator.

• Please note the particular risks around cutting wire. You are only permitted to cut wire and other metals in the architecture workshop• You must not act in a manner that puts either yourself or others at risk in the studio. If you witness rowdy or inappropriate behaviour please inform the

Stage coordinators:

BSc CO-ORDINATORS

Stage 01 Gul Kacmaz ErkStage 02 Gehan SelimStage 03 Keith McAllister

M.ARCH CO-ORDINATORS

Stage 05 /06 Gary A. Boyd

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g.PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered.

All programmes of the University are subject to the University’s Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Image: ‘Exploiting the Edge’ By Tom Cosgrove MArch 2

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Programme Title: Master of Architecture Final Award:(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

M.Arch (M.Arch, M.Arch with Commendation), M.Arch with Distinction)

Programme Code: S342100AM:14/15 UCAS Code: Not applicable JACS Code: K100

Mode of Study (Full-time, Part-time, other) : Full Time

Type of Programme : Architecture Length of Programme : Two years

Awarding Institution/Body:Teaching Institution:

Queen’s University, Belfast.School of Planning Architecture and Civil Engineering

School/Department: ArchitectureFramework for Higher Education Qualification Level:

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/informationandguidance

Level 7 of Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level

Accreditations (PSRB): ARB and RIBADate of next scheduled accreditation visit: July 2016 (RIBA)

External Examiner Name: Dominic Wilkinson & Michael Stacey (Liverpool University & University of Nottingham)

Signy Svalastoga (London Metropolitan University)

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations:

(Please see General Regulations)

Yes

Programme Specific Regulations: Student cannot graduate without passing all modules.

(THIS IS A REQUIREMENT OF THE PSRBs)

Students with protected characteristics NA

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations:

(Please see General Regulations)

No

Length of Programme 2 YEARS FT / 4 SEMESTERS

Educational Aims of Programme, On completion of the programme the student will be able to:

The two-year full-time postgraduate course is for students with a first degree in architecture who wish to progress their studies in architecture and potentially continue to full professional status and progress to final qualification as a practising architect. The core educational aims are to educate graduates who would have the following attributes:

• An exceptionally high level of architectural ability, that is technical, aesthetic, and creative, consistent with EU and ARB/RIBA Part II criteria, but reflective of the particular ethos, character, and location.

• A self-confidence based on knowledge, mature critical awareness, and refined judgment.

• A deep-rooted understanding of context – ethical, societal, professional, and cultural, within which architecture is practiced and produced.

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Programme Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

Ability to undertake design briefs of increased and focused ambition dealing with wider issues of settlement set within particular urban and social context

Ability to be critically aware, and evolve personal design agenda and methodologies

Ability to develop coherent and well-researched and evidenced architectural proposals

Ability to assimilate and if necessary challenge external inputs, information, contradictions, contexts within the design process

Ability to assimilate technology as both process and context within ambitious and sophisticated architectural design proposals

Ability to produce architecture as artefact with an appreciation of the competing frameworks within which it is delivered

Ability to communicate advanced architectural intention, process, and output in a range of media and occasions

Ability to take intellectual and emotional ownership of a design process

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Ability to apply and appreciate creativity

Ability to apply informed judgment to knowledge acquisition

Ability to distil complex issues, discern patterns, and identify salient points

Ability to process and communicate advanced thought in text/prose

Ability to speculate, propose, sustain, and validate a developed intellectual position

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Methods of Assessment

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio and/or as

written dissertation.

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio and/or as written dissertation.

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

On the completion of this course successful students will be able:

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Ability to manage one’s time and production

Ability to construct an extended essay, to assemble data, to manipulate language, and to demonstrate clarity and effectiveness in sequential argument, layout and display of text and illustrations

Ability to work creatively and successfully within a team

Ability to be both intellectually agile and strategic

Knowledge and understanding of architectural theory

Knowledge and understanding of the canon of architectural precedents

Knowledge and appreciation of advanced representational techniques

Knowledge and understanding of brief investigation and formulation as responses to human needs – stated and implied

Knowledge and understanding of the core values underlying sustainable design

Knowledge and understanding of research methodologies

Knowledge and understanding of physical, cultural, and artistic contexts

Knowledge, experience, and understanding of group dynamics, authorship, negotiation, and the production of architecture.

Knowledge and understanding of the principles of management and business administration

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review and focussed lecture

Focussed lecture series with seminars

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio and/or as written dissertation

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio a

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio.

Coursework and exam

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge and Understanding

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Knowledge and understanding of the interplay of urban form, settlement, and landscape

Knowledge and understanding of materials, space, light and their interaction with assembly and construction

Knowledge and understanding of structural and environmental systems

Knowledge and appreciation of design intentions and its resolution through technology and construction

Knowledge and appreciation of the societal and ethical context within which architecture exists and is produced

Knowledge and understanding of the profession, industry, legislative, economic and contractual frameworks and awareness as to how these are evolving.

Knowledge and understanding of the regulatory framework within which buildings are designed and awareness as to how these are evolving

Knowledge of the existing building stock and its conservation

Knowledge and appreciation of value and economy within architectural design including the cost control mechanisms needed to ensure their delivery.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review.

Focussed lectures series with seminars.

Self-directed design project work involving research supported by lectures, tutorials, workshops and critical review. Also focussed lectures series with seminars.

Focussed lectures / seminar series with studio based research and design project and/or dissertation type based investigation and documentation

Focussed lectures series with seminars.

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio and/or as written dissertation.Project work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio and/or as written dissertation.

Coursework and examProject work in text or design form submitted as part of portfolio

Coursework and exam.Project work in text or drawn form submitted as part of portfolio

Coursework and exam

Coursework and exam

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific Skills

Module Title Module Code Level/ stageCredits Availability Duration Assessment S1 S2

MArch Studio 1 ARC7022 M.Arch I 30 X 12 weeks 100 MArch Studio 2 ARC7016 M.Arch I 30 X 12 weeks 100 Studio as Laboratory II ARC7018 M.Arch II 10 X 5 weeks 100 Thesis Project I ARC7019 M.Arch II 20 X 7 weeks 100 Thesis Project II ARC7020 M.Arch II 60 X X 12 weeks 100 Thesis Research ARC7021 M.Arch II 30 X X 24 weeks 100

Professional Skills (2017/18) N/A Humanities Dissertation ARC7017 M.Arch I 30 X X 24 weeks 100 Technology Dissertation ARC7023 M.Arch I 30 X X 24 weeks 100

PROGRAMME BREAKDOWN

Coursework Exam

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Image: ‘ Carding Dying Weaving’

by Jacob Thompson MArch 2

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“Find optimism

in the inevitable.”

Rem Koolhaas

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Queens University BelfastArchitecture School of Natural and Built Enviroment M.Arch Programme Director: Gary A. Boyd and Colm Moore

David Keir BuildingStranmillis RoadBelfastBT9 5AG

Tel: (028) 90974006 (direct line to the School Office)


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