Home >Education >Mc connell pp_ch20

Mc connell pp_ch20

Date post:13-Jan-2015
Category:
View:260 times
Download:4 times
Share this document with a friend
Description:
 
Transcript:
  • 1. Umiker's Management Skills for the New Health Care Supervisor, Fifth Edition Charles McConnell
  • 2. Chapter 20 Conflict and Confrontation
  • 3. Disagreements?
    • Disagreements can be healthy as long as they culminate in positive solutions or force second looks at questionable situations
    • When resolved, disputes can foster improved relationships.
  • 4. Principal Causes of Conflict
    • Unclear Expectations or Guidelines
    • Poor Communication
    • Lack of Clear Jurisdiction
    • Differences in Temperaments or Attitudes
    • Individual or Group Conflicts of Interest
    • Operational or Staffing Changes
  • 5. When Conflict is Suppressed
    • It rarely goes away on its own.
    • It invariably worsens.
    • It eventually becomes more difficult to resolve.
    • It is more likely to result on long-lasting damage.
  • 6. Strategies for Coping with Conflict
  • 7. Avoidance
    • Avoidance may be appropriate when:
    • The problem is not yours
    • There is nothing you can do about it
    • It is inconsequential and not worth the effort
    • You need more information
    • One of you is emotionally upset
    • The possible disruption outweighs the benefits n
    • You can see it will change if you can wait it out
  • 8. Fight
    • If you fight, you could lose.
    • If you win a skirmish, its still not over.
    • Your opponents may become saboteurs.
    • Choose to fight when someone is violating an important rule or committing an ethical or legal violations.
  • 9. Surrender
    • Surrender can be appropriate when:
    • You know the other party is right.
    • You have no stake in the issue.
    • Your chance of winning is infinitesimal.
    • Harmony and stability can be achieved.
    • Giving in on a minor item now can mean winning a more important one later.
  • 10. Compromise
    • Compromise may be appropriate when:
    • Opposing goals are incompatible.
    • A temporary settlement to complex issues is called for.
    • Time constraints dictate the need for an expedient solution.
    • Discussions have stalled.
  • 11. Collaboration
    • The parties attack the problems rather than each other.
    • Problems are resolved through honest and open discussion.
    • Collaboration uncovers information, challenges false assumptions or perceptions, and promotes improved understanding.
    • It leads to better decisions
  • 12. Win-Win
    • This true win-win approach is usually the best alternative, but it customarily requires more creative solutions
  • 13. Confrontation Guidelines: Ask
    • What do I want to accomplish?
    • What is the most I will give up?
    • What do I believe the other person wants?
    • What false assumptions or incorrect perceptions might the other party hold?
  • 14. Confrontation Guidelines: Ask
    • Which strategy should I apply?
    • What are my hot buttons, and what should I do if they are pushed?
    • If I plan to use a collaborative approach, what special precautions should I take?
  • 15. Gearing up for Confrontation
            • Practice success imagery.
            • Adjust your self-talk.
            • Rehearse.
  • 16. When Confronting
    • Avoid sitting across a desk or table from the person.
    • Open the discussion by saying something like Lets see how we can solve this in a way that satisfies both of us.
    • Outline the problem, then move to areas of agreement
    • Listen attentively, asking pertinent questions.
  • 17. When Confronting
    • It often pays to ask the person what he or she wants
    • Let the person know that you hear and understand content and feelings.
    • Use the persons name frequently.
    • Seek a win-win solution.
  • 18. When Confronting
    • Emphasize your inability to change the past and affirm that you want to focus on the present and future.
    • Stay cool and avoid rhetorical or emotional escalation.
    • Let the other party save face; he or she should come away with something.
  • 19. To Be More Effective:
    • Be prepared, just as you would be for a debate.
    • Choose the best time and place.
    • Regard the other person not as an enemy but as a partner in problem solving.
    • Clarify the other persons viewpoint as well as your own.
  • 20. To Be More Effective:
    • Focus first on a point of agreement, then move on.
    • Be assertive, not aggressive.
    • Attack the problem or the behavior and its results, never the other person
    • Do not cause your opponent to lose face; use no threats or ultimatums.
  • 21. To Be More Effective:
    • Do not be sarcastic or critical.
    • Avoid using the word you. It is frequently followed by an attack on the persons ego.
    • To avoid retaliation, use the straw man technique.
    • Be aware of your body language
  • 22. To Be More Effective:
    • Control your voice. Keep its volume, pitch, and rate under control.
    • Be diplomatic and tentative when facing firm resistance.
    • When you are cornered or upset, escape by pleading stress.
  • 23. To Be More Effective:
    • Do not get stuck believing that your solution is the only workable one
    • Promise realistic rewards that you can deliver (If you will, then I will).
    • End on a positive note.
  • 24. Coping with an Angry Person
    • Never lose your cool
    • Make no comments about the other persons anger or tell him or her not to be angry.
    • Do not patronize or lecture.
    • When a person approaches you and you sense that he or she is angry, greet the individual as a friend.
  • 25. Coping with an Angry Person
    • Ask questions. The person who asks the most pertinent questions controls the agenda.
    • Listen to the persons outbursts without interrupting.
    • Make certain that you understand the problem.
  • 26. Coping with an Angry Person
    • Avoid becoming defensive or argumentative.
    • Empathize by paraphrasing what you think the person is angry about and why he or she feels that way.
    • Assure the person that something will be done.

Click here to load reader

Embed Size (px)
Recommended