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Metropolitan Food Clusters

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Slide 1Please visit our website at www.metropolitanfoodclusters.wur.nl
Input from: Stichting Onderzoek Wereldvoedselvoorziening, VU Amsterdam Jouke Campen, Plant Research International , Wageningen UR Johan Sanders, Food & Biobased Research, Wageningen UR Nieuw Gemengd Bedrijf Nieuw Prinsenland
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• Agro production takes a new shape in metropolitan food clusters
• The distinction between urban and rural areas within metropoles is vanishing
• Young and smart inhabitants of rural areas move first, causing rural collapse in areas still responsible for traditional food production
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Urban people have more purchasing power: shift in consumption basket
Increasing consumption of processed food.
Increasing consumer discern from food availability towards safe, healthy and high quality food
Transparency in food chain “from farm gate to food plate”
Africa (Sub-
Metropolitan Food Clusters meet these challenges
Consumer driven, answering diverse food requirements and quality demand based on increasing purchasing power.
Network of industrial agricultural producers and processors, waste and water managers, energy providers making optimal use of logistics and knowledge flows that all concentrate in a metropolitan environment.
Are a significant contribution to sustainable development of the metropolis itself
MFC Key innovation 1: Resource Use Efficiency
Von Liebigs Law of the minimum factor Liebschers law of integrated development
Resource use efficiency in agroproduction increases with the level of integration: the number of controlled factors as well as their intensity.
Example resource use efficiency: the Dutch tomato space and water footprint
Delivering fresh products to markets is key technology. Mexico is currently poorly connected to the freight container network
MFC Key Innovation 2: Agrologistics
MFC Key innovation 3: vertical integration shortening of production chains
Example: Broiler Chain
An example of vertical integration: opportunities of an integrated poultry chain
Integration reduces transport and veterinary risks
Better meat quality because of stress reduction
Reduction of contamination and prevention of loss of taste
Large scale and industrial mode of production enables radical environmental technology: Smell -Ammonia emission -Fine dust reduction
Mother animals
Technologies for horizontal integration
Processing 120.000 ton organic waste/yr, producing 4.5 MW power.
Co-digester is core of industrial ecology in agropark
Microalgae refineries
Proteins for food/feed
Oils for biodiesel
Omega 3 fatty acids
MFC Key innovation 5: Co-design: Integral design of hardware, orgware and software
Hardware What you can hold
Orgware
Knowledge management
Team development
NGO’s go for influence
Co-design: Integral design based on local ownership of the project and delivering solutions for all stakeholders
Transition management
Knowledge workers go
for peer reviewed
NGO’s/CSO’s
MFC is much more than just prime agricultural production: It is in fact a regional innovation cluster
SME metal construction lindustry
customers
Other
customers
The MFC key innovations together take the spatial shape of an intelligent agro logistic network
High productive land with village and farms
Low productive land
Natural forest
Urban land
Agroparks are spatial cluster of high-productive plant and animal production and processing units in industrial mode combined with the input of high levels of knowledge and technology. The application of industrial ecology reduces costs and environmental emissions
Key spatial element of MFC 1: Agropark
RTC’s are the satellites in rural areas where the inputs from land dependent production for the whole network are collected. They will also be the centers for training and education of high productive farmers.
Key spatial element of MFC 2: Rural Transformation Centre (RTC)
Scope for Rural Transformation
Aiming at land-dependent farmers who want to join the MFC
Change from middle-man system to vertically integrated chain and contract farming
Transformation process induced through RTC:
changes towards better products
quality improvement of products
empowerment of present rural inhabitants to change their lives
Collection centre
Units Bank Microcredits
Mentoring Training
Commercial infrastructure
In consolidation centers, products, both raw and processed, coming from the rural environment or from specialized agroparks, are combined with import flows, if necessary be processed further, and then recombined and distributed into the metropole
Key spatial element of MFC 3: Consolidation Centre
Example: Processing, trade, distribution & consolidation in Fresh Park Venlo
Storage,
distribution,
Floriade
Warehouses and
industry and logistics, 30 minutes from
Amsterdam
– Business park: 70 ha
– ICT-server centre
Example: Masterplan Agropark Greenport Caofeidian, China: ecocity-agropark
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Metropolitan Food Clusters sustainable food for 21 st century global urban society Please visit our website at www.metropolitanfoodclusters.wur.nl Input from: Stichting Onderzoek Wereldvoedselvoorziening, VU Amsterdam Jouke Campen, Plant Research International , Wageningen UR Johan Sanders, Food & Biobased Research, Wageningen UR Nieuw Gemengd Bedrijf Nieuw Prinsenland
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