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MIGRATORY BIRD MANAGEMENT

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MIGRATORY BIRD MANAGEMENT. FEDERAL GOV’T RESPONSIBLE INTER-STATE RESOURCE LACEY ACT – 1900 Gave authority over interstate transportation of illegal wildlife INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE ONLY FEDS. DEAL WITH TREATIES - PowerPoint PPT Presentation
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MIGRATORY BIRD MANAGEMENT FEDERAL GOV’T RESPONSIBLE INTER-STATE RESOURCE • LACEY ACT – 1900 Gave authority over interstate transportation of illegal wildlife INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE • ONLY FEDS. DEAL WITH TREATIES Authority expanded by treaty with Great Britain (actually Canada in 1916, Mexico in 1936, etc.) These treaties later are ratified to become law
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  • MIGRATORY BIRD MANAGEMENT

    FEDERAL GOVT RESPONSIBLEINTER-STATE RESOURCE LACEY ACT 1900Gave authority over interstate transportation of illegal wildlifeINTERNATIONAL RESOURCEONLY FEDS. DEAL WITH TREATIESAuthority expanded by treaty with Great Britain (actually Canada in 1916, Mexico in 1936, etc.)These treaties later are ratified to become law

  • TreatiesA. U.S. - CANADA: 1916B. U.S. - MEXICO: 1936C. U.S. - JAPAN: 1972D. U.S. - U.S.S.R: 1976E. U.S. - 17 OTHERS: 1940F. 7 OTHERS (NOT U.S.): 1975 (U.S. IN 1988)

    MIGRATORY BIRD ACT (1918): A + B

    UPDATED/ REAUTHORIZED C + D

    CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE: E

    CONVENTION ON WETLANDS OF INTERNATIONAL IMPORTANCE (ESP. AS WATERFOWL HABITAT: F

  • Federal laws pertaining to Migratory WildlifeMigratory bird act (1918)Implemented treatiesProhibits hunting of insectivoresProvides a uniform system of protectionCovers management of species injurious to agricultureLater amended to set certain closed seasons, refuges, habitat enhancement, exchange of research data, regulation of hunting, and native rightsMigratory Waterfowl Act (1929)Established refuge system and research on migratory birds, but provided no funding

  • More Federal lawsMigratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act (1934)Known as duck stamp actChanged in 1976 to Migratory bird hunting and conservation stamp actAll waterfowl hunters required to by the stamp in addition to their state licenseCost $1 in 1934Cost $15 in 2002Actually created refuges and funded research

  • Duck Stamp History

  • Duck Stamp Examples

  • More federal lawsFederal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act (1937)Known as the Pittman-Robertson Act11% excise tax on firearms and amunitionShared with states to fund management, habitat acquisition, and research requires 25% match from stateAllocation to a state depends on land area, population, and number of licensed hunters

  • A few more lawsCentral Valley Project (1954)Water delivery into San Joaquin Valley for waterfowlEndangered Species Act (1973)Earlier acts passed in 1966 and 1969 tooCalls for listing, having, taking, selling, transporting, etc.Protects habitat too!Other laws

  • Conservation issues lead towaterfowl managementDraining of western wetlands by the Bureau of reclamation (early 1900s)Nations first waterfowl refuge established:Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge (1908)1930s drought and dust bowl eraIn 1946 state management agencies formed Joint Black Duck CommitteeJoint Waterfowl Committee1947 USFWS divided nation into 4 regions called flyways for setting hunting regulations

  • Flyway system historyAlso in 1947 the Mississippi Flyway Technical Committee formed1951 Association of Game, Fish, and Conservation Commissions passed resolution #10 calling for flyway councils1952 Flyway councils were foundedAtlantic, Mississippi, Central, PacificNational Council too

  • FLYWAY COUNCIL

    1. COORDINATE WATERFOWL MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES OF THE STATES IN THE FLYWAY

    2. PROMOTE MEMBER ACTIVITIES THAT SERVE A LONG TERM TO THE RESOURCE

    3. PROVIDE A POINT OF CONTACT BETWEEN USFWS AND STATES FOR FLYWAY ISSUES

    4. ADVISE USFWS ON WATERFOWL MANAGEMENT NEEDS, INCLUDING HARVEST REGULATIONS

    5. ASSIST WITH THE NATIONAL WATERFOWL MANAGEMENT PLAN ACTIVITIES

  • The flyway councilsOne voting member from each stateUsually the director from that stateEach state has a specialist or team of specialists that attend technical sessionsCommittee meetings to deal with specific species, habitat, or project issuesThe individual flyway councilsRecommends harvest regulations to the National Flyway CouncilOrganizes population surveysSets up banding programsCoordinates hunter surveysImplements research and habitat projects

  • National Flyway CouncilComprised of 2 voting members from each flyway AND special interest organizations (DU, WMI, etc.)Recommend regulations to the Director of the USFWSRecommends regulations to the Secretary of InteriorSigns regulations into lawRequires posting in the Federal Register before regs officially become lawCongress may intervene during this period

  • Timetable for setting harvest regulationsJanuary USFWS present preliminary regulations for public comment, holding 2 public hearingsData include previous fall harvest and population information, habitat conditions, and recent population trendsFebruary - Flyway councils meet to review available dataMarch National Flyway Council meetingHeld in conjunction with the North American Wildlife and Natural Resources ConferenceJune USFWS publishes regulations on early seasonsStates write specific regulationsMay be more but not less restrictiveJuly individual councils meet again to consider breeding ground surveys and to set later season regulationsSeptember Regular season regulations recommendations are forwarded up the line so final leaflets are available to hunters in late September

  • Fall flight forecast for mallardsBased on procedures published in the Journal of Wildlife Management in 1969 (Geis et al. 1969; jwm 33:848-859)

    Y = 7.926 + 1.468X1 - 0.624X2 0.028X3 + 0.016X4

    Y = predicted number of young (millions)X1 = number of July ponds (millions)X2 = continental mallard breeding population (from May pond count)X3 = percentage of May ponds remaining in JulyX4 = index to number of broods (unadjusted; thousands)

    99% CI = +/- 7% of Y

    Fall population = Y + X2 5% of X2 = Y + 0.95X2

  • MALLARD POPULATION + HARVEST STATISTICSa - MAY POND DATAb - PRODUCTION + (BREEDING POP - 5%)c - WING SURVEY / MAIL QUESTIONNAIREd - DIFFERENCE (TO GET NEXT - YEARS BREEDING POP)TO GET TOTAL AS CALCULATED FROM BANDING DATA

    196519661967Breeding populationa6.17.87.6Fall Populationb15.116.318.0Harvestc4.46.67.1Non-hunting mortalityd3.21.53.0Hunting mortality30%41%40%Total mortality51%50%56%

  • How to adjust harvestCould adjust bag limitsDailyPosessionSeason\Could set QuotaCould use a point systemCan adjust season length

  • DUCK HARVEST BY 5-DAY INTERVALS BASED ON 40-DAY SEASON, WING SURVEY DATA 1969-70

    % OF HARVESTDAYSKENTUCKYMINNESOTA1-5 15.647.81-10 25.9 62.21-15 38.073.71-20 48.082.31-25 61.889.01-30 74.893.81-35 86.497.11-40 100.0100.01-45 108.9101.91-50 - -1-55 - -

  • Other Aspects of harvest regulations?Early seasonsNon-toxic shotNon-game species


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