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BY LYNNE JETER FRANKLIN, TENN. – Federal subpoenas, contract disputes, lower admissions, rising bad debt, and a reduction in surgeries contributed to a move that industry watchers now say was predictable. On July 30, Community Health Systems (Nasdaq: CYH), a Franklin, Tenn.-based hospital operator, announced plans to acquire Health Management Associates Inc. (NYSE: HMA), a Naples-based hospital group that, ironically, had been on a spending spree acquiring struggling hospitals. In late March, Fortune magazine had named HMA among the World’s Most Admired companies in Health Care: Medical Facili- ties for the second consecutive year and fifth time in seven years. HMA had also been named the leading com- pany for two subcategories in 2012: Use of Corpo- rate Assets and Social Responsibility. Yet soon after HMA CEO Gary Newsome announced retirement plans in May to preside over a Uruguay mission with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, rumblings December 2009 >> Hannah Gay, MD PAGE 3 PHYSICIAN SPOTLIGHT PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FRANKLIN, TN PERMIT NO.357 ONLINE: MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL NEWS.COM ON ROUNDS PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER September 2013 >> $5 PROUDLY SERVING THE MAGNOLIA STATE MSMOC Weighs In Zurich 2012 Concussion Consensus Statement focuses on concussion definition, on- field recognition, management and tools The importance of clinical suspicion for identifying a concussion cannot be overstated, says orthopedic surgeon Austin Barrett, MD, of the Mississippi Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center (MSMOC) ... 9 New Lines of Research NCI Data Set Opens Access to Cancer-Related Genetic Variations How will this breast cancer drug react in patients that are HER2 positive? Will this new lung cancer therapy work in a patient with multiple genetic variations? ... 11 HMA Hospitals Changing Hands Community Health Systems acquires Florida-based hospital operator in historic deal (CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) Coming Soon! Register online at MississippiMedicalNews.com to receive the new digital edition of Medical News optimized for your tablet or smartphone! (CONTINUED ON PAGE 8) Golden Anniversary Hattiesburg Clinic celebrates 50 years and status as the state’s largest privately-owned multispecialty outpatient clinic BY LYNNE JETER HATTIESBURG—Clark, Con- erly, Gable, Gillespie, Guice, Hud- dleston, O’Neal, Pearson, Raulston, and Tatum. The physicians who opened the doors of the Hattiesburg Clinic on May 1, 1963, need no first names. In the small university setting in the Pine Belt, everyone knew them, including On May 8, Hattiesburg Clinic CEO Tommy Thornton honors the 10 founding members and their families at a ceremony commemorating the silver anniversary.
Transcript
Page 1: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

By LyNNE JETER

FRANKLIN, TENN. – Federal subpoenas, contract disputes, lower admissions, rising bad debt, and a reduction in surgeries contributed to a move that industry watchers now say was predictable.

On July 30, Community Health Systems (Nasdaq: CYH), a Franklin, Tenn.-based hospital operator, announced plans to acquire Health Management Associates Inc. (NYSE: HMA), a Naples-based hospital group that, ironically, had been on a spending spree acquiring struggling hospitals.

In late March, Fortune magazine had named HMA among the World’s Most Admired companies in Health Care: Medical Facili-ties for the second consecutive year and fi fth time in seven years. HMA had also been named the leading com-pany for two subcategories in 2012: Use of Corpo-rate Assets and Social Responsibility.

Yet soon after HMA CEO Gary Newsome announced retirement plans in May to preside over a Uruguay mission with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, rumblings

December 2009 >>

Hannah Gay, MD

PAGE 3

PHYSICIAN SPOTLIGHT

PRSRT STDU.S.POSTAGE

PAIDFRANKLIN, TN

PERMIT NO.357

ONLINE:MISSISSIPPIMEDICALNEWS.COM

ON ROUNDS

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

September 2013 >> $5

PROUDLY SERVING THE MAGNOLIA STATE

MSMOC Weighs InZurich 2012 Concussion Consensus Statement focuses on concussion defi nition, on-fi eld recognition, management and tools

The importance of clinical suspicion for identifying a concussion cannot be overstated, says orthopedic surgeon Austin Barrett, MD, of the Mississippi Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center (MSMOC) ... 9

New Lines of ResearchNCI Data Set Opens Access to Cancer-Related Genetic Variations

How will this breast cancer drug react in patients that are HER2 positive? Will this new lung cancer therapy work in a patient with multiple genetic variations? ... 11

HMA Hospitals Changing HandsCommunity Health Systems acquires Florida-based hospital operator in historic deal

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4)

Coming Soon!Register online at

MississippiMedicalNews.com to receive the new digital edition of Medical News optimized for

your tablet or smartphone!

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 8)

Golden Anniversary Hattiesburg Clinic celebrates 50 years and status as the state’s largest privately-owned multispecialty outpatient clinic

By LyNNE JETER

HATTIESBURG—Clark, Con-erly, Gable, Gillespie, Guice, Hud-dleston, O’Neal, Pearson, Raulston, and Tatum.

The physicians who opened the doors of the Hattiesburg Clinic on May 1, 1963, need no fi rst names. In the small university setting in the Pine Belt, everyone knew them, including

On May 8, Hattiesburg Clinic CEO

Tommy Thornton honors the

10 founding members and their families at a ceremony

commemorating the silver

anniversary.

Page 2: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

2 > SEPTEMBER 2013 m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m

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Page 3: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m SEPTEMBER 2013 > 3

Hannah Gay, MDPhysicianSpotlight

By LUCy SCHULTZE

Hannah Gay, MD, has been the subject of global attention since the March announcement that an HIV-infected baby in her care had been func-tionally cured of the virus.

Ironically, though, that’s not the career achievement she ranks most highly.

“We’re now at a point in Mississippi where we rarely see a child who becomes infected at birth, and that is the biggest suc-cess,” said Gay, an associ-ate professor of pediatrics at the University of Missis-sippi Medical Center.

“If we can prevent the baby from becoming infected, we don’t have to worry about curing him later.”

Developing a system to identify and treat HIV-infected women during pregnancy has allowed Gay and her colleagues to virtually halt the spread of the virus to newborns in the state.

When her career at UMMC began in 1994, the transmission rate in Mississippi from mother to child was 25 to 30 percent, she said. Over the past 12 years, that rate has dropped to less than 2 percent overall, while none of the women who have re-ceived adequate treatment have passed the virus on to their babies.

“That speaks to the efficacy of treat-ing moms during pregnancy, and that re-ally is our big focus – to make sure these moms are identified during pregnancy and get them into effective treatment,” Gay said. “Still, we always have a few that fall through the cracks.”

That was the case with the baby girl whose story has ultimately been celebrated across the global research community. Since the mother had no prenatal care and did not know she was HIV-positive, she was not plugged into the now-efficient treatment system that exists between UMMC and the Mississippi State Depart-ment of Health.

The child was born HIV-positive, and Gay began an aggressive treatment regi-men for the baby – only to have the mother drop out of the treatment relationship and fail to continue providing therapy to her child.

By the time Gay reconnected with the mother and child, she fully expected the baby would have the virus again and pos-sibly already have sustained damage to her immune system.

“When that turned out not to be the case, I was initially very confused,” said Gay, who sought further analysis from col-leagues at the Johns Hopkins Children’s

Center and University of Massachusetts Medical School.

“Using the ultrasensitive tests that they have available, they were able to de-termine, in fact, that the baby did not have detectable replication-competent virus in her viral reservoirs,” Gay said. “It’s the first case that’s been reported like this in a child

at all – and the first case in anybody achieved through the usual type of therapy.”

Gay and her colleagues knew their report would set abuzz the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Op-portunistic Infections in At-lanta, where they presented their findings in March. What they didn’t expect was how far the media would carry the story.

Over the past six months, Gay has been pro-filed by outlets like USA Today and interviewed by a host of newspapers and wire services from around the world. In April, she was named to Time magazine’s annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world.

Gay, who’s known for her quiet, thoughtful man-ner, describes the whole ex-perience “bizarre.”

“It has made life interesting,” she said. “But also, as it turns out, it has really helped to push this whole idea of searching for a cure to the forefront – in the minds of both researchers and those who fund the research.

“We’re thrilled that research toward a cure is moving forward that much more

quickly.”Such a goal wasn’t even on the hori-

zon when Gay began practicing in 1994 at UMMC, where she had received her medi-cal degree and completed her training.

A native of Jackson, she had returned with her husband and four young children after six years of mission service in Ethio-pia. The position in UMMC’s pediatric HIV clinic was one she took chiefly because it was meant to be part-time.

“It remained part-time for almost two months,” Gay laughed. “So much for staying home with my children. But fortu-nately, my husband was able to do that, so I was able to get into a very rewarding career.”

In the Department of Pediatrics, Di-vision of Infectious Diseases, Gay stepped into the task of implementing the program to identify and provide therapy to pregnant women, based on new findings that trans-mission could thereby be halted.

Over the years, Gay and physician colleague Ben Nash, MD, have gathered a team of nurses and a data manager who together make the pediatric/perinatal HIV program function smoothly. The Missis-sippi State Department of Health has also proven a critical partner in establishing an effective prevention system.

“A lot of people totally underrate our health department, but we have an excel-lent one,” Gay said. “They’re out there in the communities, and it’s the health-

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(CONTINUED ON PAGE 10)

Page 4: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

4 > SEPTEMBER 2013 m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m

this writer, who was delivered by one of the founding members of what’s now the state’s largest pri-vately-owned multispecialty outpa-tient clinic.

Their feat is remarkable, espe-cially because group practices were fairly rare in South Mississippi dur-ing the 1960s.

“The 10 physicians who came together to form Hattiesburg Clinic did so because they saw a need in the community for a multispecialty clinic – a place where they could serve patients with the concept that the whole person is the ideal to bring that about,” said Hattiesburg Clinic CEO Tommy Thornton.

The late Lamar Gillespie, MD, once said, “We thought that specializing and having different areas of treatment would be an advantage.”

“(I told Richard Clark) we could stay here … in our spot and take in more sur-geons as the need arose. We could … have that be our choice of lifestyle forever, or we could be a part of forming something really bigger and get satisfaction out of that,” recalled Dawson Conerly Jr., MD.

The late Ramsey O’Neal, MD, “didn’t really have a concept of a big clinic,” said his son, Kelly O’Neal, MD, a Hattiesburg Clinic OB-GYN like his dad. “It seemed to evolve when there was a need for Hattiesburg to have a particular specialty.”

The late Glen Pearson, MD, wanted patients’ “welfare physically, mentally, economically, spiritually bettered by the fact of our existence.” The late Frederick Tatum, MD, explained: “We were just trying to do good.”

Conerly added: “Our philosophy in starting Hattiesburg Clinic follows a quote I once heard from a fellow doctor: ‘We don’t treat the illness that the patient has; we treat the patient who has the illness.’ I’ve always followed that philosophy.”

Hattiesburg Clinic began with 25 em-ployees to assist the 10 doctors. “Before we could add a new physician, all of us had to agree to take a pay cut to support the new doctor until they got on (their) own,” said Clark.

The late Gerald Gable, MD, said in 2004 the group was highly selective about

adding new physicians. “Everybody that was brought into the clinic was well-trained, well-qualified, and compassionate,” he said. “Those were the three main things we looked for – and honesty.”

Organizational difficulties chal-lenged the young group.

“At the time we were building, we could’ve obtained the area out to the next street for $125,000,” said the late Charles Guice, MD. “We couldn’t afford it!”

When asked about the clinic’s longevity and growth, Conerly shared the group’s secret: “We were

like family. We had to trust each other to make good decisions.”

Today, Hattiesburg Clinic has more than 300 physicians and providers repre-senting approximately 45 specialties, and a staff of approximately 2,000, caring for patients in 18 counties in South Missis-sippi.

A new Dermatology-South clinic and two buildings for pediatrics and a chil-dren’s clinic are being built. A location in Bellevue will house several Hattiesburg Clinic specialties. Over the years, Hat-tiesburg Clinic has pioneered specialty services that are one of the first to Missis-sippi. The Neurological Research Center contributed greatly to the international launch of Amyvid, a new drug for Al-zheimer’s patients, while the Cardiology CARE Program provides arguably the

most comprehensive, cost- and time-effi-cient heart disease screening. (See com-panion articles.)

“At one point, I thought, maybe in my lifetime, we’ll become 30 to 35 physi-cians,” said Conerly. “I just never thought it would get this big. It makes me feel proud.”

Golden Anniversary, continued from page 1

Mississippi Specialties

Hattiesburg Clinic services offered first in the state:

• Exilis Elite: A non-invasive procedure that uses radio frequency to reduce fat and tighten skin.

• Breast Tomosynthesis: A 3-D imaging technology that allows better visualization for improved detection of breast cancer.

• Canaloplasty: A lower-risk surgical technique used to reduce pressure for patients with glaucoma.

• Symplicity Trial: A clinical trial used to provide additional information about a medical device intended to help treat high blood pressure in patients whose blood pressure isn’t controlled, despite treatment with multiple blood pressure medications.

• Neurological Research Center: A facility of Hattiesburg Clinic, NRC provides patients in South Mississippi access to leading-edge clinical trials.

SOURCE: Hattiesburg Clinic.

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Page 5: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

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By LyNNE JETER

HATTIESBURG – For $125 and 90 minutes’ time, Pine Belt residents may de-termine their risk assessment for cardiovas-cular disease.

Hattiesburg Clinic Cardiology, a 14-member practice in a joint project with the Forrest General Hospital Spirit of Women Program, began offering the Car-diovascular Assessment Risk Evaluation (CARE) in October 2010.

“We worked for two years to come up with a screening procedure that’s com-prehensive, affordable and respectful of

patients’ time,” said Thomas Messer Jr., MD, administrative medical director of cardiology and lead cardiologist for the CARE Program at Hattiesburg Clinic. “At the end of 90 minutes, patients are armed with information and an understanding of their risk for heart disease.

If patients know they have coronary artery disease, they can better prepare for making choices and staying healthy – be-fore events occur, Messer said.

“For example, perhaps someone’s had a heart attack and can stave off a second one if their cholesterol is in a certain range, or control diabetes tighter to minimize the risk of making plaque,” he said. “We want patients to leave our clinic empowered.”

Coronary artery disease made na-tional headlines in late July, when 53-year-old radio personality Kidd Kraddick died suddenly while attending a golf tourna-ment in Louisiana benefitting his children’s charity, Kidd’s Kids. Preliminary autopsy results from the Jefferson Parish Coroner’s Office showed he died of cardiac disease.

“He didn’t know he had the disease,” said Messer. “Like many busy people, he may have sloughed off minor symptoms. Some people are intimidated about going to the doctor, and the expense, especially because most people have high deductibles through their insurance provider these days.”

The CARE assessment involves a Car-diac CT Calcium Score, lipid profile, fast-ing blood sugar, EKG, calculation of BMI, and risk assessment.

“We modeled our product on a cen-ter in California that we heard from at an American Association of Cardiovascular Administrators conference,” said Messer. “The group went over the logistics with us, and the hurdles. We had a strong commit-

ment from Hattiesburg Clinic administra-tors, who helped us make the out-of-pocket expense affordable to our local residents.”

Craig Chancellor, NP, helped Messer develop program protocols, and is one of four cardiology mid-level providers who manage the CARE Clinic and provide in-depth counseling to patients.

“We also provide patients with access to an online program so that when they get home, they can plug in their numbers as positive changes occur – diabetic levels improve, blood sugar levels improve, smok-ing cessation -- and the program will reflect how those changes have improved their

risk of heart disease,” said Messer. Because only three to five patients are

scheduled daily at the CARE Clinic, pa-tient schedules typically run on time.

“An important part of the process is not making patients wait after they’ve been fasting,” said Messer.

Because the assessment is self-pay, the information goes into the patient’s elec-tronic medical record, but the patient isn’t required to divulge the information to their primary care provider – it’s highly recom-mended.

“At $125, many people gift the assess-ment to their loved ones, typically parents or grandparents who may not otherwise take the time or have the spare money or inclination to arrange it themselves,” said Messer. “The Spirit of Women has done a great job promoting the CARE screening program.”

Also, because the assessment is self-re-ferral, patients deal directly with the CARE Clinic.

“Pick the day and time slot,” said Messer. “You don’t need three people in the middle of that process.”

Only a few people have left the CARE Clinic for admission to the hospital for emergency procedures because their visit resulted in the knowledge of advanced cor-onary artery disease.

“The program is getting a lot of respect from the community,” said Messer, adding that the CARE Clinic also offers Hatties-burg Clinic employees the assessment at a reduced rate. “The medical community has also been very supportive. A couple of hospitals in Jackson have similar programs, but ours may be the most comprehensive, cost-effective and time-efficient program of its kind in the state.”

Cardiology CARE Focus Hattiesburg Clinic develops innovative screening test for coronary artery disease

“Ours may be the most comprehensive, cost-effective and time-efficient program of its kind in the state.” – Thomas Messer Jr., MD, Administrative Medical Director of Cardiology, Lead Cardiologist, CARE Program, Hattiesburg Clinic.

Page 6: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

6 > SEPTEMBER 2013 m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m

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Hattiesburg, MS 39403-0990PH. 601.582.5551 FAX 601.582.5556FAX 601.582.5556FAX

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Our attorneys work hard every day in the ever-changing medical law environment. So, we’re up-to-date on all the latest rules, regulations and trends that affect the business side of health care. Call us today, and concentrate on your patients.

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By LyNNE JETER

HATTIESBURG—When neurolo-gist Ronald Schwartz, MD, CPI, began conducting cutting-edge clinical trials for Alzheimer’s patients at the Neurological Research Center (NRC) at Hattiesburg Clinic nearly a decade ago, he might not have guessed the level of participation would lead to a medical breakthrough for the healthcare industry: Amyvid, the fi rst and only radioactive diagnostic tool used to evaluate patients for Alzheimer’s dis-ease and other causes of cognitive decline.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administra-tion (FDA) approved Amyvid™ in early 2012 for Eli Lilly and Company, a drug that’s used in conjunction with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging to evaluate the level of amyloid plaques in the brain. “Amyvid’s method of binding to amyloid plaques provides a visual in-dication of the presence or absence of plaques in the brain, contributing to a more conclusive diag-nosis,” said Schwartz, di-rector of the NRC, who participated in the initial autopsy study where the tracer was validated.

With major pharma-ceutical companies ushering Alzheimer’s drugs into the pipeline, NRC has sev-eral promising Alzheimer’s studies in the works.

“We’re a fl agship site for a new solan-ezumab trial that started in early August for the leading anti-amyloid immunother-apy drug,” said Schwartz. “Hopefully, this phase III pivotal trial will fi nally de-termine if this medication, and this treat-ment strategy, will be effective.”

Setting the StageHattiesburg Clinic recruited

Schwartz in 2001, impressed by his neu-rology residency at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and fellowship in behavioral neurology at the University of Florida. “My overriding interest was always to have a specialty (dementia) practice,” said Schwartz. “If we could break in as a clinical trial site, we would be in the unique position of offering our patients access to leading-edge therapies. At that time, the industry began shifting its research studies focus from academic centers to practices with larger patient populations, like ours.”

With its onsite resources – imaging center (MRI, PET), labs, ancillary and support services – Hattiesburg Clinic has the ideal environment to support clinical trial protocols, said Schwartz.

“Some of the biggest challenges relate

to the process of carving out a research program within the confi nes and culture of a large, clinical practice,” he said.

Schwartz knew the timing was ripe because pharmaceutical companies are focusing on early stage Alzheimer’s drugs for disease modifi cation.

“In the clinic, it can be frustrating to have patients who continue to decline while on available medications,” he said. “As a physician, you feel helpless. When you can transition patients into clinical trials, that helplessness evolves into opti-mism and hope. It changes the dynamic from what’s right now an incurable dis-ease to discussions about early diagnosis, biomarkers, amyloid imaging and neuro-therapies. The conversation shifts into a more dynamic, positive approach to the disease rather than as a clinician having to say, ‘I’ve got nothing for you.’ It keeps pa-tients engaged, looking for the next avail-able therapy.”

Even though Schwartz undertook the fi rst Alzheimer’s clinical trial in 2005, the NRC at Hattiesburg Clinic wasn’t offi cially established until several years later. “It’s been a maturation process of a good eight years to get the entire program where it should be,” he said. “Productive trial sites are defi ned by an effective staff. The NRC currently has an excellent team that’s been working together on AD trials for several years and is able to maintain high levels of recruitment and retention.”

Schwartz also pointed out that Al-zheimer’s studies are “procedurally com-plex because the disease is slow-moving.”

“To see a change, you have to antici-pate trials lasting 18 months and extend-ing to several years,” he said. “Motivated subjects are truly the key to any successful research protocol.”

Schwartz has received patient referrals from hundreds of miles away, including the University of Mississippi Medical Center, New Orleans, Meridian, and Mobile, Ala.

Releasing AmyvidNeurological Research Center at Hattiesburg Clinic plays role in Lilly’s release of promising Alzheimer’s diagnostic tool

Amyvid: How it Works

PET scans with minimal to no plaques are inconsistent with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, decreasing the likelihood that a patient’s symptoms are due to Alzheimer’s. Those with Alzheimer’s disease produce positive scans with moderate to high levels of amyloid plaques. These levels may also be present in patients with other types of neurological conditions and older people with normal cognition.

Dr. Ronald Schwartz

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 12)

Page 7: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m SEPTEMBER 2013 > 7

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Page 8: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

8 > SEPTEMBER 2013 m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m

swept through Wall Street that the fiscally struggling public company might be the target of a takeover.

In a May 31 note to investors, Chris Rigg, an analyst with Susquehanna Finan-cial Group, was cautiously optimistic that CHS might be pursuing HMA, estimating the company could be acquired for $18.50 a share, a premium to HMA’s shares that had recently traded near $14.

“We would be surprised if a transac-tion were announced in the very near-term,” he noted. “We don’t believe CEO Gary Newsome would be leaving the com-pany in July if a formal auction process, which we expect HMA would conduct, were currently underway. That being said, we believe Community is the best-positioned name in the hospital group to operate HMA rural focused hospital as-sets.”

The EngagementIn a power play reminiscent of the

1987 blockbuster movie, “Wall Street,” the news became official when CHS an-nounced plans to acquire HMA for $3.9 billion in a deal valued at $7.6 billion, cre-ating the nation’s largest for-profit hospi-tal chains in terms of number of facilities.

“This is the second biggest hospi-tal deal announced this summer,” said healthcare industry consultant George Paul, antitrust partner with White & Case. In June, Dallas-based Tenet Healthcare Corp. (NYSE: THC) announced its acquisi-tion of Nashville, Tenn.-based Vanguard Health Systems (NYSE: VHS) in a pact valued at $4.3 billion.

“This deal is part of a growing wave of hospital consolidation, as hospitals seek ways to diversify and lower costs in anticipation of a sea change occurring in the healthcare industry with the imple-mentation of the Affordable Care Act, uncertainty over how states will handle Medicaid coverage and reimbursement, and Medicare changes,” he said.

Paul emphasized that under Obam-acare, scale will matter greatly as hospitals seek to cope with reimbursement changes and as consumers become increasingly price sensitive. “Insurers will pressure hospitals to become more efficient than ever, and as a result, it’s not surprising to see these two companies merge,” he added.

With a similar focus on non-urban locations, CHS leases, owns or operates 135 hospitals around the country. With HMA’s 71 hospitals, CHS would have 206 acute-care hospitals.

The antitrust review will focus on highly localized markets, Paul pointed out.

“While the two parties overlap in 29 states, it doesn’t appear that they have substantial overlaps on a localized level,” he explained. “The Federal Trade Com-mission (FTC) will focus on how many pa-tients in an area would likely view the two operators as substitutes for each other in terms of location, quality and specialties.

Where the two are close substitutes, the FTC could seek divestitures if it were to find that patient choice may be limited.”

The new CHS would be rivaled only by its across-town neighbor, Nashville, Tenn.-based Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), which has fewer hospi-tals (162), yet reports higher revenue. Last year, HCA raked in $33 billion; CHS and HMA had a combined $18.9 billion.

“This compelling transaction pro-vides a strategic opportunity to form a larger company with a diverse portfolio of hospitals that is well-positioned to real-ize the benefits of healthcare reform and to address the changing dynamics of our industry,” said CHS CEO Wayne Smith. “Our complementary markets and the ability to form networks in key states, along with the synergies that will be available to us, can create value for the shareholders of our companies, the communities we serve, our employees and medical staffs.”

Both companies’ boards of direc-tors unanimously approved the definitive merger agreement. The deal would give HMA shareholders a 16 percent stake in the new company. Before the market opened on July 30, the day of the an-nouncement, HMA shares fell 6.9 percent to $13.89; CHS stock rose 2.4 percent to $48.35.

Mississippi Impact If the sale goes according to plan,

10 HMA Mississippi hospitals, including five in the Metro Jackson area, will move to the CHS portfolio. But Todd Lupton, CEO of HMA’s Jackson group, said the ownership switch shouldn’t prompt sig-nificant changes in daily operations, add-ing that “it’ll be very beneficial to all the hospitals involved” and “together, we’ll be part of an even stronger company.”

HMA owns Central Mississippi Med-ical Center in Jackson, Crossgates River Oaks Hospital in Brandon, Madison River Oaks Medical Center in Canton, and River Oaks Hospital and Woman’s Hos-pital, both in Flowood. It also manages Natchez Community Hospital, Biloxi Re-gional Medical Center, Gilmore Regional Medical Center in Amory, Northwest Mississippi Regional Medical Center in Clarksdale and Tri-Lakes Medical Center in Batesville.

CHS spokeswoman Tomi Galin wasn’t as straightforward, saying it’s “too early to discuss any possible changes.” CHS operates two hospitals in Mississippi – River Region Health System in Vicks-burg and Wesley Medical Center in Hat-tiesburg.

Smith said he considered keeping CHS an independent company and ex-plored partnerships with other compa-nies but decided acquiring HMA would “create value for the shareholders of our companies, the communities we serve, our employees and medical staffs.”

The ownership change also won’t slow the progress of a lawsuit filed in June by HMA’s Mississippi hospitals against Blue Cross Blue Shield of Mississippi for improperly reducing inpatient services

HMA Hospitals, continued from page 1

George Paul

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 10)

Page 9: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m SEPTEMBER 2013 > 9

By LyNNE JETER

The importance of clinical suspicion for identifying a concussion cannot be overstated, says orthopedic surgeon Aus-tin Barrett, MD, of the Mississippi Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center (MSMOC).

“If there’s any ques-tion or uncertainty about it, medical personnel would do well to follow the ‘if in doubt, sit them out’ guideline,” said Bar-rett. “The long-term consequences of further neurological injury far outweigh those of sitting out for a game.”

Barrett and sports medicine special-ists at MSMOC, the state’s first full-service orthopedic specialty practice, agree the 2012 Concussion Consensus Statement doesn’t differ significantly from the 2008 statement. The changes focus on concus-sion definition, on-field recognition, man-agement and offering tools to assist with recognition, such as SCAT3 and the child SCAT3.

The 2012 Concussion Consensus Statement was derived from the 4th In-ternational Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport, held last November in Zurich. Every four years, the Interna-tional Ice Hockey Federation, Interna-tional Olympic Committee, International Rugby Board, International Federation for Equestrian Sports, and FIFA (International Federation of Association Football) host the conference, which results in an updated concussion consensus statement.

“(The 2012 statement) also addresses several questions that we currently don’t know the exact answers to, but will hope-fully learn in the future,” said Barrett.

For example, one question posed in the 2012 statement concerns the role of concussions in the development of CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy), an entity that’s gained much attention, par-ticularly in American football players and boxers.

“In the most recent report, the indi-vidual role of concussions in the develop-ment of CTE has changed slightly from the previous report,” said Barrett. “While it’s true that no direct cause-and-effect rela-tionship between concussions and CTE has yet been found, this doesn’t mean that a re-lationship doesn’t exist. Many factors likely play a role in CTE, and we must continue to be mindful of the potential contribution of concussions to this entity.”

Among high-profile, self-inflicted deaths in recent years are professional ath-letes Junior Seau, Derek Boogard, Dave Duerson, who may have been the only one to commit suicide and leave instructions donating his brain for the study of CTE. Former NFL quarterback Jim McMahon, who revealed in 2010 that he is suffering from memory loss, has agreed to donate his brain to science after his death. “Back then, it was just tape an aspirin to your hel-met and you go back in,” said McMahon, leader of the Chicago Bears’ 1985 Super Bowl-winning season.

Barrett emphasized that concussions are “potentially serious neurological inju-ries that are now justifiably gaining world-wide attention.”

“They’re a major contributor to sports injuries, with the CDC estimating that roughly 175,000 to 300,000 of the 1.7 million worldwide traumatic brain in-juries (TBIs) annually are related to sports or recreation,” he said, adding the 2012

statement’s “listing of signs and symptoms of a concussion is also helpful to those not accustomed to them. These can be very subtle, and the report does well to note that LOC (loss of consciousness) isn’t required for the diagnosis.”

The 2008 conference resulted in the development of the Sport Concussion As-sessment Tool (SCAT2), a standardized method of evaluating athletes ages 10 years

and older for concussions. The layman-friendly SCAT3 recognized in the 2012 statement has a background section and is much more streamlined with clinician in-structions on its own page, rather than after each section.

“It includes a great protocol for graduate return to play for athletes with a concussion, as well as how to handle those with more se-rious or prolonged symptoms,” said Barrett.

MSMOC Weighs InZurich 2012 Concussion Consensus Statement focuses on concussion definition, on-field recognition, management and tools

Robert R. Smith, M.D. Gamma Knife Center

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Page 10: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

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HMA Hospitals Changing Hands, continued from page 8

department nurses who see these women at church or at the grocery store and know when somebody gets pregnant – and can get them in for prenatal care and testing.”

Today, renewed hope for ultimately defeating HIV makes Gay’s daily efforts even more rewarding, as other recent stud-ies from around the world also help point the way to a cure.

“I’ve seen it go from the time when HIV was a death sentence, to the time when it has become a chronic treatable ill-ness,” she said.

“At the time I first started, when I had a child who was newly diagnosed, I had to sit down with the family and say, ‘We will keep your child healthy as long as possible – and then we will do our best to keep your child comfortable.’

“In just a period of a few years, we went from that situation to the point where I could say, ‘If you will work with me and be very diligent in giving these medications, your child can live a long, healthy life.’

“The extreme difference there has, of course, made it very rewarding to be in this field.”

Outside of her work, Gay enjoys nee-dlework and is an active member of Trace Ridge Baptist Church. She and her hus-band, Paul, have four grown children and one grandchild.

Physician Spotlight: Hannah Gay, MD, continued from page 3

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payments to the hospitals. Blue Cross Blue Shield has declined to comment on the lawsuit.

“To my knowledge, the lawsuit is going to proceed as scheduled,” said Tom Kirkland, an attorney for HMA hospitals. Soon after the suit was filed, Blue Cross Blue Shield announced the Mississippi HMA hospitals would soon be categorized as “out of network.”

That deterrent may not matter much, since House Bill 374, passed in the last legislative session, provides clinics the op-portunity to have patients reassign their insurance payments if the clinic is an out-of-network provider. The new law, which became effective July 1, would allow the insurance payment to go directly to the provider rather than the patient. It would benefit physicians who aren’t in the Blue Cross Key Physician network.

The UnravelingThe relationship between HMA and

its largest shareholder (14.6 percent), Glenview Capital Management, a hedge fund managed by billionaire Larry Rob-bins, had soured in recent months. Glen-view, a private investment management firm established in 2000 with more than $6 billion of assets, also owns nearly 10 percent of CHS. Robbins had been criti-cal of HMA’s sluggish financial results and “unconstructive” executive behav-ior, pointing to HMA CFO Kelly Curry. Glenview had tried to replace HMA’s entire board of directors with eight candi-dates in a Fresh Alternative campaign to revitalize the company. In June, Glenview had written HMA about “significant room for improvement,” which it said had fallen short in its financial performance for more than a decade.

“Under the supervision of the sitting

board, HMA lacks the financial acumen to deliver on its projections,” Glenview released in a July 30 statement. “Unfortu-nately, this continues to be the case.”

Another Nashville, Tenn.-based hos-pital group, LifePoint Hospitals (NAS-DAQ: LPNT), had also expressed interest in acquiring HMA.

The Next StepUntil the merger is completed –

the target deadline is March 31 – John Starcher Jr., president of HMA’s Eastern Group with 23 hospitals in seven states, will step up as HMA interim CEO.

HMA’s projected second-quarter earnings show a drop of .05 percent in net revenue to $146 billion, attributing the discouraging fiscal picture to low ad-missions, increases in observation stays, higher bad debt, a reduction in surgeries, and the federal government’s sequestra-

tion. Same-hospital admissions were pre-dicted to fall 6.7 percent, compared to the second quarter of 2012.

In its first-quarter financial filing, HMA reported it had received a subpoena from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for documents in-volving accounts receivable, billing write-downs, contractual adjustments, reserves for doubtful accounts, and revenue. In May and June, HMA received three more subpoenas from the HHS’s Office of In-spector General related to the process by which the company admits people from its emergency department. The new sub-poenas supplemented ones the company received in 2011. Another subpoena was issued on physician relationships. In De-cember, a CBS “60 Minutes” segment fo-cused on HMA’s aggressive policies aimed at increasing admissions and “disgruntled former employees.” No stranger to the federal pressure-cooker, CHS recently re-ceived a new subpoena for similar allega-tions from the Department of Justice.

Page 11: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

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Read Mississippi Medical News Online:

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MS SW130271 MS Med News.indd 1 3/11/13 2:50 PM

By CINDy SANDERS

How will this breast cancer drug react in patients that are HER2 positive? Will this new lung cancer therapy work in a patient with multiple genetic variations?

Finding answers to those questions just got a bit easier with the rollout of a vast data set of cancer-specifi c genetic variations by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Yves Pommier, MD, PhD, chief of the Labo-ratory of Molecular Pharmacology at the NCI, was one of three lead researchers on the study, published July 15 in Cancer Research, that pinpointed more than six billion connections between cell lines with mutations in specifi c genes and the drugs that target those genetic defects. Paul Meltzer, MD, PhD, chief of the Genetics Branch at the Center for Cancer Research and James Doroshow, MD, director of the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diag-nosis, were the other principal investiga-tors.

Pommier explained the new data-base builds upon the NCI-60 cancer cell

line collection, which is comprised of nine different tissues of origin – breast, ovary, prostate, colon, lung, kidney, brain, leu-kemia and melanoma. In their Cancer Research article, the authors note the NIC-60 panel is the most frequently studied human tumor cell line in cancer research and has generated the most ex-tensive cancer pharmacology database worldwide.

“Most of the cell lines are from cancer tissues that are hard to treat and are usu-ally resistant to therapy,” he said. “The ge-nomic database is unmatched and enables researchers to mine all the gene expression in relationship to a drug.” Pommier con-tinued, “Each drug has a different profi le in the cell line because they act on differ-ent targets.”

In this most recent study, the investi-gators sequenced the whole exome of the full NCI-60 cell lines to defi ne novel can-cer variants and deviant patterns of gene expression in tumor cells. “The whole ge-nome for the cell line has never been done before,” he said. “Many, many genes had never been sequenced.”

The researchers cataloged the genetic coding variations, developing a list of pos-sible cancer-specific gene aberrations. The group then used the Super Learner

algorithm to predict the sensitivity of cells with variants to more than 200 anti-cancer drugs … those approved by the FDA and those still under investigation. By study-ing the correlation between the gene vari-ants – such as TP53, BRAF, ERBBs, and ATAD5 – and anti-cancer agents includ-ing vemurafenib, nutlin and bleomycin, the researchers were able to predict out-comes, showing one of the many ways the data could be used to validate and gener-ate novel hypotheses for future investiga-tion.

Access to the data is freely available through multiple sources including the CellMiner and Ingenuity websites. By opening up the scalable data on the whole genome sequencing and drug connectiv-ity, Pommier and his colleagues hope to help other researchers connect cancer-spe-cifi c gene variants with drug response to move the science forward. “It’s an evolv-ing system,” he said, adding that profi les on drugs in clinical trials will be added to the database as information becomes available to keep the data set current.

In explaining how the system works, Pommier said a researcher interested in a specifi c agent could plug that drug into the database. “You’ll get the profi le activity of the drug, and then you can ask if there

is any match to any specifi c gene muta-tions,” he said. From there, Pommier con-tinued, the researcher could query, “Are these cells more resistant or receptive to the drug?”

Getting those answers rapidly should help researchers move major lines of on-cology drug development toward per-sonalized medicine to achieve optimal outcomes in a safer, more effi cient and effective manner. With the added knowl-edge provided by the data bank, Pommier said researchers might separate patients into groups based on their genetic profi le and therefore be able to use specifi c drugs in a more rational manner.

“Between a targeted drug and a clini-cal application, you need a verifi cation in the middle,” he stated. That’s just what this new database offers.

New Lines of ResearchNCI Data Set Opens Access to Cancer-Related Genetic Variations

Dr. Yves Pommier

Page 12: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

12 > SEPTEMBER 2013 m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m

Global PictureBecause slightly more than half of

patients with dementia have Alzheimer’s disease, noted Schwartz, the key to im-proving treatment protocols rests in a more specifi c diagnostic tool that segues into the neuroscience industry’s under-standing of biomarkers.

“Having a specifi c diagnostic tool, that’s a whole paradigm shift in testing for Alzheimer’s disease,” he said.

Unfortunately, insurance companies haven’t yet consented to coverage for these tools, such as Amyvid, Schwartz noted.

“It’s still new,” he said. “However, if current trials are successful, we’ll be treat-ing Alzheimer’s patients very differently in next fi ve to 10 years, and saving money in the long run.”

In 2011, Congress passed a law to develop a national approach to Alzheim-

er’s disease, a strong step to promoting a national conversation. New alliances are quickly forming, such as the unique part-nership between the Alzheimer’s Associa-tion and the Society of Nuclear Medicine to draft a consensus statement on neuro-imaging.

“Last summer, diagnostic criteria that was 20 to 25 years old was revamped,” said Schwartz. “One of many questions is: what criteria should we have in place as a soci-ety? Screening for colon cancer with a colo-noscopy at age 50 has become a standard procedure. Do you start amyloid screening at 60, with or without certain risk factors? Those type of answers blend into politics and money. Participation in clinical trials is how we’ll move forward towards a bet-ter, more informed plan for managing the upcoming Alzheimer’s epidemic.”

Releasing Amyvid, continued from page 6

Alzheimer’s: A Diffi cult Diagnosis

Alzheimer’s and other causes of cognitive impairment share many overlapping symptoms including memory loss, visuospatial ability, executive function and behavior and language defi ciencies. Because a defi nitive diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is usually determined through an autopsy, physicians rely on medical history, clinical examination and a variety of diagnostic tools when evaluating patients.

GrandRoundsRiver Oaks Hospital Announces New COO

L. Dwayne Blaylock, President and CEO of River Oaks Hospital, announced that Heather Sistrunk, RN, BSN, MHSA, of Brandon had been named Chief Operating Offi cer of River Oaks Hospital, a 160 bed

facility located in Flowood. Prior to this role, Sistrunk served as the Southern Di-vision Director of Quality and Clinical Implementation for Health Management Physician Network (HMPN). She has more than seventeen years of health care experi-ence and began her career as a nurse in the Coronary Care Unit at Mississippi Baptist Medical Center. She also served as Admin-istrative Director in Cardiovascular Services at Mississippi Baptist Medical Center be-

fore joining HMPN.Sistrunk received a bachelor’s degree

in Nursing from Mississippi University for Women and a master’s degree in Health Services Administration from Mississippi College. She is a member of the Ameri-can Academy of Medial Administrators, Mississippi Organization for Nursing Ex-ecutives and the American College of Cardiology. She also served pro-bono as the Executive Director of the Mississippi

Healthcare Alliance.

NewSouth NeuroSpine Selected to Introduce Innovative Spine Imaging Technology

Physicians at NewSouth NeuroSpine are among the fi rst in the nation to intro-duce a groundbreaking new spine imaging technology that yields more precise images of the spine in motion and enables physi-cians to better diagnose and manage back pain for their patients. The Vertebral Mo-tion Analysis (VMA) technology, developed by Ortho Kinematics, Inc., uses fl uoroscopy to capture real-time images of the spine, while the patient is guided through a pre-set range of motion. The technology was approved by the Food and Drug Adminis-tration in December 2011, and NewSouth NeuroSpine is one of just four non-hospital facilities nationwide to offer the now com-mercially available technology to patients.

The VMA utilizes a patented Motion Normalizer device, which provides pow-ered passive trunk bending while the pa-tient is standing and lying down. Patients grip handlebars during the test and the ‘motion normalizing’ technology gently moves them through a specifi ed range of motion to capture a true picture of the spine’s ability to fl ex and bend. The 30-minute procedure is ideal for assessing patients with suspected instability of the lower lumbar spine in a weight bearing or non-weight bearing posture.

Heather Sistrunk

Page 13: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m SEPTEMBER 2013 > 13

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Agreement Signed, UMMC Patients With Blue Cross Insurance Remain In Network

Leaders at the University of Missis-sippi Medical Center signed a new one-year agreement with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Mississippi, ending six months of negotiations with the insurer.

With the agreement in place, patients insured through Blue Cross can continue to receive in-network care at UMMC. The existing contract was set to expire Aug. 28.

“We were very concerned about how this issue was going to impact our patients. While UMMC needs equitable reimburse-ment for the highly specialized services we provide, the last thing we wanted to do was to inconvenience or cause hardship for our patients.”

Citing reimbursement substantially below its peer institutions in neighboring states, Medical Center administrators en-gaged Blue Cross in negotiations earlier this year.

As the state’s only academic medi-cal center, UMMC provides advanced care not available at other Mississippi facilities, including the state’s only Level 1 Trauma Center, only children’s hospital and chil-dren’s trauma services, only level IV neo-natal intensive care unit and its only organ transplant services, among many others.

Together with the Mississippi State Department of Health, UMMC leads the state’s medical response during disasters. The availability of these services benefits all Mississippians.

As well, UMMC cares for the state’s most complex medical cases, which often require multi-disciplinary teams of experts and sub-specialists.

UMMC initially set a June 28 dead-line to reach an agreement or terminate its contract. Negotiators extended it to July 17, and again through August 28.

Memorial Hospital at Gulfport Recognized Nationally as First in Mississippi

Memorial Hospital at Gulfport ranked as the best hospital in Mississippi, accord-ing to U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News released its 24th annual Best Hos-pitals rankings, recognizing hospitals that excel in treating patients who need an es-pecially high level of care. Memorial was ranked #1 of 116 hospitals that serve the residents of Mississippi.

U.S. News also listed Memorial among the top hospitals in the nation for Diabetes and Endocrinology care. It was the only hospital in Mississippi to receive national recognition in any of the 16 medical spe-cialties studied by U.S. News. Memorial ranked 42nd nationally in this category, which measures Diabetes and Endocrinol-ogy patients’ survival, safety and volume, as well as nurse staffing. Only 147 hospi-tals in the U.S. received a national ranking for any of the medical specialties that were measured.

Six other specialties at Memorial were rated as high-performing. These included Gastroenterology and GI Surgery, Geriat-rics, Nephrology, Neurology and Neuro-surgery, Pulmonology and Urology.

The hospital scored high in patient safety, “demonstrating commitment to re-ducing accidents and medical mistakes,” according to U.S. News. Patients also gave Memorial scores higher than national and state averages in patient satisfaction cat-egories. These rankings are designed to help patients and their families identify the best places to seek high-quality care within their community and health insur-ance network. To determine the rankings, U.S. News analyzed data for nearly 5,000 healthcare facilities nationwide.

Rush Foundation Hospital Achieves Prestigious Iso 9001:2008 Quality Certification

Rush Foundation Hospital has recently been notified that it has been certified as an ISO 9001:2008, Quality Management Systems compliant organization. This certification is accredited by DNV Certification Inc. of Houston TX. Rush Foundation Hospital is one of only three hospitals in the state and one of only fifty in the nation to achieve this distinction.

ISO 9001 is a standard related to quality management systems and is designed to help organizations ensure that they meet the needs of patients, medical staff members and employees.

Chuck Reece, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Rush Health Systems noted that the procedures and standards that are learned and implemented dur-ing the ISO 9001:2008 evaluation process allow Rush Foundation Hospital to develop more sustainable quality performance.

To become certified as ISO 9001:2008 compliant, Rush Foundation Hospital, Women’s Healthcare Center, and Rush Rehabilitative Services underwent a 36 month evaluation process that included development of a formal quality management system (QMS), man-agement systems review, employee training, process documentation, establishment of process metrics and a pre-audit initial assessment; all of which are required to be in compli-ance with the ISO 9001:2008 standard. The process culminated in a four-day registration audit by DNV. A certificate of registration was issued to the organization on May 23, 2013.

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14 > SEPTEMBER 2013 m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m

Reece named chairman of MHA Board of Governors

Chuck A. Reece, President of Rush Foundation Hospital and Executive Vice President and Chief Op-erating Officer of Rush Health Systems, was re-cently elected Chairman of the 2013-2014 Mississippi Hospital Association (MHA) Board of Governors during MHA’s 82nd Annual Lead-ership Conference.

Mr. Reece has held numerous ad-ministrative positions within Rush Health Systems since 1972. He is a graduate of Mississippi State University and the Execu-tive MBA program at Vanderbilt University.

First Mohs surgeon in North Mississippi

Advanced Dermatology & Skin Can-cer Associates has expanded into DeSoto County, Miss. The new clinic, located in Olive Branch, expands the practice’s der-matology practice. The DeSoto location opened in April 2013, with the Medi Spa that opened in July. ADSCA is the only Mohs surgery clinic in North Mississippi be-tween Jackson, Miss. and Memphis, Tenn.

The DeSoto clinic offers complete dermatological and cosmetic services, in-cluding Mohs surgery, which boasts a 99 percent cure rate for skin cancer, including melanoma. It is the first clinic to offer Mohs surgery in North Mississippi. It will also be home to a medical spa offering non-sur-gical cosmetic procedures, which is a new addition to ADSCA’s business. The DeSoto location has 12 patient rooms and a medi-cal spa, and employs a dermatologist, aes-thetician and physician assistants available for same-day and next-day appointments.

Moore Named NMMC

PresidentTim Moore has been appointed as

president of North Mississippi Medical Center-Tupelo, a 650-bed regional referral center that is the largest, private, not-for-profit hospital in Missis-sippi.

Since April 2012, Moore has served as vice president of North Mississippi Health Services’ community hospitals, working closely with the facilities in Eupora, Iuka, Pontotoc and West Point, Miss., as well as Hamilton, Ala.

Moore came to Tupelo from Meridian, where he had served as system vice presi-dent of regional operations for Rush Health Systems since March 2007. Prior to that, Moore was affiliated with NMHS, serving as administrator of North Mississippi Medical Center-West Point from 2003-2007.

A native of Forest in Scott County, Moore holds an associate’s degree in ra-diological technology from Meridian Com-munity College and a bachelor’s degree in industrial science from Mississippi State University. He earned a master’s degree in health care management from the Univer-sity of New Orleans in 2003.

Mississippi Medical News is published monthly by Medical News, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of SouthComm, Inc. ©2013 Medical News Commu-nications. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Medical News will assume no responsibilities for unsolicited materials. All letters sent to Medical News will be considered Medical News property and therefore uncondition-ally assigned to Medical News for publication and copyright purposes.

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Tim Moore

Page 15: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

m i s s i s s i p p i m e d i c a l n e w s . c o m SEPTEMBER 2013 > 15

Athletes want doctors they can trust. That’s why Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center is the state’s leading full-service orthopaedic specialty practice.

Our sixteen board certified, fellowship trained specialists routinely perform shoulder, elbow, hand, hip, knee, ankle and foot procedures, and guide these patients through rehabilitation to complete recovery.

We wish all our Junior High, High School, and College football teams in Mississippi a great 2013-14 season.

Support Our Mississippi Athletes. MSMOC... because Life is a Sport.

SATURDAY MORNING CLINIC : For high school and junior high athletes from 8-11 am during football season. Orthopaedic Exam & Physical Therapy FREE. X-rays and MRI available.

The Team Behind YOUR Team.

Jeff D. Almand, M.D. Gene R. Barrett, M.D.Austin M. Barrett, M.D.Jamey W. Burrow, M.D.

Graham C. Calvert, M.D.Jason A. Craft, M.D. Chris Ethridge, M.D. Larry D. Field, M.D.

E. Rhett Hobgood, M.D. Brian P. Johnson, M.D. Penny J. Lawin, M.D. Robert K. Mehrle Jr., M.D.

James W. O’Mara, M.D. Trevor R. Pickering, M.D. James Randall Ramsey, M.D. Walter R. Shelton, M.D.

Toll Free (800) 624.9168 or (601) 354.4488 - www.msmoc.com

1325 East Fortification StreetJackson, MS 39202

401 Baptist Drive, Suite 301Madison, MS 39110

4309 Lakeland DriveFlowood, MS 39232

Scan the QR code to the right with your smartphone to get Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center website information. While you are there be sure to click on our facebook link and Like Us and Follow Us on Twitter. Now download the MSMOC Mobile Application on your smartphone!

Page 16: Mississippi Medical News Sept 2013

1 0 2 0 H I G H L A N D C O L O N Y PA R K W AY, S U I T E 4 0 0 , R I D G E L A N D , M S 3 9 1 5 7© 2 0 1 3 H O R N E L L P

A L A B A M A | L O U I S I A N A | M I S S I S S I P P I | T E N N E S S E E | T E X A S

HEALTH CARE REFORM

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