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D.E. RAY Managing Editor NASHVILLE - The Nash- ville city park commission held a special meeting at Western Sizzlin in Nashville this past Sunday afternoon, which was combined with their annual park planning committee meeting. The regular session saw commissioners discussing a range of topics dealing with park properties. Park direc- tor Nikki Cherry reported that repairs for damage to lights from storms this sum- mer were nearly complete, and that the replaced lights were set on photo-reactive cells rather than timers. She also reported that repainting and re-caulking of windows at the Legion Hut, which the parks department manages, are underway, and expressed concern that some of the windows would need re- placement. Commission pre- siding officer Freddie Horne instead recommended that storm windows be placed over the existing windows for the time being, as they would not interfere with the build- ings status on the historical registry and would provide some insulating effect for the building. Cherry then discussed two bidding issues for mi- nor building projects at the park. The first, a bid for the construction of 10 foot fences on either end of the new basketball court at the main park on Johnson Street, was submitted at a cost of $9,526.00. Commissioners asked Cherry to research if using two four-foot sections, as will be used around the rest of the court, stacked on top of each other to make an eight foot fence would be cheaper. Commissioners also sug- gested a simplified design for the extended fencing and netting for the baseball fields which would incor- porate existing structures rather than requiring their removal. Cherry responded that the proposed use of metal sleeves to go over the pipes currently serving as the backstop behind home plate would be easy for the contractors that had shown interest in the project to com- plete, and that she expects the project to be finished by the end of November. The group then discussed the expense of extending utilities to a new pavilion constructed at the main park, with Cherry report- ing that extending water lines would cost only about $300, but that because a new transformer would need to be placed extending electri- cal service to the structure THURSDAY • September 25, 2014 • Issue 77 • 1 Section • 12 Pages • USPS 371-540 • 75 cents • PUBLISHED EACH MONDAY & THURSDAY In Howard County, Arkansas since 1878 The Nashville News Waste collection rates in the city of Nashville are set to increase beginning next month. According to a letter submitted to the city by Waste Management Public Sector Solutions Manager Doug Sims, the company is insti- tuting a two percent hike in rates, based on the Consumer Price Index. Begin- ning Oct. 1, resi- dential rates will rise to $11.95 for most users and $6.67 for senior citizens, while commercial rates will increase to between $21.72 and $252.16 depending on the type of service a business requests of Waste Management. Waste Manage- ment is entitled to adjust rates as it sees it each September per the contract they have with the city. Trash rates to rise next month The Scrapper Booster Club will host a tailgate party Fri., Sept. 26 ahead of the Scrappers’ home opener against Arkadelphia. The event is set to begin at 4:30 p.m. on the team’s practice ield and will include a pep rally, bounce houses and a performance by pee wee cheer- leaders in addition to the opportunity to purchase Scrapper gear, candles, hair extensions, shirts and multiple other items. Food for the event will consist of cupcakes, ham- burgers, hot dogs, barbecue, baked potatoes and turkey legs. A silent auction and rafle wi ll also be held. Tailgate party set for Friday Pastor Rev. Lee Winfrey and mem- bers of Mt. Zion Baptist Church, located at 1500 Ansley Street in Nashville, will host a praise event Sun., Sept. 28 at 3 p.m. Praise can be in form of choral singing, solos, poetry, praise dance, readings or testimonials. Praise event set at Mt. Zion The Millwood Lake Focus Commit- tee and the US Army Corps of Engineers at Milwood Lake are collaborating to host the 2014 Wounded Warrior Deer Hunt, to be held Nov. 20-22. The War- rior Transition Unit of Fort Sill, OK will be bringing seven soldiers to Millwood Lake for an outdoor experience. The WTU mission is to facilitate the healing and rehabilitation of soldiers, return them to duty when possible, or prepare them for a success- ful life as a veteran in their community. Wounded Warrior hunt scheduled humans of arkansas Newhope girl documenting state in style of famed ‘Humans of New York’ creator KAtElYn CoffmAn Staff Writer A young Newhope girl has been capturing the sto- ries of people across Arkan- sas once snapshot at a time. Armed with her Cannon Rebel camera, 11 year old Katie Chandler has been approaching people from various areas of the state and sharing their anecdotes, quotes and insights on her Facebook page “Humans of Arkansas.” What began as a home school project has morphed into a page with over 1,500 “likes” and has gained Chan- dler attention from multiple news platforms. According to Chandler, for the past three years she and her sister have created a large home school project. Her inspiration for this one came from the Humans of New York Facebook page created by photographer Brandon Stanton. Chandler has been inter- ested in photography since she was seven years old. She admires Stanton’s way of capturing the raw emotion of his subjects. “You can look at the pic- ture and it’s almost like you don’t have to read the story - you can just see it on their face,” She said. While the aspiring pho- tographer enjoys taking pictures, the stories people share with her also appeal to the young lady. “I like to take the pictures most of all, but I think a lot of the stories are good be- cause you think you have it so bad then you hear someone tell you their story and you’re like ‘Wow, they’ve been through a lot,’” She explained. Not only that, but from an educational aspect, the project has taught Chan- dler and her younger sister history, sociology, culture, geography and even politics. “Home school is a lot about real world learning experiences,” explained Chandler’s mother, Amanda. While many of the people Chandler has spoken with have been happy to talk with her, some have not been as accommodating. This too has taught the young girl an important life lesson - rejec- tion. “Rejection is something she is going to encounter throughout her life and this I feel has really prepared her for it,” her mother stated. Since the project began, CHARlES GooDIn Editor NASHVILLE - City alder- men narrowly approved increases to municipal wa- ter and sewer rates Tues- day during their regular monthly meeting. The 5-6 vote came fol- lowing an address by Pub- lic Works Director Larry Dunaway, who said the first $23,977 payment on the $6.8 million USDA loan used to fund ongoing improve- ments to the city’s water and sewer infrastructure is coming due sooner than he expected. “Me and Keith Hus- key with USDA were talk- ing about it, and he said, ‘Yaknow, we’re gonna have to get an account set up for the government to elector- nically debit this money pretty quick because those payments start coming due in October,’” Dunaway said. “I said, ‘Nah, it ain’t Octo- ber. We had 18 months.’ So, he showed me, and he was right - it was 13 months. I was thinking 18 months or I would have said something about it before now.” Dunaway presented al- dermen with two options for increasing the rates. The first would have raised a projected $180,344 in additional revenue by in- creasing minimum water by $1 per month, water consumption by 10 cents per 1,000 gallons, minimum sewer by $1 and sewer con- sumption by 50 cents per 1,000 gallons. A second op- tion, which was ultimately selected by the council, increased water minimums by $2 per month, water consumption by 10 cents per 1,000 gallons, minimum sewer by $2 and sewer consumption by 50 cents per 1,000 gallons, raising an additional $226,496 for the city, according to pro- jections. Both proposals applied the same increases to se- nior citizen rates, which will now jump to a water minimum of $8.98 monthly and a sewer minimum of $11.70. The rate hikes are actu- ally the second phase of in- creases that were originally discussed three years ago at the conclusion of former Mayor Mike Reese’s term in office. As its first official act under current Mayor Billy Ray Jones, the council approved a $4 increase to sewer minimums, a 50 cent increase to water consump- tion, a five percent hike on the water minimum and a 10 cent hike in water consumption. The second phase represents the total amount USDA recommend- ed raising rates in order to facilitate payments on the loan. “When we raised rates in 2011 ... well, that rate in- crease was half of what the rate study suggested,” Dun- away said. “We’re generat- ing about $163,000 more from the rate increase than before the rate increase. What we have to generate to make this payment every month is $287,000 a year. So, these proposals are based on those numbers.” Dunaway told alder- men he was in favor of the higher increase, in part due to fears that the cost of operating the waste wa- ter treatment plant may increase as a result of the improvements. “We don’t know what our operational costs are going to be versus what we’re doing now. We’re expecting them to be a little higher, but who knows?” he said. “We don’t know what our chemical useage is gonna be. We know we’re losing some things we’re using now but we don’t know what we’re gonna be using in other parts of the system, so this is one factor that’s a little iffy.” Jones disagreed with Dunaway’s assessment of the possible costs involved in operating the improved waste water plant, say- ing it will likely cost less than the current facility, but discussion among the council indicated that a majority felt asking for the larger increase now would be better accepted by the public than having to ask Water and sewer rate hike approved D.E. RAY | Nashville News Park commissioners James Reed, Jason Harrison, Josh Tice, Dale Patrick, Deborah Marshall, Donny Woods, Freddie Horne and park director Nikki Cherry at their recent special meeting at Western Sizzlin in Nashville. Commissioner Leslie White was not present at the meeting. Park commissioners planning for the future See HUmAnS | Page 10 See HIKE | Page 10 See PARK | Page 10
Transcript
Page 1: Nashville News The · NASHVILLE - The Nash- ... purchase Scrapper gear, candles, hair extensions, ... tee and the US Army Corps of Engineers at Milwood Lake are

D.E. RAYManaging Editor

NASHVILLE - The Nash-ville city park commission held a special meeting at Western Sizzlin in Nashville this past Sunday afternoon, which was combined with their annual park planning committee meeting.

The regular session saw commissioners discussing a range of topics dealing with park properties. Park direc-tor Nikki Cherry reported that repairs for damage to lights from storms this sum-mer were nearly complete, and that the replaced lights were set on photo-reactive cells rather than timers. She also reported that repainting and re-caulking of windows at the Legion Hut, which the parks department manages, are underway, and expressed concern that some of the windows would need re-placement. Commission pre-

siding officer Freddie Horne instead recommended that storm windows be placed over the existing windows for the time being, as they would not interfere with the build-ings status on the historical registry and would provide some insulating effect for the building.

Cherry then discussed two bidding issues for mi-nor building projects at the park. The first, a bid for the construction of 10 foot fences on either end of the new basketball court at the main park on Johnson Street, was submitted at a cost of $9,526.00. Commissioners asked Cherry to research if using two four-foot sections, as will be used around the rest of the court, stacked on top of each other to make an eight foot fence would be cheaper.

Commissioners also sug-gested a simplified design for the extended fencing

and netting for the baseball fields which would incor-porate existing structures rather than requiring their removal. Cherry responded that the proposed use of metal sleeves to go over the pipes currently serving as the backstop behind home

plate would be easy for the contractors that had shown interest in the project to com-plete, and that she expects the project to be finished by the end of November.

The group then discussed the expense of extending utilities to a new pavilion

constructed at the main park, with Cherry report-ing that extending water lines would cost only about $300, but that because a new transformer would need to be placed extending electri-cal service to the structure

THURSDAY • September 25, 2014 • Issue 77 • 1 Section • 12 Pages • USPS 371-540 • 75 cents • PUBLISHED EACH MONDAY & THURSDAY In Howard County, Arkansas since 1878

The

Nashville NewsWaste collection

rates in the city of Nashville are set to increase beginning next month.

According to a letter submitted to the city by Waste Management Public Sector Solutions Manager Doug Sims, the company is insti-tuting a two percent hike in rates, based on the Consumer Price Index. Begin-ning Oct. 1, resi-dential rates will rise to $11.95 for most users and $6.67 for senior citizens, while commercial rates will increase to between $21.72 and $252.16 depending on the type of service a business requests of Waste Management.

Waste Manage-ment is entitled to adjust rates as it sees it each September per the contract they have with the city.

Trash rates to rise next month

The Scrapper Booster Club will host a tailgate party Fri., Sept. 26 ahead of the Scrappers’ home opener against Arkadelphia. The event is set to begin at 4:30 p.m. on the team’s practice ield and will include a pep rally, bounce houses and a performance by pee wee cheer-leaders in addition to the opportunity to purchase Scrapper gear, candles, hair extensions, shirts and multiple other items. Food for the event will consist of cupcakes, ham-burgers, hot dogs, barbecue, baked potatoes and turkey legs. A silent auction and rafle will also be held.

Tailgate party set for Friday

Pastor Rev. Lee Winfrey and mem-bers of Mt. Zion Baptist Church, located at 1500 Ansley Street in Nashville, will host a praise event Sun., Sept. 28 at 3 p.m. Praise can be in form of choral singing, solos, poetry, praise dance, readings or testimonials.

Praise event set at Mt. Zion

The Millwood Lake Focus Commit-tee and the US Army Corps of Engineers at Milwood Lake are collaborating to host the 2014 Wounded Warrior Deer Hunt, to be held Nov. 20-22. The War-rior Transition Unit of Fort Sill, OK will be bringing seven soldiers to Millwood Lake for an outdoor experience. The WTU mission is to facilitate the healing and rehabilitation of soldiers, return them to duty when possible, or prepare them for a success-ful life as a veteran in their community.

Wounded Warrior hunt scheduled

humans of arkansasNewhope girl documenting state in style

of famed ‘Humans of New York’ creatorKAtElYn CoffmAn

Staff Writer

A young Newhope girl has been capturing the sto-ries of people across Arkan-sas once snapshot at a time. Armed with her Cannon Rebel camera, 11 year old Katie Chandler has been approaching people from various areas of the state and sharing their anecdotes, quotes and insights on her Facebook page “Humans of Arkansas.”

What began as a home school project has morphed into a page with over 1,500 “likes” and has gained Chan-dler attention from multiple news platforms.

According to Chandler, for the past three years she and her sister have created a large home school project. Her inspiration for this one

came from the Humans of New York Facebook page created by photographer Brandon Stanton.

Chandler has been inter-ested in photography since she was seven years old. She admires Stanton’s way of capturing the raw emotion of his subjects.

“You can look at the pic-ture and it’s almost like you don’t have to read the story - you can just see it on their face,” She said.

While the aspiring pho-tographer enjoys taking pictures, the stories people share with her also appeal to the young lady.

“I like to take the pictures most of all, but I think a lot of the stories are good be-cause you think you have it so bad then you hear someone tell you their story and you’re like ‘Wow, they’ve

been through a lot,’” She explained.

Not only that, but from an educational aspect, the project has taught Chan-dler and her younger sister history, sociology, culture, geography and even politics.

“Home school is a lot about real world learning experiences,” explained Chandler’s mother, Amanda.

While many of the people Chandler has spoken with have been happy to talk with her, some have not been as accommodating. This too has taught the young girl an important life lesson - rejec-tion.

“Rejection is something she is going to encounter throughout her life and this I feel has really prepared her for it,” her mother stated.

Since the project began,

CHARlES GooDInEditor

NASHVILLE - City alder-men narrowly approved increases to municipal wa-ter and sewer rates Tues-day during their regular monthly meeting.

The 5-6 vote came fol-lowing an address by Pub-lic Works Director Larry Dunaway, who said the first $23,977 payment on the $6.8 million USDA loan used to fund ongoing improve-ments to the city’s water and sewer infrastructure is coming due sooner than he expected.

“Me and Keith Hus-key with USDA were talk-ing about it, and he said, ‘Yaknow, we’re gonna have to get an account set up for the government to elector-nically debit this money pretty quick because those payments start coming due in October,’” Dunaway said. “I said, ‘Nah, it ain’t Octo-ber. We had 18 months.’ So, he showed me, and he was right - it was 13 months. I was thinking 18 months or I would have said something about it before now.”

Dunaway presented al-dermen with two options for increasing the rates. The first would have raised a projected $180,344 in additional revenue by in-creasing minimum water by $1 per month, water consumption by 10 cents per 1,000 gallons, minimum sewer by $1 and sewer con-sumption by 50 cents per 1,000 gallons. A second op-tion, which was ultimately selected by the council, increased water minimums by $2 per month, water consumption by 10 cents per 1,000 gallons, minimum sewer by $2 and sewer consumption by 50 cents per 1,000 gallons, raising an additional $226,496 for the city, according to pro-jections.

Both proposals applied the same increases to se-nior citizen rates, which will now jump to a water minimum of $8.98 monthly and a sewer minimum of $11.70.

The rate hikes are actu-

ally the second phase of in-creases that were originally discussed three years ago at the conclusion of former Mayor Mike Reese’s term in office. As its first official act under current Mayor Billy Ray Jones, the council approved a $4 increase to sewer minimums, a 50 cent increase to water consump-tion, a five percent hike on the water minimum and a 10 cent hike in water consumption. The second phase represents the total amount USDA recommend-ed raising rates in order to facilitate payments on the loan.

“When we raised rates in 2011 ... well, that rate in-crease was half of what the rate study suggested,” Dun-away said. “We’re generat-ing about $163,000 more from the rate increase than before the rate increase. What we have to generate to make this payment every month is $287,000 a year. So, these proposals are based on those numbers.”

Dunaway told alder-men he was in favor of the higher increase, in part due to fears that the cost of operating the waste wa-ter treatment plant may increase as a result of the improvements.

“We don’t know what our operational costs are going to be versus what we’re doing now. We’re expecting them to be a little higher, but who knows?” he said. “We don’t know what our chemical useage is gonna be. We know we’re losing some things we’re using now but we don’t know what we’re gonna be using in other parts of the system, so this is one factor that’s a little iffy.”

Jones disagreed with Dunaway’s assessment of the possible costs involved in operating the improved waste water plant, say-ing it will likely cost less than the current facility, but discussion among the council indicated that a majority felt asking for the larger increase now would be better accepted by the public than having to ask

Water and sewer rate hike approved

D.E. RAY | Nashville News

Park commissioners James Reed, Jason Harrison, Josh Tice, Dale Patrick, Deborah Marshall, Donny Woods, Freddie Horne and park director Nikki Cherry at their recent special meeting at Western Sizzlin in Nashville. Commissioner Leslie White was not present at the meeting.

Park commissioners planning for the future

See HUmAnS | Page 10 See HIKE | Page 10

See PARK | Page 10

Page 2: Nashville News The · NASHVILLE - The Nash- ... purchase Scrapper gear, candles, hair extensions, ... tee and the US Army Corps of Engineers at Milwood Lake are

2 Editorial The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, September 25, 2014

Postmaster, send Change of address to:

P.o. Box 297Nashville, ar 71852

Louis ‘Swampy’ Graves, Editor and Editor Emeritus, 1950-2001

Mike Graves, CEO/PublisherDonna Harwell, Comptroller/Office Mgr.Charles Goodin, EditorD.E. Ray, Managing Editor Katie Whisenhunt, Advertising Sales Cindy Harding, Circulation Manager

The News is the oldest active business in Howard County -- Founded in 1878.

Find us on the Internet at: www.swarkansasnews.com

The Nashville News

USPS 371-540 P.O. Box 297 418 N. Main St. Nashville, AR 71852

Telephone (870) 845-2010Fax (870) 845-5091

Toll Free 1-888-845-NEWSEstablished 1878. Published since Sept. 1, 1979

by Graves Publishing Company, Inc.Lawrence Graves, President

Subscription rates:$30.00 per year in Howard, Pike, Sevier, Little River

and Hempstead counties;$50.00 elsewhere in continental United States

Periodicals Postage Paid at Nashville, Arkansas

Any erroneous statement published in the newspaper will be gladly and promptly corrected after management is notified.

The News is a twice weekly publication.

Tacked to the wall of Greg Orman’s campaign office is a print of a John Steuart Curry painting, “Tragic Prelude,” that hangs in the capitol in Topeka. It depicts John Brown of Osawatomie, 39 miles south of here, as what he was, a deranged product of “bleeding Kansas,” the Civil War’s over-ture. Today, Orman, who is as calm as Brown was crazed, is emblematic of fascinating Kansas.

Orman wants to deny Pat Roberts a fourth Senate term, thereby ending a congressional career that began in 1981 with 16 years in the House. Orman, who favors term limits and pledges to serve only two terms, is running as an independent. The Democrats’ nominee has dropped out of the race, so Orman, 45, or Roberts, 78, will be a senator come January. Sensible Kan-sans have a problematic choice to ponder: Electing Orman would deepen the Senate’s pool of talent, but it might thwart Republican efforts to control the Senate.

Kansas has not elected a Democratic senator since 1932 and has voted Republican in 12 consecutive presidential elec-tions. It has, however, had Democratic governors during 28 of the last 50 years, and its Republican senators have often had Bob Dole’s “collaborative” (Orman’s approving word) style. Orman has made campaign contributions to Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and Harry Reid, and voted for Obama in 2008 but favored Romney in 2012.

Orman discusses policy problems with a fluency rare among Senate candidates and unusual among senators. From his firmly Republican father, who owns a small furniture store in Stanley, Kansas, Orman acquired an animus against “the beehive of regulations”: One regulation is a “pinprick” but cumulatively regulations are akin to “falling into a beehive.” He is reading Paul Ryan’s new book, and shares Ryan’s anxi-ety about how nearly 60 percent of the federal expenditures are not subject to annual appropriations. He also shares Ryan’s dismay that a single mother earning about $20,000 can pay, in effect, a marginal tax rate twice as high as the 39.6 percent top statutory rate on the affluent because she can lose government benefits and incur expenses when she increases her earnings.

Orman is anxious about the deficit explosion that will occur when the cost of government borrowing doubles, as surely it will. (“Deficits are nothing more than deferred

taxes.”) But when asked about even such a minor change in entitlement spending as the “chained CPI” recalculation of inflation, he is noncommittal. Independent politicians are politicians, too.

In high school, Orman became national president of Boys Nation, which earned in 1986 a Rose Garden ceremony with

Ronald Reagan. In 1988, while at Princeton, he did some work for George H.W. Bush’s presi-dential campaign. That year, Orman says, a sight on New York’s subway -- two children clinging to their father, who did not seem to feel safe -- quickened his interest in politics, which has occupied more of his life since business success made him wealthy.

In Orman’s office here, Princeton’s 1991 yearbook is open to the page with his picture. Next to it is a pungent quotation he chose from Ross Perot (“The wimps are us”), who a year later as an independent presidential candidate would receive 19 percent of the popular vote, including 27 percent in Kansas.

Orman, who says he will caucus with whichever party is “clearly” in the majority next year, has a month to clarify “clearly.” If in January there are 51 or more Republican sena-tors and 48 Democrats (counting the two “independents” who caucus with them), Orman would join the Republicans. If there are 50 Republicans and 49 Democrats, would Orman conduct an auction: What problem-solving agenda would each party outline to engage him to give it control? (Demo-crats have Vice President Biden as a tie-breaker.) Orman’s “clearly” might indicate his understanding that a narrow Republican majority won in 2014 might evaporate in 2016, when Republicans will be defending 24 seats rather than this year’s 15.

The Senate’s intellectual voltage would be increased by Orman’s election. But improving 1 percent of the Senate is less important than taking 100 percent of Senate control from Harry Reid, who has debased the institution to serve Barack Obama, whose job approval among Kansans is just 40 percent.

Some Kansans will try to calculate whether they can send Orman to a Senate that will be “clearly” controlled by Republicans. So, this campaign is a prelude to a wager with national consequences.

GEORGE

WILLWashington

Post

High stakes in Kansas

Some pundits are saying that President Obama has been floundering in his response to the ISIS crisis because public opinion polls show most Americans don’t want another war.

In all my 84 years, I cannot recall a time when most Ameri-cans wanted war. That is something we should be proud of. But wars are not always optional.

Even World War II — which some have called “the good war” — was not something that most Americans wanted. But the Japanese took that decision out of our hands when they bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. And Hitler removed any possible doubt when he declared war on us shortly afterward, making sure that we were in the war all over the world.

No one has promoted the dangerous notion that war is optional more than Barack Obama. He declared peace in Iraq when he pulled American troops out, and he declared victory over Al Qaeda because his administration had killed bin Laden (with an assist from the Navy SEALS). But all this make-believe has come back to haunt him, as make-believe often does.

Make no mistake about it, make-believe wins elections — and winning elections is Obama’s thing. The big problem is that the things that win elections are not the things that win wars.

With an eye on the upcoming Congressional elections, Barack Obama has assured all and sundry that there will be no American “boots on the ground” in the fight against ISIS. But telling your enemy in advance what you will or will not do is not the way to win wars.

This is not rocket science, and Obama either already knows it or he has military advisers who will tell him, if he will listen. But the military have their priorities and Obama has his, even if his political priorities can end up costing far more American lives than hitting ISIS with everything we have got ASAP.

The longer the war drags on, through half-measures and tentative tactics, the longer ISIS has to recalibrate its strategies and to sneak its agents into the United States, to launch terrorist attacks inside the American homeland. We can either kill them over there now or have them kill Americans here later.

The longer our potential allies have to wonder whether

President Obama is serious, the longer they will hold back from making full commitments, knowing how the Obama administration began by betraying existing American com-mitments to Poland and the Czech Republic, followed by undermining Israel’s position in the Middle East and then throwing Ukraine to the wolves when push came to shove, by refusing to let them have weapons to defend themselves.

When Winston Churchill surveyed the staggering mag-nitude of worldwide carnage and destruction at the end of World War II, he said that there was never a war easier to prevent than the one which had just devastated so much of the world.

He said that the earlier we would have op-posed Hitler, the lower the cost would have been.

At one time, according to Churchill, a memorandum could have stopped Hitler, given the balance of military power against him early on.

When Hitler stationed troops in the Rhine-land in 1936, in violation of major international

treaties, the military commanders in charge of those troops had orders to retreat at the first sign of French military op-position, since France alone at that point could have over-whelmed the German army as it existed then.

Although France at that point was militarily capable of stopping Hitler in his tracks, and preventing World War II, politically the French government dared not move. The French people, with the horrors of the First World War still painfully vivid in their memories, wanted no part in military operations.

The net result was that Hitler grew stronger militarily over the years and then invaded France at a time of his choosing. The French then found themselves at war, whether they wanted to be or not. And they soon found themselves defeated and subjugated under Nazi rule.

Barack Obama has done more than anyone else to pro-mote the dangerous illusion that we can choose whether to have a war or not. But our enemies have already made that choice.

Retired Marine Corps General James Mattis said: “No war is over until the enemy says it’s over. We may think it’s over, we may declare it over, but in fact, the enemy gets a vote.”

ThOmas

sOWELL

Creators

Syndicate

Who wants war?

On March 2, 1819, the Arkansas Territory was created, with the capital at the small outpost at Arkansas Post. Arkansas Post was the first European city founded in what would become Arkansas, but by 1820, the members of the new territorial legislature realized that a new capital would be needed. The decision where to base the government for Arkansas would have profound effects upon the future economic and political development of Arkansas.

Arkansas Post had been founded by Henri de Tonti, a French soldier and fur trader, in 1686 and had served as a trading post for the various French, Spanish, and Native American fur trappers in the area. It served as the admin-istrative center for the region while the French and Span-ish controlled the region, and Spain would maintain a small garrison at the settlement for many years. Located in what is now Arkansas County where the Arkansas and White Rivers meet just west of the Mississippi River, it was conveniently located for the river traffic of the day, but flooding plagued the post almost from its founding.

Flooding forced Arkansas Post to move three times. The population never rose above 500 residents, and by 1820, overland trade was moving steadily west of the Mis-sissippi River.

Some states would move their capitals repeatedly. Georgia would move its capital ten times between its founding as a colony in 1733 and 1807. It would be moved several more times before settling on Atlanta in 1868. Tennessee similarly would move its capital eight times between 1790 and 1826. After Louisiana gained statehood in 1812, it would move its capital seven times by 1880. And probably the strangest of all: between 1776 and 1853, Rhode Island would rotate its capital annually among the county seats of each of its five counties.

Territorial legislators decided on two possible sites further up the Arkansas River: Cadron, in what is now Faulkner County, and a site called “Petit Roche” further downstream. John McElmurry and a group of investors had planned a community on sixty-four acres on Cadron Creek in 1818 to entice settlers and furiously lobbied leg-islators for the capital. In February 1820, Territorial Gov. James Miller signed a law naming Cadron as the county seat for Pulaski County, whose original borders would take up most of Central Arkansas. Legislators appropri-ated some $1,400 to fund a jail and county courthouse at Cadron.

“La Petit Roche,” some 30 miles to the southeast, had been discovered by French explorer Bernard de la Harpe in 1722, noting the small outcropping of rock on the Arkansas River as a geographical reference. By 1820, a ferry across the river had found success but attracted few settlers. However, land speculators led by William Russell of St. Louis, pushed for a town to be founded on the site and for it to be the new capital for Arkansas, named Little Rock.

When legislators met again in October, several promi-nent politicians had acquired property in Little Rock, including legislators, judges, and Gov. Miller. Some, like Miller, hedged their bets and had property at both settle-ments. By October 10, 1820, the bill to name Little Rock the new capital passed, reluctantly signed by Miller, and the government moved into the newly founded town the next year.

Little Rock would be incorporated in 1831 and grew to become a thriving city of 195,000. Cadron, however, would fade from history, with the settlement all but abandoned by 1830. While Cadron Township exists on paper in Faulkner County, it has been all but eclipsed by its boom-ing neighbor just to the east, Conway.

n n n

Dr. Kenneth Bridges, a History Professor at South Ar-kansas Community College in El Dorado, can be reached at [email protected]. The South Arkansas Historical Foundation is dedicated to educating the public about the state’s rich history. The SAHF can be contacted at PO Box 144, El Dorado, AR, 71730, at 870-862-9890 or at http://soarkhistory.com/.

DR. kEnnETh

bRIDGEsHistory

Professor

Henri de tonti and the choosing

of little Rock

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Thursday, September 25, 2014 | The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 Community 3

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Ella McCrary Jones, 89, Beloved Mother, September 23Ella Gladys (Missie) McCrary Jones

passed from this life on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 in Fort Smith, Arkansas Missie was born in Temperanceville, Arkansas, near Nashville, on November 6,

1924 to Violia Wakeield and Clyde Owens McCrary.

She loved the hills of Arkansas and spent most of her life in west and southwest areas of the state.

Missie was preceded in death by her devoted husband of 67 years, Herman Dale Jones; her parents, Miss Ola and Mr. Clyde; her sisters, Mamie Helen Jones, Katie Mae Cooper, Dovie Clyde McCrary; her brother, James Matthew McCrary; her nephew, Carl Owens McCrary; and in-laws Ora and Richard Jones.

She is survived by her beloved children, David Jones of Omaha, Texas, Cathy Walker of Atlanta, Georgia, Barbara Evans of Fort Smith, Linda Jones of Naples, Texas and Steven Jones of Jessieville; daughters-in-law, Sandra Jones and Belinda Jones; grandchildren, Stephanie Cortez, Monica Mathie, Susan Walker, Emily Walker, Ryan Jones and Lacey Tillman; brother-in-law Charles Jones, sister-in-law Marie McCrary; ten great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Missie was a loving wife, mother and grandmother, a homemaker and a very bright and talented member

of the “greatest generation”. With a life long love of reading, Missie became self-taught and

skilled in many areas. In addition to being an excellent seamstress and accomplished knitter, Missie was an exceptional cook, baker and candy maker. Folks sought out her dishes at church potluck dinners and other social gatherings. In Nashville, DeQueen, Ashdown, Waldron and Mena, she will be

remembered for her cake decorating skills, having made beautiful and exquisitely detailed

cakes for all occasions. Her children always had special birthday cakes and their teachers were often the recipients of her lovely ‘basket of lowers’ cake.

Missie was of the Baptist faith and last held memberships at Faith Missionary Baptist Church in Mena and Immanuel Baptist Church in Nashville. As the mother of a special needs child, Missie and her husband Dale were early members of the ARC and advocates of public school services for all children.

In lieu of lowers, donations in her memory may be made to The ARC, the Alzheimer’s Association, or the American Diabetes Association.

Graveside services will be on Sunday, September28, 2014 at 2:00 PM at County Line Cemetery in Nashville, AR with Brother Glen Green oficiating under the direction of Latimer Funeral Home, Nashville.

You may send an online sympathy message at www.latimerfuneralhome.com.

Charles “Batman” BattsMr. Charles Edward Batts “Batman, 61, of Fulton,

Arkansas, passed away September 20, 2014. He was born March 31, 1953 in Texarkana, Arkansas.

He is survived by his wife, Terry Batts; step-mom, Margie Sue Batts; three daughters, Tonoka Batts of Little Rock, Christina Batts (Maurice) Bull of Los Angeles, California, and Marsha (Kelvin) Batts of Midland, Texas; three stepsons, Shaun (Alesha) Collins of Mineral Springs, Reginald (Laquita) Lewis, Jr. of Jonesboro and Trevor (Macy) Lewis of Mineral Springs; eight brothers, James (Sheila) Batts, Ronald (Janice) Batts, Andrew Atkins all of Texarkana, Tony Batts of Texarkana, Texas, LaTier (Misty) Davis of Ashdown, Willie James Atkins of Little Rock, Tommie (Yolunda) Price and Sammie Price of Waco, Texas; ive sisters, Rosie (Charles) Tyous of Texarkana, Texas, Betty (James) Green of Mercho Valley, California, Laquessa Batts, Shauntel Collins and Gus Lee Beasly all of Texarkana; 13 grandchildren; and a host of relatives and friends

Visitation will be 3:00-5:00 pm Friday at the funeral home.

Funeral services will be held 11:00 am Saturday, September 27, 2014 at M. H. Peeples Auditorium in Saratoga. Burial will be at Camp Springs Cemetery in Columbus.

Arrangements entrusted to Hicks Funeral Home, Inc.

Jeremy Simms-WatsonJeremy Lee Simms-Watson age 22 of Hot Springs

faced his untimely death Monday, September 22, 2014. He was born February 26, 1992 in Hope, Arkansas to George and Yolanda Rogers Watson.

Survivors include his son, Jeremy Simms of Hot Springs; his father, George Watson, Sr of Mineral Springs; his mother, Yolanda Watson of Hot Springs; siblings, Denise Watson of Hot Springs, George Watson, Jr, Scottanya (Roderick) Scott, Michelle Watson and Sabrina Watson, all of Little Rock; grandparents; Clyde and Ruth Ann Rogers of Texarkana and Beryl Watson of Detroit, Michigan; step-siblings, AnReckez and Amanda Daniels; step mother, Shelia Simms of Rosston; a host of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and extended family.

Funeral services will be 11:00 a.m., Friday, September 26, 2014 in Tabernacle C.M.E. Church,1670 Schaal Road, Schaal, Arkansas with the Rev. Chester Jones oficiating. Burial will follow in Jones Cemetery.

Visitation will be from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m., Thursday at the funeral home.

Guest registry is at http://www.carriganmemorial.com

Arrangements are entrusted to Carrigan Memorial Funeral Services.

Alton ParsonAlton Parson, 70, of Nashville, Arkansas, passed

away on Saturday, September 20, 2014 in Nashville. He was born on January 15, 1944 in Prescott, Arkansas, the son of the late Jewell Parsons and Lois (Hartness) Parsons King.

Survivors include his wife, Laveda Parson of Ashdown; two sons, Alan Parson and wife, Catrina of Nashville and Ryan Parson and wife, Katie of Little Rock; two daughters, Annette Fay and husband, Patrick of Vilonia and Rena Koon and husband, Brooks of Mabelvale; four stepchildren, Susan Dancer of Fouke, Misty Porter, Marcia Mitchell, and Scott Porter all of Ashdown; two sisters, Ima Semmler of Mineral Springs, and Wilma Bowden and husband, Jerry of Nashville; one half brother, Calvin Parsons of Pennsylvania; one half sister, Rhoda Small of Hope; one step sister, Doris Sillivan of Missouri; nine grandchildren; 11 step grandchildren; and three step great-grandchildren; and a host of other relatives and friends mourn his passing.

Graveside services were held at 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, September 24, 2014 at Mineral Springs Cemetery with Brother Don Embry of Ashdown and Brother Tim Freel oficiating under the direction of Latimer Funeral Home, Nashville.

Visitation was held from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the funeral home, Nashville.

You may send an online sympathy message at www.latimerfuneralhome.com.

NASHVILLE - Two area women were arrested re-cently in connection with an alleged burglary and theft.

According to a statement issued by Sheriff Butch Mor-ris, 23 year old Rachel Reed, of Nashville, was taken into custody by Deputy Steven Wakefield Sunday and 18 year old Carrington Cowart, of Glenwood, was arrested Monday by Investigator Da-vid Shelton. Morris said both face charges of burglary and theft of property related to

an incident said to have oc-curred on Dillard Creek Road in which money was taken from a residence.

Both suspects remain in jail and no bond has been set at this time.

COWART REED

two arrested in connection with thefts

Ebenezer United Method-ist Church, located at 318 West Dodson Street, will host a cookout and rummage sale fund raiser Sat., Sept. 27

beginning at 10 a.m. Sandwiches and plate

dinners will be available, and the public is invited to attend.

Church to host cookout, rummage sale fund raiser

Ninth grade students at Nashville Junior High will dedicate a memorial bench in honor of their late class-mate, Sawyer Hill, Thurs.,

Oct. 16 at the Nashville City Park beginning at 12:30 p.m. Hill was fatally injured in a car accident earlier this year.

Bench dedication set to honor late nJHS student

The Dierks High School FBLA will be holding their Powder Puff Flag Football Tournament Tues., Oct. 7 at 5:30 p.m. at the Dierks High School football field.

Freshmen will face Senior girls at 5:30, with sopho-mores playing juniors at 6 p.m. A consolation game

will be played at 6:30, and a championship face off will begin at 7 p.m.

Admission to the games will begin at 5 p.m. for a $3 entry fee. Concessions will be available.

All proceeds will go to costs of travel to the FBLA spring conference.

Powder puff football game scheduled at Dierks

A congenital heart de-fect walk will be held at the Nashville City Park Sept. 27 beginning at 9 a.m. All pro-ceeds will be donated to the Arkansas Congenital Heart Defect Coalition and Ar-kansas Children's Hospital.

You can register online at http://kiphollin.webs.com. This event is coordinated by Every Baby, Every Heart. For additional information contact Abbie Cogburn or Tyra Hughes at 870-557-5131 or 870-845-6340.

Congenital heart defect walk set at park Saturday

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4 Community The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, September 25, 2014

GREAT GIVE AWAYWho: EveryoneWhen: Saturday, Sept. 27th - 8 A.M. to NoonWhere: Mineral Springs Church of Christ318 Bridgeman Dr./Hwy 27 - Mineral Springs, AR

ITEMS WILL INCLUDE• Baby Clothes • Car Seats, High Chairs, etc. • Dishes, Kitchen Items • Men’s/Women’s Clothing • Purses • Shoes • Toys • Misc.

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Kerry Mounts and Jeff Icenhower, of Dierks, would like to announce

the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Morgan Whitney Icen-hower, of Dierks, to Dextin Blake Wheeler, also of Dierks.

Whitney is the grand daughter of Terry and the late Linda Mounts and Mike and Glenda Icenhower, all of Dierks. She is a 2008 graduate of Dierks High School, a 2010 graduate of UA Cossatot’s LPN program and a 2014 graduate of the Texarkana College’s RN

program.Dextin is the son of Danette Alspaw,

of De Queen, and Damon Wheeler, of Carlton, Minnesota. He is the grand son of Dan and Marlene Alspaw, of Ashdown, and Otis and Evonne Black-mon, also of Ashdown. Dextin is a 2007 graduate of De Queen High School and is currently employed with Oneok Pipeline.

The couple will be united in matri-mony Sat., Oct. 11 at 111 Lazy J Lane in De Queen. The ceremony is set to begin at 5 p.m., and all friends and fam-ily are invited to attend.

Campbell film to kick off Hot Springs documentary festival

HOT SPRINGS – The 23rd Annual Hot Springs Docu-mentary Film Festival will re-turn to The Arlington Resort Hotel & Spa Oct. 10-19. Mul-tiple festival events and most of the film screenings will be held at the historic hotel. As host and main sponsor of the film festival, The Arlington is offering a special room rate of $92 per night.

A documentary about country music legend Glen Campbell – “Glen Campbell . . . I’ll be Me” – will kick off the festival on Oct. 10. Directed and produced by James Ke-ach and produced by Trevor Albert, the film showcases Campbell’s life and Goodbye Tour. The film features inter-views with Bruce Springs-teen, Bill Clinton, The Edge, Paul McCartney, Jay Leno, Vince Gill, Steve Martin and Taylor Swift.

Keach and Albert, along with members of Camp-bell’s family – his wife Kim and children Ashley, Cal and Shannon – will answer questions after the screen-ing and brother/sister duo Ashley and Shannon will give a live performance that will include an original song from the film. The bands Billstown and the Drew Henderson Band, both of which include Campbell family members, will play the after party.

Film screenings will take place in the Ballroom and Conference Center on the second mezzanine level of The Arlington. These two large soundproof rooms were converted into cinemas 1 and 2 last year allowing the festival to run two screen-

ings at the same time. Con-cessions will be available at the hotel.

Tickets and passes may be purchased at the ticket box at The Arlington during the festival and in advance at https://hsdff2014.eventbrite.com. A limited number of opening and closing night tickets, as well as special event tickets, will be sold. A pre-sales ticket box office will be available at the Hot Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 6-9.

Festival officials stated that purchasing a general admission ticket does not guarantee admission. VIP pass holders, Film Buff pass holders, sponsors and film-makers are admitted first to all films. Officials suggest that patrons arrive early.

Prices for passes and tick-ets range from $200 to $5 depending on which events at-tendees wish to participate in.

Actor and director Luke Wilson has chosen the Hot Springs Film Festival as a key stop on the festival circuit for his award-winning moc-kumentary short “Satellite Beach,” co-directed with his brother Andrew. Wilson will be in Hot Springs for the clos-ing weekend of the festival to take part in duel screenings of a first-time mockumentary sidebar, which will explore the blurring of lines between truth and fiction in the moc-kumentary form.

Other interesting film screenings will include:

* “Stray Dog” from writer and director Debra Granick – about a Vietnam vet and

biker named Ron “Stray Dog” Hall, whom she {met in Mis-souri on the set of her prior film “Winter’s Bone.”

* Producer Spike Lee’s “Evolution of a Criminal,” about a 1997 armed bank robbery case in Houston.

* “Charlie Victor Romeo,” called by A.O. Scott of the New York Times “one of the most terrifying movies I have ever seen.”

* “The Apothecary,” a 2014 Student Academy Award winner.

* “The Lion’s Mouth Opens,” a new film by Oscar-nominated director Lucy Walker.

* “Last Chance High” from the Renaud Brothers.

* Multiple award-winners from top festivals including Tribeca, Sundance and Hot Docs.

There will also be a 20th anniversary screening of the classic sports documenta-ries “Hoops Dreams” with an appearance by Arthur Agee Jr. (one of the basket-ball players followed in the film) and producer Gordon Quinn, and Oscar winner “When We Were Kings” with director Leon Gast alongside Muhammad Ali’s daughter and grandson.

The Hot Springs Docu-mentary Film Festival is the oldest documentary film festival in North America and is an Oscar-qualifying festival in the category of Documentary Short Subject. For more information, visit hsdfi.org. To make hotel res-ervations at The Arlington, visit arlingtonhotel.com or call 1-800-643-1502.

Rick Evans Grandview Prairie Conservation Cen-

ter in Columbus will host a fishing derby Sat., Sept. 27 in observation of National Hunting and Fishing Day.

The event will take place from 9-11:30 a.m. and will include prizes awarded for the smallest and largest

catches. Activities are open to

any child under the age of 16, but all children must be accompanied by an adult. Participants are asked to bring their own fishing gear and bait.

fishing derby scheduled at Grandview

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Community 5Thursday, September 25, 2014 | The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397

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Flu Shots Avaliable

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Call 870-845-1413

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Trees, Shrubs, All Plants, Antique Furniture & Lots of Misc.

in building. Home & 3 acres. The Garden Center & Trading Post

1699 Hwy 26 E 3 miles from Delight on Murfreesboro Hwy. Thursday, Sept. 25 thru Thursday, Oct. 2

Moving Sale Friday & Saturday

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*Yard Sale* 302 S. Pine St.

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Yard Sale • 806 W Sypert • NashvilleThursday 9/25 - Saturday 9/27

Boys/Plus sized men/Plus size women clothes, shoes, toys, decorations, 13” TV, exercise equipment, books, glassware, corner shelf, stools, life jacket, lots more bargains galore!

* Yard Sale * Friday & Saturday • 8am - ?2416 Mount Pleasant DR.

5 miles past High School on right. Women clothes size 1X, 2X, 3X some new,

Eddie Bauer car seat, lots of odds and ins, shoes size 10, Fall and Christmas decorations, childs recliner, treadmill.

Rain or Shine • Inside Garage Sale! Friday: 7am - ? • Saturday: 6am - NoonBehind Sunshine Acres - Look for signs

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Monday-Saturday • 8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m. Sunday • 2:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

In today’s financial world, many consumers use debit, credit and prepaid cards to purchase goods and ser-vices. Many are used inter-changeably. However, there are some major differences in each type of card. Under-standing these differences can help you to be a wise consumer.

* Each card works differ-ently. If you use a credit card, you are borrowing money that you must pay back, in addition to interest, if you do not pay the balance in full by the due date. If you use a debit card, which is issued by your bank and linked to your checking or savings ac-count, the money taken from the account is yours and you will never incur interest charges. With prepaid cards, you are spending the money deposited onto them, and they usually aren’t linked to your checking or sav-ings account. Prepaid cards sometimes charge a fee for using the card. Prepaid cards are not protected against un-authorized transactions as credit cards and debit cards.

* Watch for fees. You may be charged an overdraft fee if you use a debit card for a purchase, but there aren’t enough funds in the account linked to the card. Similarly, a credit card issuer may decline a transaction that puts you over your credit limit unless you have agreed to pay a fee to permit over-the-limit transactions. In that case, you will have to pay an extra fee. Prepaid cards sometime have promotional offers that seem attractive, but you may incur various additional costs. These costs may include monthly fees, charges for loading funds

onto the card and fees for each transaction.

* Your liability for an un-authorized transaction var-ies depending on the type of card. Federal law limits your losses to a maximum of $50 if a credit card is lost or stolen. For a debit card, your maximum liability un-der federal law is $50 if you notify your bank within two business days after learning of the loss or theft of you card. But, if you notify your bank after those first two days, under the law you could lose much more. You liability for the fraudulent use of a prepaid card cur-rently differs depending on the type of card. Federal law treats payroll cards the same as debit cards, but currently there are no federal consumer protections limit-ing your losses with other general-purpose, reloadable prepaid cards and store gift cards. For all cards, industry practices may further limit your losses, so check with your card issuer.

Whether you carry one or more credit cards or debit cards, you will need to keep track of all your purchases. Be sure to review the credit card statement as soon as it arrives to confirm the trans-actions. If you see unauthor-ized transactions, contact your credit card company as soon as possible. The same goes for debit cards. Review your bank statement either online often, or the paper statement monthly to

make sure transactions were recorded properly. Again, if you see discrepancies, con-tact your bank immediately.

The University of Arkan-sas Division of Agriculture in Howard County has great free information on using and understanding credit, budgeting and a tool for organizing your credit card information. The “Credit and Debit Card Register” is a fact sheet which lists all your card information. In the event your card is stolen, you will need to have the name of the credit card com-pany, phone number where to report stolen or lost cards, address to write concerning lost or stolen cards, your account number, number of cards on the account, and the name or names on the account. This fact sheet pro-vides space to list all needed information.

For a free copy of the fact sheet or for more informa-tion on managing credit or other financial matters, contact the Howard County Extension Office at 870-845-7517 or visit our office lo-cated on the second floor of the courthouse.

Sources for information for this article were obtained from: www.feedthepig.org and the University of Ar-kansas Division of Agricul-ture. Check out our website www.uaex.edu and click on “Health & Living,” then “Per-sonal Finance.”

Recipe of the Week

This recipe is great for busy days since most of

the work is done in a crock pot. The recipe is part of the Healthy & Homemade Meals, 2015 Nutrition & Fit-ness Calendar. There is a limited supply at the Howard County Extension Office. Come by for your free copy before they are all gone. Each month features a different recipe.

Slow Cooker Pork Chili2 pounds boneless pork

butt, roast, or shoulder1 cup bell pepper, diced

(1 medium pepper)1 cup onion, diced (1 me-

dium onion)1 ½ cups salsa1 can (15 ounces) low-

sodium pinto beans1 can (14.5 ounces) low

sodium diced tomatoesTrim visible fat from the

pork. Cut into 2 inch chunks. Place in slow cooker. Add pepper, onion, and salsa. Cook on a low setting for 6 hours or a high setting for 3 hours.

At the end of the cooking time, pull the meat apart into shreds with a fork. Put half of the shredded pork in the refrigerator or freezer to use at a later date. Return the rest of the pork to the slow cooker. Add pinto beans and diced tomatoes. Cook another 30 minutes until hot.

Yields: 6 servings (1 ¼ cups per serving). Approxi-mate cost per serving: $1.52

Nutrition Information per Serving:

Calories – 240, Fat – 7g, Sodium – 590 mg, Carbo-hydrates – 17 g, Fiber – 6 g, Protein – 23 g. Good source of Vitamin A and C

Know the difference between the cards

NASHVILLE - Equipment to outfit the Southwest Arkansas Solid Waste Management District’s tire shredding program is expected to arrive early next month, Director Max Tackett told board members Tuesday during a brief quarterly meeting.

Tackett said the landfill made its second pay-ment on the shredder itself, which is expected to arrive Oct. 1, primarily using grant funds from the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality.

“We’re getting a lot closer to the actual shredding of tires,” Tackett explained.

He cautioned, however, that progress on the project has been limited by issues with water un-der the western portion of the foundation for the building that will eventually house the operation.

According to Tackett, engineers did discover a few isolated water pockets during test drilling before the foundation was laid, but neither those nor the plumbing laid for the building is believed to be responsible for the present water problems.

“I think that water is getting down in there some-how,” he explained, proposing the installation of a French drain around the structure as a potential solution.

Landfill officials are expected to further review the issue and take action within the next several months.

In related business, directors voted unanimously in favor of spending roughly $17,000 on additional 40 foot dumpsters to be used with the program, and agreed to use the remainder of the $1.7 million brought in by the landfill’s last bond issue to place a liner in the district’s final class one cell.

-Charles Goodin

Landill’s tire shredding program one step closer to fruition with equipment purchase

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NASHVILLE - As many as one in 10 suf-fer some effects of dyslexia, according to experts at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital - the premier institution for dyslexia in the country - and for those feeling the strongest impact, the learning disability can hold them back in many ways. But a local woman is working to help children overcome that.

Kathie Woll, of Blevins, works with students impacted by dyslexia. She has started with one student in the Nashville area, after years of working in and around Texarkana.

Woll said that she does initial assess-ment of students who may have dyslexia, as well as therapy in a curriculum de-signed at Scottish Rite Hospital. Testing can be done over multiple days, and the course she teaches from can run two years or more, meeting three days a week.

The Arkansas Masonic Lodge offers therapy for children with dyslexia and other language difficulties at four loca-tions around the state: Fayetteville, Little Rock, Searcy and Stuttgart. There are no facilities within two hours’ travel from Nashville.

Woll said that the work that she does is closer to what a speech therapist or occupational therapist would do, but de-signed specifically for dyslexia sufferers.

The curriculum focuses initially on the visual identification of sounds, or phonemes, and how they are put together before moving on to syllables, and then intensive work on spelling. “Spelling is a big issue for dyslexic kids,” Woll said.

She said that moving on to syllables is a big step for the students, as before then they were working with all the sounds a single letter can produce.

Woll, who said that she has a masters degree in curriculum design with a spe-cialty in reading instruction, also works on writing- bucking a trend away from the use of cursive script. “Cursive is easier for kids with dyslexia. All the lowercase letters begin at the baseline. It gives them a place to start,” she stated.

Woll currently sees only one student in Nashville, but is open to taking on more students. She admitted that the cost of the program is expensive, as much as $10,000, but asserted that it recoups itself over a lifetime - and many of her students know that themselves.

”Older kids have a concept of how it is hurting them,” she explained.

D.E. RAY | Nashville News

Blevins native Kathie Woll instructs a local student suffering the effects of dyslexia during a recent tutoring session. Woll is looking for new students in the area.

hElpIng kIdsArea dyslexia therapist looking for new students

lUKE REEDERStaff Writer

NASHVILLE - The Nash-ville Scrapper Tennis team played two games this week at Murfreesboro and Mal-vern, winning 12 of 14 match-es at Murfreesboro and eight of nine games at Malvern.

At Murfreesboro Monday, the Scrapper men won all of their matches. Matthew Carver won 6-0, Jacob Car-penter 6-4, Caleb Glann 6-1 and Robbie Morphew 6-2 in singles, and Garrett and Glenn Hartness won the only guys’ double match 6-0.

The girl’s side only lost two matches on Monday. Olivia Herzog lost her match 6-0 and Alexus White lost 6-4. Brittany Backus started her day with a 6-0 win, McKenzie Morphew won 6-4, and Leslie Lingo and Klaire Howard both won their matches 6-0. In doubles action, Backus and Herzog and White and Morphew both won 6-1 and Howard and Lingo ended the day with a 6-4 win.

The next day the team traveled to Malvern and put up another dominating performance with the guys winning out again and the girls only losing one match.

Carver and Carpenter wrapped up singles play with 6-1 and 6-3 victories respectively. For the duos, the Hartness brothers won 6-1 and Glann and Robbie played two matches winning both 6-0 and 6-3.

On the other side, How-ard lost 6-2, Lingo won 6-1 and Herzog had a 6-4 vic-tory to end singles play. For the girl’s doubles teams of Backus and Herzog and White and McKenzie both had 6-4 victories to end the day at Malvern.

Scrapper tennis squad battles malvern, murfreesboro

HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE - The Nashville golf team faced off against six other teams in the 7-4A district tournament at Magellan Golf Course in Hot Springs Village on Tuesday.

The Scrapper golfers put up some very good scores on the afternoon, with Jack-son Beavert leading the team by shooting 79 on the 18 hole course. Jordan Conant posted 85, Josh Reeves

shot 100 and Zach Jamison rounded out the afternoon with 101. This set the team’s combined score at 264- just behind the Malvern and Fountain Lake teams.

While the combined score was not good enough to qualify the entire team to advance to the state tourna-ment, Beavert and Conant qualified as two of the four individuals sent from the dis-trict for state competition.

Pair of Scrapper golfers are state-bound

Time seems to be mov-ing faster than me. I saw a shopper buying Halloween decoration on Sunday, and thought it was a bit soon. But notice that autumn begins this week. I keep busy trying to keep up with my schedule and do a little exercise.

We have several people on our sick list for prayer this week: Evelyn Savage, Hattie Jean Pauley, M.D. Deloney and Lela James. Thank you.

Mount Zion Church in White Cliffs will have regular worship service on Sept. 28 at 11 a.m. Everyone is welcomed.

Condolences to the Willis family in Paraloma on the death of your family mem-ber. We will remember you in our prayers.

I noticed that many citi-zens are concerned about the passing of the liquor law in the county. We are the ones to speak up at the polls and encourage our friends to go to the polls and vote. Don’t sit home and let the law pass and then complain. Too late. Do something now.

D.D. Coulter was a visitor at the Mount Zion Sunday school on Sunday. He is our

good neighbor and comes when possible. God bless you.

What do you do when you make a mistake? Well, I try to correct it. I thought to get a dog for myself would be company. So I got a puppy. This puppy was not ready to be taken away from his mom. He cried and cried night and day. The only thing that quieted him was when I held him. For three days and three nights he cried. We had no sleep. Monday morn-ing I decided that I must do something and returned him back to his mother. Sorry to return a gift, but there was no choice. Hope I am forgiven.

Christian Refresher

Genesis 8:22 KJV

“While the earth re-maineth, seedtime and har-vest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease.”

Love is the key.

mary

CrosslIn

White Cliffs News

Arrival of autumn camequickly this year in White Cliffs

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Thursday, September 25, 2014 | The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 Community 7

PUBLIC NOTICENotice is hereby given that there has been iled in

the County Court of Howard County, Arkansas, the Petition of Weyerhaeuser NR Company asking for the annexation to the City of Dierks of the following described lands situated in Howard County, Arkansas, and contiguous to said city, to–wit:

BEING A PORTION OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 28 WEST, HOWARD COUNTY, ARKANSAS; BEING A PORTION OF THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND DEEDED TO WEYERHAEUSER COMPANY, RECORDED BOOK 261, PAGE 498 IN THE DEED RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY, ARKANSAS; AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BOUNDED ON THE NORTH BY HIGHWAY 278, BOUNDED ON THE EAST BY BARITE ROAD, BOUNDED ON THE SOUTH BY THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4, AND BOUNDED ON THE WEST BY THE WEST LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4.

A plat of said land proposed for annexation is on ile with said Petition in the ofice of the Clerk of said Court, and the undersigned has been named by the Petitioner as the person authorized to act on its behalf.

The Court has ixed the 28th day of October, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. o’clock as the date for a hearing on said Petition, and all interested persons are now notiied to be present at said Court at the time and date so ixed.

Given this 23rd day of September, 2014.Brandon CogburnATCHLEY, RUSSELL, WALDROP & HLAVINKA, L.L.P.1710 Moores Lane - P. O. Box 5517Texarkana, Texas 75505-5517Telephone: (903)792-8246On Behalf offWEYERHAEUSER NR COMPANY33663 Weyerhaeuser Way SouthFederal Way, Washington 98003 (BCT:77,79,81;w278)

PUBLIC NOTICE1987 Toyota Supra • VIN: JT2MA71JOH0047760will be sold at public auction on October 9, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at 134 Gyp Trail in Nashville for cash to the highest bidder. (PD:77)

PUBLIC NOTICE1989 Dodge Spirit VIN: 1B3BA56K0KF448963Is being held at Bypass Diesel & Wrecker Service, Inc. 9224 Hwy 278 West Nashville, AR 71852 870-845-1597 due to abandonment. Vehicle will be sold at public sale unless claimed within 45 days. Failure to reclaim vehicle waves all rights, title, and interest in above vehicle. Vehicle may be reclaimed during business hours by providing ownership, and by paying all charges against vehicle. (BD;77;w70)

PUBLIC NOTICE From time to time, Suddenlink’s agreements with the owners of cable networks and television stations must be renewed. We are usually able to renew or extend those agreements. Our current agreement with Viacom will expire on September 30, 2014. We are working diligently to negotiate a new, acceptable and fair agreement to continue carrying Viacom’s channels. If we cannot, we expect Viacom will stop providing these channels to us and we, in turn, would introduce new, yet-to-be-conirmed channels that our customers have indicated they would like added to their lineups. Suddenlink will provide updates on this subject through a variety of methods, including the website SuddenlinkOnYourSide.com. Viacom channels are Comedy Central, Nickelodeon, Nick 2, Nick Jr., Nick Toons, Teen Nick, TV Land, Spike TV, CMT, CMT Pure Country, MTV, MTV 2, MTV Jams, MTV Hits, MTV U, BET, Centric, VH-1, VH-1 Classic, VH-1 Soul, Palladia, Logo, Tr3s, and EPIX. (IM;77;w151)

PUBLIC NOTICEThe Mineral Springs School District

will have Parent/Teacher Conferences on Thursday, September 25, 2014 from 2:00 pm until 5:30 pm. The Annual Report to the Public will begin at 6:00 pm in the cafeteria.

(MSSD;77;w36)

PUBLIC NOTICEFrom time to time, Suddenlink’s agreements with

the owners of cable networks and television stations must be renewed. We are usually able to renew or extend those agreements. Our current agreement with Viacom will expire on September 30, 2014. We are working diligently to negotiate a new, acceptable and fair agreement to continue carrying Viacom’s channels. If we cannot, we expect Viacom will stop providing these channels to us and we, in turn, would introduce new, yet-to-be-conirmed channels that our customers have indicated they would like added to their lineups. Suddenlink will provide updates on this subject through a variety of methods, including the website SuddenlinkOnYourSide.com. Viacom channels are Comedy Central, Nickelodeon, Nick 2, Nick Jr., Nick Toons, Teen Nick, TV Land, Spike TV, CMT, CMT Pure Country, MTV, MTV 2, MTV Jams, MTV Hits, MTV U, BET, Centric, VH-1, VH-1 Classic, VH-1 Soul, Palladia, Logo, Tr3s, and EPIX. (IM:77;w149)

Kaitlyn is a senior at Nashville High School. She has been invited to perform at the Capital One Bowl All American half time show in Orlando FL. on January 1, 2015. It will be a 6 day event. Besides the New Year performance she will be visiting many attractions in Central FL. At this time she is asking for any inancial assistance you or your organization could help to make this happen. This is a performance she will remember for a lifetime. The deadline for her turning in the money is October 7th. Any help you could give would be greatly appreciated. To donate contact Donna Furr 870-200-2701 or mail to 221 West Sunset Nashville, AR. 71852.

Kaitlyn Burley

dancer with Dancastics

Dance Studio in

Hope.

DELIGHT - One man has been arrested as local law enforcement continue look-ing into the circumstances around the death of a Delight woman.

According to a press re-lease issued by the Pike County Sheriff’s Office, Dustin Hembey, 35, was arrested at his home at 36 Caddo Gap Road in Delight on Sept. 13. The release in-dicates that Hembey called 911, reporting that his mother, Jo Ann Hembey, 72, had fallen and hit her head. Hembey is the biological grandson and adopted son of Hembey.

The call was transferred to medical responders. Pike County Dispatcher Jack Manlove also paged out Delight and Antoine First Responders. Pike County Deputies Shaun Furr and Jason McDonald were also

dispatched to this call. Deputies were informed prior to their arrival that Hembry had recently been released from prison and that there was a possibility that guns were present at the residence.

The press release indi-cates that Furr arrived on the scene at approximately 8:35 p.m. When Furr announced his presence, a male’s voice stated, “we are back here.” Furr reportedly entered went toward the direction of the voice and found Hembey standing in the living room. Hembey directed Furr to the bedroom where Delight First Responder Chris Goodson was with the female victim, Hembey.

Goodson reportedly in-formed Furr that the victim “was unresponsive” and asked Furr to request that medical responders “step

it up.” Furr also requested a medical helicopter be called on standby, according to the report. Life Net was report-edly unavailable for flight so Air Evac 73 out of De Queen was contacted.

“Furr was advised by Goodson to try and get a hold of Mrs. Hembey’s daughter, Mikki Hill, ... to let her know what was going on,” the report stated. The daughter was apparently not reached at that point.

At approximately 8:39 p.m., the medics and Deputy Rodney Haney arrived on scene and were directed to the bedroom.

The report indicates that Furr questioned Hembey who said he was in his bed-room when he “heard a sound like she had fallen

onto the living room floor. Mr. Hembey stated he went into the living room and Mrs. Hembey was laying on the floor,” the report stated.

Hembey reportedly told deputies he moved the vic-tim to the bedroom “where he could put her oxygen mask on because she was not breathing.” He report-edly told Furr that he then called 911.

The report states that “medics advised Deputy Furr that Mrs. Hembey’s injuries were not consistent with the nature of the call.”

Detective Sergeant Clark Kinzler was contacted and, at Kinzler’s request, Hem-bey consented to allow the property to be searched. Hembey reportedly went through his statement again,

pointing out where he was when he reportedly heard the victim fall.

While he photographed and processed the scene, Kinzler reportedly found a box of ammunition “on the nightstand in the bedroom Mr. Hembey had identified as his,” according to the report. “After observing the box of ammunition Detec-tive Kinzler observed what appeared to be a 22 rifle stacked in the corner with two other air rifles.”

“Hembey was informed at that time that he was under arrest for felon in posses-sion of firearms,” the report stated. “Mr. Hembey was then placed into custody and transported to the Pike

County Sheriff’s Office. A criminal history of Mr. Hem-bey shows that he has been convicted multiple times of numerous felonies includ-ing a previous possession of firearm by certain person charge out of Pike County.”

The victim was transport-ed from the scene to Bap-tist Hospital in Arkadelphia where she was pronounced dead. Her body was then transported to the Arkansas State Crime Lab for autopsy.

According to the report, the “matter currently re-mains under the investiga-tion of the Criminal Inves-tigation Division with the Pike County Sheriff’s Depart-ment.”

Death of Delight woman under investigation

KATELYN COFFMAN | Nashville News

J.T. Carter and Fayrene and Larry Elrod with Ridgeway Baptist Church work a barbecue stand serving pork, beef and bologna sandwiches Friday to raise funds to go on a medical mission trip to Senegal, located in West Africa. The group will depart Nov. 6 and stay for 10 days distributing medication.

raIsIng funds

MINERAL SPRINGS - The newly elected Mineral Springs school board attend-ed a training session Monday evening. The two-part train-ing was presented by Kristen Garner, staff attorney for the Arkansas School Board As-sociation, and Hazel Burnett, of the Fiscal Distress division of the Arkansas Department of Education.

The board will hold their first official meeting, at which they will be sworn in, Wed., Oct. 1 at 5 p.m. Senior board member Mike Erwin will preside at that meeting, where the board will elect a president, vice-president, secretary and ex-officio members, as well as setting a time for their regular meetings.

newly-elected board will be sworn in oct. 1

Two area men recently enlisted in the Army National Guard.

Private (PVT) Emanuel Estrada, of Nashville, has earned education benefits valued at $50,420 by enlist-ing. PVT Estrada will serve with the Institute Support Unit as a carpentry and masonry specialist at Camp Robinson in North Little Rock He is the son of Cris-tina and Pedro Estrada of

Nashville and is a graduate of Nashville High School.

Private (PVT) Aaron Gray, of Saratoga, earned the same benefits by enlist-ing. He will serve with the Bravo Company 1st BN 153 INF after attending Basic Combat Training and Ad-vanced Individual Training. He is the son of Laurie and Robert Gray of Saratoga and a graduate of Mineral Springs High School.

two join national Guard

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8 SportS The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, September 25, 2013

411 N. Sherman Mineral Springs, AR

287-4716

Class AAAAArkansas High School Football Ranking & Notes

Class AAArkansas High School Football Ranking & Notes

All the sports coverage you’ll ever want!

The Nashville Newswww.swarkansasnews.com

Nashville • (870) 451-9994FIRST STATE BANK

J W Manufacturing

1. WARREn (1-2)2. nASHvIllE (3-0)3. DollARWAY (2-1)4. StAR CItY (3-0)5. ARKADElPHIA (3-0)6. nEWPoRt (2-1)7. mAlvERn (2-1)8. HAmBURG (2-1)9. DARDAnEllE (3-0)10. GoSnEll (2-0-1)11. PottSvIllE (2-1)12. ASHDoWn (2-1)13. WESt HElEnA (1-2)14. PRAIRIE GRovE (1-1)15. PUlASKI RoBInSon (3-0)16. foUntAIn lAKE (2-0-1)17. PoCAHontAS (3-0)18. HEBER SPRInGS (2-1)19. mEnA (3-0)20. DovER (3-0)21. SHIloH CHRIStIAn (1-2)22. ClInton (2-1)23. lonoKE (1-2)24. montICEllo (2-1)25. CAC (2-1)26. HIGHlAnD (1-2)27. GRAvEttE (2-1)28. StUttGARt (1-2)29. CRoSSEtt (2-1)30. PEA RIDGE (3-0)31. JonESBoRo WEStSIDE (2-1)32. ozARK (1-2)33. DUmAS (1-2)34. HUntSvIllE (2-1)35. DEWItt (1-2)36. BERRYvIllE (2-1)37. SUBIACo ACADEmY (2-1)38. BAUxItE (2-1)39. ARKAnSAS BAPtISt (1-2)40. CAvE CItY (1-2)41. BRooKlAnD (2-1)42. RIvERvIEW (1-2)43. HARRISBURG (1-2)44. lInColn (1-2)45. GEntRY (0-3)46. tRUmAnn (1-2)47. SoUtHSIDE BAtESvIllE (0-3)48. WAlDRon (0-3)

GAmE of tHE WEEKno. 9 DARDAnEllE

At no. 11 PottSvIllEThe winner takes control of the 4-4A. Coaches voted Dardanelle to win the league in the preseason and Pottsville to finish second. Undefeated Dardanelle has beaten Danville, Booneville and Clarksville by a combined 144-34 the past three weeks, and the first team defense hasn't allowed a point. Junior safety Chris Kershner has made 15 tackles, recovered a fumble and intercepted three passes. Daniel Craig (22 tackles) and Easton Carter stabilize the unit after taking over as inside linebackers. Sophomore defensive lineman Caden Brown (18 tackles, three tackles for loss) has forced two fumbles. “He's lived in the backfield in every game,” Coach Josh Price says. Senior quar-terback Kristian Thompson has rushed for more than 300 yards this year “and last week he played like we want,” the coach says. “He's learning when to run with it and when to pitch it.” Kirshner caught three passes for 103 yards and a score in last week's 48-0 win at Clarksville. Pottsville started the season 2-0, high-lighted with a 30-point win over Class 5A Morrilton. The Apaches committed five turnovers, gave up a kickoff return for a TD and an interception return for a score in last week's 35-28 setback at Class 6A Russellville. Pottsville half-backs Taylor Waddell and Josh Dugger each have more than 400 yards rushing this season. Dugger caught two key passes on the

winning drive last year. “Defense is our key,” Pottsville coach Bryan Rust says. Senior linebackers Logan Hunt and Alsono Torres top Pottsville's tackle chart.

WEEK 4 PREDICtIonS(favored team in All CAPS followed by point spread)

1-4ABerryville at SHIloH CHRIStIAn (18): Shiloh Christian welcomes the drop into Class 4A. The Saints are 16-18-1 since winning the 2010 state title. Shiloh Christian sophomore Connor Reece passed for 316 yards and two TDs in last week's 14-point loss to Victory Christian, Okla. Berryville stuffed Green Forest's two-point attempt in the final minute last week, sur-viving 34-32. Berryville has never beaten the Saints.PEA RIDGE (14) at Gentry: Un-defeated Pea Ridge has given up just 20 points this season. Gentry QB Stone Faulkenberry threw two TDs in last week's nine-point loss to Class 3A Greenland.GRAvEttE (25) at lincoln: Both teams run the ball effectively. Lincoln rushed for 378 yards in last week's 23-point triumph at Cedarville, and the Wolf D record-ed 16 tackles for loss. Gravette workhorse Cedric Duarte averages 230 yards rushing per game. Lion senior linebacker Michael Olvera has racked up 26 tackles this year, and he returned an interception 25 yards for a TD last week.Huntsville at PRAIRIE GRovE (24): Huntsville's Christian Cain has rushed for 264 yards and four TDs the past two weeks. Prairie Grove pounded West Fork 42-0 last week, the Tigers first game since Week 1. Senior Bobby Catt ran five times for 103 yards and a TD and caught a 59-yard TD pass in the first quarter, but missed the rest of the game after a second-quarter ankle injury.

2-4ACAC (14) at Riverview: CAC gives up 30 points per game, but the Mustangs don't sweat it because they score so quickly. Junior Braylon Harris ran for three TDs in last week's 21-point win at

Class 5A Valley View. Riverview's D didn't give up a point in last week's 7-0 setback to Bald Knob (Bald Knob returned a kickoff for the only score).HEBER SPRInGS (1) at lonoke: These teams have split the past eight meetings since entering the same conference in 2006. Heber Springs QB Hunter Chandler threw three TDs in last week's 20-point win at Harding Academy. Lonoke threw a late interception and couldn't convert on fourth down in the fourth quarter of last week's one-point loss at Class 5A LR McClellan.nEWPoRt (2) at West Helena: This could turn into a shootout. Newport gave up almost 500 yards in last week's 39-point loss at Sylvan Hills. West Helena aver-ages 40 points per game.Southside Batesville at StUtt-GARt (28): Stuttgart has never lost to Southside Batesville, out-scoring the Southerners 359-31 the past eight seasons. Southside Batesville allows 35 points weekly.

3-4AGoSnEll (24) at Brookland: Gosnell gained more than 500 yards in last week's 29-29 tie with Rivercrest. Injured RB Carlos Blackman didn't play but could return this week. Gosnell has beaten Brookland by a combined 82-21 the past two seasons.Harrisburg at CAvE CItY (2): Cave City failed to score in last week's 35-0 loss at Hoxie, and they Cavemen have lost to the Mustangs 70-0 the past two years. Harrisburg gives up 34 points a game.HIGHlAnD (10) at Jonesboro Westside: Highland has beaten the Warriors by a combined 211-37 the past five years. Rebel senior Deon Stewart caught two TDs in last week's 26-point win over Earle. Jonesboro Westside played physical and the ran the ball effectively in last week's nine-point win over Class 2A Cross County.trumann at PoCAHontAS (28): Trumann has lost 22 of its past 23 games and hasn't beaten a league opponent since Week 5, 2011.

Undefeated Pocahontas outscores opponents by 26 points a game.

4-4ADARDAnEllE (4) at Pottsville: Hootens.com Class 4A Game of the Week.PUlASKI RoBInSon (7) at Ar-kansas Baptist: Pulaski Robinson led North Pulaski 33-0 at halftime last week. Senator running back T.J. Hammonds ran for 125 yards, caught a TD pass and threw another against North Pulaski. Arkansas Baptist surrendered more than 400 yards rushing in last week's 22-point loss at Booneville.ClInton (8) at ozark: Clinton's D forced four turnovers and yielded just 178 yards in last week's 42-point win at Yellville-Summit. The Yellowjackets led 35-0 in the middle of the second quarter. Ozark sophomore Corey Helmert returned a kickoff 90 yards for a TD in last week's 35-point loss at Charleston.DovER (11) at Subiaco Acad-emy: Dover has beaten Subiaco Academy six of the past 10 sea-sons. The undefeated Pirates have scored 131 points in three games this year, more than the first eight games combined last fall. Dover started 3-0 for only the third time since 1996.

7-4AArkadelphia at nASHvIllE (1): A battle of unbeatens. Arkadelphia has beaten Nashville the past two years by a combined 74-61. Arkadelphia junior QB Jeff Blake ran for 207 yards and three TDs in last week's 22-point win at Hot Springs. Nashville junior QB Leonard Snell (41 of 66 for 516 yards and 12 TDs, and 26 carries for 92 yards) and sophomore run-ning back Darius Hopkins (37 car-ries, 356 yards) force opponents to defend the run, opening up one-on-one situations for senior receiver LaMichael Pettway (13 catches, 269 yards and nine TDs). Scrapper junior end Billy Stewart has 37 tackles, 10 TFL and 3.5 sacks this year.mena at ASHDoWn (6): This could decide a playoff spot.

Undefeated Mena beat De Queen by 20 points in the opener, while Ashdown beat De Queen by 26 points a week ago. Ashdown junior Brandon Northcross ran for a TD and threw a pair of TDs against De Queen, while the D returned two fumbles for scores.Bauxite at mAlvERn (17): Baux-ite senior Ben Madison has re-ceiving, rushing, punt return and kickoff return TDs this season. Malvern sophomore Amari Reed ran six times for 145 yards and two TDs in last week's 17-point win over HS Lakeside. foUntAIn lAKE (28) at Wal-dron: Winless Waldron gives up 41 points a game. Fountain Lake tied Class 5A Maumelle 6-6 a week ago. The Cobras botched an extra point attempt and missed a field goal as time expired.

8-4A

WARREn (16) at Crossett: Top-ranked Warren must regroup after last week's 29-point loss to Pulaski Academy. Lumberjack Kilay Cox ran for 109 yards and two TDs last week, and he's gained almost 400 yards this fall. Crossett has won consecutive games for the first time since the middle of the 2012 season.HAmBURG (32) at DeWitt: DeWitt has won six conference games the past six years. Ham-burg scores 36 points weekly. Lion RB Deandre Rachel has gained more than the 300 yards this fall.Dumas at DollARWAY (21): Dollarway turned the ball over four times in last week's eight-point loss at Camden Fairview. The Cardinals scored a defensive TD at Camden Fairview. Dumas tight end Will Gragg caught two TDs in last week's 24-point win over Class 6A LR Hall.monticello at StAR CItY (25): Undefeated Star City averages 49 points per game. The Bulldogs returned a punt, kickoff and interception for TDs in last week's 31-point win at Class 5A Mills. Senior Dajunn Harris ran nine times for 112 yards and a TD and caught five passes for 79 yards and a score at Mills.

1. JUnCtIon CItY (2-0)2. BEARDEn (3-0)3. HAzEn (3-0) 4. E. PoInSEtt CoUntY (3-0)5. RISon (2-1)6. GURDon (1-2)7. EARlE (1-2)8. HECtoR (3-0)9. DIERKS (3-0)10. EnGlAnD (3-0)11. DES ARC (2-1)12. mAGnEt CovE (2-1)13. mURfREESBoRo (3-0) 14. CRoSS CoUntY (1-2)15. mCCRoRY (2-1) 16. BIGEloW (2-1)17. moUnt IDA (2-1)18. WooDlAWn (2-1)19. mARKED tREE (2-1) 20. StRonG (2-1)21. CUttER m. StAR (2-1)22. CARlISlE (1-2)23. WAlnUt RIDGE (0-3) 24. ConWAY CHRIStIAn (2-1)25. BRInKlEY (2-1)26. PARKERS CHAPEl (1-2)27. lAfAYEttE CoUntY (2-1)28. PoYEn (1-2)29. foREmAn (2-1)30. HACKEtt (2-1)31. mInERAl SPRInGS (0-2)32. QUItmAn (1-1-1)33. HAmPton (1-2)34. moUntAInBURG (2-1)35. HERmItAGE (0-3)36. SAlEm (0-3)37. SPRInG HIll (0-2-1)38. W. YEll CoUntY (1-2)39. mAGAzInE (0-3)40. AUGUStA (1-2)41. DECAtUR (0-2)42. ClAREnDon (1-2)43. UnIon CHRIStIAn (1-2)44. PAlEStInE-WHEAtlEY (1-2)45. J.C. WEStSIDE (0-3)46. moUntAIn PInE (0-3)47. mIDlAnD (0-3)48. mARvEll (0-3)49. RECtoR (0-2)50. HARtfoRD (0-3)

GAmE of tHE WEEKno. 9 DIERKS At no. 6 GURDon

This could again decide the 7-2A championship. Gurdon looks to avenge last year's 34-15 loss at Dierks that decided the 2013 league title. Last week, Gurdon took down Class 3A Glen Rose 27-14 after opening losses to Class 3A No. 3 Prescott and No. 6 Smackover by a combined score of 88-22. Gurdon junior RB Jackie Harvell gutted Glen Rose for 220 yards with another 50-yard jaunt negated by a penalty. Se-nior end John Clemons (31 tackles) and cornerback Alunzo Leeper (26 tackles) pace the Go-Devil defense.No. 9 Dierks, which graduated 17 seniors off its 2013 team, relies on senior G/DT Layne McWhorter (6-3, 270) and RT Cameron Brewer (6-4, 255) to clear paths for all-state run-ning back Trendin McKinney. Senior Caleb Dunn (6-0, 170) and junior Tyler Miller (6-0, 190) man the ends and are playing well. Gurdon should dress 23 Friday night, and Dierks will dress 31.

WEEK 4 PREDICtIonS(fAvoRED tEAmS In All CAPS)

3-2Amidland at EARlE (42): First-year varsity program Midland allowed 615 yards last week to Class 3A No. 45 Cedar Ridge. No. 7 Earle trailed Class 4A No. 26 Highland by just 12-6 at halftime but fell 40-14. Earle rarely slows down for speed bumps. It torched hapless Manila 86-0 Week 10 last year.Salem at E. PoInSEtt CoUntY (38): EPC offense roaring early this season, averaging 432 yards and 47 ppg. Sernior QB Aaron Scales has completed 76 percent of his passes for 744 yards and eight TDs with just one INT. Junior Clay Malone has

20 receptions for 298 yards. Senior Quin Young has caught 17 balls for 237 yards and three TDs. The EPC defense allows 219 yards and 19 ppg, led by Scales with 36 tackles.WAlnUt RIDGE (12) at Rector: Rector, idle last week, relies heavily on junior QB Garrett Buck (5-11, 180). Walnut Ridge has struggled with injuries, and the lack of reps in practice has hampered its timing on offense. Senior OG Justin Hand (possible concussion) and all-league RB Tyler Binkley (ankle) among the hurting. Sophomore QB Will Weir passed for 250 yards in a 34-20 loss to Class 4A Harrisburg. All-3-2A LB Tyler Andrews has played with pain and leads the Bobcats in tackles.Cross County at mARKED tREE (1): Playoff positioning starts now with both teams expected to finish in the top half of the league. Despite generating more than 500 yards of offense last week, Cross County lost to Class 4A Jonesboro Westside 47-38. Junior RB Anfernee Davis ran for 182 yards and two TDs. Marked Tree lost 61-24 last week to Class 3A Barton. Marked Tree has won the last two in the series. Cross County won four in a row from 2008-2011.

4-2ADecatur at HACKEtt (28): No. 30 Hackett held Magazine to 80 yards offense last week in a 33-0 victory. Hackett sophomore RB Darrick Kel-logg ran for 114 of the Hornets' 294 total yards. magazine at UnIon CHRIStIAn (19): Opponents have outscored Magazine 94-6 this fall. UC freshman QB Christian Snipes has completed 46 of 86 passes (56 percent) for 876 yards and seven TDs with two interceptions. Sophomore receivers Hauken Smith and Dylan Bryant have caught 15 passes apiece.W. Yell County at HECtoR (15): Western Yell contained (Class 4A) Subiaco Academy's athletic QB Kelly Hollis last week in a 20-18 loss. WYC boasts a tall and talented receiving corps of Chris (6-2, 190) and Alex Thygesen (6-2, 160) and senior Clayton Montgomery (6-4, 165). Hector sophomore QB Tanner Gaines completed 12 of 21 passes for 232 yards and three TDs last week in a 42-6 win over Hartford. Junior LB Colton Foster recorded three sacks.moUntAInBURG (35) at J.C. Westside: Mountainburg joins Hector with a perfect 3-0 conference

record. Mountainburg plays host to defending league champion Hector Week 6.

5-2AQuitman at BIGEloW (2): Bigelow fresh off an impressive 34-18 win over Class 3A Danville, which had beaten Mount Ida 28-14 Week 2. Bigelow has not lost in this series since Quitman started varsity foot-ball in 2008. Bigelow won 48-34 in 2013, 21-14 in OT in 2012, 43-15 in 2011, 48-12 in 2010, 34-7 in 2009 and 42-0 in 2008.Poyen at ConWAY CHRIStIAn (3): Conway Christian topped previously unbeaten Class 3A Rose Bud 36-22 a week ago. Rose Bud had beaten Conway Christian the previous two years by an average of 14 point. Se-nior RB Ancil Lea ran for 120 yards and a TD, while junior Clayton Dent rushed for 117 yards and two TDs. An opposing league coach called this Poyen's best team in its 5-year history of varsity football. Class 3A No. 7 Episcopal coach Richie Marsh praised Poyen's effort after his team beat the the Indians 42-8.mountain Pine at CUttER m StAR (21): Cutter Morning Star, still sting-ing from a 12-point loss to improved (Class 3A) Bismarck, hands Moun-tain Pine its 24th consecutive loss. EnGlAnD (10) at magnet Cove: Newcomer England looks to end Magnet Cove's three-year reign over the 5-2A. No. 10 England boasts the kind of speed teams in the 5-2A normally don't see until playoff time, but senior all-state slotback Tyrik Harris has been slowed with an achil-les injury. Sophomore QB Brayden Brazeal has played well, and all-state LB Monte Toney leads the Lions in tackles. England's starting defense has allowed three TDs this fall. Eng-land started nine sophomores the past two weeks. Magnet Cove starts just two seniors on offense and three seniors on defense. Junior DE Nathan Reynolds, junior LBs Josh Smeltzer and Isaac Whitley, and all-league senior FS Ross Nitch are playing well for Magnet Cove's de-fense. Senior WR Tanner Clements caught eight passes for 136 yards and TD last week in a loss to Benton Harmony Grove. Junior Jay Kelley caught seven passes for 92 yards.

6-2AAUGUStA (31) at Palestine-Wheatley: Augusta effectively threw the deep ball last week on Carlisle,

but an interception late kept it from knocking off the Bison. Palestine-Wheatley really struggling after a 36-0 loss to Clarendon. BRInKlEY (10) at Clarendon: Brin-kley playing with more intensity for first-year head coach Ethan Baker. All-league junior tailback Daquan Greene (6-2, 230) hesitates and then hits a hole. Last week he ran for more than 100 yards and recorded 20 tackles in a 42-40 loss to Des Arc.Carlisle at DES ARC (6): Both escaped with tight road wins last week. Des Arc led Brinkley 36-19 in the third quarter but then gave up a long TD pass and fumbled a kickoff. Des Arc senior Tyler Hill ran for 233 of the Eagles' 491 rushing yards. Carlisle lacks team speed, but senior returning starters Keyshaun Allen (5-10, 300) and Dylan Brazeal (5-10, 260) at the defensive tackles are hard to move.mcCrory at HAzEn (12): Hazen has dominated opponents up front with junior RT Donovan Gurley (6-0, 330), senior RG Colby Rollins (5-11, 270) and senior center Colton Felts (5-11, 250). Hazen senior Lucas Tenison (shoulder) and all-state RB Trenton Mosby (ankle) have been limited but should be ready to go Friday night. Junior Logan Penn ran for 160 yards and four TDs last week when the Hornets rushed for 500 yards in a 50-18 win at Osceola. Junior ed Khalid Mills (6-1, 210) spearheads a defense that allows just 150 yards per game.marvell at RISon (35): No. 5 Rison bounced back last week with a 30-7 win over Camden Harmony Grove. In a tragic Week 2, Rison buried a former player Friday afternoon before losing at Junction City that night 48-8. Rison's defense held Camden H. Grove junior QB C.J. Par-ham, who passed for 195 yards vs. Bearden, to eight of 27 passing for 55 yards. Rison junior RBs Cortez Phillips and Bryson Marks rushed for 109 and 92 yards, respectively, at Harmony Grove.

7-2ADierks at GURDon (6): See Game of the Week.foREmAn (10) at Spring Hill: Foreman sophomore QB Tucker Hall completed 11 of 17 passes for 190 yards and a TD last week in a 29-14 win over Class 3A Horatio. Sophomore Kolton Moore caught six passes for 144 yards and a TD.

lafayette County at mURfREES-BoRo (8): No. 13 Murfreesboro made it four win out of the past five meetings with Class 3A Center-point with a 22-19 win last week. Murfreesboro senior QB Alex Kennedy completed 18 of 33 passes for 218 yards and a TD. Classmate Ross Stewart caught six passes for 75 yards. Jarrett Pitchford paced Murfreesboro with 10 tackles.mineral Springs at moUnt IDA (7): Mineral Springs idle last week after a 52-33 loss to England Week 2. Mount Ida senior team leader and LT Dakota Barrett (injured knee vs. Danville Week 2) may return by Week 6 vs. Spring Hill. Mount Ida will dress 17 Friday night, including it leading tackler, junior LB Caleb Jones (6-0, 180).

8-2APARKERS CHAPEl (8) at Strong: This matchup features two exciting running backs in Parkers Chapel sophomore Dezmon Jackson and Strong senior Isaiah Ellison. Jackson ran 21 times for 167 yards and two TDs last week against No. 2 Bearden's stingy defense. Ellison ran 17 times for 114 yards and a TD in a 16-0 win over Hampton. Ellison also took a short pass 60 yards to the Hampton 15 and ran 15 yards on the next play for the TD. Hampton at WooDlAWn (4): Woodlawn won this matchup 38-36 a year ago in a shootout. Last week, a bad snap, untimely penalties and dropped passes (four on its final drive) doomed Hampton in a 16-0 loss to Strong. Woodlawn edged Hermitage 20-14 last week in overtime, a year after beating the Hermits 72-52.Hermitage at JUnCtIon CItY (35): After an open week, No.1 Junction City notches its 30th consecutive victory. Two weeks ago, the Dragons jumped then No. 3 Rison and won easily 48-8.marvell at RISon (35): No. 5 Rison bounced back last week with a 30-7 win over Camden Harmony Grove. In a tragic Week 2, Rison buried a former player Friday afternoon before losing at Junction City that night 48-8. Rison's defense held Camden H. Grove junior QB C.J. Par-ham, who passed for 195 yards vs. Bearden, to eight of 27 passing for 55 yards. Rison junior RBs Cortez Phillips and Bryson Marks rushed for 109 and 92 yards, respectively, at Harmony Grove.

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CHARlES GooDInEditor

DIERKS - The Dierks Out-laws will put more than just their record on the line Friday as they hit the road to Gurdon for a showdown pigskin prog-nosticators are saying may determine the 7AA champion. Kickoff is set for 7 p.m.

Gurdon enters the game with a 2-1 record after losing to Prescott and Smackover in the preseason, but this year’s record likely matters less to the Go-Devils than last year’s 34-15 loss to the Outlaws - a game which cost them the league crown. With Gurdon eager for retribution and picked to win by Hooten’s Arkansas Football, Outlaw Head Coach David Bennett knows he will have his work cut out for him.

“Offensively, they’ve got a tremendous amount of skill kids,” Bennett said Tues-day during a brief phone interview. “Defensively, they play aggressive. They’ve al-ways been pretty sound on defense, so it’s gonna be another probably typical Dierks-Gurdon game.”

The Go-Devils are led of-fensively by speedy junior running back Jake Harvell, who rushed for 220 yards last

week in the team’s lone win over a Glen Rose team that has proven less competitive than in previous years. Ben-nett said Harvell is a track phenom who will be difficult to chase down.

“He’s the defending cham-pion on the 100 [meter dash] and I think he might have won the 200 too, and as a team Gurdon won the sprint relays,

so they’ve got a lot of speed,” the coach said.

Other threats include all-conference receiver Dewayne Marlow, who Bennett says “can really run” and quarter-back Parker Whitson, while middle linebacker Jackson Kirkpatrick, cornerback Alu-nzo Leeper and defensive end John Clemons, who has recorded 31 tackles this year,

pace the defense.Bennett said a number

of Outlaws have emerged as leaders over the course of the young season, includ-ing Cameron Brewer, Layne McWhorter, Tyler Miller, Jake Eudy, Jacob Lloyd, Jake Green and Justin Joyner, all of whom have joined quar-terback Tyler Kesterson and standout running back

Trendin McKinney in push-ing the team to 3-0 this year. Last Friday, the team posted a 33-18 win over the favored Fouke Panthers in what Ben-nett described as a challeng-ing contest.

“Fouke is a ball-control, ground game. They do a real good job of running a toss stretch play where you gotta string it out, and they’ve got a couple of good running backs. We had our work cut out for us last week,” he said, noting that the team dressed out nearly twice as many athletes as the Outlaws. “That puts a strain on a 2A team that’s playing kids both ways, a lot of them. I was very proud of the kids last week - they stepped up and played really well for us.”

That level of effort will be called upon this week if Di-erks hopes to escape Gurdon with a win.

“Our kids know, just like theirs do, that we gotta come out and play Friday night,” Bennett said. “This’ll be one of those where who executes the best, their game plan and that kind of stuff, that’s what we’ve been focusing on. In a game like this, you can’t go out and make mistakes, you can’t turn the ball over and you have to score.”

CHARlES GooDInEditor

NASHVILLE - A battle of unbeaten teams that could decide the 7-4A conference championship will take place Friday as the Nashville Scrappers gear up to host the Arkadelphia Badgers. Kickoff is set for 7:30 p.m.

Expectations are high for both squads, which post-ed big wins in the opening weeks of their nonconfer-ence schedules. Most recent-ly, the Badgers edged out Hot Springs with a second half surge, beating the Trojans 35-13, while Nashville enters the game with added momentum from a 22-13 win over 5A Wat-son Chapel last week.

Arkadelphia’s focus seems to have shifted away from offense with the loss of Division II college recruits Jakahari Howell and Kris Oliver, who now put their talents to work at Ouachita Baptist University. In their absence, Scrapper Head Coach Billy Dawson said the team relies on air-tight de-fensive play to earn its wins.

“Defensively, they re-turned seven guys off of a squad that, last year, led the state in points given up. The front four is as good as we’ll see in totality,” Dawson said Wednesday during a brief interview. “The inside two are kind of the focal point. One defensive end’s a real athletic kid, the other is a technique guy, so they’re gonna be good defensively. That’s kind of where they hang their hat.”

The team is led at defen-sive tackle by 6’2” tall, 250 pound senior Emmanuel Coo-

per, who Dawson describes as “a hoss who’s given us fits for two years,” and whose versatility and speed is so great that he’s listed as a run-ning back on offense. Joining him at defensive tackle is An-thony Jenkins, who Dawson said “gave us some problems last year.”

So far, the duo have per-formed admirably, forcing four turnovers last week against Hot Springs and join-ing other Badger defenders in allowing just 34 points in three games.

Dawson said the team’s offensive schemes are simi-lar to what fans have seen in years past, but feature dif-ferent athletes after the Bad-gers graduated two starting receivers, all of their linemen, their quarterback and their running back last season.

“They’re still doing what they do, they’re just doing it with different guys, and they don’t get behind the chains. You don’t see negative plays. You don’t see mistakes,” Dawson said, pointing out that they are likely to con-trast that discipline with attempts at forcing mistakes on behalf of the Scrappers. “This year, they’re averag-ing 39 points a game but 25 points of those are second half points. That’s kind of the way they’ve been - they’ve been better in the second half, and I think some of that’s got to do with tempo. They wear you out and then capitalize in the second half. People have really struggled offensively against them to maintain a drive, to hold on to the ball.”

Dawson said he antici-pates the return of starting

tailback Alex Buckley, who has missed the last two games due to injury, which likely means his replace-ment, Ty Kosters, will shift to another position, providing the Badgers with another scoring threat.

“That kind of gives them a different dimension because they’ll move Kosters out to receiver, which gives them another guy,” the coach explained.

He added that senior re-ceiver J. Brooks Burnham is another threat to watch, calling the 5’8” tall senior a “savvy route runner.”

Although the Scrappers escaped last week’s contest with the win, Dawson said he felt the team made too

many mental errors on of-fense, and the Scrappers have focused on maintaining rhythm and tempo during practice this week. Since sophomore Darius Hopkins rushed for over 200 yards and three scores during the team’s week one win over Hope, defenses have keyed in on stopping the threat, forcing the Scrappers to adjust their offensive strate-gies in a way that’s played to the benefit of senior receiver LaMichael Pettway and ju-nior Deajeon Armstrong. The pair have combined for nearly 400 yards and 11 scores through the air so far this season.

“They’re putting a lot of folks in the box, so we’ve got-

ta find a way to get them out of the box, and get Pettway and Deajeon and some of those guys some touches other than throwing it to them,” Dawson said.

Chapel’s focus on stop-ping the run last week forced the team to run the ball with junior quarterback Leonard Snell, a fourth dimension of Nashville’s offense Dawson said is likely to play a major factor this week.

“Everybody knows he can run, we just haven’t run him. If you put an extra guy in the box, you gotta do it, so in or-der for us to get out of there alive Friday we had to do it,” the coach said. “I’m sure they’re preparing for that. They probably oughta be.”

CHARLES GOODIN | Nashville News

Sophomore running back Darius Hopkins struggles past two Watson Chapel defenders last week during the Scrappers’ 22-13 win over the Wildcats. Since rushing for over 200 yards and three scores during week one, defenses have focused on stopping the prolific ball carrier.

DEIRDRE DOVE | Nashville News

Tyler Kesterson pulls ahead for positive yardage Friday during the Dierks Outlaws’ win over Fouke.

outlaws to face Gurdon in key conference match

nashville to open conference schedule with Arkadelphia

D.E. RAYManaging Editor

MINERAL SPRINGS - The Mineral Springs Hornets prepare to face their first conference game tomorrow night against the Mt. Ida Li-ons on the road.

Speaking earlier in the week, Hornets head coach Jason Burns said that he expects action to be fast and furious in the coming game, com-menting several times on the relative speed of both his players and the Lions.

“Their quarterback can run. They’ve got a slotback that is very quick. We’re going to have to run the ball - I think we’re pretty well matched up,” he said.

Burns said that the Mt. Ida team does en-joy some significant advantages in the com-ing game. “They’re a physical team. They’ve got a little bit of size,” he explained, but add-ed that possibly the biggest advantage that the Lions will enjoy will be playing in front of their home crowd. “They get a lot of sup-port, and the crowd is a factor.”

The 0-2 Hornets face the 2-1 Lions coming off a week without play-ing, in which the Lions defeated the Mountain Pine Red Devils 42-14.

Burns said that the Mineral Springs squad had taken their week without a challenger to hone their own skills not only for the com-ing matchup against the Lions, but also on a more basic level. “We’ve been working on fundamental stuff: trying to limit turn-overs, limit mistakes... We’ve been trying to work on finishing the game.”

He stated that his team had suffered loss-es because of breaks in their rhythm and losing leads, explaining that, “We’ve had too many momentum hits.”

Despite that, Burns expressed some quiet optimism about the Hornets’ chances in coming games, espe-cially praising those who take the field in tense moments dur-ing previous games. “Special teams really cleaned up. Overall, we’re a lot better off this time this year than this time last year.”

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10 Community The Nashville News | Online at http://www.swarkansasnews.com | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, September 25, 2014

"Count on It"

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

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16 17 18

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34 35 36

37 38 39

40 41 42

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49 50 51 52 53 54 55

56 57 58 59

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63 64 65

Across

1 Pair on the feet

6 Tears

10 Kickoff need, in football

13 Work on the turkey

14 Concept

15 Not at home

16 Short work at the theater

18 Achy

19 Football scores: abbr.

20 Maple or cherry

21 Yogurt eater's need

23 Crazy as a ___

24 Not on the schedule

25 Get an A for ___

28 Historical times

31 Roker and Pacino

34 Civil disturbances

35 Actress Dunne

36 Stabler or Jennings

37 Burden

38 Happening

39 Prima donna

40 The, in Germany

41 Make law

42 Doomed person

43 Spooky ability

44 Get something off your chest

45 Car door opener

46 Be in arrears

48 Mist

49 Powerful beams

52 Untainted

53 J. Edgar Hoover's org.

56 ___ and crafts

57 Goldilocks visited their house

60 Get together

61 Do what you're told

62 Pal of Kukla and Fran

63 Golf course score

64 Sodas

65 Enjoy a frozen pond

Down

1 Get off ___-free

2 Finger's place

3 Valuable sources of minerals

4 Actress ___ Marie Saint

5 Parts, as of the economy

6 Become edible, as fruit

7 Not doing much at all

8 Split ___ soup

9 Verbalizes

10 Perfectly matched pair

11 Make, as money

12 They may be brown or blue

15 Since

17 Horse's gait

22 Show off for the camera

23 Plenty

25 Eat away at

26 Penalties

27 Fancy bed

28 Put up

29 Monthly bill

30 Picnic pest

32 Even

33 Trap

35 ___ the Terrible

38 Compass dir.

39 Completed

41 At any time

42 Park structures

45 Rabbit's cousin

47 Toward the setting sun

48 Big helicopters, in military slang

49 Light source

50 Neighborhood

51 "Cut it out!"

52 ___ school

53 Roosevelt's dog

54 Englishman

55 "Understood"

58 "Curb Your Enthusiasm" network

59 Animal with antlers

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© 2009 Hometown Content

Sudoku Puzzle #3396-D

Difficult

1 2 3

4 5

6 3 7 8

7 4 6 1

8 9

6 3 8 7

9 1 5 4

5 2

3 8 7

Answers on Pg. 3

for a third increase later. Clark was the lone per-

son to vocally object to the larger increases prior to voting, saying that the smaller increases would give the city an opportu-nity to revisit rates later. Ultimately, a motion was made to approve the larger increases.

Council members Matt

Smith, Monica Clark, James Parker, Andy Anderson and Mike Milum voted against the increase, while Freddy Brown, Jackie Harwell, Nick Davis, Vivian Wright, Jimmie Lou Kirkpatrick and Carroll Mitchell voted yes. Kay Gathright was absent from the meeting.

The rate hikes will be included in an ordinance presented to the council next month, and will go into effect Nov. 1 if they are ap-proved at that time.

In other business during the meeting, the council heard from water customer

Martha Hayes, whose water meter was recently replaced while she was on vacation in Chicago. According to Jones and Dunaway, the meter had been leaking on the city’s side, but the replacement caused the galvanized steel lines running from the meter to her home to clog.

Hayes said she asked her son to replace the line, and that he, in turn, asked the city to pay the $400 cost of the procedure, which Jones refused to do, citing laws that place responsibility for repairs to plumbing on the residential side of the

meter on those who own the residence.

“Doesn’t fix or repair mean it should be as good or better than before?” Hayes asked the council.

Jones and Dunaway said Hayes’s line was dry for less than an hour, and that clog-ging is always a risk when dealing with galvanized lines due to deterioration inside the pipe.

Code enforcement officer David Johnson also spoke on the subject, telling the council that Hayes’s son had neither requested a permit to do the work, nor had the

line inspected after it was repaired - both violations of city code.

“All this plumbing work that was done was done unlawfully,” Johnson said.

Council member Mitchell eventually moved to pay half the cost of the replace-ment, but the vote came to a tie with Smith, Clark, Mitch-ell, Anderson and Milum voting yes, Brown, Harwell, Davis, Wright and Parker voting no and Kirkpatrick abstaining. Jones then cast the tie-breaking vote against the measure.

As the meeting drew to

a close, aldermen voted unanimously on two other, unrelated issues. The first, a proposal by Fire Chief Jerry Harwell to sell an early-model fire truck used for decoration by the de-partment in favor of using the space for additional training, was soundly de-feated by council members who moved to keep the ve-hicle for sentimental value. The second, a proposal by Police Chief Dale Pierce to renovate the former Nash-ville City Jail into usable office and storage space, was approved.

would cost $8,134. She stat-ed that the cost for placing the transformer could be financed over a period of six years, coming to around $120 per month. Horne sug-gested that this would be a good option, because he sees the need for further electrical expansion in the future of the park in any case.

The final action of the reg-ular park commission meet-ing was to hear a request to

host a reunion for “Nashville Swingin’”, a group that held regular music shows at the Elberta Theater on Main Street in the 1980s. The com-mission seemed generally well disposed toward host-ing the event, but did not take action.

Horne then adjourned the regular meeting and called the planning session to order.

The group quickly moved to name Donny Woods, Josh Tice and Horne to serve as the budget committee to pre-pare the park department’s budget for the coming year.

Members then talked

about what projects they would like to see added to the budget for the coming year, with Horne talking about placing a basketball hoop at the Toland Heights park on the south end of town, and Tice suggesting a frisbee golf course at the main park on Johnson Street. Suggestions were also made that all rest rooms in the main park should have bi-cycle racks outside and baby changing stations inside.

There was also sub-stantial discussion of the possible construction of a “splash pad”, which Cherry described as a sort of flat,

multi-spouted fountain that children could play in on hot days. She commented that a possible donor had spoken to her about covering the cost of the feature. Commis-sioners were trepedacious about the project, and dis-cussed the need for careful placement at length. They suggested that Cherry come back to them with firm cost figures before they made a decision, though Woods remarked that if a donor was giving it to the park, they might as well go ahead.

Cherry also talked about the previously discussed proposal of adding chair-

backed seating at the base-ball fields, which she re-ported would cost around $10,000. The group decided that funds generated by the annual March for Parks event held next spring could be used for that project.

Commissioner James Reed then asked about the opaque backing added to the fencing at the softball field, which had reportedly drawn many complaints from spectators. Cherry told him that the backing was purchased by the school for their games, and that park employees merely put it up before the season and took

it down after. Reed asked if there were perhaps transpar-ent alternatives, or if there was a way to build elevated stands to see over the back-ing for spectators. Cherry responded that she would look into the issue and come back to the group.

Cherry then spoke about the possible need for addi-tional employees at the park, saying that facilities and activities had expanded to the point that it was hard to keep things up with current staffing levels. Commission-ers expressed sympathy, but did not take definitive action at that time.

the shy blond haired stu-dent has also learned peo-ple skills.

“Not very long ago I was really shy and wouldn’t talk to people about anything. It’s taught me to just go up to people and see what

they have to say,” Chandler noted.

Chandler constantly searches for people to ap-proach wherever she goes. She has developed a list of questions to ask that may or may not lead to a tiny tidbit of gold within its an-swer. Some people that she speaks with do not make it on the page. To sort out those that do and don’t, she and her mother spend time sorting through voice

recordings searching for interesting, funny or wise information.

“It takes up a lot of time,” Amanda Chandler remarked.

Chandler agreed, adding, “Trying to find people who are interesting is sometimes difficult but everybody has a story and you just have to dig deep to find it.”

Generally, if the girls in-terview several people in one day, they do not post

them all on Facebook at once. In fact, researching when they should create another post as well as what appeals to the public is another learning experi-ence Chandler and her sis-ter have been able to take part in with the Humans of Arkansas project.

Despite a few negative comments, most of the feed-back Chandler has received has been positive, with fol-lowers writing encouraging

statements such as “good work” on her page.

Chandler is not sure what will come of Humans of Arkansas.

“I kind of wanted it to turn into some photogra-phy thing, but who knows, it might turn into a book or something else but it’d be really good if it would turn into something with photog-raphy,” she said.

Either way, she continues to be inspired by Stanton

and his Humans of New York page. Amanda Chan-dler is hoping to take her daughter to New York City in January and is crossing her fingers that perhaps the two camera fanatics and people watchers will get to meet.

For now, Humans of Ar-kansas will continue. Fans can look for the next in-stallment soon, which will feature Lori Harper from Mount Ida, whom Chandler is interviewing today.

HIKEfrom Page 1

PARKfrom Page 1

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Page 11: Nashville News The · NASHVILLE - The Nash- ... purchase Scrapper gear, candles, hair extensions, ... tee and the US Army Corps of Engineers at Milwood Lake are

Jimmy Don Sullivan Welding & Construction Service, 845-4752, licensed septic tank installation. (JDS:tf; w12) ___________________________he Terminator Pest Control (870) 557-1780. (tf) ___________________________Ward Shavings LLC - dry shavings $1,500/van load. (870) 285-3377. (WS:89-tf; w9) ___________________________Brazil’s Full Service Center & Detail. For all your car care needs! Why shine when you can sparkle. 805 S. Main, right beside Hickory House. Call us at 870-557-7739. (mg:tfn) ___________________________If you are looking for a caregiver I have 12 years experience. Call 870-703-4326. (PD:71-78) ___________________________

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3 or 6 ac. lots, city water, Hwy 26W, owner inancing. (501) 758-2303. (CL:74-tf; w13) ___________________________19 acres+/-, 1-1/2 miles south of Dierks, AR on Timberlane Road. Utilities on property. Lots of shade trees. $4000/acre. 870-784-0232. (PD:73-78) ___________________________15.77 =/-, 1-1/2 miles south of Dierks, Ar. Road goes through this property. Utilities are avail-able. Borders Timber Co. on East. $4000/acre. 870-784-0232. (PD:73-78) ___________________________Multiple Dwellings & Hwy Com-mercial Buildings on 800 Block South Main, Nashville. 870-845-1173 or 870-557-1173. (ET:75-tfn,w14) ___________________________

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MUST SELL! 3/2 tape and textured set up on 1 acre. 30 yrs at 4.75% for $467.63. Call 24 hours! (903) 831-4540. (SH:99-tf, w21) ___________________________SINGLE PARENT AND FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS. Special i-nancing for low down and monthly payments. Call anytime! (903) 831-7324. (SH:99-tf; w18) ___________________________Bad or good credit! You own land, we can inance you on any home. Call 24 hrs. (903) 831-5332. (SH:99-tf; w18) ___________________________ABANDONED 3/2 with land. Must sell! Call 25 hrs. (903) 831-6412. (SH:99-tf; w10) ___________________________

Angus Bulls. (870) 451-4189. (mg:tf) ___________________________HAY FOR SALE - 870-557-0123. (PD:62-87) ___________________________

Looking for scrap metal, small amounts OK. Call (870) 557-0838. (dj:tf) ___________________________Now buying good usable pallets 40 inches wide X 48 inches long $2.00 each delivered to Ward Shavings LLC 870-285-3377. (WS:82-tf, w20) ___________________________LOOK GOOD...... FEEL BET-TER!!! Cancer Survivors. For more information contact: 870-845-2759 or 870-557-1444. (tf) ___________________________

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ClaSSifiEdS 11 Thursday, September 25, 2014 | The Nashville News | Online at http://www.swarkansasnews.com | Call: 1-888-845-6397

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We strive for accuracy, though occasionally er-rors do occur. Please notify us immediately if your ad has a mistake in it, so that we may cor-rect it and give you a free rerun for the irst day that it ran incorrect-ly. Mistakes not brought to our attention before the second printing of the ad are eligible for one free corrected ad only!For more information and assistance regarding the investigation of i-nancing or business op-portunities, he Nash-

ville News urges our readers to contact the Better Business Bureau of Arkansas, 12521 Can-nis Rd., Little Rock, AR 72211 or phone (501) 665-7274 or 1-800-482-8448.

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Page 12: Nashville News The · NASHVILLE - The Nash- ... purchase Scrapper gear, candles, hair extensions, ... tee and the US Army Corps of Engineers at Milwood Lake are

12 Community The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, September 25, 2014

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New Generation Outreach Ministries Presents:

4th Church AnniversarySeptember 27 - 28, 2014

Kevin Brazil, Pastor

September 27, 2014New Generation will kick off this 2 day

event with a “pre - musical” at 6pm. Everyone is invited... Come on out and

BRING YOUR YOUTH!

September 28, 2014Embrace an awesome experience at 3pm

as we end it with a phenomenal man of God... Pastor Cedell White of New

Beginning Ministry.

September 276:00 p.m.

September 283:00 p.m.

Pastor Cedell White “Guest Speaker”

NEW GENERATION OUTREACH MINISTRIES

103 Main Street • Nashville

County faIr

CorrECtIonsn Layne Thompson (above), Savannah

Jackson (right) and Darrell Reed

(below right) were inadvertently omitted from

the Mon., Sept. 22 edition of the

Nashville News. All three participants

in the Howard County Fair should have been included

in the special section devoted to covering the event

included in that issue. Additionally,

Rayleigh Harmon was misidentified

as Addison Harmon in the same edition. The Nashville News

regrets the errors.

Staff photosby D.E. Ray

COURTESY PHOTO | Nashville Primary School

Todd Warren, Chief Meteorologist KTAL 6 News, recently visited with second grade students at Nashville Primary School. During his visit, Warren talked with the students about the water cycle, clouds and weather safety.

spECIal vIsItor

DIERKS - DeAnn Vaught of Horatio has of-ficially announced her intention to seek the District 4 seat as a Republican in the Arkan-sas House of Representatives during the Nov. 4 General Election. She is running against Democratic incumbent Fonda Hawthorne. The following is her announcement:

“My name is DeAnn Vaught and I am run-ning for State Representative of District 4. I have been married to Jon Vaught for 25 years this October. We have three daughters. Brit-tanee is in physical therapy school at UCA in Conway, Shyann is a freshman at Central Baptist in Conway and Josie is a sophomore at De Queen High School.

I graduated from Horatio High School and then attended Southern Arkansas Univer-sity where I graduated with an Ag Business degree. Jon and I moved to Sevier Country after college to begin farming. We own and operate a family farm in Horatio where we have six chicken houses, a Cargill sow farm, and the only dairy in Sevier Co. We are mem-bers of the NRA, Sevier County Farm Bureau, Arkansas Pork Producers and the Arkansas Cattlemen’s Association. Most importantly I am a strong Christian and I attend church regularly at First Baptist Church in De Queen.

I will be a strong voice for District 4 in Little Rock. I am not scared of hard work and I understand the struggles of small busi-nesses. As your state representative, I’ll stand up for our Christian values and I will work to find ways to bring more businesses to our district and to our state.

I am passionate about our student’s edu-cation and future. We must find a better way to help those students who do not have a desire to attend college and prepare them to earn a living in the workforce.

Our children need better school lunches. In many cases, school lunches are the only meals some students actually get to eat. As state representative, I’ll stand up for our local schools and support restoring local control of lunch menus and portions. The menu changes are calorie restrictions mandated by the federal government but

there are several things the state can do to offset the changes and allow our students to once again have satisfying meals. We must also find a way to help our elderly so they do not have to choose between medicines and food.

We need less government hassle and more individual freedom. I will be a strong defender of our Second Amendment rights. I have my concealed weapon license. I also enjoy hunting with my family and I am ex-cited for this deer season.

If you are ready for common sense repre-sentation and for someone to stand up for what is right I would appreciate your vote on November 4th.”

Hawthorne, who has held the seat for a single term so far, hails from Ashdown, where she works as Economic Development Officer with the Little River Chamber of Commerce. Hawthorne, also a Baptist, attended Ouachita Baptist University, and also graduated from the US Institute of Organization Management and the Community Development Institute. She is a past member of the De Queen Lions Club and the Ashdown Rotary Club, and a current member of the Ashgrove Citizens Committee and the Arkansas State Cham-ber of Commerce. In the legislature, she sits on nearly a dozen committees focusing on local issues, including the Legislative Joint Auditing Committee, the House Committee on State Agencies and Governmental Affairs, the House Committee on City, County and Local Affairs. Hawthorne has two children and reports enjoying fishing and swimming in local lakes and streams.

Horatio woman to challenge Hawthorne for District 4 House

VAUGHT HAWTHORNE

District includes Dierks, other portions of Howard

County, in addition to Sevier and Little River Counties


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