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New York Tribune.(New York, NY) 1919-01-10 [p...

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The Violet Gets a 1 !3^v^y__^)^, B __¦ J«i Jl _M_ HB OB- ^BY wld.MACBETH (Copyright, 1919, New York Tribune Inc.) Jones, Obstinate Cuss Vice-President Jones, of the Cardinals, may find himself in the toils if he insists upon having: his Rickey after July. Quite as Much Tyrus Raymond Cobb is a i'ree agent.just like Count Billious. WHATS THE SIGNIFKCANCE? SCBIBBLES James C. Isaminger, the sage of Philadelphia: "Pat Moran has sent the president of a certain big league hall .lub a box of fish hocks for pocket use as a Christmas token." Nothing to Worry About World's championship emblems. Ainaa Strunk. Not to Mention Ear Muffiers The management of the Waldorf should lay in a stock of gas masks to protect guests during the joint baseball meeting. The National League aione is bad enough, but when the two majors get together.well finish it yoursclf. Keep Eye on Old Fox Keep an eye on Clark Griffith. The Old Fox must be preparing to unload something on some of our David Harums. Whenever the Wash¬ ington bo..s intends to dicker you may bank upon him seeing to it that his chattel doea not suffer for want of publicity. How tenderly GriiY ve- gards his veteran utility player, Hank Shanks, is a matter of opinion. But the following tribute from the pen of Louis A. Dougher (to one fatfiliar with Griffith's cunning) might be interpreted by Mr. Shanks as 8 sign to pack his household goods for delivery to some major league city other than the capital of our country in 1919: "In al! this chatter of trades and releases, it is not expected that Manager Griffith will part with Hank Shanks, the sweet tenor from Monaca, Pa. Hank is such a versatile cuss that he is almost a necesi sity. "Apart from his light hitting, Hank makes good wherever he is played. He can play all three outfields with sureness and grace. He bows before no other outfielder, not even Speaker, Cobb, Lewis, Felsch or Veach, whom we consider the first five leading gardeners in that order. Hank is sure one sweet outfielder. "When anything goes wrong in the infield, there's Hank waiting to f;!l the hole. He has done good work at third base, fair work at short and he ousted Ray Morgan from his second base job with com- parative ease. "It is unfortunate that Hank is not a .290 batsman, for he would play left field all the time if he were, and that's where he shines most. Slow to get away, Hank beats out few slow ones, but his brains make him a capable base runner, once he lands at first base. Indeed, no branier a ba.-^e runner now plays in the American League, though there are many with more speed. "Hank- is a good influence with a bail club. Game as a pebble, he is willing to give his best. -He is aggressive to an extreme, though scldom running up against the umpire's ban: In fact, some of the of¬ ficials, like Tomroy Connolly and Billy Evans, like to hear Hank rave, for he ii so much in earnest. "Off the field Hank is a quiet, well-behaved, decent citizen. He plays baseball more because he likes it than for any other reason. He came to Washington in 1912, and since then has made hundreds of personal friends, while there isn't a fan at Georgia avenue who doesnt like to see and hear him in action. "He Is the ideal utility man That's why he'll probably stick with the Griffs.'' lhe Passing of Heroes So many brilliant athletes have fallen in the war that even a world's champion gets but a half-dozen lines or less in the European papers when he dies. One whose death passed almost unnoticed was George Parent, who succumbed to pneumonia in Paris, Parent was three times long-distance cycling champion of the world. He began racing in 1905 as an amateur, when he was 20 years old; He won the championship of France in 1908, and in the next three years he anmially vron the national and world's 100 kilometers (62.1 miles) cham-1 pionahip. In his prime he beat Bobby Walthour, Darragon and others of that calibre, including the best professonals of Brussels, Rome and' Copenhagen. Parent's fatal weakness was a theory that he could train en beer, and by 1912 he was through. j In the war he was a typical hero of France. Early in 1914 he re- ceived one bullet in the breast and another in the calf of the leg. In: 1915 has was wounded again, was invalided out of the army and became a nmnitions worker. j His record of winning three successive world's long distance cham- pwnships has probably nev_r been equalled, and the memory of his riding! at the Parc des Princes will live for many a day. Big Soccer Football Battle On Schedule for Sunday Rival Teams to Meet at Lenox Oval in Replay Cup Match , The most promisin* soccer football tontest in the national championships to ba gtafjed in Manhattan in re- ***« year? i:s schedulcd for Lenox <*»'. 147th Street and Lenox Avenue, fcsOt Sunday afternoon. It will be tho "Play the third round National Challenge Cup jratne between rival «»Pj*r_ taems. Federal Ship A. A. S. IfcekV?. 7bN* ,J," and Mo"e Dr* FieM rtu'KUnK two hour» at Clark's __mT l Newark. last Sunday, the SH" *«'« ft"*ced by darkness to quit _2SJ* having reached a decision. v«n»id*ririK lhe power of the forward ''*» »t *a» a truiy remarkable fcame, k.li /°,ai hav'«''Jr been acored. Foot- nlL, lha h****** order mark-d both ¦SE!.' _eri°<*«* and th,. two extra »*"«d» rrf fifteen miitutea each. iwt'0"- *ork of t}"; attackinjc divi- _S_-»_*Terai li*¦««-'!¦ threatened to re- UrcZ * *|t-*»<n«fa« point, but thc dc- t*«L <ach .J«*«n WM enual to ail fcr^-t"CLtfY The diipiay was of such 4id An.c\t}»at «xpcrt8 in the crowd wiV;' ?u"»!tat* to clasa both teamn .n th, pr««nt national titleholders. °«n?«rh%fn St««l F. (1 eb.rl .#__." °ff"»al« who were in Wy&T ¦ Ch«»«» Creiichton. of » LI ¦. '* th* referee and Andrew «*n i.''/" :' ^<r«t*nr of lhe Am«ri- .»»* .."it!!. AwocUtton, ax*in will .Wiin*. ''"' ?UU» Football A»«o- Tg? ***«**£#, to the match. 3i_i 'fnr/'r* ?ivS F- c- of Qu»ncy, **of wv^t fourth ".¦** th* w»n- «w national title **ri<>», bounded Gutnt Returm STlf / th^h* NftW Yfl'k Gf»nt". ***itt jom MeCraw in tn* 8ooth. Squash Play Postponed Until Next Monday Play in the opening round of the Metropolitan Association aquash tennia championship tourney scheduled for yesterday was deferred until next Mon¬ day afternoon, on account of the in¬ ability of two of the clubs to muster together full teams. The matches ' ullod for Columbia playing Yale and the combined Princeton Squash clubs entcrtaining thc Harvard Club. It was announced that no future poKtponements would be countenanced in the championship series. New Orleans Results threo Flnt race (two-year olds; pume $500; ...,. furlongs) Zatiz, li", (Mitra.f), 0 lo 5 7 to 10 and 1 lo 2. first; Ogdon Girl, 101 (Cotmtanllm-)' t.U' h.P U> "' *"" 1 to u>' xwond; Oar Ihe VVay. 115 (Conr.ellyi, 3 to 1. even iuul l to 1 Udrd. Time, .38 1-5. ' ' l " Eady lo:i>;, Ml»» Mink, Marrln .May, and Bone Dry also ran. Heeoiid raco Cbroe-yearolds; cialmlng; purso 1800; oo; mBal-Hjiiwy Ught, 104 fc. HohiriUi). 7 to 2, 7 to 5, and il to 5. flmt; Alitolitelte, 102 iHneideman;, 5 t.j 2, even. aud 1 to 2 goooud Astraea. Wi <Caa*ld>). 8 to 1, 3 to 1, and 8 io 5, Ihlixt Ttme, 1.47 4-5. Wiswt Fool, Court <?al!uit, Dahlnda. Dott&'s ~\: i "-""ricate. and Frank Khannon also ran. Tblrd ra/* ifour-yi-ar-oid* and upward; clalrn- Ing; puiM $f,0y; one mlle and a alateauthi-- V/uroddln. 107 iCmiMU). 12 to 1, 5 to 1 aml 5 lo t. flrat; Aruaigamator, 108 (C. Robinson) 4 to 1, 8 to :>, ajcl 4 to 5, aeooqdj Pol.it Bl'eu D«r»lsb, Klimer. Haadt, Hbymer. arid Rosewatcr alvi ran. Fourth rae« (four-year-olds and upwar*): pursy 11,000; one mll«>.Wamaw, 105 (Gainer), lu tn 8, 6 to 5, and 3 to 5, flrat; C'obslt j^k, 97 Qtoanml 7 to 2 7 t/» 5. ar.d 7 fo 10. sen'otid; Waukeag^ II.' fManduoo, 7 to 1, 0 ((J 2. and eveti tblrd Tlin*, 1.47 4 J, Ditntnlon, Amak-tto. llarrest King, and Rufus ItiWj a)iv» r*d. Flflh ra/'n (four-yMr-olffa »nd upward; clatoi- lfig; porw $60/); «.* i;i!l» ai.d a sUteemh). (inuany, I0«! '(«t»ik*r), 2 l'i 1, 4 to I, a*id 2 to 5, find; Ultlwr, 113 (Blco), 7 lo ;: 7 lo 5 and 7 to 10, MfalOi Kw.lab,. 10H (Moonev), 7 'to 1 1 t/» 2, and 0 to fl, third. Time, I '>7 1-* Blue Rock Jason. Esdv Klleen, Mer;y Twlnkle 1 vi.uz.i: Uoiigv, Bli. of Blarney, and N*> Maiwarr aie'i ra/i Mlxtb wa <four-year-oid» and upward: <iaim- lii((; purse $«00; un* m)U and a »tiU«ntb).Y«f- ma*. 107 (WJII1«), 9 to 2, » 10 5. and 4 to K fim, Thlrtt, 100 (Orsgory), 12 to 1, » lo 1, an<j 6 Ui 2, seeondj Ad*l»nt/>, 113 (Hmltli), 8 to 2. * to 6, *ri4 4 10 «, thlr.i. Tlm:«, I 57 J-5. IlarwowJ, tto/at Ititcrast, Ed th Hamnanti, Dr CnsnM, Mlvifiila,, and Jurlgdiitton a;*o ran. ttuniAh r»/« (fouryoaroM* and upward; elnlra I'g; i>»r*» %HW; turn mlle and a »lx!/»»nth7-M»ry H !oh iftiirfie,, J2 ti, j, r to 1, *nd 5 to 2, ftM«, A,u*!, uo (M.jotMrf), 11 to 1, 3 to 1, and » i/» f, aaeofid; Bemper Btaiwart, 10« (CsMldy). 10 "1, 4 to 1, uid 2 t/» 1, tblrd. 'fitw. KW« «'«», /.ten Ha<mwofl, Browrut Fan/rlt*. *M4rn*. Boy, p«a Coft»j«lly( uid i*'»1im also 31ow in B For Big Boom In All Sports Star Athletes Return to Col¬ lege Again After Lend- ing Hand to Uncle Sam After a period of comparative in- activity lasting almost two full years, athletics are to be resumed at Ford- ham University. More than 1,500 mem¬ bers of the former student body who have been engaged in the various branches of government service dur¬ ing the war have again taken up their studiesj in the ciasses which were formaliy opened dunng the past week. .Many of tnose who have. returned to the university are weil known icr their atnleuc prowess on'the tracti and m looibaii, DasiietDail and basebah. It ls me opimon oi memuers of tne ath- ieuc board that the Maroon wnl be better and more largeiy represented iu the coiiego athletic world than ever bfore. All that. is now necessary inasmucb as classes have ofticinlly opened is to secure thc sanction of the faculty to commenco athletic work. Thc Rev. Father Edward S. Brock, for more than five years in charge of athletics at Bos¬ ton College whero he developed several strong teams, is the new Perfect of Discipline at Fordham. Father Brock has taken ovpr the work of directing athletics for the Maroon and expressed himself yesterday as more than pleased with the prospects for basketball and baseball. Together with Charles Robinson, a senior tho manager of the 1919 Maroon basketball squad, he has arranged a tentative schedule of games which with the sanc¬ tion of the athletic govcrning body will mean Fordham will meet many of the big collen-c fives. Last year Fordham had no 'varsity basketba 1 team and had to be con¬ tent with a i'reshmnn quintet. This out it. which included r.uch players Dick Groto, "Bill" Finn. Frunk Frish and others made quite a name for themselves; All of the players on the first year 1918 squad have resumed work at I-ordnam during the week. Jim Ryan. a guard from thc Mount St. Marysteam entered Fordham yes¬ terday. 1 he candidates for the team are anxiously awaiting the sanction of the faculty before commencing prac- Erasmus llall Winning Streak The Erasmus Hall High School' basketball team added Adelphi Acad-J emy to its list of victims in swamping the latter yesterday by the score of 48 to 15 on the Flatbush School's court. Well-guarded baskets by Eras¬ mus Hall prevented the visitors from scoring oftener. At half time the vic- tors had a lead of 31 tr. Q. "Eppy" Barnes, the creek right for¬ ward of Erasmus Hall, was th*e indi¬ vidual star of the game. He accbunted for nearly half of his team's points on ten goals from the field. Linoki, left forward. assisted Barnes some- what in the victory by tallying six lield baskets. The biggest point scorer for Adelphi waa Mumm, left forward, who scored three goals from the field. The linc-uu: iian,n^.HaU <1S) %lM Adelpld (15) %$&&.- v* .'.'.'..'.¦.'.'...'.......:SS ftg» *% wKi h"vir. L<'.1.Hal ; iQotLla from field.Barnes (10), TJnckl (51, Mo- v ,'*" 'V' ,Ml.lr-"" '3>- I'^nblus Ci), MU-UbU. j,). SuIwUtutlons.Jlay for LUiokl fiogera f'.r Hay CUljjuruey for Snvcr, Mlchell for Snialley. !,7 '.;" f',r., !,i'"; I'cfw- I'lifTe, New .urk UiaveiBlty. rinio of halvea.Flftoen minutce. Skating Races Monday The semi-monthly ice skating races at the 181st Street Ice Palace are sched- uled for next Monday evening and will consist of a one-mile handicap and a' half-mile novice for girls. The N. Y. A. C, Tremont S. C. Palace S. ' C. Woodlands S. C. and United States Navy teams have all signified their in- tention of competing. ] Havana Results HAVANNA, Clilm. Jan. !)..The follcirtn. are tin; resuits of to-day's races at Or'ental Fark: 1'irst race (two-year-olds and upward; clalm¬ lng; purse $500; flvo and a hauf furlongs).Flying Dart. 100 (Domtalck), 0 (/> 1. 5 lo 2 ¦_,_ fi & 5* !!r.-;t; Brown I'rincp, 117' (Sterling), 2 to 1 4 to f. and 2 to 7, .second; l'eep Again, 110 (Dreyer) 3 to !. lto! and 1 to 0, third. T,mo, 1:1/4.5 Clartesa, Colors, Expres.loh. OmoUmra, Jojatn. Will Soon, tilbraltar and llanda Off al.so ran Boeond rtue (Unvc-year-oids and uimar.) ciaJm- ¦'¦ ng: punio J.'iOO; flvc and a half rurlntigia).King Truvato, 101 (Thurbcr). 8 to 5, 7 to 10 ond 1 to X 17:;;; Cwdorno, Ktll (Doyle), 7 to 2, 6 to 5 and 3 to 5, second; Bulger, 10S (Kterl:ng>, 2 to 1, 4 to r, and 2 to 5, third. Time, 1:12 1-5 Or.ama. Omapliale DIouo, I'uuliue, Crowley and liurilngame iLse ran. j Third raw (four-year-oids and upward: clalm¬ lng: purse $700; Qve and a half furlongs) Merry jublloe, 110 <7W)lng), 5 to 1. 2 to 1 and evon. flrsl; Agu... 112 (Flnlay). 2 lo 1, 4 to 5 and 2 to 5, KU.1H..I, Mlgg Jar.bo. 105 (Davt.-a), 2 to 1. 4 to 7 !»'. 2 to 0, third. Tlmo, 1M4 »«5. B.t«K» __nd, Fram-cs Crawford, M.rr Burgo- m>Mmt .v'orvlc, Beverly .lamtt, and Pomp aluo ran. ) ulr'.n race (three-yoar-oldR and upward; elalra- Ing; ^ur.se tr'U0; livo and a half furlouga) MIrs Qore, 1OT (Hurke). 3 to 1. (i to 5 and 3 to 5, first.: l'Uodor|,.n, 103 (Davles), 4 to 1, R to 5 and 4t» 5, second; Hulclior lioy. 110 (Ttiurber). 12 to 1. 4 lx> 1 and 2 to 1, third. 'lime, 1:1S 2-5. Itrown Jlahy, Julland. 1'lcrrot and 1/coma al»o ran. I'lfth racn (fouryoar-olds and upward; clalm¬ lng. pnrsc $500;' one nilV. and flft.y yards).Hea Opll. 114 (Thurber), ,'( to 2, 1 to 2 an. Si_L flrsl; Illglt Tldo, lo« (Kterllne), 7 to 2, .! to 5 aiid 8 to 5, swond; Tarlelwi P. 106 (JafTcott), 5 to 1. 2 ti, and eren, third. Tltno, 1:50 1-5, Tiger .llrn. Tlm .1. Ilogan, 1'iinio .Movcr and Al.nrdl also ran. I tf.xth raco (four-year-oids and upward; clnlm- ing; purso $«0U ,,ue mllei -Woodthatoh, ion (lltill- man), 3 to 1, eren ond 1 to t, flrs'i; Doo Tuur.li. 1U4 ((1. l'rceeci, 2 to J. 7 to 10 and 1 to 4, nwoml; fe_muiit, 103 (Plckons), 7 to 1. 2 to 1 and even, third. Time, 1 :.r,a. Tlio (iradcr, John VV. Kleln and Trapping also ran. I New Orleans Entries Klmt race (clalmlng; for nialdrn two-ycar-oldg; niirne. »500; thrt-o furlonga).Dlxlc Klyw, 113; Lady Montjoy. Jl'l; i'argarel Uairetti, Ug: Hlb, 113; Ucck nnd Call, 113; Lonaly, u;i; itunan, 11(1. 8ecr1r.1l raro (ria.mlng; for tlireeycar-old* and up¬ ward; puntR, »000; llvo and a half furlongs)--IM'k WlnfOT, 113; ll.tir aml llitlf, )13; Cavemaii, 113; \...i/tg,: 10S; Ciarica liuth, 108; Augustus, 108; .luiii-, A. Khr.-lihiu. 105; Fninrcs Htarr. 102; Beaile, 10(i; QUMp'i M«ld. 100; Olrwtn.a. 02. I I'lilril race (rlalruli.; f.r Uir*o-ve»r-oldR and up¬ ward; DOtH,$.'()(); Qve and a half furlongs)--I,ag- WT?'. r_8;wN_*,l**l 108: HMliam'R Journey, 10a; ii',,,1'f,'*t'n,M'l'".1<1' ,07; v'«liWlte. 102; M,4. 102; Mlda, 101: Kita. 103; IU,, Hati/uels. 100; t!ouhU,r Balance 91. Fourth race (cla'.mltig; for throc-yrar-oM* and nn- ward; puree. »600; Dvt, and a half furlongal .Bla ac. 17; llnelium, 11',. Kcymar, 114; True aa BtMl, i?;. }lnee1,£l'"'', ' <: .*i((ul»ta. 112; Lady Bmall, i?e K. W aH; 8*,,r,rl»''h' ll°: M1"' wVi'nm (clalmlng; for Uiro*-yearold» and up¬ ward; puti»e, 1500: (me mile and a slitcinth). PfMiOO, 112; IMIs and Call,, 1):-; ixtehy II. 110 rry 110; IUrr>; J'.ricvognl. 109; Opportunlly. 107; .I'addv D»»r, 107; 1/k,\ llnrljert. 101 Hixth race (clamng, tin thrae-ycir-oida and un. ward; pur».i »5(HI; 0110 mile and acvanty yards),- 1J/0; Klngllng 11, 105; Don Ihxlgo, 104; Haafarcr! Hevtmlh, race (clalmlng; for tU/ge-yaar-old* and urnvard; vtrtn. $.100; one mllc and arumty yardul- Cl.olrmn«i.r, 112: dl.-lpner. 100; Thlrat. 101 I)er- (rtflh, Ul; l*ul_aW.' 111; Uarwowl, 108; ilertyor, 10*. asketball.New York PATRICK MORAN, who has signed up as first aid to John J. McGraw, has had a long and varied career in baseball since he broke into the game at Lyons, N. Y.. back in o97. From third baseman on a minor league team to manager of a pennant-winning aggregation in the big show is the long stnde taken by the popular Pat, who is now a weleome Giant Boxiog News and Notes .Bv FRED HAWTHORNE. HO, LANDLORD, A FLAGON OF YOUR BEST WINE! Wc have recently fallen hair to a fortune, Aunt Eleanor Ann, and wo fell all full of thri'us and everything. To-morrow we are going to start diink- hig our fortuno u, as many a gilded youth has wadod through his patri- mony before, but we aro going to drink this fortune up literally, four- fingers moasttrc at a gulp. Thore arc not going to be any "wild oats" in connection with this celcbra- tion. Instead-, vvc shall take our usual breakfust order of rolled oats and cream. We have found that the rolled variety are much more digostible than the "wild" ones and fur cheap'er. We beeame an heir last night, when the telephone bell gurglod mysterious- ly on our dosk and a voice said: "Ia that you, Boss? Well, this is Silvey, you know, Silvey Burns. Say, I jus' got a lot o' fine Italian red wine, came in this morning from the old country; ain't been opened in live years. Great stutT, you know, big kick, porka Dio! I'm gonna send a counla o' bottles down to you; how long will you be there? We are a person of few words and decisive action. "We'll be here until the bottles come, Silvey. We'll meet them at the door with a brass band. Show them in." The Sporting Editor, who had over- heard our eonveisation, and who already had his hat and overcoat on preparatory to doing the subway glide to his home on the Heights of Wash¬ ington, sudenly decided he would stick around and wait for the big show, and' he got, very chummy right off. He's that kind of a pusson, Aunt Eleanor Ann. In due, time the bottle twins were ushered into our august presence, and we took off our hat and shook hands with them. It was hard to tell theni apart, as they were both dark com- pjexioned, of tho some build nnd wore the same style of coiks on their heads. The Sporting Editor tried to get on good terms with one of the bottles at once, and kept asking if it had ever run across Kid Chianti, in Rome, or the Haig twins, in Scotland, or young Gordon Gin, in London. The bottle didn't suy a single word, and finally the Sporting Editor, getting a bit exasperated, said: "Why don't you take your hat off?" Seeir.g tho situa¬ tion was getting dangerous we grabbed both the bottle twins and leu them out of thc office by the hand and took them home. On Sunday afternoon we are go¬ ing to have a very serious talk with the twins, at which time we shall decide upon their future, but we aro afraid they are both destined to tread the downward path. It is reported from London that Jimmy Wilde, the lilliputiu'n, "tangle- foot" champion of the world, is plan- ning to win the bantam and feather- weight titles within the next year nnd will start his lampaigD ns soon as he has wiped up the rinp; with Pai Moore, of Memphis who gained a decision over Jimmy in the international bout.s at London last month. Wilde intends to come to this coun¬ try within the next few months. which will probably interest "Just" Willard, our reckless heavyweight champion. Although he refuses to mingle with Jack Dempsey or any other heavy¬ weight who might accidentally leun a haymnker on his sensitive jawbono, Willi.rd will no doubt grnsp the oppor¬ tunity to meet: Wildo at catch weiphts*. Ah the flvweight champion "Just" Will- ai *i would bc ubout in his spherc. and his battle cry would be, "SWat the flyl" Our old side kick Tom Cassidy, one of the K. of C. men who has done much to lighten the burden of the boyB who went overseas to battle with the Bsche. has arr-inged a monster boxing and vaudeville show at St. Mary's Hall. in Hobok*»n, for next Wednesday nicrht. All tho convalcscent men at the hos¬ pital in Hobokon and nnv others who care to come aro invited, ns well as officers, nnd tho old sitrn. "Evorything Pree! Everybody Weleome!" will he linn"'ng «vt tho entrnnco Chanipiona of tho ring, the wrestling mut and the stage will be on hand, and two full brasg bands will dish out the melody. It looks like a large evening, buddies! AXD THEY TALK ABOUT BROAD¬ WAY! A friend of ours arrived in our palpi- tating midst the other day, Aunt El¬ eanor Ann, and strolled up Broadway with us. We were pointing with "na- tive son" pride to the clustered white lights, the gilded cafes, the ru^hing taxicabs, all the signs of a hectic hot- house life. But he didn't seem to bc impresscd a littlo bit. "So you cal] this life, do you? You Broadway babies don't ever go to bcd until the sun rises, do you? You're a lot of wicked Willies here, aren't you? Well, let me whisper to you a little se- cret. You Broadwayites are a lot of Egyptian mummies compared to Phila- dolphians. I've been down in the 'Sleepy City,' as you call it, for a coupie of months, and I've come back to Broadway for the rest cure. In Phila¬ delphia they not only put the sun to' bed, but they wake it up in the morn- mg and dress it and send it to school, and they lead the moon around by the hand all night and put wet towels on its head when it's full. "When I get my health back I'm going to take another whirl at old' Philly, but my physician has ordered me to have absolute quiet for the next few weeks, and that's why I'm here." 9 Columbia Crew Has Big Record In World War Sixteen of the nineteen men who rowed in the Columbia 'varsity crews of l«rl4, 1915 and 1910 at Poughkeepsie ( served in the,army during. the war, one of whom was kihed and one seriously wounded, according to records. com- F.iied yesterday by the -athletic asso- ciation at Columbia. Six of the sixteen were in the avia- tion serviee, and one of them, 0. B. Meyers, who rowed in the 1916 'varsity boat race, was decorated several times by the French government for his dar- ing in bringing down German 'planes. Of the championship 191| crew. six men were in the serviee.Naumer, bow,I was in thc medical corps; Williams,' No. 2, in the engineers; Rothwell, No. 3, in aviation; Sanborn, No. 5, in the marines; Bratton, No. 6, in aviation, and McCarthy, strokc. in aviation. Of the 1915 eight, on which throe mon who rowed in 191-1 had scats, Jauss, at No. 2, was killed in the fighting early in the summer; Tichborn, No. 8, was an aviator; Dieckman, No. 5, was in the army, and Fermser, stroke, was in the engineering corps. Of the last Colum- hia eight which rowed at Poughkeepsie,! Sengstaken, bow, waa in the army; Meyers, No. 2. in aviation; O'Loughlin. No. 3, in the army; Lahey, No. 4, in the ambulance serviee; Penncll, No. 7, in the field artillery, and Leys, stroke, in the ambulance serviee. The records do not ahow that Ferris, No. 7 in the 1915 eight, was ir. thc serviee. but it, is believed that he was in the army. The record, not including Ferris, shows that 85 per cent^ of the Varsity oarsmen nt Columbia irr the three years immediately preceding the war, an- swered tho call to the colors. -.- Sandlot Baseball Men Appeal to the Majors JOHNSTOWN, Penn., Jan. 9..Coop¬ eration between NUational, American and minor leagues and the National Baseball Federation. sand lot govern- ing body of the United States, will be a chief topic of discussion at a meet¬ ing of tho latter organization in Crcve- land January 17 nnd 18. John A. Heydler. of the National League; Ban Johnson, of the American' Leugue, nnd M. H. Sexton and John H. Farrell. president and secretary, re- spectiveiy, of the National Association of Minor Lea<rues, have been invited to attend the Clcvelun-1 aeasi^n. A. C. Floi Loses a Star In M. Baker AH-Aromid Athlete Will Not Return to the Heights This Year New York University's basketball team received a severe setback yester-1 day afternoon, when it was announced that Maxwell Baker, the star forward, would be unable to return to college this year. Baker has been practising with the squad all week, with the ex- pectation of playing this season, but unavoidable difficulties arose which necessitated his retirement from the university. Baker has represented the Violet on the basketball court for the past two years and along with Captain Egan was the mainstay of last season's quin- tet. His regular position was at cen¬ tre, but he was also seen at forward and guard in many contests. Baker was an all-around athlete at University Heights, having caught on thc varsity baseball team for two sea- sons and having held down right end on the football eleven this fall. The basketball squad of twentv men went through its regular paces yester¬ day afternoon in the University Heights gymnasium. under the leader- ship of Captain Floyd Egan. Three mombcrs of last year's five are still with the squad and, with these men as a nucleus, a good team should he de¬ veloped. Captain Egan has been acting as coach of the squad and has accom¬ plished great result3. He is confident of victory when the Violet meets Rut- gers (to-morrow night on the local team's court in thc opening game of the season. . ..i- Basketball Bates In 145-lb. Class Are Aimoimced The schedule for the 145-pound Metropolitan Association basketball championship was announced yester¬ day by the committee in charge. In contesting for the title, the ten teams will play all the others twice. with thc opening game down for competition on January 16. The tournament will cover a period of ve weeks with each team playing two games in the space of ve days. Among the referees aopointed wero Sam Harris, Tom Smith, Philip Sha- piro, Edward Siskind and Frederick Hill. The schedule follow.;: January W, Mohawk ra. St- Ansf»lm-s; 17, Rutgcr.-i TO. Ilron.r Churr-h; lg. Xatlotial Turn Verrtn vs Union Settlement; 20. St. Cbristopher vs. Salpm- Cresuent, Itutgem rs. St. (Iporge'n; 21, St Georye'j tb. Tltan; 23, National Turn Vereta tr. Mohnvvk'- 24, Ht Aiisc m's va. ilutitors. Haiom-Creswnt vs.' Mohawk. Imlon Srttlemrnt n. St. Oeonte'i- 25 Tltan ts. Bronx Churob, I'nion Settlement ts' Haloui-Cresciint; 20, National Tvini VercUl vs St Chrlstophcr; 27. Ht. Christopher ts. Bronx Churih- 30, Mohawk to. Bronx Church: 31, St. George's vs Mohawk. st.. (Iirlateplier vs. St. ctaselm's TUan v«' Salcm-Cre5<XT,t, l-obrJary X Ttront Churrm vs. Union fcetUeraeiit.- 3. National Ttim Verrin vs Rutgcrs; 3, st George's va. St. Chrlntoiihor; 4, T Un ts. Xational Turn Vereln; 7. RuUura tr. Salem-Crca-ent; S. St, Au- selm's to. t'rion Bottiemci:t. urishes Despite War * WingedFoot' Gave Over 500 Members to Beat the Hun In Meantime Organization Played Host to 100,000 Soldiers and Sailors By A. C. Cavagnaro Although the majority of the big athletic clubs of the country suffered somewhat from the unsettled condi¬ tions during the past year this was not the case with the New York Athletic Club, according to the annual report which was mailed to the thousands of members yesterday. In truth 1918 proved the biggest year in the history of the club. The sur¬ plus for the tiscal year ending Novem¬ ber 30 was $1,415,381,87, which is ap¬ proximately $60,000 more than last year. This is especialiy gratifying in view of the fact that the club had to contend with the general increase in cost of labor and supplies. The sinking fund of the club, which was begun in 1914 for the purpose of meeting any emergency, has now reached the toal of $160,386.37, of which $100,000 is made up of Liberty bonds. The assets of the club are $2,- 182,829. Nearly 6,000 Members The club now can also boast of hav¬ ing the iargest membership in the his¬ tory of the Winged Foot organi*;ation. which ceiebrated its fiftieth anniver¬ sary last September. The roster of the club contains 5,692 names. showing an increase in membershin for the year of 189 men. Morc than five hundred of the club members joined Uncle Sam's ranks in the war against the Boche and twelve of them gave their lives. Among those who made tho supreme sacrifice were some of the most enthusiastic workers for tho organization. They included Major James A. McKenna, jr., Major iJohn Purrcy Mitchel, Major Henry I). Gi 11, Commander James S. Beecher, Lieutenant Herbert A. Buermeyer. nephew of the only living founder of thc- club; Lieutenant John W. Overton, Lieutenant Louis J. Ledcrle, jr., Lieu- tenant Marshall G. Peabodv, Lieuten- ant Arthur L. Engels, Cadet WaVk-s B. Bradley. jr., Private D. F. Fergiison and Sergeant Richard D. Hamilton, jr. Arthur McAleenan, captain of the track and field team, did" not make a report on the point scoring activitics of the athletes of the organization, as the club early took the stand that. with this country at war sports should be t.aboo. Mr. McAleenan's report is therefore brief. lt says in part: "I am pleased to submit herewith my reoort of the athletic activities during the past year. In a sense the Ectua! athlet'c activities of the club, aside from those fosterc-d in the cluh- house. such as boxing, wrestling, fenc- inf, etc. have been curtailed to a point where I have no report to make. This is due to the decision of the c'ub last year not to be represented in any championship events, and also to the fact that approximately ninety per cent of our athletic members are in the servic-1. Therefore there are no chanipionships to be repDrted and the number of points scored are so small that it is not worth while to >publish them. "At the outbreak of the wsr, as out- lined in my report of last year, all Gossip of Owing to his severe attack of in- fluenza, Gordon Smith, the professional of the Sunnyside Country Club, was obliged to cancel his engogement at Augusta, where he was to have as- sisted David Ogilvie for the winter. jSmith, who has recovered from his ill¬ ness, will teach indoor this-winter golf at a New York school. This indoor work at the nets is of far more benefit to the beginner than «nere exercise, as the rudiments of the game aro taught, and without the foun¬ dation of the game one makes but lit¬ tle progress in the way of improve- ment when he goes out on the links in the spring. Even golfers who have had many years of experience upon tne links and have acquired bad form can have their faults corrected and be taught a more perfect style, which will be a great benefit to them when they begin their spring practice on the turf. It iB expected that many of the noted amateur golfers, who have been in the serviee will again be seen on the links this year in the various cham- pionships, among whom will ba Robert A. Gardner, national champion in 1909 and 1915 and the runner-up to Charles Evans, jr., in 1916; E. P. Allis, the in- tercollegiate champion of 1914; Ham¬ ilton K. Kerr, the Connecticut state champion of 1915, and James H. Hyde, the South Shore champion, who has been prominent in many tourneys, and there are a host of others not ffuite as prominent, who have seen serviee abroad. Among other top notchers, who were in the serviee, even though they were not sent abroad, were Fran- cis Quimet, national open champion of 1913, national amateur champion of 1914 and Massachusetts amateur cham¬ pion in 1913, 1914 and 1915. Charles Evans, jr., the present open and ama- RESORTS 1DEAL WINTER HOME Hotel Montclair MONTCLAIR. N. J. MOST DELIGHTPLLLY SITF- ATF.D RKS1HENTIAL HOTEL IN NEW YORK'S STJBURBS. OPEN' THE ENTIHE YEAR. FREDERICK C. HALL COMPANY. LAUREL W THE PIwES Overlookln* Lak* fnrotmljo.In tbe roldsl of the nine* LAKEWOOD, NEW JERSEY Offers ft week-eml or season sojourner all the corrtforta. convenlences aml entcrtaln- ments of a present tlay hotel. Palm Room dancea.Daily orchestra: concert*. Branch ofAce of G. A. Huhn & Sons, Brokers FRANK F. SHDTK. Mgr. THE KIRKWOOD ON CAMDEN HEIGHTS SOUTH CAROLINA OFXN JANVARY TO MAY Ig-HOLK GOLF RIDING CLIMATB T. EDMUND KKUIBHOLZ Hotel Cfaiendon *KffiK* aml cottagee. Dlrectly on ocean. 18 hole jolf course. ttouUsU uu aspUraUon, 1180 Uroadway. N«w Vork. the Golfers teur champion, who joined the aerial service shortly before the close of the war, after putting in a most active season p'aying cxhibition matches for the benefit of the Red Cross; Gardner "W White and many others including Fred Herreshofi*. The annual meeting of the New Jer¬ sey State Golf Association is to be held Tuesday, January 28. The most important matter to be brought before the meeting is the resurnption of the annual championship and the award- ing of the event. This, however. is practically settled and the meeting will be merely a matter of form. The event was given to the Deal Golf and Coun¬ try Club in 1917, but it was postponed on account of the war. The Deal club is having its course thoroughly over- hauled for tlie event. Nathan Schroeder, the president of the association, has written to'E. F. Holden, jr., the secretary, asking the latter to ascertain whether the Deal Golf Club still wanted to eonduct the state championship. Deal does want it and will give the New Jersey golfers a course to play over that calls for their best efforts. Donald Ross, the course architect, spent some days last fall going over the course and mapp'ng out the many -changes that will make \he course one of the finest tests of golf in the metropolitan district. KEvSORTS F!nd out difference In fares to the far South resorts and Old Point Comfort OLD POINT COMFORT, VA. A HOTEL CHAMBERLiN ^ rfSfr Swlrnming Tool, Golf, Sea- *X#^ Itll food Culalne. Ktcry Kuropean V MJ*_ Bath and Treatment. Wrtte* y\ » ~^_ StO. F. ADAMS. M»nager\X_^/ Fortreta Monroe, Va.. er >»¦*"* Booklet* anu Information at B»>i-t_' Ruffner Hotel Bureau, Hotel McAlpin, Cook'a, 245 B'way, 561 Fifth Av-n.e; Mt.r. Bters, 2K5 Fifth Ave.; Raymond & Whit- comb. .05 Fifth Ave.; Frank Tourlst Co 489 Fifth Ave. "Ask Mr. Fostcr" at Lord tc Taylor's. "Brooklyn Eagle Beeort Bureau" t ATLANTIC CITV.N.J. {Stliuxted.ploiNf^cd cuvd f mot-vaqed. to give . oomfortr<*iut hicattv. f mirsRj.Bc/zsy Tttt UA0W8 ft&aun. MOUta Of TM( WWU.9 ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. "IHE NATWH'S HEALTH SHOT" mialtn is spficir.Ncv A Oermlcide Clitnate and Clean Street*. Nc Du«t. No Dirt. lnnurnerable Out. door Recreariorn and Indrwr Enterralnmenr* Mmu ganigat .05 U, H WHiTl 80*1 Ct. HOTEL iRAMATAN 28 Minutes from Grand Centrr.l. City coaveniwoea ln the oountry. Winter aporta. .Saturday dan.ea. j.»« r couoert a. .0 electric t ra Ina HOTEL GRAMj.TAN. Ljgwrenoe Paj-k, Bron-vtlle, N T. "Homeicard Bound'9 Sent From Sea by ¦Athletic Heroes THE hundreds of athletes with tlie local National Guard units, which make up the greater part of the 27th Divisic'n in France, is on its way home. This information was re¬ ceived her yesterday in a cafc'.e- gram from Walter J. Shauakan, thc Brooklyn A. A. and 13th Regiment runner. Tha message contained only two words, "Homeward Bound," but they mean much to athletics in this city. of our resources and activities were turned to competitions and entertain- ments for the benefit of the soldiers and sailors. That this work might be well organized, the Board of Govcrnors appointed a special committee to havo full charge of such activities and to be known as the Army and Navy Be- nevdlent Fund Committee." ln promoting sports and entertain- ments for the serviee men. not a penny was taken from the. c!ub nor were ita members charged in any respect. The money needed for this work was de- rived from the boxing tournaments nnd a number of concerts. The sports fur- nished the soldiers by the club in¬ cluded bcxing exhi'itions, between amateurs and nrofessior.als, track and iic'.d contests. football and rowing. It was estimated that the Winged Foot Club, in all of these entertainments, played host to more than 100,000 sol¬ diers and sailors. Now that the war is over, Mr. Mc- Aleenan assures the members that th«» club will soon be at its pre-war strength in ita track and field activi¬ ties. The club will resume its athletics in every way and the athletes will again ix- permited to represent the club in championships. ¦-» Colonial Yacht Club Elecls New Officers At the-annual meeting of the Colon¬ ial Yacht Club held at the Club House, north of 133th Street and the Hudson River, last night, the following oracero were elected: Commodore, James E. Geissberger; vice commodore, A. M. Garretaon; rear commodore, Walter Spiegel; fleet cap¬ tain, Guill Schenk Whitehouse; treas- urero, H. V. Bruns; recording secre¬ tary, W. A. Doty; financial secretary, C. r. Stone; fleet surgeon, Dr. II. M. Burns; measurer, L. A. Huxtable; fleet chaplain, R. E. Weldon; board of direc¬ tors, Edwin 11. Georgie, E. D. Knowles, Frank Totten, J. Heynen and S. Swayze. The treasure's report showed the'or- gnnization to be in a very remarkable cendition financially, regardless of thc fact that the honor roll was exceed- ingly large and that all activities had been postponed during the war. The regetta committee an dthe en- tertainment committee have plans al¬ ready under way for one of the most interesting seasons ever experienced by this club. The 210-mile cornfteld light-ship race wiil be run as well as all of the other open races generally held under the auspices of the Colonial before the war. The commodore of the Rocking Chair Fleet has also arranged a lively programme for his division. TRAVEL . Pakcpiiicer nnd tarco Srrrtrea NEW YORK TO LIVERPOOL Caronia .(Rn. 29 Princess Juliana.Feb. 5 Royal George.Feb. 6 Saxonia .Feb. 12 Carruania .Feb. 17 Orduna .Feb. 26 Cai cnia.March 3 NEW YORK TO GLASGOW Oriana .Feb. 6 NEW YORK TO LONDON Pannonia.Feb. 18 *».-* STATE 8TERET. NEW \OttK. iHifE FtaFlThI NEW YORK.LIVERPOOL Lapland . .Jan. 22 Megantic..Jan. 31 Adriattc. -Jan. 25 Baitic.Feb. 1 Lapland. . .Feb. 19 DRAFTS ANO MONEK ORDERS Britain. lri-ii«i).j.liaij.bcauLiuuTia Offices, 9 Broadway, New York ftammi 6eN£RALETf(ANMruwnaift NEW YORK.BORDEAUX-PARiS WEEKLY DEPARTORE8 H ' .v/...*.. ,pnone BawUn% GrMB rjn> RED 'D' LIKE SP "" rT MONTAOOT Fot Porto Illro. * uracao trnl Veoeauela B. S. Maracalbo, Wednesday, Jan 15, at l p jtf B. B. Oaracaa. Wednesday. lan. 2i, at 1 p' m b. 8. Zii'.a. Wednesday, January 29, at 1 P m .S. S. Pliliade'.phia. Wednesday. Feb. 5 at 1 P M 6uj»?rior Aii-nminoaauona for Passenaera BUSS. HAUJ-.n & CO.. Genl Mgn Phone S1TC HanoTf-r. Sl Wall Street EUROPE, JAPAN, CHINA jflicial Acenta Trang-Atlantic and Trans- PfcClfic b. h. Linea. Tnurs and Tickets by .'-11 P.ajl Rout-B. Complete urraiijteir.tnti for biiBincss or recreation travel. im-iudin* Pullman reservationa. rail tiok»t8 &c THOS. COOK & SON, 245 Broadway, 561 Fifth Ave.. N. T. :- "THE rrBI.IC BE PLEASED" COLONIAL LINE 4. I'ECVirFNCER- $2.97 ALL OLTSIDE » I \T1 l'.OOM.s.si.lu »J it trmlr f-fuea incla. « W,.r Tae. Boat liuvt-i. Pler 89. North River. «4 u P. jfc ¦Plicoe Hprln* 9491. Worceater. tS.tl. Providence direct. tt.tl hTATKKOlMH, fl.OO ond Si.OS Daily. including Sunday, 5.00 p. M, From Pti r 19. E. K. Pbone S700 ?rekm«a
Transcript
Page 1: New York Tribune.(New York, NY) 1919-01-10 [p 15].chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1919-01-10/ed-1/seq-15.pdfNew York Tribune.(New York, NY) 1919-01-10 [p 15].

The Violet Gets a 1!3^v^y__^)^,

B __¦ J«i Jl _M_ HB OB-

^BY wld.MACBETH(Copyright, 1919, New York Tribune Inc.)

Jones, Obstinate CussVice-President Jones, of the Cardinals, may find himself in the toils

if he insists upon having: his Rickey after July.Quite as Much

Tyrus Raymond Cobb is a i'ree agent.just like Count Billious.WHATS THE SIGNIFKCANCE?

SCBIBBLES James C. Isaminger, the sage of Philadelphia:"Pat Moran has sent the president of a certain big league hall

.lub a box of fish hocks for pocket use as a Christmas token."

Nothing to Worry AboutWorld's championship emblems.Ainaa Strunk.

Not to Mention Ear MuffiersThe management of the Waldorf should lay in a stock of gas masks

to protect guests during the joint baseball meeting. The National Leagueaione is bad enough, but when the two majors get together.well finishit yoursclf.

Keep Eye on Old FoxKeep an eye on Clark Griffith. The Old Fox must be preparing to

unload something on some of our David Harums. Whenever the Wash¬ington bo..s intends to dicker you may bank upon him seeing to it that hischattel doea not suffer for want of publicity. How tenderly GriiY ve-gards his veteran utility player, Hank Shanks, is a matter of opinion.But the following tribute from the pen of Louis A. Dougher (to onefatfiliar with Griffith's cunning) might be interpreted by Mr. Shanks as8 sign to pack his household goods for delivery to some major leaguecity other than the capital of our country in 1919:

"In al! this chatter of trades and releases, it is not expected thatManager Griffith will part with Hank Shanks, the sweet tenor fromMonaca, Pa. Hank is such a versatile cuss that he is almost a necesisity.

"Apart from his light hitting, Hank makes good wherever he isplayed. He can play all three outfields with sureness and grace. Hebows before no other outfielder, not even Speaker, Cobb, Lewis, Felschor Veach, whom we consider the first five leading gardeners in thatorder. Hank is sure one sweet outfielder.

"When anything goes wrong in the infield, there's Hank waitingto f;!l the hole. He has done good work at third base, fair work atshort and he ousted Ray Morgan from his second base job with com-parative ease.

"It is unfortunate that Hank is not a .290 batsman, for he wouldplay left field all the time if he were, and that's where he shines most.Slow to get away, Hank beats out few slow ones, but his brains makehim a capable base runner, once he lands at first base. Indeed, nobranier a ba.-^e runner now plays in the American League, thoughthere are many with more speed.

"Hank- is a good influence with a bail club. Game as a pebble,he is willing to give his best. -He is aggressive to an extreme, thoughscldom running up against the umpire's ban: In fact, some of the of¬ficials, like Tomroy Connolly and Billy Evans, like to hear Hank rave,for he ii so much in earnest.

"Off the field Hank is a quiet, well-behaved, decent citizen. Heplays baseball more because he likes it than for any other reason.He came to Washington in 1912, and since then has made hundredsof personal friends, while there isn't a fan at Georgia avenue whodoesnt like to see and hear him in action.

"He Is the ideal utility man That's why he'll probably stick withthe Griffs.''

lhe Passing of HeroesSo many brilliant athletes have fallen in the war that even a world'schampion gets but a half-dozen lines or less in the European papers whenhe dies. One whose death passed almost unnoticed was George Parent,who succumbed to pneumonia in Paris,Parent was three times long-distance cycling champion of the world.He began racing in 1905 as an amateur, when he was 20 years old; He

won the championship of France in 1908, and in the next three years heanmially vron the national and world's 100 kilometers (62.1 miles) cham-1pionahip. In his prime he beat Bobby Walthour, Darragon and othersof that calibre, including the best professonals of Brussels, Rome and'Copenhagen. Parent's fatal weakness was a theory that he could trainen beer, and by 1912 he was through. jIn the war he was a typical hero of France. Early in 1914 he re-ceived one bullet in the breast and another in the calf of the leg. In:1915 has was wounded again, was invalided out of the army and became anmnitions worker. j

His record of winning three successive world's long distance cham-pwnships has probably nev_r been equalled, and the memory of his riding!at the Parc des Princes will live for many a day.

Big Soccer Football BattleOn Schedule for Sunday

Rival Teams to Meet at

Lenox Oval in ReplayCup Match ,

The most promisin* soccer footballtontest in the national championshipsto ba gtafjed in Manhattan in re-***« year? i:s schedulcd for Lenox<*»'. 147th Street and Lenox Avenue,fcsOt Sunday afternoon. It will be tho"Play o£ the third round NationalChallenge Cup jratne between rival«»Pj*r_ taems. Federal Ship A. A. S.IfcekV?.7bN* ,J," and Mo"e Dr*

FieM rtu'KUnK two hour» at Clark's__mT l Newark. last Sunday, theSH" *«'« ft"*ced by darkness to quit_2SJ* having reached a decision.v«n»id*ririK lhe power of the forward''*» »t *a» a truiy remarkable fcame,

k.li /°,ai hav'«''Jr been acored. Foot-nlL, lha h****** order mark-d both¦SE!.' _eri°<*«* and th,. two extra»*"«d» rrf fifteen miitutea each.iwt'0"- *ork of t}"; attackinjc divi-_S_-»_*Terai li*¦««-'!¦ threatened to re-

UrcZ * *|t-*»<n«fa« point, but thc dc-t*«L <ach .J«*«n WM enual to ailfcr^-t"CLtfY The diipiay was of such4id An.c\t}»at «xpcrt8 in the crowdwiV;' ?u"»!tat* to clasa both teamn.n th, pr««nt national titleholders.°«n?«rh%fn St««l F. (1eb.rl .#__." °ff"»al« who were in

Wy&T ¦Ch«»«» K« Creiichton. of

» LI ¦.'* th* referee and Andrew

«*n i.''/" :' ^<r«t*nr of lhe Am«ri-.»»* .."it!!. AwocUtton, ax*in will.Wiin*. ''"' ?UU» Football A»«o-Tg? ***«**£#, to the match.

3i_i 'fnr/'r* ?ivS F- c- of Qu»ncy,**of wv^t fourth ".¦** th* w»n-

«w national title **ri<>»,

bounded Gutnt Returm

STlf/ th^h* NftW Yfl'k Gf»nt".

***itt jom MeCraw in tn* 8ooth.

Squash Play PostponedUntil Next MondayPlay in the opening round of the

Metropolitan Association aquash tenniachampionship tourney scheduled foryesterday was deferred until next Mon¬day afternoon, on account of the in¬ability of two of the clubs to mustertogether full teams. The matches' ullod for Columbia playing Yale andthe combined Princeton Squash clubsentcrtaining thc Harvard Club.

It was announced that no futurepoKtponements would be countenancedin the championship series.

New Orleans ResultsthreoFlnt race (two-year olds; pume $500; ...,.furlongs) Zatiz, li", (Mitra.f), 0 lo 5 7 to 10and 1 lo 2. first; Ogdon Girl, 101 (Cotmtanllm-)'t.U' h.P U> "' *"" 1 to u>' xwond; Oar IheVVay. 115 (Conr.ellyi, 3 to 1. even iuul l to 1Udrd. Time, .38 1-5. ' ' l "

Eady lo:i>;, Ml»» Mink, Marrln .May, and BoneDry also ran.Heeoiid raco Cbroe-yearolds; cialmlng; purso1800; oo; mBal-Hjiiwy Ught, 104 fc. HohiriUi).7 to 2, 7 to 5, and il to 5. flmt; Alitolitelte, 102iHneideman;, 5 t.j 2, even. aud 1 to 2 goooudAstraea. Wi <Caa*ld>). 8 to 1, 3 to 1, and 8 io5, Ihlixt Ttme, 1.47 4-5.Wiswt Fool, Court <?al!uit, Dahlnda. Dott&'s~\: i "-""ricate. and Frank Khannon also ran.Tblrd ra/* ifour-yi-ar-oid* and upward; clalrn-Ing; puiM $f,0y; one mlle and a alateauthi--V/uroddln. 107 iCmiMU). 12 to 1, 5 to 1 aml5 lo t. flrat; Aruaigamator, 108 (C. Robinson) 4to 1, 8 to :>, ajcl 4 to 5, aeooqdj Pol.it Bl'euD«r»lsb, Klimer. Haadt, Hbymer. arid Rosewatcralvi ran.Fourth rae« (four-year-olds and upwar*): pursy11,000; one mll«>.Wamaw, 105 (Gainer), lu tn8, 6 to 5, and 3 to 5, flrat; C'obslt j^k, 97Qtoanml 7 to 2 7 t/» 5. ar.d 7 fo 10. sen'otid;Waukeag^ II.' fManduoo, 7 to 1, 0 ((J 2. and evetitblrd Tlin*, 1.47 4 J,Ditntnlon, Amak-tto. llarrest King, and RufusItiWj a)iv» r*d.Flflh ra/'n (four-yMr-olffa »nd upward; clatoi-lfig; porw $60/); «.* i;i!l» ai.d a sUteemh).(inuany, I0«! '(«t»ik*r), 2 l'i 1, 4 to I, a*id 2 to

5, find; Ultlwr, 113 (Blco), 7 lo ;: 7 lo 5 and7 to 10, MfalOi Kw.lab,. 10H (Moonev), 7 'to 11 t/» 2, and 0 to fl, third. Time, I '>7 1-*

Blue Rock Jason. Esdv Klleen, Mer;y Twlnkle1 vi.uz.i: Uoiigv, Bli. of Blarney, and N*> Maiwarraie'i ra/i

Mlxtb wa <four-year-oid» and upward: <iaim-lii((; purse $«00; un* m)U and a »tiU«ntb).Y«f-ma*. 107 (WJII1«), 9 to 2, » 10 5. and 4 to Kfim, Thlrtt, 100 (Orsgory), 12 to 1, » lo 1, an<j6 Ui 2, seeondj Ad*l»nt/>, 113 (Hmltli), 8 to 2.* to 6, *ri4 4 10 «, thlr.i. Tlm:«, I 57 J-5.IlarwowJ, tto/at Ititcrast, Ed th Hamnanti, Dr

CnsnM, Mlvifiila,, and Jurlgdiitton a;*o ran.ttuniAh r»/« (fouryoaroM* and upward; elnlra

I'g; i>»r*» %HW; turn mlle and a »lx!/»»nth7-M»ryH !oh iftiirfie,, J2 ti, j, r to 1, *nd 5 to 2,ftM«, A,u*!, uo (M.jotMrf), 11 to 1, 3 to 1, and »i/» f, aaeofid; Bemper Btaiwart, 10« (CsMldy). 10"1, 4 to 1, uid 2 t/» 1, tblrd. 'fitw.KW« «'«», /.ten Ha<mwofl, Browrut Fan/rlt*.*M4rn*. Boy, p«a Coft»j«lly( uid i*'»1im also

31ow in B

For Big BoomIn All Sports

Star Athletes Return to Col¬lege Again After Lend-ing Hand to Uncle Sam

After a period of comparative in-activity lasting almost two full years,athletics are to be resumed at Ford-ham University. More than 1,500 mem¬bers of the former student body whohave been engaged in the variousbranches of government service dur¬ing the war have again taken up theirstudiesj in the ciasses which wereformaliy opened dunng the past week.

.Many of tnose who have. returnedto the university are weil known icrtheir atnleuc prowess on'the tracti andm looibaii, DasiietDail and basebah. Itls me opimon oi memuers of tne ath-ieuc board that the Maroon wnl bebetter and more largeiy represented iuthe coiiego athletic world than everbfore.

All that. is now necessary inasmucbas classes have ofticinlly opened is tosecure thc sanction of the faculty tocommenco athletic work. Thc Rev.Father Edward S. Brock, for more thanfive years in charge of athletics at Bos¬ton College whero he developed severalstrong teams, is the new Perfect ofDiscipline at Fordham.Father Brock has taken ovpr the work

of directing athletics for the Maroonand expressed himself yesterday asmore than pleased with the prospectsfor basketball and baseball. Togetherwith Charles Robinson, a senior thomanager of the 1919 Maroon basketballsquad, he has arranged a tentativeschedule of games which with the sanc¬tion of the athletic govcrning body willmean Fordham will meet many of thebig collen-c fives.

Last year Fordham had no 'varsitybasketba 1 team and had to be con¬tent with a i'reshmnn quintet. Thisout it. which included r.uch players a«Dick Groto, "Bill" Finn. Frunk Frishand others made quite a name forthemselves; All of the players on thefirst year 1918 squad have resumedwork at I-ordnam during the week.Jim Ryan. a guard from thc MountSt. Marysteam entered Fordham yes¬terday. 1 he candidates for the teamare anxiously awaiting the sanction ofthe faculty before commencing prac-

Erasmus llall

Winning StreakThe Erasmus Hall High School'

basketball team added Adelphi Acad-Jemy to its list of victims in swampingthe latter yesterday by the score of48 to 15 on the Flatbush School'scourt. Well-guarded baskets by Eras¬mus Hall prevented the visitors fromscoring oftener. At half time the vic-tors had a lead of 31 tr. Q."Eppy" Barnes, the creek right for¬

ward of Erasmus Hall, was th*e indi¬vidual star of the game. He accbuntedfor nearly half of his team's pointson ten goals from the field. Linoki,left forward. assisted Barnes some-what in the victory by tallying six lieldbaskets. The biggest point scorer forAdelphi waa Mumm, left forward, whoscored three goals from the field.The linc-uu:iian,n^.HaU <1S) %lM Adelpld (15)

%$&&.- v* .'.'.'..'.¦.'.'...'.......:SSftg» *% wKih"vir. L<'.1.Hal;iQotLla from field.Barnes (10), TJnckl (51, Mo-v ,'*" 'V' ,Ml.lr-"" '3>- I'^nblus Ci), MU-UbU.j,). SuIwUtutlons.Jlay for LUiokl fiogera f'.rHay CUljjuruey for Snvcr, Mlchell for Snialley.!,7 '.;" f',r., !,i'"; I'cfw- I'lifTe, New .urkUiaveiBlty. rinio of halvea.Flftoen minutce.

Skating Races MondayThe semi-monthly ice skating races

at the 181st Street Ice Palace are sched-uled for next Monday evening and willconsist of a one-mile handicap and a'half-mile novice for girls. The N. Y.A. C, Tremont S. C. Palace S.

'

C.Woodlands S. C. and United StatesNavy teams have all signified their in-tention of competing. ]Havana Results

HAVANNA, Clilm. Jan. !)..The follcirtn. aretin; resuits of to-day's races at Or'ental Fark:1'irst race (two-year-olds and upward; clalm¬lng; purse $500; flvo and a hauf furlongs).FlyingDart. 100 (Domtalck), 0 (/> 1. 5 lo 2 ¦_,_ fi & 5*!!r.-;t; Brown I'rincp, 117' (Sterling), 2 to 1 4 tof. and 2 to 7, .second; l'eep Again, 110 (Dreyer)3 to !. lto! and 1 to 0, third. T,mo, 1:1/4.5Clartesa, Colors, Expres.loh. OmoUmra, Jojatn.Will Soon, tilbraltar and llanda Off al.so ranBoeond rtue (Unvc-year-oids and uimar.) ciaJm- ¦'¦ng: punio J.'iOO; flvc and a half rurlntigia).KingTruvato, 101 (Thurbcr). 8 to 5, 7 to 10 ond 1 toX 17:;;; Cwdorno, Ktll (Doyle), 7 to 2, 6 to 5and 3 to 5, second; Bulger, 10S (Kterl:ng>, 2 to1, 4 to r, and 2 to 5, third. Time, 1:12 1-5Or.ama. Omapliale DIouo, I'uuliue, Crowley andliurilngame iLse ran. jThird raw (four-year-oids and upward: clalm¬lng: purse $700; Qve and a half furlongs) Merryjublloe, 110 <7W)lng), 5 to 1. 2 to 1 and evon.flrsl; Agu... 112 (Flnlay). 2 lo 1, 4 to 5 and 2to 5, KU.1H..I, Mlgg Jar.bo. 105 (Davt.-a), 2 to 1.4 to 7 !»'. 2 to 0, third. Tlmo, 1M4 »«5.B.t«K» __nd, Fram-cs Crawford, M.rr Burgo-m>Mmt .v'orvlc, Beverly .lamtt, and Pomp aluo ran.) ulr'.n race (three-yoar-oldR and upward; elalra-

Ing; ^ur.se tr'U0; livo and a half furlouga) MIrsQore, 1OT (Hurke). 3 to 1. (i to 5 and 3 to 5,first.: l'Uodor|,.n, 103 (Davles), 4 to 1, R to 5 and4t» 5, second; Hulclior lioy. 110 (Ttiurber). 12

to 1. 4 lx> 1 and 2 to 1, third. 'lime, 1:1S 2-5.Itrown Jlahy, Julland. 1'lcrrot and 1/coma al»o

ran.I'lfth racn (fouryoar-olds and upward; clalm¬

lng. pnrsc $500;' one nilV. and flft.y yards).HeaOpll. 114 (Thurber), ,'( to 2, 1 to 2 an. Si_Lflrsl; Illglt Tldo, lo« (Kterllne), 7 to 2, .! to 5 aiid8 to 5, swond; Tarlelwi P. 106 (JafTcott), 5 to 1.2 ti, and eren, third. Tltno, 1:50 1-5,

Tiger .llrn. Tlm .1. Ilogan, 1'iinio .Movcr andAl.nrdl also ran. I

tf.xth raco (four-year-oids and upward; clnlm-ing; purso $«0U ,,ue mllei -Woodthatoh, ion (lltill-man), 3 to 1, eren ond 1 to t, flrs'i; Doo Tuur.li.1U4 ((1. l'rceeci, 2 to J. 7 to 10 and 1 to 4,nwoml; fe_muiit, 103 (Plckons), 7 to 1. 2 to 1and even, third. Time, 1 :.r,a.

Tlio (iradcr, John VV. Kleln and Trapping alsoran. I

New Orleans EntriesKlmt race (clalmlng; for nialdrn two-ycar-oldg;

niirne. »500; thrt-o furlonga).Dlxlc Klyw, 113; LadyMontjoy. Jl'l; i'argarel Uairetti, Ug: Hlb, 113; Uccknnd Call, 113; Lonaly, u;i; itunan, 11(1.8ecr1r.1l raro (ria.mlng; for tlireeycar-old* and up¬ward; puntR, »000; llvo and a half furlongs)--IM'kWlnfOT, 113; ll.tir aml llitlf, )13; Cavemaii, 113;\...i/tg,: 10S; Ciarica liuth, 108; Augustus, 108;.luiii-, A. Khr.-lihiu. 105; Fninrcs Htarr. 102; Beaile,10(i; QUMp'i M«ld. 100; Olrwtn.a. 02. II'lilril race (rlalruli.; f.r Uir*o-ve»r-oldR and up¬ward; DOtH,$.'()(); Qve and a half furlongs)--I,ag-WT?'. r_8;wN_*,l**l 108: HMliam'R Journey, 10a;ii',,,1'f,'*t'n,M'l'".1<1' ,07; v'«liWlte. 102; M,4. 102;Mlda, 101: Kita. 103; IU,, Hati/uels. 100; t!ouhU,rBalance 91.Fourth race (cla'.mltig; for throc-yrar-oM* and nn-ward; puree. »600; Dvt, and a half furlongal .Bla ac.17; llnelium, 11',. Kcymar, 114; True aa BtMl,i?;. }lnee1,£l'"'', ' <: .*i((ul»ta. 112; Lady Bmall,i?e K. W aH; 8*,,r,rl»''h' ll°: M1"'wVi'nm (clalmlng; for Uiro*-yearold» and up¬ward; puti»e, 1500: (me mile and a slitcinth).PfMiOO, 112; IMIs and Call,, 1):-; ixtehy II. 110L» rry 110; IUrr>; J'.ricvognl. 109; Opportunlly. 107;.I'addv D»»r, 107; 1/k,\ llnrljert. 101Hixth race (clamng, tin thrae-ycir-oida and un.ward; pur».i »5(HI; 0110 mile and acvanty yards),-

1J/0; Klngllng 11, 105; Don Ihxlgo, 104; Haafarcr!Hevtmlh, race (clalmlng; for tU/ge-yaar-old* andurnvard; vtrtn. $.100; one mllc and arumty yardul-Cl.olrmn«i.r, 112: dl.-lpner. 100; Thlrat. 101 I)er-

(rtflh, Ul; l*ul_aW.' 111; Uarwowl, 108; ilertyor, 10*.

asketball.New YorkPATRICK MORAN, who has signed up as first aid to John

J. McGraw, has had a long and varied career in baseballsince he broke into the game at Lyons, N. Y.. back in

o97. From third baseman on a minor league team to managerof a pennant-winning aggregation in the big show is the longstnde taken by the popular Pat, who is now a weleome Giant

Boxiog News and Notes.Bv FRED HAWTHORNE.

HO, LANDLORD, A FLAGON OFYOUR BEST WINE!

Wc have recently fallen hair to a

fortune, Aunt Eleanor Ann, and wo

fell all full of thri'us and everything.To-morrow we are going to start diink-hig our fortuno u, as many a gildedyouth has wadod through his patri-mony before, but we aro going todrink this fortune up literally, four-fingers moasttrc at a gulp.Thore arc not going to be any "wild

oats" in connection with this celcbra-tion. Instead-, vvc shall take our usualbreakfust order of rolled oats andcream. We have found that the rolledvariety are much more digostible thanthe "wild" ones and fur cheap'er.We beeame an heir last night, when

the telephone bell gurglod mysterious-ly on our dosk and a voice said: "Iathat you, Boss? Well, this is Silvey,you know, Silvey Burns. Say, I jus'got a lot o' fine Italian red wine, camein this morning from the old country;ain't been opened in live years. GreatstutT, you know, big kick, porka Dio!I'm gonna send a counla o' bottlesdown to you; how long will you bethere?We are a person of few words and

decisive action. "We'll be here untilthe bottles come, Silvey. We'll meetthem at the door with a brass band.Show them in."The Sporting Editor, who had over-

heard our eonveisation, and whoalready had his hat and overcoat onpreparatory to doing the subway glideto his home on the Heights of Wash¬ington, sudenly decided he would stickaround and wait for the big show, and'he got, very chummy right off. He'sthat kind of a pusson, Aunt EleanorAnn.

In due, time the bottle twins wereushered into our august presence, andwe took off our hat and shook handswith them. It was hard to tell theniapart, as they were both dark com-

pjexioned, of tho some build nnd worethe same style of coiks on their heads.The Sporting Editor tried to get on

good terms with one of the bottles atonce, and kept asking if it had everrun across Kid Chianti, in Rome, orthe Haig twins, in Scotland, or youngGordon Gin, in London.The bottle didn't suy a single word,

and finally the Sporting Editor, gettinga bit exasperated, said: "Why don't youtake your hat off?" Seeir.g tho situa¬tion was getting dangerous we grabbedboth the bottle twins and leu them outof thc office by the hand and took themhome. On Sunday afternoon we are go¬ing to have a very serious talk with thetwins, at which time we shall decideupon their future, but we aro afraidthey are both destined to tread thedownward path.

It is reported from London thatJimmy Wilde, the lilliputiu'n, "tangle-foot" champion of the world, is plan-ning to win the bantam and feather-weight titles within the next year nndwill start his lampaigD ns soon as hehas wiped up the rinp; with Pai Moore,of Memphis who gained a decision overJimmy in the international bout.s atLondon last month.

Wilde intends to come to this coun¬try within the next few months. whichwill probably interest "Just" Willard,our reckless heavyweight champion.Although he refuses to mingle withJack Dempsey or any other heavy¬weight who might accidentally leun ahaymnker on his sensitive jawbono,Willi.rd will no doubt grnsp the oppor¬tunity to meet: Wildo at catch weiphts*.Ah the flvweight champion "Just" Will-ai *i would bc ubout in his spherc. andhis battle cry would be, "SWat theflyl"Our old side kick Tom Cassidy, one

of the K. of C. men who has done muchto lighten the burden of the boyB whowent overseas to battle with the Bsche.has arr-inged a monster boxing andvaudeville show at St. Mary's Hall. inHobok*»n, for next Wednesday nicrht.All tho convalcscent men at the hos¬pital in Hobokon and nnv others whocare to come aro invited, ns well as

officers, nnd tho old sitrn. "EvorythingPree! Everybody Weleome!" will helinn"'ng «vt tho entrnnco Chanipionaof tho ring, the wrestling mut and the

stage will be on hand, and two fullbrasg bands will dish out the melody.It looks like a large evening, buddies!AXD THEY TALK ABOUT BROAD¬

WAY!A friend of ours arrived in our palpi-tating midst the other day, Aunt El¬

eanor Ann, and strolled up Broadwaywith us. We were pointing with "na-tive son" pride to the clustered whitelights, the gilded cafes, the ru^hingtaxicabs, all the signs of a hectic hot-house life. But he didn't seem to bcimpresscd a littlo bit."So you cal] this life, do you? You

Broadway babies don't ever go to bcduntil the sun rises, do you? You're alot of wicked Willies here, aren't you?Well, let me whisper to you a little se-cret. You Broadwayites are a lot ofEgyptian mummies compared to Phila-dolphians. I've been down in the'Sleepy City,' as you call it, for acoupie of months, and I've come back toBroadway for the rest cure. In Phila¬delphia they not only put the sun to'bed, but they wake it up in the morn-mg and dress it and send it to school,and they lead the moon around by thehand all night and put wet towels onits head when it's full."When I get my health back I'm

going to take another whirl at old'Philly, but my physician has orderedme to have absolute quiet for the nextfew weeks, and that's why I'm here."

9

Columbia CrewHas Big Record

In World WarSixteen of the nineteen men who

rowed in the Columbia 'varsity crewsof l«rl4, 1915 and 1910 at Poughkeepsie

( served in the,army during. the war, oneof whom was kihed and one seriouslywounded, according to records. com-F.iied yesterday by the -athletic asso-ciation at Columbia.

Six of the sixteen were in the avia-tion serviee, and one of them, 0. B.Meyers, who rowed in the 1916 'varsityboat race, was decorated several timesby the French government for his dar-ing in bringing down German 'planes.Of the championship 191| crew. sixmen were in the serviee.Naumer, bow,Iwas in thc medical corps; Williams,'No. 2, in the engineers; Rothwell, No.3, in aviation; Sanborn, No. 5, in themarines; Bratton, No. 6, in aviation,and McCarthy, strokc. in aviation. Ofthe 1915 eight, on which throe mon whorowed in 191-1 had scats, Jauss, at No.2, was killed in the fighting early inthe summer; Tichborn, No. 8, was anaviator; Dieckman, No. 5, was in thearmy, and Fermser, stroke, was in theengineering corps. Of the last Colum-hia eight which rowed at Poughkeepsie,!Sengstaken, bow, waa in the army;Meyers, No. 2. in aviation; O'Loughlin.No. 3, in the army; Lahey, No. 4, inthe ambulance serviee; Penncll, No. 7,in the field artillery, and Leys, stroke,in the ambulance serviee. The recordsdo not ahow that Ferris, No. 7 in the1915 eight, was ir. thc serviee. but it,is believed that he was in the army.The record, not including Ferris,shows that 85 per cent^ of the Varsityoarsmen nt Columbia irr the three yearsimmediately preceding the war, an-swered tho call to the colors.-.-

Sandlot Baseball MenAppeal to the Majors

JOHNSTOWN, Penn., Jan. 9..Coop¬eration between NUational, Americanand minor leagues and the NationalBaseball Federation. sand lot govern-ing body of the United States, will bea chief topic of discussion at a meet¬ing of tho latter organization in Crcve-land January 17 nnd 18.John A. Heydler. of the National

League; Ban Johnson, of the American'Leugue, nnd M. H. Sexton and John H.Farrell. president and secretary, re-spectiveiy, of the National Associationof Minor Lea<rues, have been invited toattend the Clcvelun-1 aeasi^n.

A. C. Floi

Loses a StarIn M. Baker

AH-Aromid Athlete Will NotReturn to the HeightsThis Year

New York University's basketballteam received a severe setback yester-1day afternoon, when it was announcedthat Maxwell Baker, the star forward,would be unable to return to collegethis year. Baker has been practisingwith the squad all week, with the ex-pectation of playing this season, butunavoidable difficulties arose whichnecessitated his retirement from theuniversity.Baker has represented the Violet on

the basketball court for the past twoyears and along with Captain Eganwas the mainstay of last season's quin-tet. His regular position was at cen¬tre, but he was also seen at forwardand guard in many contests.Baker was an all-around athlete at

University Heights, having caught onthc varsity baseball team for two sea-sons and having held down right endon the football eleven this fall.The basketball squad of twentv menwent through its regular paces yester¬day afternoon in the UniversityHeights gymnasium. under the leader-ship of Captain Floyd Egan. Threemombcrs of last year's five are stillwith the squad and, with these men asa nucleus, a good team should he de¬veloped.

Captain Egan has been acting ascoach of the squad and has accom¬plished great result3. He is confidentof victory when the Violet meets Rut-gers (to-morrow night on the localteam's court in thc opening game ofthe season.

. ..i-

Basketball BatesIn 145-lb. ClassAre Aimoimced

The schedule for the 145-poundMetropolitan Association basketballchampionship was announced yester¬day by the committee in charge. Incontesting for the title, the ten teamswill play all the others twice. with thcopening game down for competition onJanuary 16.The tournament will cover a periodof ve weeks with each team playingtwo games in the space of ve days.Among the referees aopointed wero

Sam Harris, Tom Smith, Philip Sha-piro, Edward Siskind and FrederickHill.The schedule follow.;:January W, Mohawk ra. St- Ansf»lm-s; 17, Rutgcr.-iTO. Ilron.r Churr-h; lg. Xatlotial Turn Verrtn vsUnion Settlement; 20. St. Cbristopher vs. Salpm-Cresuent, Itutgem rs. St. (Iporge'n; 21, St Georye'jtb. Tltan; 23, National Turn Vereta tr. Mohnvvk'-24, Ht Aiisc m's va. ilutitors. Haiom-Creswnt vs.'Mohawk. Imlon Srttlemrnt n. St. Oeonte'i- 25Tltan ts. Bronx Churob, I'nion Settlement ts'Haloui-Cresciint; 20, National Tvini VercUl vs StChrlstophcr; 27. Ht. Christopher ts. Bronx Churih-30, Mohawk to. Bronx Church: 31, St. George's vsMohawk. st.. (Iirlateplier vs. St. ctaselm's TUan v«'Salcm-Cre5<XT,t,l-obrJary X Ttront Churrm vs. Union fcetUeraeiit.-3. National Ttim Verrin vs Rutgcrs; 3, st George'sva. St. Chrlntoiihor; 4, T Un ts. Xational TurnVereln; 7. RuUura tr. Salem-Crca-ent; S. St, Au-selm's to. t'rion Bottiemci:t.

urishes Despite War* WingedFoot' Gave Over 500

Members to Beat the HunIn Meantime Organization

Played Host to 100,000Soldiers and Sailors

By A. C. CavagnaroAlthough the majority of the big

athletic clubs of the country sufferedsomewhat from the unsettled condi¬tions during the past year this was notthe case with the New York AthleticClub, according to the annual reportwhich was mailed to the thousands ofmembers yesterday.

In truth 1918 proved the biggest yearin the history of the club. The sur¬

plus for the tiscal year ending Novem¬ber 30 was $1,415,381,87, which is ap¬proximately $60,000 more than lastyear. This is especialiy gratifying inview of the fact that the club had tocontend with the general increase incost of labor and supplies.The sinking fund of the club, which

was begun in 1914 for the purpose ofmeeting any emergency, has nowreached the toal of $160,386.37, ofwhich $100,000 is made up of Libertybonds. The assets of the club are $2,-182,829.

Nearly 6,000 MembersThe club now can also boast of hav¬

ing the iargest membership in the his¬tory of the Winged Foot organi*;ation.which ceiebrated its fiftieth anniver¬sary last September. The roster of theclub contains 5,692 names. showing anincrease in membershin for the yearof 189 men.Morc than five hundred of the club

members joined Uncle Sam's ranks inthe war against the Boche and twelveof them gave their lives. Among thosewho made tho supreme sacrifice weresome of the most enthusiastic workersfor tho organization. They includedMajor James A. McKenna, jr., MajoriJohn Purrcy Mitchel, Major Henry I).Gi 11, Commander James S. Beecher,Lieutenant Herbert A. Buermeyer.nephew of the only living founder ofthc- club; Lieutenant John W. Overton,Lieutenant Louis J. Ledcrle, jr., Lieu-tenant Marshall G. Peabodv, Lieuten-ant Arthur L. Engels, Cadet WaVk-sB. Bradley. jr., Private D. F. Fergiisonand Sergeant Richard D. Hamilton, jr.Arthur McAleenan, captain of the

track and field team, did" not make a

report on the point scoring activiticsof the athletes of the organization, asthe club early took the stand that.with this country at war sports shouldbe t.aboo.

Mr. McAleenan's report is thereforebrief. lt says in part:

"I am pleased to submit herewithmy reoort of the athletic activitiesduring the past year. In a sense theEctua! athlet'c activities of the club,aside from those fosterc-d in the cluh-house. such as boxing, wrestling, fenc-inf, etc. have been curtailed to a pointwhere I have no report to make. Thisis due to the decision of the c'ub lastyear not to be represented in anychampionship events, and also to thefact that approximately ninety percent of our athletic members are inthe servic-1. Therefore there are nochanipionships to be repDrted and thenumber of points scored are so smallthat it is not worth while to >publishthem."At the outbreak of the wsr, as out-

lined in my report of last year, all

Gossip ofOwing to his severe attack of in-

fluenza, Gordon Smith, the professionalof the Sunnyside Country Club, was

obliged to cancel his engogement atAugusta, where he was to have as-

sisted David Ogilvie for the winter.jSmith, who has recovered from his ill¬ness, will teach indoor this-winter golfat a New York school.This indoor work at the nets is of

far more benefit to the beginner than«nere exercise, as the rudiments of thegame aro taught, and without the foun¬dation of the game one makes but lit¬tle progress in the way of improve-ment when he goes out on the linksin the spring. Even golfers who havehad many years of experience upon tnelinks and have acquired bad form canhave their faults corrected and betaught a more perfect style, which willbe a great benefit to them when theybegin their spring practice on the turf.

It iB expected that many of the notedamateur golfers, who have been inthe serviee will again be seen on thelinks this year in the various cham-pionships, among whom will ba RobertA. Gardner, national champion in 1909and 1915 and the runner-up to CharlesEvans, jr., in 1916; E. P. Allis, the in-tercollegiate champion of 1914; Ham¬ilton K. Kerr, the Connecticut statechampion of 1915, and James H. Hyde,the South Shore champion, who hasbeen prominent in many tourneys, andthere are a host of others not ffuiteas prominent, who have seen servieeabroad. Among other top notchers,who were in the serviee, even thoughthey were not sent abroad, were Fran-cis Quimet, national open champion of1913, national amateur champion of1914 and Massachusetts amateur cham¬pion in 1913, 1914 and 1915. CharlesEvans, jr., the present open and ama-

RESORTS

1DEAL WINTER HOMEHotel Montclair

MONTCLAIR. N. J.MOST DELIGHTPLLLY SITF-ATF.D RKS1HENTIAL HOTEL INNEW YORK'S STJBURBS.

OPEN' THE ENTIHE YEAR.FREDERICK C. HALL COMPANY.

LAUREL W THE PIwESOverlookln* Lak* fnrotmljo.In tbe roldsl

of the nine*

LAKEWOOD, NEW JERSEYOffers ft week-eml or season sojourner allthe corrtforta. convenlences aml entcrtaln-

ments of a present tlay hotel.Palm Room dancea.Daily orchestra:

concert*.Branch ofAce of G. A. Huhn & Sons, Brokers

FRANK F. SHDTK. Mgr.

THE KIRKWOODON CAMDEN HEIGHTS

SOUTH CAROLINAOFXN JANVARY TO MAY

Ig-HOLK GOLF RIDING CLIMATBT. EDMUND KKUIBHOLZ

Hotel Cfaiendon *KffiK*aml cottagee. Dlrectly on ocean. 18 hole jolf course.ttouUsU uu aspUraUon, 1180 Uroadway. N«w Vork.

the Golfersteur champion, who joined the aerialservice shortly before the close of thewar, after putting in a most activeseason p'aying cxhibition matches forthe benefit of the Red Cross; Gardner"W White and many others includingFred Herreshofi*.

The annual meeting of the New Jer¬sey State Golf Association is to beheld Tuesday, January 28. The mostimportant matter to be brought beforethe meeting is the resurnption of theannual championship and the award-ing of the event. This, however. ispractically settled and the meeting willbe merely a matter of form. The eventwas given to the Deal Golf and Coun¬try Club in 1917, but it was postponedon account of the war. The Deal clubis having its course thoroughly over-hauled for tlie event.

Nathan Schroeder, the president ofthe association, has written to'E. F.Holden, jr., the secretary, asking thelatter to ascertain whether the DealGolf Club still wanted to eonduct thestate championship. Deal does wantit and will give the New Jersey golfersa course to play over that calls fortheir best efforts. Donald Ross, thecourse architect, spent some days lastfall going over the course and mapp'ngout the many -changes that will make\he course one of the finest tests ofgolf in the metropolitan district.

KEvSORTS

F!nd out difference In fares to the far Southresorts and Old Point Comfort

OLD POINT COMFORT, VA.A HOTEL CHAMBERLiN ^rfSfr Swlrnming Tool, Golf, Sea- *X#^Itll food Culalne. Ktcry Kuropean V

MJ*_ Bath and Treatment. Wrtte* y\ »

~^_ StO. F. ADAMS. M»nager\X_^/Fortreta Monroe, Va.. er >»¦*"*Booklet* anu Information at B»>i-t_'Ruffner Hotel Bureau, Hotel McAlpin,Cook'a, 245 B'way, 561 Fifth Av-n.e; Mt.r.Bters, 2K5 Fifth Ave.; Raymond & Whit-comb. .05 Fifth Ave.; Frank Tourlst Co489 Fifth Ave. "Ask Mr. Fostcr" at Lordtc Taylor's. "Brooklyn Eagle Beeort Bureau"

t ATLANTIC CITV.N.J.{Stliuxted.ploiNf^cd cuvdf mot-vaqed. to give. oomfortr<*iut hicattv.

fmirsRj.Bc/zsy

Tttt UA0W8 ft&aun. MOUta Of TM( WWU.9ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.

"IHE NATWH'S HEALTH SHOT"mialtn is spficir.Ncv

A Oermlcide Clitnate and Clean Street*.Nc Du«t. No Dirt. lnnurnerable Out.door Recreariorn and Indrwr Enterralnmenr*

Mmu ganigat .05 U, H WHiTl 80*1 Ct.

HOTELiRAMATAN28 Minutes from Grand Centrr.l.City coaveniwoea ln the oountry.Winter aporta. .Saturday dan.ea.j.»« r couoert a. .0 electric t ra Ina

HOTEL GRAMj.TAN.Ljgwrenoe Paj-k, Bron-vtlle, N T.

"Homeicard Bound'9Sent From Sea by

¦Athletic HeroesTHE hundreds of athletes

with tlie local NationalGuard units, which make

up the greater part of the 27thDivisic'n in France, is on its wayhome. This information was re¬

ceived her yesterday in a cafc'.e-gram from Walter J. Shauakan,thc Brooklyn A. A. and 13thRegiment runner.

Tha message contained onlytwo words, "Homeward Bound,"but they mean much to athleticsin this city.

of our resources and activities wereturned to competitions and entertain-ments for the benefit of the soldiersand sailors. That this work might bewell organized, the Board of Govcrnorsappointed a special committee to havofull charge of such activities and tobe known as the Army and Navy Be-nevdlent Fund Committee."

ln promoting sports and entertain-ments for the serviee men. not a pennywas taken from the. c!ub nor were itamembers charged in any respect. Themoney needed for this work was de-rived from the boxing tournaments nnda number of concerts. The sports fur-nished the soldiers by the club in¬cluded bcxing exhi'itions, betweenamateurs and nrofessior.als, track andiic'.d contests. football and rowing. Itwas estimated that the Winged FootClub, in all of these entertainments,played host to more than 100,000 sol¬diers and sailors.Now that the war is over, Mr. Mc-

Aleenan assures the members that th«»club will soon be at its pre-warstrength in ita track and field activi¬ties. The club will resume its athleticsin every way and the athletes willagain ix- permited to represent the clubin championships.

¦-»

Colonial Yacht ClubElecls New Officers

At the-annual meeting of the Colon¬ial Yacht Club held at the Club House,north of 133th Street and the HudsonRiver, last night, the following oracerowere elected:Commodore, James E. Geissberger;vice commodore, A. M. Garretaon; rear

commodore, Walter Spiegel; fleet cap¬tain, Guill Schenk Whitehouse; treas-urero, H. V. Bruns; recording secre¬tary, W. A. Doty; financial secretary,C. r. Stone; fleet surgeon, Dr. II. M.Burns; measurer, L. A. Huxtable; fleetchaplain, R. E. Weldon; board of direc¬tors, Edwin 11. Georgie, E. D. Knowles,Frank Totten, J. Heynen and S. Swayze.The treasure's report showed the'or-gnnization to be in a very remarkablecendition financially, regardless of thcfact that the honor roll was exceed-ingly large and that all activities hadbeen postponed during the war.The regetta committee an dthe en-

tertainment committee have plans al¬ready under way for one of the mostinteresting seasons ever experiencedby this club. The 210-mile cornfteldlight-ship race wiil be run as well asall of the other open races generallyheld under the auspices of the Colonialbefore the war. The commodore of theRocking Chair Fleet has also arrangeda lively programme for his division.

TRAVEL

.

Pakcpiiicer nnd tarco SrrrtreaNEW YORK TO LIVERPOOLCaronia .(Rn. 29Princess Juliana.Feb. 5Royal George.Feb. 6Saxonia .Feb. 12Carruania .Feb. 17Orduna .Feb. 26Caicnia.March 3NEW YORK TO GLASGOW

Oriana .Feb. 6NEW YORK TO LONDONPannonia.Feb. 18

*».-* STATE 8TERET. NEW \OttK.

iHifE FtaFlThINEW YORK.LIVERPOOL

Lapland . .Jan. 22 Megantic..Jan. 31Adriattc. -Jan. 25 Baitic.Feb. 1

Lapland. . .Feb. 19DRAFTS ANO MONEK ORDERSBritain. lri-ii«i).j.liaij.bcauLiuuTia

Offices, 9 Broadway, New York

ftammi 6eN£RALETf(ANMruwnaiftNEW YORK.BORDEAUX-PARiS

WEEKLY DEPARTORE8H ' .v/...*.. ,pnone BawUn% GrMB rjn>

RED 'D' LIKE SP "" rT MONTAOOTFot Porto Illro. * uracao trnl VeoeauelaB. S. Maracalbo, Wednesday, Jan 15, at l p jtfB. B. Oaracaa. Wednesday. lan. 2i, at 1 p' m

b. 8. Zii'.a. Wednesday, January 29, at 1 P m.S. S. Pliliade'.phia. Wednesday. Feb. 5 at 1 P M6uj»?rior Aii-nminoaauona for PassenaeraBUSS. HAUJ-.n & CO.. Genl MgnPhone S1TC HanoTf-r. Sl Wall Street

EUROPE, JAPAN, CHINAjflicial Acenta Trang-Atlantic and Trans-PfcClfic b. h. Linea. Tnurs and Tickets by.'-11 P.ajl Rout-B. Complete urraiijteir.tntifor biiBincss or recreation travel. im-iudin*Pullman reservationa. rail tiok»t8 &c

THOS. COOK & SON,245 Broadway, 561 Fifth Ave.. N. T.

:-

"THE rrBI.IC BE PLEASED"

COLONIAL LINE4.

I'ECVirFNCER- $2.97ALL OLTSIDE » I \T1 l'.OOM.s.si.lu t» »J ittrmlr f-fuea incla. « W,.r Tae.Boat liuvt-i. Pler 89. North River. «4 u P. jfc¦Plicoe Hprln* 9491.

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Daily. including Sunday, 5.00 p. M,From Pti r 19. E. K. Pbone S700 ?rekm«a

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