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revista de design, com ultimos lançamentos
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  • 25 Artists

    MAke Authenticity Work

    thecrAftof design

    2013bonusissue

  • Tom

    Van E

    ynde

    Jamie Y

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    Rau + B

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    Denyse Schm

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    Features

    046 Shift 061 Reveal

    047Golden Age

    People today care more than ever about how things are made and who made them. The upshot? More opportunities than ever for makers to put on anoth-er hat as designers, collaborating with manufacturers and retailers. Joyce Lovelace reports on the trend and tells the stories of six designer-craftspeople whove made the leap.

    062Populist Modern

    Architects monopolized Scott McGlasson for the first decade of the woodworkers career. Then the economy tanked, and he reinvented his business plan. Today, the craftsman brings his design-minded approach to everything from custom furni-ture to turned plates, hawked in person at farmers markets and craft fairs. Christy DeSmith tells his story.

    070Fear and Fascination

    Gaze upon glass artist Shayna Leibs Wind and Water series, constructed from hundreds of pieces of hand-pulled cane, and one might assume two things: Shes an artist of preternatural patience, and shes had a long relationship with the sea. The first is categorically true, the second, more complicated. Judy Arginteanu meets up with Leib to talk about overcoming fear.

    078Piecework

    Where can inspiration take us? Jim Rose knows; from the begin-ning of his career, the artist has remained open to it. The result is striking steel furniture, inter-pretations of Shaker forms and traditional quilts, all meticulously crafted from reclaimed metal. Julie K. Hanus reports.

    Published by the American Craft Councilwww.craftcouncil.org

    Design 2013

  • Shaw

    n Lovell M

    etalworks

    Joel Baldw

    in

    Ryan K

    elley

    104Back to Basics

    Two decades after first learning woodturning, Joshua Vogel, co-founder of furniture company BDDW, has made it his full-time venture, producing goods as Blackcreek Mercantile & Trad-ing Co. Caroline Hannah pays a visit to the consummate crafts-man and his partner, Kelly Zan-eto, at their home and workshop in the Hudson Valley.

    084Drawn to Fire

    Shawn Lovells technique at the forge is as lyrical as the nature-inspired bed frames, arbors, doors, chandeliers, and other home goods the black-smith creates. Deborah Bishop visits Lovell at her Alameda, California, studio.

    090Crafted Systems

    Portland, Oregon-based designer Aurelie Tu hires women from a local YWCA shelter to help assemble her stylish felt lamp-shades, rugs, and vessels, imparting new skills and the therapeutic effects of making. Elizabeth Lopeman reports on an empowering business model.

    096Curves Ahead

    In Vivian Beers hands, rigid metal becomes impossibly sen-suous furniture. Julie K. Hanus talks to the New Hampshire-based designer/maker about her latest bodies of adventurous work, her residency at SUNY-Purchase, and taking advantage of the many opportunities the past few years have presented.

    Lincoln Barbour

  • Departments

    010 Vitreluxe glass studios creative approach to production

    012 Nicholas Stawinskis city-scaped furniture

    014 How Andrew Gilliatt puts the fun in functional

    016 Wendy Stevens sheet metal handbags

    018 Heather Knights chic ceramic tiles

    020 Mandi Kings road to glass

    022 Paul Loebachs furniture with a twist

    024 Jennifer Merchants mega-fun acrylic jewelry

    026 Furniture maker Doug Meyer reclaims Ohios rustbelt

    028 Jewelry artist Tia Kramers kinetic creations

    030 Marc Maioranas hand-forged housewares

    032 Lara Knutsons reflective glass fabrications

    Handmade designs you can own, curated by the editors of American Craft.

    114Shop Till We DropWhats the real price of a bar-gain buy? And should we expect people to pay more for handmade goods? Ellen Ruppel Shell, author of Cheap: The High Cost of Discount Culture, talks with Shannon Sharpe.

    116Open BookWhen Natalie Chanin decided to publish how-to books, including patterns for her most popular pieces, some thought the cloth-ing designer had made a mistake. Instead, her brand has bloomed. Julie K. Hanus asks Chanin to tell us how.

    118The Future Is NowHeres a question sure to stir up discussion: Does the future of craft lie in design? Monica Moses interviews Garth Clark, ceramics dealer, craft historian, and consummate flamethrower.

    120Road Map to CreativityNow in his 80th decade, the inimitable Wendell Castle designer, craftsman, and father of the art furniture movement shares his newest guide to living a creative life.

    09 Start 035 Goods

    What does craft have to do with design?

    06 From the Editor

    113 Ideas

    Vitreluxe glasspage 10

    Wendy Stevenshandbagspage 16

    Nicholas Stawinski furniturepage 12

    Stool photo: N

    icholas Staw

    inski / Glass photo: P

    aul Foster / Bag photo: K

    ate Lacey

  • ALARA JEWELRY42 W. MAIN STREETBOZEMAN, MT 59715800-267-9104WWW.ALARAJEWELRY.COM

    A MANO GALLERY 42 N. UNION STREETAT THE OLD FIVE AND DIMELAMBERTVILLE, NJ 08530609-397-0063WWW.AMANOGALLERIES.COM

    HEART OF THE HOME 28 S. MAIN STREETNEW HOPE, PA 18938215-862-1880WWW.HEARTOFTHEHOME.COM

    BILLY THE TREE JEWELRY 2617 JEWELL ROADBELLEAIR BLUFFS, FL 33770866-677-7735WWW.BILLYTHETREE.COM

    ROOTS HOME AND GARDEN 193 COMMERCIAL ST.

    PROVINCETOWN, MA 02657508-487-2500

    WWW.SHOPROOTS.COM

    VILLAGE ARTISANS GALLERY321 WALNUT STREET

    BOILING SPRINGS, PA 17007888-258-0256

    WWW.VILLAGEARTISANSGALLERY.COM

    ECO GALLERIA GIFTS400 MAPLE AVENUE

    AT THE TRAIN STATIONORADELL, NJ 07649

    201-262-4438WWW.ECOGALLERIA.COM

    DANCING TREE CREATIONS ARTISANS GALLERY AND STUDIO

    338 S. IRONSTONE DRIVEBOYERTOWN, PA 19512

    610-780-8639WWW.DANCINGTREECREATIONS.COM

    JCK LAS VEGAS - MAY 31 - JUNE 3 - BOOTH # S10517NY NOW (ex NY GIFT FAIR) - AUG 17 - 20 - BOOTH #9234

  • Portrait: Douglas Kirkland

    when a magazine called American Craft talks about design, what does it mean? Design can mean many

    things, of course. Design is a discipline, a problem-solving process that often yields inno-vation. Design is also a business strategy, allowing artists to part-ner with industry as designers to produce more work and make more sales. Design, more sub-jectively, is also an aesthetic a purposeful, visually logical approach that feels fresh and appealing to consumers.

    For this magazine, in this first-ever bonus digital edition dedicated to design, the term means all three things.

    Since 1941, American Craft has championed the work of individual craftspeople, many of whom are experts in specific materials for example, clay, wood, glass, fiber, metal more

    than designers per se. Celebrat-ing original, masterful fine craft is still our mission. But the lines between craft and design are blurring more every day.

    So this issue recognizes the rise of the modern-day designer-craftsperson the material- savvy artist who also excels in design. Thats design as a pro-cess, design as a business strat-egy, and design as an aesthetic.

    Consider lighting and furni-ture designer Alison Berger, for example (page 50). Take one glimpse inside her studio and you see a careful, highly techni-cal process. That skillful design process has led to partnerships with Holly Hunt and Herms.

    Then there is Kathy Erteman, a critically acclaimed ceramist who, by the way, also makes sophisticated dinnerware for Crate & Barrel (page 54). Her sculptural work graces

    museums and galleries, but shes got an astute business side, too.

    And for design aesthetic, look no further than Vivian Beer, whose sleek steel and concrete furniture has made her the darling of design aficionados across the country (page 96). Heres this young, great designer whos got so much potential and is so committed to her craft creating these incredibly well-designed, well-crafted pieces, says Lewis Wexler, co-owner of Wexler Gallery in Philadel-phia. Thats a powerful combination.

    Design has taken center stage in our culture. We expect everything from our boots to our tech gadgets to be flawlessly designed. For some artists, such as the two dozen were featur-ing in this issue, the zeitgeist is perfect. You do have those rising to prominence who are

    The Three Faces of Design

    Monica MosesEditor in Chief

    able to merge what you might call those two sides of their brain, says Rose Apodaca, co-owner of A+R, a stylish home accesso-ries store with two locations in Los Angeles. Theyre using craft-y methods and applying those notions in ways where items can be produced on a larg-er scale maybe not a Walmart scale, but certainly one that means a good business and living for them.

    We think there is much to admire in the process, business, and aesthetic powers of the art-ists on the following pages. We hope you do too.

    Alison Bergers highly technical process is evident in her studio.

    from the editor

    06 american craft design 2013

  • editorial

    Monica MosesEditor in Chiefmmoses@craftcouncil.org

    Julie K. Hanus Senior Editorjhanus@craftcouncil.org

    Mary K. BaumannWill HopkinsCreative Directors

    Elizabeth RyanInteractive Editoreryan@craftcouncil.org

    Andrew Zoellner Assistant Editorazoellner@craftcouncil.org

    Judy Arginteanu Copy Editor

    Joyce LovelaceContributing Editor

    Carlo ApostoliDesigner

    subscriptions

    To subscribe to American Craft and join the nonprofit American Craft Council, call (888) 313-5527.

    publishing

    Joanne Smith Advertising Sales Managerjsmith@craftcouncil.org

    Kathy Pierce Advertising Coordin

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