Home >Documents >On the benefits of phase shift keying to optical ... · PDF fileOn the benefits of phase...

On the benefits of phase shift keying to optical ... · PDF fileOn the benefits of phase...

Date post:06-Feb-2018
Category:
View:217 times
Download:1 times
Share this document with a friend
Transcript:
  • FRANCESCO VACONDIO

    On the benefits of phase shift keying to optical

    telecommunication systems.

    Thse prsente la Facult des tudes suprieures de lUniversit Laval

    dans le cadre du programme de doctorat en gnie lectriquepour lobtention du grade de Philosophi Doctor (Ph.D.)

    Facult des sciences et de gnieUNIVERSIT LAVAL

    QUBEC

    2011

    cFrancesco Vacondio, 2011

  • Contents

    Contents i

    Acknowledgements iv

    Rsum vi

    Abstract viii

    Foreword x

    List of Figures xiii

    List of Tables xviii

    Acronyms and Abbreviations xix

    List of Symbols xxii

    1 Meeting the Needs of a Bandwidth Hungry World 1

    1.1 Why Phase Modulation? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

    1.1.1 PSK Transmitters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

    1.1.2 DPSK Receivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

    1.1.3 DPSK Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

    1.2 SOAs and phase modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

    1.2.1 Optical amplification in semiconductor diodes . . . . . . . . . . 19

    1.2.2 SOA basic equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

  • Contents ii

    1.2.3 Nonlinear Effects in SOAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

    1.2.4 Phase modulation to mitigate SOA nonlinearity . . . . . . . . . 29

    1.3 Renewed interest in coherent detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

    1.3.1 Coherent reception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

    1.3.2 Flagging interest in 1990s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

    1.3.3 Coherent reception in 2010s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

    1.4 Thesis organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

    2 DQPSK: When is a Narrow Filter Receiver Good Enough? 37

    2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

    2.2 Linear Impairments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

    2.2.1 Experimental Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

    2.2.2 Numerical Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

    2.2.3 Back-to-back operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

    2.2.4 Chromatic dispersion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

    2.2.5 Polarization mode dispersion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

    2.3 Nonlinear Phase Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

    2.3.1 Experimental Results and discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

    2.3.2 Numerical Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

    2.4 Multichannel operation of the narrow filter receiver . . . . . . . . . . . 58

    2.5 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

    3 SOA nonlinearity postcompensation for PSK signals 64

    3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

    3.2 Exploiting the low-pass nature of SOAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

    3.3 Phase Noise Variance at SOA Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

    3.4 Large vs. small signal models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

    3.5 NLPN compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

    3.5.1 NPLN Reduction: noisy CW laser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

    3.5.2 NPLN reduction: DPSK modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

    3.6 Nonlinear distortion compensation for intensity modulated signals . . . 82

    3.6.1 Dependence on Saturation Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

    3.6.2 Experimental Validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

    3.7 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

    4 An introduction to the digital coherent receiver 88

    4.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

  • Contents iii

    4.2 Electro optical circuit of the dual polarization downconverter . . . . . . 90

    4.3 Digital signal processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

    4.3.1 Normalization and resampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

    4.3.2 CD compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

    4.3.3 Polarization demultiplexing and equalization . . . . . . . . . . . 97

    4.3.4 Carrier frequency and phase estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

    5 Dual versus single carrier for 40 Gb/s coherent BPSK systems 101

    5.1 Coherent Detection in Core Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

    5.2 Experimental setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

    5.3 Single channel back-to-back measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

    5.4 WDM transmission over 2400 km . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

    5.5 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

    Conclusions and Future Work 114

    A Amplification in semiconductor diodes 117

    Bibliography 120

    List of publications 134

  • Acknowledgements

    I am greatly in debt to my supervisor, Leslie Ann Rusch. Leslie, I have learned a lot

    from you; your guidance and good advices have always been there for me when I needed

    them. My gratitude also goes to my cosupervisor Alberto Bononi. You have been a

    true inspiration for the work of this thesis. I have learned (and continue learning) a lot

    from you. It has been my honor to work with you both during the past few years.

    I thank the members of the jury Prof. Roberto Gaudino, Dr. Leo Spiekman and

    Dr. Andrew Chraplyvy, for taking the time to read my thesis and for their very fruitful

    comments.

    I was lucky enough to have had great colleagues who became great friends. Amir,

    Walid, Simon, Julien: the time spent in Canada for this thesis would not have been the

    same without you.

    I have fond memories of the technical and non-technical discussions with the other

    members of Leslie and Sophie Larochelle group. I want to particularly thank Mehrdad,

    Mehdi, Marco, Jeffrey, Jos, Pegah and Ziad. Being in COPL with you all has been a

    pleasure.

    I want to express my gratitude to Dr. Sbastien Bigo, the director of the WDM

    Dynamic Networks department in Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs France. He gave me the

    opportunity to spend a very fruitful internship in his laboratories during the time of

    this thesis. Gabriel, Jeremie, Oriol, Max, Haik and Patrice welcomed me as one of their

    team from the very beginning, I am grateful to you for this.

    A Ph.D. is a life experience which goes way beyond this dissertation. I very simply

    would not have done this without Veronica: you make me the person I am. Also, I want

    to thank my lifelong friends for their support and for always treating me like I never

    left, during my short but intense trips back in Italy. I cannot mention all the wonderful

  • Acknowledgements v

    people I met in Qubec, who made me feel at home away from home: thats something

    Ill always be grateful for.

    Finally, all the credit goes to my family, to whom I owe everything.

  • Rsum

    Les avantages de la modulation de phase vis--vis la modulation dintensit pour les

    rseaux optiques sont claires et accept par la communaut scientifique des tlcommu-

    nications optiques. Surtout, la modulation de phase montre une meilleure sensibilit

    au bruit, ainsi quune plus grande tolrance aux effets non-linaires que la modulation

    dintensit.

    Nous prsentons dans cette thse un tude qui vise dvelopper les avantages de la

    modulation de phase. Nous attaquons dabord la complexit du rcepteur en dtection

    directe, en proposant une nouvelle configuration dont la complexit est comparable

    celle du rcepteur pour la modulation dintensit traditionnel, mais avec des meilleures

    performances. Cette solution pourrait convenir pour les rseaux mtropolitains (et

    mme daccs) haut dbit binaire. Nous passons ensuite lexamen de la possibilit

    dutiliser des amplificateur semi-conducteur (SOA) au lieu des amplificateurs fibre

    dope lerbium pour fournir amplification optique aux signaux moduls en phase.

    Les non-linarit des SOA sont tudies, et un compensateur simple et trs efficace est

    propos. Les avantages des amplificateurs semi-conducteur par rapport ceux fibre

    sont bien connus. Surtout, la mthode que nous proposons permettrait lintegrabilit

    des SOA avec dautres composants de rseau (par exemple, le rcepteur nomm ci-

    dessus), menant des solutions technologiques de petite taille et efficaces dun point de

    vue nergtique.

    Il y a deux types de systmes pour signaux moduls en phase: bas sur la dtection

    directe, ou sur les rcepteurs cohrents. Dans le dernire partie de ce travail, nous nous

    concentrons sur cette dernire catgorie, et nous comparons deux solutions possibles

    pour la mise niveau des rseaux terrestres actuel. Nous comparons deux configurations

    dont les performances sont trs comparables en termes de sensibilit au bruit, mais nous

  • Rsum vii

    montrons comment la meilleure tolrance aux effets non linaires (en particuliers dans

    les systmes dbit mixte) fait que une solution soit bien plus efficace que lautre.

  • Abstract

    The advantages of phase modulation (PM) vis--vis intensity modulation for optical

    networks are accepted by the optical telecommunication community. PM exhibits a

    higher noise sensitivity than intensity mod

Click here to load reader

Embed Size (px)
Recommended