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Peatland restoration in Belarus: from grants to carbon credits · 2019. 4. 5. · Total project...

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Stirling conference, June 22, 2011 Viktar Fenchuk (APB) Norbert Schaffer (RSPB) Zbigniew Karpowicz (RSPB) Yelnia raised bog, Belarus Peatland restoration in Belarus: from grants to carbon credits
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  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Viktar Fenchuk (APB)

    Norbert Schaffer (RSPB)

    Zbigniew Karpowicz (RSPB)Yelnia raised bog, Belarus

    Peatland restoration in Belarus: from grants

    to carbon credits

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    - Belarus is the country of peatlands

    - Peatlands cover 14.2% of the territory of Belarus (2,9 mio ha)

    Why Belarus?

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Belarus

    - In 1960-1990 over 50% of peatlands (1,5 mio ha) were drained.

    - C. 70% are drained for agriculture

    - Following the breakdown of USSR large areas of drained peatlands are now abandoned or ineffectively used

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Peat extraction

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Forestry

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Agriculture

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    From carbon sinks to carbon sources

    Belarus:

    #17 in peatland area in the World, but…

    # 8 in CO2 emissions from degraded peatlands

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    UNDP-GEF Peatlands project (2006-2010)

    GEF SGP Projects (2008 – ongoing)

    Belarus Climate & Biodiversity projects (2008-2012)

    Ministry of Forestry of the Republic of Belarus

    Ministry of Forestry of the Republic of Belarus

    Village councils

    Peatland rewetting in Belarus

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    More than 20

    sites

    Over 50’000 ha

    rewetted

    Peatland rewetting in Belarus (2006- 2011)

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Dalbeniski degraded peatland / to be restored in 2011 with KfW funds

    Before

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Zady degraded peatland / to be restored in 2011 with KfW funds

    Before

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Hrycyna degraded peatland / restored in 2009 with KfW funds

    After

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Hrycyna degraded peatland / restored in 2009 with KfW funds

    After

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    From 2012 onwards

    Finances thought using mechanisms of voluntary carbon market

    Additional area rewetted 2012-2015 – 9 440 ha

    Rewetted area managed: 18 020 ha

    TOTAL emission reductions 2011-2028 – 936 000 tCO2e

    Total project size: 4,5 mio euro

    Belarus Peatland Rewetting (BPR) project

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Managed sites – 9 sites rewetted with KfW funds in 2008- 2011

    Sites to be restored – 5 sites to be rewetted starting 2012

    Belarus peatland rewetting project

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Site Name Area, ha

    Hrycyna 3,505

    Obal 1,780

    Poplau Moch 415

    Zadenauski Moch 700

    Scerbinski Moch 1,400

    Dakudauskaje 1,600

    Zady 3,380

    Dalbeniski 4,760

    Chareuskoje 200

    Barcianiha 280

    18,020

    Emission reductions from this area will be fully included in the project

    BPR - Managed sites

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Site Rewetting Area (ha)

    1. Bializkaje 1,600

    2.Hadylova-Uchlast,southern part

    2,400

    3. Pcic 1,800

    4. Biarozavik 2,400

    5. Hladynski Moch 1,240

    Total 9,440

    BPR – sites to be rewetted

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Conclusion of InitialMemorandum of Understanding (MoU)* between Ministry of Environmental Protection and HLG/KfW

    Conclusion of Emission Reduction Purchase Agreement (ERPA) between Project Entity and HLG/KfW

    Submission of a Project Idea Note (PIN) to the Ministry for Environmental Protection for a Letter of Endorsement.

    Submission of full Project Design Document (PDD) to the Ministry. Issuance a Letter of Approval

    * Initial MoU becomes MoU after Letter of Approval is issued

    National carbon project cycle

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    • World’s leading voluntary carbon standard

    • 2011 – amended to allow Peatland Rewetting and Conservation Projects (PRC) – in frames of KfW funded project

    • Approved monitoring and baseline methodology is under development - in frames of KfW funded project

    - Voluntary Standard applied in addition to VCS

    - Ascertains that projects:

    • minimize climate change• support sustainable development• conserve biodiversity

    International carbon standards- double certification process

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Starts after finalization of national carbon cycle and receipt a Letter of Approval from the Ministry of Environment

    Registration of the project (PDD) and verification – i.e. the process of auditing the emission reductions achieved.

    Registration involves the preparation of a validation report and its submission (together with other relevant documentation) to the VCS Registry Operator.

    Verification involves the preparation and submission of a verification report. Once this is approved, the VCS Registry Operator will issue VCUs

    Procedure

    VCS PD Valid. & Verif.

    Additionality Test

    Methodology existing/new

    Validation report

    Verificationreport

    Certificationstatement

    Proof of title

    VCS registrySerial No.

    VCU Issuance

    Project developer Validator & Verifier

    VCS Association(Board and Secretariat)

    Registry Operator(s)

    appointsaccredits

    International carbon project cycle

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    New VCS Methodology is developed by the Project

    GEST (Green House Gas Emission Site Types) approach

    GEST: vegetation types with specific water level classes and

    annual GHG fluxes

    Estimating Project Carbon Impact

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Estimating Project Carbon ImpactBased on vegetation mapping and prediction of habitat development

    with and without rewetting

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    BACI approach (Before-After–Control–Impact)

    CBM methodology

    Dalbeniski raised bog – Impact (rewetting) Skuraty raised bog – Control site

    Estimating Project Biodiversity Impact

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Long-term effect

    Based on habitat development scenario

    Species 2010 2040

    Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) 0 10-19 pairs

    Wood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola) 39-46 pairs 81-98 pairs

    Golden plover (Pluvialis apricaria) 0 25-31 pairs

    Merlin (Falco columbarius) 0 5 pairs

    Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina) 3 pairs 5-8 pairs

    Crane (Grus grus) 3-7 pairs 17-23 pairs

    Black Grouse (Tetrao tetrix) 86-151 males 193-340 males

    Short-toed Eagle (Circaetus gallicus) 1 individual 3 pairs

    Black stork (Ciconia nigra) 1-5 pairs 4-9 pairs

    Teal (Anas crecca) 77-89 pairs 125-158 pairs

    Scarlet Rosefinch (Carpodacus

    erythrinus)

    37-51 pairs 150-225 pairs

    Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) 24-41 pairs 120-150 pairs

    Citrine Wagtail (Motacilla citreola) 64-74 pairs 69-233 pairs

  • Stirling conference, June 22, 2011

    Thank you

    Short-toed snake eagle – one of the species to benefit from restoration


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