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Philly Benchamrking

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  • PHILADELPHIA BUILDING BENCHMARKING 2012 REPORTING YEAR INITIAL RESULTS

  • COMPLIANCE SUMMARY

    Philadelphians waste millions of dollars each year heaCng, cooling, and lighCng inefficient buildings. The building sector accounts for over 60% of citywide carbonemissions, among the highest percentage rate in the country. But how can you idenCfy an inefficient building?

    Year 1 Citywide Benchmarking Compliance (as of April 3, 2014)

  • ABOUT THIS REPORT

    The Mayors Office of Sustainability (MOS) has launched the citywide benchmarking program to help rate performance across the citys building stock, beginning with large non-residenCal faciliCes 50,000 square feet or greater. This report analyzes the first year of reporCng (completed in 2013), which covers energy and water usage for the 2012 calendar year.

    KEY FINDINGS Ratable buildings in Philadelphia have an average ENERGY STAR score of 64, well above the naConwide average of 50. Hundreds of buildings fall below this naConwide average, demonstraCng the opportunity represented by energy efficiency retrofits. Compliance rates were similar to benchmarking programs in other ciCes, but improved outreach and guidance will be necessary for Year 2.

  • WHY BENCHMARKING?

    In 2012, City Council passed legislaCon mandaCng energy and water use reporCng for non-residenCal buildings 50,000 square feet or larger. The first reporCng deadline was set for Fall 2013.

    The City of Philadelphia is already benchmarking its municipally owned faciliCes, including office buildings, fire staCons, libraries and prisons. See the first report on municipal benchmarking here!

    Sector Energy Usage Summary

    The Citys first Municipal Benchmarking Report analyzed energy usage by sector for public buildings across Philadelphia

    0

    50

    100

    150

    200

    250

    PrisonsMuseumsMaintenanceFacili!es

    andWarehouses

    OtherFacili!es

    LibrariesFireSta!ons

    Recrea!onFacili!es

    Police Ene

    rgy U

    sage

    Inte

    nsity

    (kBT

    Us/s

    f)

    Building Sector

    0

    10

    20

    30

    40

    50

    60

    70

    80

    90

    100

    MedicalOffices

    Offices andCourts

    ENER

    GY ST

    AR Sc

    ores

    http://www.phila.gov/green/PDFs/Municipal%20Energy%20Benchmarking%20Report.pdf

  • WHY BENCHMARKING?

    Improving the efficiency of our commercial building stock is one of the most powerful tools we have to reduce the Citys carbon footprint. Benchmarking gives building owners, managers and tenants the right informaCon to make decisions and take acCon to reduce their energy and water costs.

    Buildings account for almost 62% of all greenhouse gas emissions in Philadelphia

    GHG Emissions by Sector (Citywide)

    Buildings Street Lights

    Industrial Waste Wastewater Treatment

    61.9%17.7%

    5.2%

    6.8%

    7.8%

    .4%

    .2%

  • NATIONWIDE CONTEXT

    Philadelphia is not alone in mandaCng energy and water benchmarking. Many of Americas largest ciCes have passed similar laws, with many more jurisdicCons considering acCon.

    U.S. Benchmarking Policy Landscape*

    *Source: Ins-tute for Market Transforma-on

    Commercial Policy Adopted

    Commercial Policy Interest

    Public Buildings Benchmarked

    HAWAII

    MINNESOTA

    MICHIGAN

    MASSACHUSETTS

    CONNECTICUT

    OHIO

    ALABAMA

    MAINEWASHINGTON

  • NATIONWIDE CONTEXT

    In addiCon to mandaCng benchmarking, Philadelphia joins several ciCes naConwide that require public disclosure of a limited subset of benchmarking metrics. Similar to raCng the energy efficiency of home appliances, the goal of making this informaCon public is to help both building owners and tenants make more informed decisions. Public disclosure in Philadelphia will begin with 2013 data in late summer, 2014.

    Philadelphia is one of a number of ciXes that are already implemenXng benchmarking and disclosure laws

    New York City

    2,500

    281

    205113

    420

    305Millions of square feet benchmarked

  • BENCHMARKING 101

    To benchmark, building managers enter building characterisCcs and energy and water usage informaCon into ENERGY STAR Por`olio Manager, a free, web-based tool provided by the EPA. Por`olio Manager is the industry standard for benchmarking and disclosure programs.

    Users who successfully benchmark their building(s) receive scores reflecCng both their energy efficiency (see sidebar) and their annualized water consumpCon. These scores are normalized for the size of the building, with ENERGY STAR scores further adjusted for weather and building usage.

    Any building can be entered into Por`olio Manager. Interested in benchmarking your property? Get started, and visit www.phila.gov/benchmarking for details on publishing your score.

    EUI

    A measure of a sites energy use by building square footage. Lower numbers indicate be:er energy efficiency.

    EUI or ENERGY STAR?

    ENERGY STAR

    A scale of 1-100 reflecCng a buildings overall energy usage compared to peer buildings naConwide. An ES score of 50 is average, with higher scores reflecCng be:er-performing buildings.

    http://portfoliomanager.energystar.gov/http://www.phila.gov/benchmarking

  • CITYWIDE BUILDING CHARACTERISTICS

    Buildings of all shapes and sizes have submiced benchmarking reports, but offices, schools (K-12 and higher educaCon), and warehouses have reported the most faciliCes thus far.

    The most energy-intensive sectors were food sales (which includes grocery stores), laboratories, and health care faciliCes (including hospitals).

    Sectors in the top-lee quadrant of this graphic reported the highest energy intensity, while those in the bocom-right had lower energy intensity with a

    greater number of total submissions

    Number of Buildings by Sector

    Total EnergyUsage (kBtu)

    0En

    ergy

    Inte

    nsity

    (Sou

    rce

    EUI)

    600

    500

    400

    300

    200

    100

    0

    50

    Warehouse

    Other

    FoodSale

    Laboratory

    Health Care

    Public Assembly

    100 150 200

    1

    5

    10

    Though hospitals and other health care faciliCes represent only a small number of reported buildings, the energy-

    intensive nature of these faciliCes makes this sector one of Philadelphia's best opportuniCes for savings through

    improved building performance.

  • CITYWIDE BUILDING CHARACTERISTICS

    The majority of reported buildings were constructed aeer 1950, reflecCng both the post-war building boom and the more recent growth in commercial construcCon.

    Among those buildings eligible for an ENERGY STAR raCng, buildings constructed in the late 19th century or mid-20th century performed best, but generally there appears to be licle correlaCon between building age and score. This matches similar findings from benchmarking reports in New York and Washington, D.C.

    0

    20

    40

    60

    80

    100

    Aver

    age

    ENER

    GY S

    TAR

    Scor

    e

    18801890

    19001910

    19201930

    19401950

    19601970

    19801990

    20002010

  • CITYWIDE ENERGY USAGE

    The 1,773 buildings in this por`olio reported using over 23 billion kBtus of energy in 2012. This represents around 17% of citywide building energy use.

    Improved energy performance results in cost savings as well. Bringing low-performing faciliCes up to median levels of efficiency could save building owners over $100 million in annual energy costs, money that can be re-invested in businesses, employees, and communiCes.

    Total Energy ReducXon of 23% Across 1600+ Buildings and 3.5% Citywide

  • CITYWIDE ENERGY USAGE

    ENERGY STAR RaXngs of Eligible Buildings

    Num

    ber o

    f Bui

    ldin

    gs R

    epor

    ted

    0

    6

    2

    8

    10

    12

    4

    ENERGY STAR Score

    Philadelphia Citywide Average,ENERGY STAR Score

    0 20 40 60 80 100

    For those buildings eligible for an ENERGY STAR score, the average raCng was 64 more than 14 points higher than the naConwide average.

  • SECTOR SUMMARY Offices: Office buildings performed well above the naConwide average of 50, and nearly half would be eligible for ENERGY STAR cerCficaCon, an addiConal level of recogniCon offered to those buildings that score at least a 75 on the 1-100 scale. Schools: K-12 faciliCes (including School District of Philadelphia, charters, and private schools) also outperformed naConal averages. Supermarkets: Despite the high Source EUI, the above-average ENERGY STAR raCng for this sector indicates Philadelphias supermarkets outperform similar buildings naConwide. Hotels: The lowest-performing sector by ES score, hotels provide the greatest sector-wide opportunity for improvement among reported buildings. Warehouses: Dozens of warehouses reported energy usage in the City of Philadelphia, with the vast majority using less than 100 kBtus of energy per square foot of space. As a result of this low energy usage, the Philadelphia warehouse sector reported an average ENERGY STAR score of between 67 (for refrigerated faciliCes) and 75 (non-refrigerated), by far the best performance of any sector in this report.

    Sector Summary by Source EUI (kBtu/per square foot)

    Sector Summary by ENERGY STAR Score (1-100)

  • NEXT STEPS: 2013 REPORTING

    The deadline for reporCng 2013 energy and water usage is June 30, 2014. Following this deadline, a limited subset of data will be publicly disclosed, providing p