Refined 36

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  • May 2014

    Digital disruptionin energy

    This is an internal publication for the Accenture Energy Community and is not intended for external (client) distribution.

  • Regular features:

    Energy results: Q4 2013

    Page 19:

    The field worker of the future are wearable technologies such as Google Glass the future of mobility in the energy industry?

    Page 14:

    Here come the drones can unmaned aerial vehicles radically change how the energy industry operates?

    Page 23:

    Digitals role in plugging the missing middle in upstream

    Page 8:

    3D printing in upstream energy an industrial evolution

    Page 30:

    Turning data into oil - how to use advanced analytics to increase production in declining fields

    Page 39:

    Fuel retailing and the digital consumer

    Page 35:

    Opportunities for advanced analytics in shale gas production

    Page 42:

    Book Review:Untapped - The Scramble For Africas Oil

    Digital disruptionin energy

    Page 4:

    Page 46:

    Your Research, News and Reviews for the Energy Community2

  • Note from the Editor

    Hello Refined readers, and welcome to Refined 36. As those who dialled into Energy24 recorded from Accentures Sophia Antipolis Technology Lab a few weeks ago heard our Industry Managing Director describe, the digital era represents a new step forward for energy, bringing about a new ecosystem, new players, new opportuni-ties and new challenges for the sector.

    In this edition of Refined, we are taking a step forward into this digital world, by ex-

    ploring a number of digital disruptions and what they mean for en-ergy, through the lens of the industry chokepoints. As introduced in the cover article by our new Technology Editor, Brian Richards, en-ergy companies have as much - or more - to gain as any other indus-try by harnessing this digital disruption. And so the race is on for energy firms to understand how to best leverage these to help solve their pressing challenges and continue to deliver value.

    At the industry level, we start by looking at 3D printing in the oil and gas supply chain, before moving to unmaned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and Google Glass. In the upstream, Myles Kirby shares his perspective on how to approach plugging the missing middle whilst Lance Dexter and David Morse review how companies can success-

    fully turn data into oil, and Toby Lomax explores the potential for advanced analytics in unconventional production more specifically. Finally, Rich Kho, a Refined alumni and past Editor-in-Chief, pro-poses a new way forward for fuel retailers in the context of the digi-tal revolution. As ever, this edition also includes the latest quarterly results for you, as well as a book review by Michael Stratton as part of our ongoing collaboration with the UKI Energy Book Club.

    Congratulations to Michael Lamb who brings the iPad home this quarter for his brilliant perspective on 3D printing as an industrial evolution in the upstream supply chain. Rinat Matsukov and Shane McIntyre come in as runners up. We will also reward all Refined writers in this edition with a stamp in their Energy Passports, in rec-ognition of their contributions to the global Energy Community of Practice.

    In the next edition, we will be exploring the new frontiers of ener-gy. If you have an idea for an article related to this theme, or indeed any topic, then please do get in touch with myself or another mem-ber of the Editorial Team (see more on our newly launched Refined page on the Energy Source), or by posting your ideas on the Stream (using the #Refined hashtag). Otherwise enjoy this issue!

    Tessa [email protected]

    Digital disruption in energy

    Your Research, News and Reviews for the Energy Community3

    This is an internal publication for the Accenture Energy Community and is not intended for external (client) distribution.This is an internal publication for the Accenture Energy Community and is not intended for external (client) distribution.

  • Digital disruptionin energy The last decade of change and opportunity was driven by digital start-ups. The coming decade will see traditional companies become the next set of digital giants Accenture Technology Vision 2014.

    In 2005, text messages were sent peer-to-peer and blogs were typically long essays. Twitter, founded the next year, bucked tra-ditional blogging and let users broadcast mi-croblog posts (tweets) to the world. Today, after less than ten years, only eight years after the companys founding, Twitter has nearly 650

    million users, hosts 58 million tweets a day, a $30 billion valuation, and gross margins above 50%.

    Over the last decade, technology companies such as Twitter, Google, and Amazon have found tremendous and rapid success not just by understanding the technology of digital dis-

    ruption including analytics, mobility, cloud computing, and social media, but by making them part of their core business strategy and creating a significant competitive advantage. These companies quickly realised that the po-tential of digital hinges on how information is gathered, converged, analysed and then made

    Your Research, News and Reviews for the Energy Community4

    This is an internal publication for the Accenture Energy Community and is not intended for external (client) distribution.

  • Digital disruption in energycontinued

    available in real-time to make decisions and meet objectives.

    The last decade of change and opportunity was driven by these digital start-ups, but the coming decade will see traditional companies become the next set of digital giants. Some would argue that the rate of adoption of a new technology hinges on its constraints and the energy industry, faced with a number of ever complex challenges including declining pro-duction rates, the need to increase capital and operational efficiency and an ageing workforce (to name but a few of the industry chokepoints highlighted in this years Q1 edition of Re-fined) has as much or more to gain as any other industry by harnessing this digital disruption and technical innovation. The race is on for en-ergy firms to understand how to leverage the concepts of digital disruption to help solve these pressing challenges and continue to de-liver shareholder value.

    The digital-physical blurOne key element behind the success of todays digital giants was the push of digital technolo-gies into the everyday activities of their con-sumers. These technologies have changed how

    travel is managed, cabs are booked, friend-ships are established, and more. In short, they no longer sit at the periphery of life but rather are intrinsically related to its very core. This

    digital-physical blur offers energy compa-nies a model for how to use digital technolo-gies not just to augment or modify existing processes, but also how to radically change them to deliver increasing value. A number of key innovations explored in this edition are introduced below.

    Wearable computingWearable computing devices such as Google Glass can allow workers in remote or distant locations to receive over-the-shoulder coach-ing from workers across the world. By enabling a remote worker to see what the on-site field worker sees and hear what the field worker hears, he or she can provide the on-site field worker with assistance with maintenance, one-on-one training, as well as support during safety issues. Its not just glasses either. The consumerisation of smart watches, fitness de-vices, and other wearable technology will like-ly drive the cost down and capability up to a point where energy companies can finally achieve the vision of a fully networked and smart worker. See The field worker of the future article in this edition.

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones)Another example of this digital-physical blur is made evident by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs have numerous industry-specif-ic use cases, including pipeline surveys, flare stack inspections, inspecting offshore plat-forms, ensuring wildlife safety, and monitor-ing flare emissions. Outfitted with a range of

    The race is on for energy firms to understand how to leverage the concepts of digital disruption to help solve these pressing

    challenges and continue to deliver shareholder value.

    Your Research, News and Reviews for the Energy Community5

    This is an internal publication for the Accenture Energy Community and is not intended for external (client) distribution.

  • Digital disruption in energycontinued

    video and sensor technology, these aerial ro-bots will extend the reach of workers to loca-tions that are either too remote or dangerous for workers. BP for example plans to deploy unmanned aerial vehicles to inspect pipelines in remote areas of Alaska at a fraction of the cost of a piloted helicopter within the next three years.1 See the article on Here come the drones in this edition.

    3D printingLike drones, the maturation of 3D printing also suggests increasing relevance for the in-dustry. 3D printers are moving down the cost curve and increasingly able to develop more complex products, making them a more com-petitive alternative to shipping and storing assets. This new digital supply chain could enable the manufacturing of parts that are no longer in production, the development of highly specialised tools, and the production of parts where and when they are needed in remote locations such as the Arctic or far off-shore. This is likely to become a hotly contest-ed area for Oil Field Services (OFS) companies - GE is already planning to begin 3D printing fuel nozzles for gas turbines later this year.2

    See the article on 3D printing in upstream energy in this edition.

    Advanced analyticsAlthough the

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