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School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports: Overview Presented by: Milt McKenna...

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School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports: Overview Presented by: Milt McKenna Horner & Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Universities of Oregon & Connecticut Slide 2 My job today To provide information about Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS). Preparation for Summer Team Training BIG IDEAS Slide 3 Coordination/ Collaboration 1999 - 2013 PBIS MSDE Sheppard Pratt Johns Hopkins University Local School Systems Slide 4 Slide 5 18,276 Schools Adopting School-wide PBIS October 2012 Slide 6 SWPBIS (aka PBIS/RtI) IS Framework Slide 7 What does PBIS look like in a school? >80% of students can tell you what is expected of them & can give behavioral examples because they have been taught, actively supervised, practiced, & acknowledged. Positive adult-to-student interactions exceed negative. Administrators are active participants. Data & team-based action planning & implementation. Function based behavior support is a foundation for addressing problem behavior. Full continuum of behavior support is available to all students. Slide 8 A Main Message Good TeachingBehavior Management STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Increasing District & State Competency and Capacity Investing in Outcomes, Data, Practices, and Systems Slide 9 PBIS Implementation Logic Slide 10 Erroneous assumptions are that the student: Is inherently bad Will learn more appropriate behavior through increased use of aversives Will be better tomorrow. Slide 11 ASSUMPTIONS BEHAVIOR is learned BEHAVIOR is teachable BEHAVIOR occurrence is affected by the environment BEHAVIOR is changeable BEHAVIOR is more likely if effective, efficient, and reinforced Slide 12 Do Sanctions work? Sanctions such as office referrals or suspensions may appear to work in the short term Removes student Provides relief to teachers, peers, administrator We often attribute responsibility for change to student &/or others (family) Jeffrey Sprague, Ph.D. ([email protected]) 12 Slide 13 Slide 14 BIG IDEAS 3-5 years Organizational Framework Critical Features same across schools unique to the culture of the school System investment in Coaching Capacity Slide 15 SYSTEMS PRACTICES DATA Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Student Behavior OUTCOMES Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement Supporting Decision Making PBIS Slide 16 Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior ~80% of Students ~15% ~5% CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE PBIS Slide 17 Academic SystemsBehavioral Systems 1-5% 5-10% 80-90% Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions Address individual needs of student Assessment-based High Intensity Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions Strategies to address needs of individual students with intensive needs Function-based assessments Intense, durable strategies Targeted, Group Interventions Small, needs-based groups for at risk students who do not respond to universal strategies High efficiency Rapid response Targeted, Group Interventions Small, needs-based groups for at- risk students who do not respond to universal strategies High efficiency/ Rapid response Function-based logic Core Curriculum and Differentiated Instruction All students Preventive, proactive School-wide or classroom systems for ALL students Core Curriculum and Universal Interventions All settings, all students Preventive, proactive School-wide or classroom systems for ALL students and staff Marylands Tiered Instructional and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Framework Slide 18 Challenge #1 Slide 19 Challenge # 2 Slide 20 Challenge # 3 Slide 21 Critical Features 1. PBIS Team 2. Faculty/Staff Commitment 3. Expectations and Rules Developed 4. Lesson Plans for Teaching expectations/rules 5. Reward/Recognition Program Established 6. Effective Procedures for Dealing with Discipline 7. Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established 8. Classroom Systems 9. Evaluation 10. Implementation Plan SUMMER TRAINING FACILITATED ACTION PLANNING Slide 22 Critical Features 1.PBIS Team 2.Faculty/Staff Commitment 3.Expectations and Rules Developed 4.Lesson Plans for Teaching expectations/rules 5.Reward/Recognition Program Established 6.Effective Procedures for Dealing with Discipline 7.Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established 8.Classroom Systems 9.Evaluation 10. Implementation Plan Slide 23 TEAM COMPOSITION Administrator Grade/Department Representation Specialized Support Special Educator, Counselor, School Psychologist, Social Worker, etc. Support Staff Office, Supervisory, Custodial, Bus, Security, etc. Parent Community Mental Health, Business Student Start with Team that Works. Slide 24 Your Turn 1.Consider your NEXT steps: a.Do you have administrator support? b.Is your team representative of your staff? If not, who else could you include? c.Can you schedule your monthly mtgs for the year? d.Can you establish team norms? e.Does your schools Mission Statement & SIP reflect school-wide positive behavior? 2.Who will do what - when? 3.Do you need any other resources? Slide 25 Critical Features 1.PBIS Team 2.Faculty/Staff Commitment 3.Expectations and Rules Developed 4.Lesson Plans for Teaching expectations/rules 5.Reward/Recognition Program Established 6.Effective Procedures for Dealing with Discipline 7.Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established 8.Classroom Systems 9.Evaluation 10.Implementation Plan Slide 26 80% Staff Buy In Start Small Easy Implementation Share/ Present Data Showcase Success Slide 27 What does a reduction of 850 office referrals and 25 suspensions mean? Kennedy Middle School Savings in Administrative time ODR = 15 min Suspension = 45 min 13,875 minutes 231 hours 29, 8-hour days Savings in Student Instructional time ODR = 45 min Suspension = 216 min 43,650 minutes 728 hours 121 6-hour school days Slide 28 Integrate past school behavior plans Assure clarity of target areas Incorporate school colors or mascot Marketing Strategy Respectful Able Motivated Safe Slide 29 Slide 30 Critical Features 1.PBIS Team 2.Faculty/Staff Commitment 3.Expectations and Rules Developed 4.Lesson Plans for Teaching expectations/rules 5.Reward/Recognition Program Established 6.Effective Procedures for Dealing with Discipline 7.Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established 8.Classroom Systems 9.Evaluation 10.Implementation Plan Slide 31 School Rules NO Food NO Weapons NO Backpacks NO Drugs/Smoking NO Bullying Redesign Learning & Teaching Environment Slide 32 3-5 Positively Stated Behavioral Expectations Slide 33 Critical Features 1.PBIS Team 2.Faculty/Staff Commitment 3.Expectations and Rules Developed 4.Lesson Plans for Teaching expectations/rules 5.Reward/Recognition Program Established 6.Effective Procedures for Dealing with Discipline 7.Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established 8.Classroom Systems 9.Evaluation 10.Implementation Plan Slide 34 34 If a child doesnt know how to read, we teach. If a child doesnt know how to swim, we teach. If a child doesnt know how to multiply, we teach. If a child doesnt know how to drive, we teach. If a child doesnt know how to behave, we teach? punish? Why cant we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others? (Herner, 1998) Slide 35 35 Once you have developed school-wide expectations, it is not enough to just post the words on the walls of the building YOU MUST TEACH THEM! My Schools Expectations Be Safe Be Responsible Be Respectful Slide 36 LEARNING MATRIX RESPECTRESPECT CLASSROOMCAFETERIANON- CLASSROOM AREAS PARKING LOT AFTER SCHOOL Myself Be in my seat before bell Dress appropriately Try my best to complete work Control my behavior Be on time Keep my area clean Dress appropriately Move to class within the time given Keep planners visible at all times Stay in designated areas Dress appropriately Drive carefully Be aware of moving traffic Display my parking permit Leave school property only upon dismissal Dress appropriately Be on time and prepared for activities Carry my student I.D. Dress appropriately Others Keep my hands to myself Say positive things to others Stay out of others personal space Cooperate with others Use non-offensive language Make sure cell phones are off and away Keep my place in line Use good manners Dispose of food in the proper manner Make sure cell phones are off and away Use appropriate language and volume Say only kind things to and about others Cheer positively Keep my hands to myself Play car stereo at a reasonable volume Follow safe traffic rules Park in my assigned space Be kind to others in heavy traffic Cheer positively Maintain appropriate noise level Learning Work Quietly Stay in my area Keep focused on my work Participate in class activities Keep my eyes on my own paper Use good manners Use appropriate voice level Listen to announcements Be prepared to leave on time Stay in assigned areas Use appropriate language and volume Keep hallways quiet Report unlawful or suspicious activity Be in first period prior to 7:17 a.m. Pay attention/cooperate with coach or sponsor Property Use materials for their intended purpose Use computers as directed by an adult Maintain materials in the condition they were given Throw my trash away Clean my area Pay for my food Use equipment properly Throw my trash away properly Keep our school free of graffiti Maintain a smoke-free environment Keep parking lot clean Open car doors carefully Keep my car locked at all times Use equipment/facilities properly Eat and drink in designated areas 1. SOCIAL SKILL 2. NATURAL CONTEXT 3. BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES Slide 37 Teaching Matrix Activity ClassroomLunchroomBusHallwayAssembly Respect Others Use inside voice ________ Eat your own food __________ Stay in your sea

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