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SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) CURRICULUM MAP CANYONS SCHOOL DISTRICT 2014 – 2015 Curriculum Mapping Purpose Canyons School District’s English language arts curriculum maps are standards-based maps driven by the Common Core State Standards and implemented using materials selected by schools and coordinated with feeder systems. Student achievement is increased when both teachers and students know where they are going, why they are going there, and what is required of them to get there. Curriculum Maps are a tool for: ALIGNMENT: Provides support and coordination between concepts, skills, standards, curriculum, and assessments COMMUNICATION: Articulates expectations and learning goals for students PLANNING: Focuses instruction and targets critical information COLLABORATION: Promotes professionalism and fosters dialogue between colleagues about best practices pertaining to sequencing, unit emphasis and length, integration, and review strategies Canyons School District English Language Arts (ELA) maps are created by CSD ELA teachers and published by the CSD Office of Evidence-Based Learning.
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Page 1: SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) CURRICULUM …csdela.weebly.com/uploads/9/5/6/3/9563459/eleventh_grade_map.pdfCanyons School District’s English language arts curriculum maps

SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) CURRICULUM MAP CANYONS SCHOOL DISTRICT

2014 – 2015  Curriculum Mapping Purpose  Canyons School District’s English language arts curriculum maps are standards-based maps driven by the Common Core State Standards and implemented using materials selected by schools and coordinated with feeder systems. Student achievement is increased when both teachers and students know where they are going, why they are going there, and what is required of them to get there.  Curriculum Maps are a tool for:  

• ALIGNMENT: Provides support and coordination between concepts, skills, standards, curriculum, and assessments

• COMMUNICATION: Articulates expectations and learning goals for students • PLANNING: Focuses instruction and targets critical information

• COLLABORATION: Promotes professionalism and fosters dialogue between colleagues about best practices pertaining to sequencing, unit emphasis and length, integration, and review strategies

                     

Canyons School District English Language Arts (ELA) maps are created by CSD ELA teachers and published by the CSD Office of Evidence-Based Learning.  

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*2013 Only ** Initial mapping and 2013 remapping +2014 Only  

These maps were collaboratively developed and refined by teacher committees using feedback from classroom teachers, literacy leads, building administrators, and the office of Evidence-Based Learning. It is with much appreciation that we recognize the many educators who collaborated in the effort to provide these maps for the teachers and students of CSD. Specific individuals that have assisted in the writing and editing of this document include:

Leslie Allen ��� Sara Allen* Carlie Allred+ Lark Anderson *+ Carrie Ashcraft+ Kjersti Barlow+ Marianne Bates** Heather Beagley *+ Eva Bellison Carolyn Brown Meghan Brown** Katie Bullock+ Samantha Burton+ Shannon Callister Kimberly Carter* Alyssa Child+ Scott Christensen**+ Arna Clark**+ Kelly Corless+ Belann Earley Sheri Ebert Nathan Elkins Melissa Engel*+

Sarah Exon Karen Fairhurst+ Katherine Falk+ Denise Ferguson**+ Julie Fielding** Jenna Fitch**+ Russ Fullmer Eric Gardner+ Megan Gardner Jana Gold*+ Camille Graff Elise Gray+ Laura Grzymkowski Glen Gunnell Michelle Gurr Erica Hall+ Tawny Hawkins*+ Brooke Haydock- Duncan Jesse Hennefer Susan Henrie Rachel Hill Martine Hales

Barbara Hopkins Brianne Hepworth**+ Robyn Holoak+ Jennifer Humphreys Maggie Jensen** Emily Kafer+ Molly Kendall Kristi Killpack+ Susan Kirkland+ Scott Lambert ���Jill Landes-Lee Christine Lantis Karen Larson Whitney Lee** Lauren Lewis+ Julie Lindsay* John Lundstrom+ Allison Martin** Ryan Martin*+ Lisa McDonald* Pollyanna McGaffin* ���Ron Meyer**+ Kelli Miller**

Kimberlee Mitchell Caitlin Moser+ Jana Mumford** Athena Nadeau+ Courtney Nielsen+ Katie Norris* Jenny Olsen Randy Olsen**+ Erin Pack-Jordan+ Hollie Pettersson Marielle Rawle+ Joanne Ribiero* Karen Richards Tavia Richards** Rob Richardson Piper Riddle** Michelle Ritter** Leslie Robinett*+ Amber Roderick-Landward Jennifer Romney Mikianne Royal Jessica Sanders* Susan Saunders*

Hannah Sharr** Michelle Shimmin Lynna Shin** Connie True Simons** Jennifer Sinclair Alex Springer Alaina Stone+ Heather Swallow Shane Tanner** Debra Thorpe Jacqueline Thurnau**+ Lisa Tolk+ Leslie Trelease+ Charlotte Williams James Wilson* Rand Winward Christine Yee*+

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Eleventh Grade: ELA Core Standards Overview Ø Understanding more from and making fuller use of written materials, including using a wider range of evidence to support an analysis

Ø Making more connections about how complex ideas interact and develop within a book, essay, or article

Ø Evaluating arguments and specific claims; assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is sufficient; and as appropriate, detecting inconsistencies and ambiguities

Ø Analyzing the meaning of foundational U.S. documents (the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights)

Ø Making an argument that is logical, well-reasoned, and supported by evidence

Ø Writing a literary analysis, report, or summary that develops a central idea and a coherent focus and is well supported with relevant examples, facts, and details

Ø Conducting several research projects that address different aspects of the same topic, using more complex books, articles, and other sources 1

Ø Responding thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesizing comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; and resolving contradictions when possible

Ø Sharing research, findings, and evidence clearly and concisely

Ø Making strategic use of digital media (e.g., animations, video, websites, podcasts) to enhance understanding of findings and to add interest

Ø Determining or clarifying the meaning of words and phrases, choosing flexibly from multiple strategies, such as using context, Greek and Latin roots (e.g., bene as in benefactor or benevolent), patterns of words (conceive, conception, conceivable), and consulting specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses)

Ø Interpreting figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyzing their role in the written materials

National PTA, 1250 N Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, PTA.org • [email protected] © 2011 PTA All rights reserved.

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Eleventh Grade English Language Arts Year at a Glance 2014-15

8 Weeks 3-4 Weeks 6-7 Weeks 6-7 Weeks 8-9 Weeks 3-4 Weeks

Unit  Theme   The  New  World   A  New  Nation   American  Romanticism  

A  Troubled  Young  Nation  

Emerging  Modernism  

Challenges  and  Successes  of  the  Twentieth  Century  

Essential  Question  

What  influences  shaped  Colonial  

America?  

How  did  the  philosophy  of  the  Age  of  Reason  influence  the  founding  of  America?  

What philosophies influenced American

Romanticism?  

How  did  the  19th  Century  shape  what  it  means  to  be  an  American?  

How  did  world  events  influence  isolation  and  

disillusionment  in  the  early  American  twentieth  century?  

How  does  postmodern  text  reflect  change  in  American  values  and  culture?  

Writing  Focus  

Informative/  Explanatory   Argument  

Argument  Narrative  

 

Argument  Narrative  

Informative/  Explanatory  

Informative/  Explanatory  

Social  Studies  

Connections  

What  is  the  American  colonial  experience?  

How  is  the  development  of  the  United  States  form  of  government  a  compound  

constitutional  republic?  

What  was  pre-­‐Reconstruction  America  like?  

Where,  how,  and  why  did  pre-­‐Reconstruction  America  expand?  

How  did  the  growth  of  industry  change  the  United  

States?  

 

What  was  the  social  reform  that  occurred  at  the  turn  of  the  century?  

 

Science  Connections  

What  role  did  science  and/or  medicine  play  in  developing  American  Culture?  

How  were  science  and  technology  involved  in  the  struggle  to  win  American  independence?

What  were  the  scientific  developments  from  this  time  period  that  inspired  literary  thought  in  the  world  and  US?

 

How  did  advancements  in  science  shape  American  during  the  19th  century?

 

How  did  major  scientific  findings  in  the  ‘20s  affect  the  country?

 

How  do  modern  discoveries  change  American  culture?  

 

Math  Connections              

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Key  Terms  

Words  for  Review:    Culture,  Analysis,  Point  of  view  

Argumentation,  Claims,  Counter-­‐Claims,  Evidence,  Reasons  

Paradox     Abolition,  Mood   Dialect     Culture      

Tier  II:    Simile,  Metaphor,  Allegory,  Analogy,    Connotative  language,  Denotative  language,  first  person  narration,  unreliable  narrator,    third  person  limited,  third  person  omniscient,  imagery,  tone,  irony  

Diction,  Rhetoric,  Ethos,  Logos,  Pathos,    Rhetorical  Device,  Structure,  Syntax  Bias  

  Autobiography,  Biography,  Dialect,  Naturalism,  Realism,  Regionalism,    Satire    

Flashback,  Foreshadowing,  Industrialization,    

 Minimalism,  Postmodernism  Civil  Rights,  Cold  War,  McCarthyism    

Tier  III:  Protestant  Reformation,  Puritanism  Oxymoron  

 Age  of  Reason,  Age  of  Enlightenment,  Nationalism  

Realism,  Romanticism,  Self-­‐Reliance,  Transcendentalism,  Utopian  Societies  Naturalism,  Optimism,,  “Fireside  Poets,”  Individualism,  Manifest  Destiny  

Abolition,  Antebellum  

Interior  Monologue,  Lost  Generation,  Prohibition  Era,  Stream  of  Consciousness,  Alienation,  American  Dream,  Disillusionment,  Harlem  Renaissance  

Assimilation,  Counter-­‐culture  

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  1  Theme:  The  New  World    

In  this  unit  students  will  discuss  what  influences  shaped  colonial  America  and  why  people  explore  new  worlds,  through  the  reading  of  period-­‐related  texts  and  the  writing  of  informative/explanatory  writings.  

Essential  Question  

Supporting  Questions   Vocabulary   Writing  Focus  

Cross-­‐Curricular  Connections  

What  influences  shaped  Colonial  America?  

• Why  did  people  explore  the  new  world?  

• How  did  Native  American  and  British  colonists  culturally  clash?    

• How  did  the  Protestant  Reformation  influence  colonial  immigration?  

• What  were  the  main  motivating  factors  of  British  colonist  for  coming  to  America?    

• What  was  life  like  for  early  settlers?  • What  role  did  religion,  particularly  

Puritanism,  play  in  developing  American  culture?  

• How  can  understanding  literary  devices  help  modern  readers  better  understand  colonial  American  writers?    

Words  for  Review:    Culture,  Analysis,  Point  of  view    Tier  II:    Simile,  Metaphor,  Allegory,  Analogy,  Connotative  language,  Denotative  language,  first  person  narration,  unreliable  narrator,    third  person  limited,  third  person  omniscient,  imagery,  tone,  irony    Tier  III:  Protestant  Reformation,  Puritanism  Oxymoron  

Informative/  Explanatory  

What  is  the  American  colonial  experience?  

• What  are  the  reasons  for  the  establishment  of  colonies  in  Americas?  

• What  are  the  differences  among  the  American  colonial  areas:  New  England,  Middle,  and  Southern  colonies?  How  do  these  colonies  contribute  to  a  rise  of  American  culture?    

What  role  did  science  and/or  medicine  play  in  developing  American  Culture?  

   

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

READING  

RL  11-­‐12.4  Determine  the  meaning  of  words  and  phrases  as  they  are  in  the  text,  including  figurative  and  connotative  meaning,  analyze  word  choices  on  tone  (includes  Shakespeare  as  well  as  other  others).  

• I  can  use  text  to  determine  the  meaning  of  words  and  phrases.  • I  can  determine  an  author's  tone  through  analysis  of  word  choice.  • I  can  determine  the  figurative  and  connotative  meaning  of  words  and  

phrases.  RL  11–12.9  Demonstrate  knowledge  of  eighteenth-­‐,  nineteenth-­‐,  and  early-­‐twentieth-­‐century  foundational  works  of  American  literature,  including  how  two  or  more  texts  from  the  same  period  treat  similar  themes  or  topics.  

• I  can  identify  similar  themes  or  topics  in  two  or  more  texts  from  the  same  time  period.  

•  I  can  demonstrate  knowledge  of  eighteenth-­‐,  nineteenth-­‐,  and  early-­‐twentieth-­‐century  foundational  works  of  American  literature.  

RI  11–12.6  Determine  an  author’s  point  of  view  or  purpose  in  a  text  in  which  the  rhetoric  is  particularly  effective,  analyzing  how  style  and  content  contribute  to  the  power,  persuasiveness,  or  beauty  of  the  text.  

• I  can  determine  an  author's  point  of  view  or  purpose  in  a  text.    • I  can  analyze  how  a  text's  style  and  content  contribute  to  the  power,  

persuasiveness,  or  beauty  of  a  text.  RL  11-­‐12.3  Analyze  the  impact  of  the  author’s  choices  regarding  how  to  develop  and  relate  elements  of  a  story  or  drama  (e.g.,  where  a  story  is  set,  how  the  action  is  ordered,  how  the  characters  are  introduced  and  developed).  

• I  can  analyze  how  the  author's  choices  impact  the  development  of  a  story  or  drama.  

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  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  WRITING  

W  11–12.2  Write  informative/explanatory  texts  to  examine  and  convey  complex  ideas,  concepts,  and  information  clearly  and  accurately  through  the  effective  selection,  organization,  and  analysis  of  content.  

• I  can  write  informative/explanatory  texts  to  examine  and  convey  complex  ideas,  concepts,  and  information  clearly  and  accurately.  

• I  can  effectively  select,  organize,  and  analyze  content  in  my  informative/explanatory  writing.  

a.  Introduce  a  topic;  organize  complex  ideas,  concepts,  and  information  so  that  each  new  element  builds  on  that  which  precedes  it  to  create  a  unified  whole;  include  formatting  (e.g.,  headings),  graphics  (e.g.,  figures,  tables),  and  multimedia  when  useful  to  aiding  comprehension.  

• I  can  introduce  a  topic,  and  build  complex  ideas  and  concepts  to  create  an  organized  and  unified  whole.  

• I  can  use  formatting,  graphics  and  multi-­‐media  to  aid  comprehension  when  useful.  

b.  Develop  the  topic  thoroughly  by  selecting  the  most  significant  and  relevant  facts,  extended  definitions,  concrete  details,  quotations,  or  other  information  and  examples  appropriate  to  the  audience’s  knowledge  of  the  topic.  

• I  can  identify  my  audience  and  use  relevant  concrete  details  (facts,  extended  definitions,  quotations,  or  other  information)  to  develop  the  topic  thoroughly.  

c.  Use  appropriate  and  varied  transitions  and  syntax  to  link  the  major  sections  of  the  text,  create  cohesion,  and  clarify  the  relationships  among  complex  ideas  and  concepts.  

• I  can  use  appropriate  and  varied  transitions  and  syntax  (sentence  fluency)  to  link  major  sections  of  the  text.  

• I  can  create  cohesion  and  clarify  relationships,  complex  ideas,  and  concepts  through  the  use  of  transitions.  

d.  Use  precise  language,  domain-­‐specific  vocabulary,  and  techniques  such  as  metaphor,  simile,  and  analogy  to  manage  the  complexity  of  the  topic.  

• I  can  use  precise  word  choice  and  relevant  vocabulary  to  direct  the  reader  through  the  topic.  

• I  can  use  metaphor,  simile,  and  analogy  to  direct  the  reader  through  the  topic.  e.    Establish  and  maintain  a  formal  style  and  objective  tone  while  attending  to  the  norms  and  conventions  of  the  discipline  in  which  they  are  writing.  

• I  can  use  correct  and  appropriate  conventions  in  my  writing.  

f.  Provide  a  concluding  statement  or  section  that  follows  from  and  supports  the  information  or  explanation  presented  (e.g.,  articulating  implications  or  the  significance  of  the  topic.)  

• I  can  provide  a  concluding  statement  that  supports  the  information  or  explanation  presented.  

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

SPEAKING  &  LISTENING  

SL  11–12.1  Initiate  and  participate  effectively  in  a  range  of  collaborative  discussions  (one-­‐on-­‐one,  in  groups,  and  teacher-­‐led)  with  diverse  partners  on  grades  11–12  topics,  texts,  and  issues,  building  on  others’  ideas  and  expressing  their  own  clearly  and  persuasively.  

• I  can  initiate  and  participate  effectively  in  a  range  of  collaborative  discussions.  (one-­‐on-­‐one,  in  groups,  teacher-­‐led).  

• I  can  initiate  and  participate  with  diverse  partners  on  grade  11  topics,  texts,  and  issues.  

• I  can  initiate  and  participate  in  discussions  and  build  on  others’  ideas.  • I  can  initiate  and  participate  in  discussions  and  express  my  own  ideas  clearly  and  

persuasively.  a.  Come  to  discussions  prepared,  having  read  and  researched  material  under  study;  explicitly  draw  on  that  preparation  by  referring  to  evidence  from  texts  and  other  research  on  the  topic  or  issue  to  stimulate  a  thoughtful,  well-­‐reasoned  exchange  of  ideas.  

• I  can  come  to  class  prepared,  having  read  and  researched  the  material.  • I  can  use  my  reading  and  research  as  evidence  for  a  thought,  well-­‐reasoned  

class  discussion.  

b.  Work  with  peers  to  promote  civil,  democratic  discussions  and  decision-­‐making,  set  clear  goals  and  deadlines,  and  establish  individual  roles  as  needed.  

• I  can  work  with  peers  to  help  create  a  civil  and  democratic  discussion  and  promote  decision-­‐making.  

• I  can  work  with  peers  to  set  clear  goals,  deadlines,  and  establish  individual  roles.  

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  c.  Propel  conversations  by  posing  and  responding  to  questions  that  probe  reasoning  and  evidence;  ensure  a  hearing  for  a  full  range  of  positions  on  a  topic  or  issue;  clarify,  verify,  or  challenge  ideas  and  conclusions;  and  promote  divergent  and  creative  perspectives.  

• I  can  pose  and  respond  to  questions  that  examine  reasoning  and  evidence.  • I  can  listen  to  a  variety  of  positions  on  a  topic  or  issue.  • I  can  clarify,  verify,  or  challenge  ideas  and  conclusions.  • I  can  promote  differing  and  creative  perspectives.  

d.  Respond  thoughtfully  to  diverse  perspectives;  synthesize  comments,  claims,  and  evidence  made  on  all  sides  of  an  issue;  resolve  contradictions  when  possible;  and  determine  what  additional  information  or  research  is  required  to  deepen  the  investigation  or  complete  the  task.  

• I  can  respond  thoughtfully  to  diverse  perspectives.  • I  can  blend  comments,  claims,  and  evidence  made  on  all  sides  of  an  issue.  • I  can  use  research  to  provide  additional  information  to  investigate,  resolve  

contradictions,  and  complete  the  task.     ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

LANGU

AGE  

L  11–12.3  Apply  knowledge  of  language  to  understand  how  language  functions  in  different  contexts,  to  make  effective  choices  for  meaning  or  style,  and  to  comprehend  more  fully  when  reading  or  listening.  

• I  can  understand  the  role  of  context  in  how  language  works  and  apply  to  my  understanding  when  reading  or  listening.  

• I  can  make  effective  language  choices  for  meaning  and  style.  a.  Vary  syntax  for  effect,  consulting  references  (e.g.,  Tufte’s  Artful  Sentences)  for  guidance  as  needed;  apply  an  understanding  of  syntax  to  the  study  of  complex  texts  when  reading.  

• I  can  use  a  variety  of  references  to  understand  syntax  (sentence  fluency)  when  reading  complex  texts.  

L  11-­‐12.4  c.  Consult  general  and  specialized  reference  materials  (e.g.,  dictionaries,  glossaries,  thesauruses),  both  print  and  digital,  to  find  the  pronunciation  of  a  word  or  determine  or  clarify  its  precise  meaning,  its  part  of  speech,  its  etymology,  or  its  standard  usage.  

• I  can  use  print  and  digital  references  to  determine  the  pronunciation,  precise  meaning,  part  of  speech,  etymology,  and  standard  use  of  words.  

d.  Verify  the  preliminary  determination  of  the  meaning  of  a  word  or  phrase  (e.g.,  by  checking  the  inferred  meaning  in  context  or  in  a  dictionary).  

• I  can  check  context  or  reference  materials  to  verify  the  meaning  of  a  word.  

                                             

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 Unit  1  Text  Resources  

 Literary   Informational    

Many  informational  and  non-­‐fiction  literary  resources  can  be  found  on  the  Canyons  School  District  Library  Wiki.    Native  American  Myths:      “How  the  World  Was  Made”  retold  by  James  Mooney  “The  Sky  Tree”  retold  by  Joseph  Bruchac  (L  770)*  from  The  Iroquois  Constitution  –  Dekanawida  (L  1350)  from  The  Life  of  Olaudah  Equiano  –  Olaudah  Equiano    The  Crucible  –  Arthur  Miller  (could  teach  this  for  Unit  6)  The  Scarlet  Letter  -­‐  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  (L  1340)    “Young  Goodman  Brown”  –  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  (L  1340)    Historical  information:  Joselit,  Jenna  Weissman.  "The  Free  Air  of  the  New  World:  The  Protestant  Immigrant  Experience."  Immigration  and  American  Religion.  May  2001:  n.p.  SIRS  Issues  Researcher.  Web.  08  Jun  2012.  (L  1360)                    CAUTION  -­‐  *  Indicates  that  the  Lexile  level  of  the  text  is  below  the  recommended  Lexile  range  for  that  grade  level.    

Many  informational  and  non-­‐fiction  literary  resources  can  be  found  on  the  Canyons  School  District  Library  Wiki.    About  The  Iroquois  Constitution  informational  article  (L  1280)      Excerpts  from  “Sinners  in  the  Hands  of  an  Angry  God”  by  Jonathan  Edwards  (L  1110)*    The  Myth;  American  Spectator  Vol.  41  No.  1,  Hasson,  Kevin  J.  "Seamu    (L  1140)*    Ethnic  Conflict:  Challenging  the  Myths;  Current  ,  Bowen,  John  R.  (L  1370)    A  Puritan's  'War  Against  Religion';  Los  Angeles  Times,  Barry,  John  M.  (L  1290)    The  Scarlet  Letter  Lives  On;  USA  TODAY  ,  Turley,  Jonathan  (L  1240)    Article  on  Arthur  Miller  and  McCarthyism    Hollywood  movie  The  Crucible  directed  by  Nicholas  Hytner  (L  1480)      Excellent  resource  to  informational  text  on  Salem  Witch  Trials  http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/salem.htm        (L  1050)*    Great,  short  informational  text  on  the  Salem  Witch  Trials  with  nice  paintings  http://www.salemwitchmuseum.com/education/    (L  1250)    John  Winthrop,  City  Upon  a  Hill,  1630    https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/winthrop.htm    (L  2590)      From  La  Relacion  by  Alvar  Nunez  Cabeza  de  Vaca    (L  820)*    On  Plymouth  Plantation  –  William  Bradford  (L  1340)            

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  1  

Glossary  of  Key  Terms    

Key  Term   Definition  ALLEGORY     A  metaphorical  narrative  in  prose  or  verse  in  which  the  characters  and  often  parts  of  the  narrative  itself  represent  moral  

and  spiritual  values  or  have  other  symbolic  meaning  (e.g.,  The  Pilgrim’s  Progress,  Animal  Farm).  ANALOGY   A  resemblance  in  some  particulars  between  things  otherwise  unlike;  inference  that  if  two  or  more  things  are  alike  in  

some  respects,  they  will  probably  agree  in  others;  a  comparison  based  on  such  resemblance.  ANALYSIS   Detailed  examination  of  the  elements  or  structure  of  something,  typically  as  a  basis  for  discussion  or  interpretation.  CULTURE   The  behaviors  and  beliefs  characteristic  of  a  particular  social,  ethnic,  or  age  group  

CONNOTATIVE  LANGUAGE  

The  emotional  association(s)  suggested  by  the  primary  meaning  of  a  lexical  unit,  which  affects  its  interpretations;  things  suggested  by  a  word  apart  from  the  thing  it  explicitly  names  or  describes.  

DENOTATIVE  LANGUAGE  

The  relationship  between  a  linguistic  event  and  its  referent,  as  the  word  book  denotes  the  object  “book.”  A  direct  specific  meaning,  as  distinct  from  an  implied  or  associated  idea.  

FIGURATIVE  LANGUAGE  

Language  that  deviates  from  a  standard  significance  or  sequence  of  words  in  order  to  achieve  a  special  meaning  or  effect  (e.g.,  similes  and  metaphors).  

IMAGERY   The  use  of  language  to  create  sensory  impressions;  the  “mental  pictures”  experienced  by  readers  while  listening  to  or  reading  a  story  or  poem.  

IRONY   A  literary  term  referring  to  the  discrepancy  between  the  appearance  and  reality  of  a  thing,  which  are  often  exact  opposites.  There  are  many  types  of  irony;  the  three  most  common  types  are  dramatic  irony,  situational  irony,  and  verbal  irony.  

• Dramatic  irony:  A  situation  in  a  play  or  narrative  in  which  the  audience  shares  with  the  author  knowledge  of  which  a  character  is  ignorant.  

• Situational  irony:  A  situation  when  a  character  laughs  at  a  misfortune  of  another  when  unbeknownst  to  him  the  same  misfortune  is  happening  to  him.  

• Verbal  irony:  A  situation  when  either  the  speaker  means  something  totally  different  than  what  he  is  saying.  Verbal  irony  also  occurs  when  a  character  says  something  in  jest  that,  in  actuality,  is  true.  

METAPHOR   A  figure  of  speech  in  which  a  word  or  phrase  literally  denoting  one  kind  of  object  or  idea  is  used  in  place  of  another  to  suggest  a  likeness  between  them;  a  figure  of  speech  in  which  a  comparison  is  implied  by  analogy,  but  is  not  stated  directly.  

OXYMORON   A  paradox  reduced  to  two  opposing  words,  usually  in  an  adjective-­‐noun  (deafening  silence)  or  adverb-­‐adjective  (shockingly  boring)  relationship,  and  is  used  for  effect,  complexity,  emphasis,  or  wit.  

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POINT  OF  VIEW   The  perspective  or  perspectives  established  by  an  author  through  which  the  reader  is  presented  with  the  characters,  actions,  setting,  and  events  that  constitute  the  narrative  in  a  work  of  fiction.  There  are  multiple  modes  of  point  of  view,  including:  

• First-­‐person  narration:  A  narrative  mode  where  a  story  is  told  by  one  character  at  a  time,  speaking  for  and  about  himself  or  herself.  The  narrator  may  be  a  minor  character  observing  the  action  or  the  main  protagonist  of  the  story.  A  first-­‐person  narrator  may  be  reliable  or  unreliable.  

• First-­‐person  perspective:  The  perspective  implicit  in  first-­‐person  narration,  intimate  on  the  one  hand  and  circumscribed  on  the  other.  

• Third-­‐person  narration:  A  narrative  mode  in  which  a  story  is  told  by  a  narrator  who  relates  all  action  in  third  person,  using  third-­‐person  pronouns  such  as  he  or  she.  

• Third-­‐person  omniscience:  A  method  of  storytelling  in  which  the  narrator  knows  the  thoughts  and  feelings  of  all  of  the  characters  in  the  story,  as  opposed  to  third  person  limited,  which  adheres  closely  to  the  thoughts  and  feelings  of  a  single  character.  

 

PROTESTANT  REFORMATION  

A  religious  movement  of  the  16th  century  that  began  as  an  attempt  to  reform  the  Roman  Catholic  Church  and  resulted  in  the  creation  of  Protestant  churches  

PURITANISM   The  principles  and  practices  of  a  movement  within  16th-­‐century  Anglicanism,  demanding  reforms  in  doctrine,  polity,  and  worship,  and  greater  strictness  in  religious  discipline,  chiefly  in  terms  of  Calvinist  principles.  

SIMILE   A  figure  of  speech  or  other  direct  comparison  of  two  things  that  are  dissimilar,  using  the  words  like  or  as  (or  other  words  of  comparison).  

TONE   The  author  or  narrator’s  attitude  reflected  in  the  style  of  the  text.  

                 

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 Unit 1 Planning and Notes

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  1  Com

mon  Form

ative  Assessment  

Figurative  Language  

Prompt:  Read  the  excerpt  from

 “Sinners  in  the  Hands  of  an  Angry  God”  by  Jonathan  

Edwards.  Then  w

rite  an  essay  in  which  you  analyze  the  strategies  Edw

ards  uses  to  achieve  his  purpose.  Support  your  analysis  w

ith  specific  references  to  the  text.  Address  three  of  the  follow

ing:  figurative  language  (similes,  m

etaphors,  etc.),  imagery  (sensory  details),  diction  

(specific  word  choice),  repetition,  and  allusions.  

 Remem

ber  to  add  adequate  commentary/analysis  as  to  w

hy  your  examples  are  significant  

and  important  for  Edw

ards  to  achieve  his  purpose.    w

ww

.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/history/.../edwards.sin

ners.htm

l The bow

of God's w

rath is bent, and the arrow m

ade ready on the string, and justice bends the arrow

at your heart, and strains the bow, and it is nothing but

the mere pleasure of G

od, and that of an angry God, w

ithout any promise or

obligation at all, that keeps the arrow one m

oment from

being made drunk w

ith your blood. Thus all you that never passed under a great change of heart, by the m

ighty power of the Spirit of G

od upon your souls; all you that were never born

again, and made new

creatures, and raised from being dead in sin, to a state of

new, and before altogether unexperienced light and life, are in the hands of an

angry God. H

owever you m

ay have reformed your life in m

any things, and may

have had religious affections, and may keep up a form

of religion in your families

and closets, and in the house of God, it is nothing but his m

ere pleasure that keeps you from

being this mom

ent swallow

ed up in everlasting destruction. H

owever unconvinced you m

ay now be of the truth of w

hat you hear, by and by you w

ill be fully convinced of it. Those that are gone from being in the like

circumstances w

ith you, see that it was so w

ith them; for destruction cam

e suddenly upon m

ost of them; w

hen they expected nothing of it, and while they

were saying, Peace and safety: now

they see, that those things on which they

depended for peace and safety, were nothing but thin air and em

pty shadows.

The God that holds you over the pit of hell, m

uch as one holds a spider, or some

loathsome insect over the fire, abhors you, and is dreadfully provoked: his w

rath tow

ards you burns like fire; he looks upon you as worthy of nothing else, but to

be cast into the fire; he is of purer eyes than to bear to have you in his sight; you are ten thousand tim

es more abom

inable in his eyes, than the most hateful

venomous serpent is in ours. You have offended him

infinitely more than ever a

stubborn rebel did his prince; and yet it is nothing but his hand that holds you from

falling into the fire every mom

ent. It is to be ascribed to nothing else, that

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you did not go to hell the last night; that you were suffered to aw

ake again in this w

orld, after you closed your eyes to sleep. And there is no other reason to be given, w

hy you have not dropped into hell since you arose in the morning,

but that God's hand has held you up. There is no other reason to be given w

hy you have not gone to hell, since you have sat here in the house of G

od, provoking his pure eyes by your sinful w

icked manner of attending his solem

n w

orship. Yea, there is nothing else that is to be given as a reason why you do

not this very mom

ent drop down into hell.

O sinner! Consider the fearful danger you are in: it is a great furnace of w

rath, a w

ide and bottomless pit, full of the fire of w

rath, that you are held over in the hand of that G

od, whose w

rath is provoked and incensed as much against you,

as against many of the dam

ned in hell. You hang by a slender thread, with the

flames of divine w

rath flashing about it, and ready every mom

ent to singe it, and burn it asunder; and you have no interest in any M

ediator, and nothing to lay hold of to save yourself, nothing to keep off the flam

es of wrath, nothing of your

own, nothing that you ever have done, nothing that you can do, to induce G

od to spare you one m

oment.

                                           

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Nam

e:_____________________________ Evaluating “Sinners in the H

ands of Angry G

od” Evidence from

Text C

omm

entary/Explanation D

evice #1

Device #2

Device #3

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  2  Theme:  A  New  Nation  

 In  this  unit  students  will  analyze  texts,  including  US  historical  documents  for  their  themes,  purposes,  and  rhetorical  features.  

 Essential  Question  

Supporting  Questions   Vocabulary   Writing  Focus  

Social  Studies  Connections  

How  did  the  philosophy  of  the  Age  of  Reason  influence  the  founding  of  America?  

• What  is  the  historical  background  of  the  Age  of  Reason  (Enlightenment)?  

• Who  were  key  figures  in  the  American  Enlightenment?  

• What  new  philosophies  formed  the  basis  of  the  Age  of  Reason?  

• How  did  the  philosophies  of  the  Age  of  Reason  affect  the  founding  of  the  United  States?  

• How  do  the  founders  use  rhetorical  devices  to  persuade  others?  

• What  are  the  most  effective  devices  to  use  in  argumentation?  

Words  for  Review:    Argumentation,  Claims,  Counter-­‐Claims,  Evidence,  Reasons    Tier  II:    Diction,  Rhetoric,  Ethos,  Logos,  Pathos,    Rhetorical  Device,  Structure,  Syntax  Bias    Tier  III:    Age  of  Reason,  Age  of  Enlightenment,  Nationalism  

Argument   How  is  the  development  of  the  United  States  form  of  gov’t,  a  compound  constitutional  republic?    

a.  What  are  the  philosophies  that  influenced  the  development  of  the  Constitution,  separation  of  powers,  balance  of  power,  and  the  elastic  clause?  

 b.  What  is  the  impact  of  the  Constitution’s  creation  on  the  United  States?  

   How  were  science  and  technology  involved  in  the  struggle  to  win  American  independence? (i.e.  telescope,  navigation  instruments  for  U.S.  Military,  road  and  canal  systems,  public  health  practices,  electricity,  invisible  ink)  

    ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

READING  

RL  11-­‐12.4:  Determine  the  meaning  of  words  and  phrases  as  they  are  used  in  the  text,  including  figurative  and  connotative  meanings;  analyze  the  impact  of  specific  word  choices  on  meaning  and  tone,  including  words  with  multiple  meanings  or  language  that  is  particularly  fresh,  engaging,  or  beautiful.  (Include  Shakespeare  as  well  as  other  authors.)  

• I  can  use  text  to  determine  the  meaning  of  words  and  phrases.          • I  can  determine  the  figurative  and  connotative  meaning  of  words  and  

phrases.  • I  can  determine  an  author's  tone  through  analysis  of  word  choice  and  

language.    • I  can  analyze  words  with  multiple  meanings.  

RI  11-­‐12.5:  Analyze  and  evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  the  structure  an  author  uses  in  his  or  her  exposition  or  argument,  including  whether  the  structure  makes  points  clear,  convincing,  and  engaging.  

• I  can  analyze  and  evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  the  author's  structure.  • I  can  analyze  and  evaluate  use  of  structure  in  creating  a  clear,  convincing,  and  

engaging  text.    

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RI  11-­‐12.8:  Delineate  and  evaluate  the  reasoning  in  seminal  U.S.  texts,  including  the  application  of  constitutional  principles  and  use  of  legal  reasoning  (e.g.,  in  U.S.  Supreme  Court  majority  opinions  and  dissents)  and  the  premises,  purposes,  and  arguments  in  works  of  public  advocacy  (e.g.,  The  Federalist,  presidential  addresses).  

• I  can  define  and  evaluate  the  reasoning  used  in  influential  U.  S.  texts  that  apply  constitutional  principals  and  legal  reasoning.    

• I  can  define  and  evaluate  the  premises,  purposes,  and  arguments  used  in  government  text.  

RI  11-­‐12.9:  Analyze  seventeenth-­‐,  eighteenth-­‐,  and  nineteenth-­‐century  foundational  U.S.  documents  of  historical  and  literary  significance  (including  The  Declaration  of  Independence,  the  Preamble  to  the  Constitution,  the  Bill  of  Rights,  and  Lincoln’s  Second  Inaugural  Address)  for  their  themes,  purposes,  and  rhetorical  features.    

• I  can  analyze  the  themes,  purposes,  and  rhetorical  features  used  in  important  seventeenth-­‐,  eighteenth,  and  nineteenth-­‐century  U.  S.  documents.  

• I  can  analyze  U.S.  documents  for  their  historical  and  literary  significance.  

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

WRITING  

Introduce      W  11-­‐12.1  Write  arguments  to  support  claims  in  an  analysis  of  substantive  topics  or  texts,  using  valid  reasoning  and  relevant  and  sufficient  evidence.  

• I  can  write  an  argument  using  valid  reasoning  with  relevant  and  sufficient  evidence.  

a.  Introduce  precise,  knowledgeable  claim(s),  establish  the  significance  of  the  claim(s),  distinguish  the  claim(s)  from  alternate  or  opposing  claims,  and  create  an  organization  that  logically  sequences  claim(s),  counterclaims,  reasons,  and  evidence.  

• I  can  identify  significant  and  opposing  arguments.  • I  can  logically  sequence  claims,  counterclaims,  reasons,  and  evidence.  

b.    Develop  claim(s)  and  counterclaims  fairly  and  thoroughly,  supplying  the  most  relevant  evidence  for  each  while  pointing  out  the  strengths  and  limitations  of  both  in  a  manner  that  anticipates  the  audience’s  knowledge  level,  concerns,  values,  and  possible  biases.  

• I  can  develop  claims  and  counterclaims  with  relevant  evidence.  • b.  I  can  identify  the  strengths  and  limitations  of  claims  and  counterclaims  

while  anticipating  the  audience's  knowledge  level,  concerns,  values,  and  possible  biases.  

c.    Use  words,  phrases,  and  clauses  as  well  as  varied  syntax  to  link  the  major  sections  of  the  text,  create  cohesion,  and  clarify  the  relationships  between  claim(s)  and  reasons,  between  reasons  and  evidence,  and  between  claim(s)  and  counterclaims.  

• I  can  use  syntax  (sentence  fluency)  to  clarify  the  relationships  among  my  claims,  reasons,  and  counterclaims.    

d.    Establish  and  maintain  a  formal  style  and  objective  tone  while  attending  to  the  norms  and  conventions  of  the  discipline  in  which  they  are  writing.  

• I  can  use  appropriate  style  and  tone  to  create  a  written  product.  • I  can  use  correct  and  appropriate  conventions  in  my  writing.  

e.  Provide  a  concluding  statement  or  section  that  follows  from  and  supports  the  argument  presented.  

• I  can  provide  a  concluding  statement  that  supports  my  argument.  

W  11-­‐12.5  Develop  and  strengthen  writing  as  needed  by  planning,  revising,  editing,  rewriting,  or  trying  a  new  approach,  focusing  on  addressing  what  is  most  significant  for  a  specific  purpose  and  audience.  (Editing  for  conventions  should  demonstrate  command  of  Language  standards  1–3  up  to  and  including  grades  11–12  on  page  54.)    

• I  can  use  multiple  techniques  of  editing  and  revision  to  develop  writing  pieces  with  purpose.  

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

SPEAKING  

&  

LISTENING   SL  11-­‐12.4:  Present  information,  findings,  and  supporting  evidence,  conveying  a  clear  and  distinct  perspective,  such  that  listeners  can  follow  the  line  of  reasoning,  alternative  or  opposing  perspectives  are  addressed,  and  the  organization,  development,  substance,  and  style  are  appropriate  to  purpose,  audience,  and  a  range  or  formal  and  informal  tasks.  

• I  can  present  the  information  and  supporting  evidence  to  convey  a  clear  point  of  view.  

• I  can  present  information  so  that  listeners  can  follow  my  line  of  reasoning.  • I  can  address  alternative  or  opposing  perspectives.  • I  can  use  appropriate  organization,  development,  substance,  and  style  to  

establish  a  purpose  and  audience.  

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  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  LANGU

AGE  

L  11-­‐12.1  Demonstrate  command  of  the  conventions  of  standard  English  grammar  and  usage  when  writing  or  speaking.  

• I  can  correctly  use  Standard  English  conventions,  grammar,  and  usage  in  writing  and  speaking.  

a.  Apply  the  understanding  that  usage  is  a  matter  of  convention,  can  change  over  time,  and  is  sometimes  contested.  

• I  can  understand  that  usage  changes  throughout  time  and  apply  it  appropriately.  

b.  Resolve  issues  of  complex  or  contested  usage,  consulting  references  (e.g.,  Merriam-­‐Webster’s  Dictionary  of  English  Usage,  Garner’s  Modern  American  Usage)  as  needed.  

• I  can  use  references  to  resolve  issues  of  complex  and  contested  usage.  

 Unit  2  Text  Resources  

 Literary   Informational    

Letters:    Abigail  Adam’s  letter  to  John  Adams  (“Don’t  forget  the  ladies…”);  http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?document=278    (L  1130)  *        Benjamin  Banneker’s  Letter  to  Thomas  Jefferson  (L  1820);      Thomas  Jefferson’s  Letter  to  Benjamin  Banneker    (L  1780)      Other:    Sayings  of  Poor  Richard  by  Benjamin  Franklin  (L  630)*    The  Midnight  Ride  of  Paul  Revere  by  Henry  Wadsworth  Longfellow  http://www.nationalcenter.org/PaulRevere%27sRide.html    (L  1720)      Washington  Crossing  the  Delaware  (painting)  by  Emanuel  Leutze  clips  from  HBO’s  John  Adams  (i.e.  Adam’s  defense  of  the  British  soldiers  after  the  Boston  Massacre)      The  CSD  Media  Wiki  site  has  links  to  most  of  the  above  listed  items  plus  additional  links  to  other  texts  that  would  fit  this  unit.    CAUTION  -­‐  *  Indicates  that  the  Lexile  level  of  the  text  is  below  the  recommended  Lexile  range  for  that  grade  level.    

Speeches  Speech  to  the  Virginia  Convention  by  Patrick  Henry  (L  850)*    Documents  Excerpts  from  Common  Sense  by  Thomas  Paine  (L  1330)    Declaration  of  Independence  by  Thomas  Jefferson  (L  1252)  Preamble  to  the  Constitution  by  James  Madison    (L  1930)    Federalist  No.  10  by  James  Madison  (L  1450)    George  Washington’s  Farewell  Address  http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/washing.asp      (L  1630)      Great  information  about  speeches  as  argument  here    The  CSD  Media  Wiki  site  has  links  to  most  of  the  above  listed  items  plus  additional  links  to  other  texts  that  would  fit  this  unit.  

           

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  2  

Glossary  of  Key  Terms  Key  Term   Definition  

AGE  OF  ENLIGHTENMENT  

An  intellectual  and  scientific  movement  of  18th  century  Europe  which  was  characterized  by  a  rational  and  scientific  approach  to  religious,  social,  political,  and  economic  issues.    

AGE  OF  REASON   An  era  in  which  rationalism  prevails,  especially  the  period  of  the  Enlightenment  in  England,  France,  and  the  United  States.    An  age  at  which  a  person  is  considered  capable  of  making  reasoned  judgments.      

ARGUMENTATION   A  type  of  discourse  in  speech  or  writing  that  debates  or  simply  develops  a  topic  in  a  logical  way.    

BIAS   Prejudice  in  favor  of  or  against  one  thing,  person,  or  group  compared  with  another,  usually  in  a  way  considered  to  be  unfair.  

CLAIMS   An  assertion  of  the  truth  of  something  COUNTER-­‐CLAIMS   A  claim  made  to  rebut  a  previous  claim  

DICTION   In  writing,  the  careful  choice  of  words  based  on  their  correctness,  clarity,  or  effectiveness.  ETHOS,  PATHOS,  

LOGOS  In  Aristotle’s  Rhetoric,  a  speaker  appeals  to  any  of  these  three  in  order  to  persuade  the  audience:  emotion  (pathos),  logic  and  language  (logos),  credibility  or  authority  (ethos).  Each  of  these  terms  has  broader  meanings  in  other  contexts.  

EVIDENCE   Facts,  figures,  details,  quotations,  or  other  sources  of  data  and  information  that  provide  support  for  claims  or  an  analysis  and  that  can  be  evaluated  by  others.  It  should  be  in  a  form  and  be  derived  from  a  source  accepted  as  appropriate  to  a  particular  discipline.  

NATIONALISM   1.  Devotion  to  the  interests  or  culture  of  one's  nation.  2.  The  belief  that  nations  will  benefit  from  acting  independently  rather  than  collectively,  emphasizing  national  rather  than  international  goals.  

REASONS   A  cause,  explanation,  or  justification  for  an  action  or  event.  

RHETORIC   The  art  of  using  language  effectively,  especially  for  persuasion,  in  speaking  or  writing,  especially  in  oratory.  

RHETORICAL  DEVICE   Rhetoric  is  the  art  of  effective  expression  and  the  persuasive  use  of  language;  rhetorical  devices  are  specific,  effective  uses  of  language  that  may  influence  or  persuade  an  audience  (e.g.,  rhetorical  questions,  repetition,  and  extended  analogies).  

STRUCTURE   Framework  of  a  work  of  literature;  the  organization  or  over-­‐all  design  of  a  work.  The  structure  of  a  play  may  fall  into  logical  divisions  and  also  a  mechanical  division  of  acts  and  scenes.  

SYNTAX   The  grammatical  principles  by  which  words  are  used  in  phrases  and  sentences  to  construct  meaningful  combinations.  

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Unit  2  Planning  and  Notes  

 

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 Eleventh  Grade  Unit  3  Theme:  American  Romanticism  

 In  this  unit  students  will  analyze  texts,  including  philosophies  that  influenced  American  Romanticism.  

 Essential  Question   Supporting  Questions   Vocabulary   Writing  

Focus  Social  Studies  Connections  

What  philosophies  influenced  American  individualism?  

• What  is  American  Romanticism?    • What  characteristics  do  American  

Romanticism  and  Transcendentalism  share  and  how  are  they  different?    

• What  were  the  philosophies  from  this  time  period  that  inspired  literary  thought  in  the  world  and  the  United  States?    

• How  do  American  writers  differentiate  themselves  from  British  writers  during  the  American  Romantic  movement?    

Words  for  Review:    Abolition    Tier  II:        Tier  III:    Realism,  Romanticism,  Self-­‐Reliance,  Transcendentalism,  Utopian  Societies  Naturalism,  Optimism,,  “Fireside  Poets,”  Individualism,  Manifest  Destiny  

Argument  Narrative  

What  was  pre-­‐Reconstruction  America  like?    How  did  the  United  States’  form  of  government,  a  compound  constitutional  republic,  and  its  institutions  and  politics,  get  developed?    How  did  the  American  government  and  politics  develop  from  the  Federalist  period  through  Jacksonian  democracy?    What  were  the  scientific  developments  from  this  time  period  that  inspired  literary  thought  in  the  world  and  US?

    ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

READING  

RL  11-­‐12.2:  Determine  two  or  more  themes  or  central  ideas  of  a  text  and  analyze  their  development  over  the  course  of  the  text,  including  how  they  interact  and  build  on  one  another  to  produce  a  complex  account;  provide  an  objective  summary  of  the  text.  

• I  can  determine  two  or  more  themes  of  a  text  and  analyze  their  development  over  the  course  of  a  text.  

• I  can  determine  how  texts  interact  and  build  on  one  another  to  produce  a  complex  account.  

• I  can  provide  an  unbiased  summary  of  the  text.  RL  11-­‐12.9:  Demonstrate  knowledge  of  eighteenth-­‐,  nineteenth-­‐,  and  early-­‐twentieth-­‐century  foundational  works  of  American  literature,  including  how  two  or  more  texts  from  the  same  period  treat  similar  themes  or  topics.  

• I  can  identify  similar  themes  or  topics  in  two  or  more  texts  from  the  same  time  period.    

• I  can  demonstrate  knowledge  of  eighteenth-­‐,  nineteenth-­‐,  and  early-­‐twentieth-­‐century  foundational  works  of  American  literature.  

RI  11-­‐12.5:  Analyze  and  evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  the  structure  an  author  uses  in  his  or  her  exposition  or  argument,  including  whether  the  structure  makes  points  clear,  convincing,  and  engaging  advocacy  (e.g.,  The  Federalist,  presidential  addresses).  

• I  can  analyze  and  evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  the  author's  structure.  • I  can  analyze  and  evaluate  use  of  structure  in  creating  a  clear,  convincing,  

and  engaging  text.  

RI  11-­‐12.2:  Determine  two  or  more  central  ideas  of  a  text  and  analyze  their  development  over  the  course  of  the  text,  including  how  they  interact  and  build  on  one  another  to  provide  a  complex  analysis;  provide  an  objective  summary  of  the  text.    

• I  can  examine  how  the  author  chooses  to  structure  the  text.    • I  can  determine  how  the  structure  contributes  to  the  meaning  of  the  text.    • I  can  evaluate  the  style  of  the  text  and  how  it  adds  to  the  meaning  of  the  

text.  

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  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  WRITING  

 Extend  W  11-­‐12.1  Write  arguments  to  support  claims  in  an  analysis  of  substantive  topics  or  texts,  using  valid  reasoning  and  relevant  and  sufficient  evidence.  

• I  can  write  an  argument  using  valid  reasoning  with  relevant  and  sufficient  evidence.  

 a.  Introduce  precise,  knowledgeable  claim(s),  establish  the  significance  of  the  claim(s),  distinguish  the  claim(s)  from  alternate  or  opposing  claims,  and  create  an  organization  that  logically  sequences  claim(s),  counterclaims,  reasons,  and  evidence.  

• I  can  identify  significant  and  opposing  arguments.  • I  can  logically  sequence  claims,  counterclaims,  reasons,  and  evidence.    

b.    Develop  claim(s)  and  counterclaims  fairly  and  thoroughly,  supplying  the  most  relevant  evidence  for  each  while  pointing  out  the  strengths  and  limitations  of  both  in  a  manner  that  anticipates  the  audience’s  knowledge  level,  concerns,  values,  and  possible  biases.  

• I  can  develop  claims  and  counterclaims  with  relevant  evidence.  • I  can  identify  the  strengths  and  limitations  of  claims  and  counterclaims  

while  anticipating  the  audience's  knowledge  level,  concerns,  values,  and  possible  biases.  

 c.    Use  words,  phrases,  and  clauses  as  well  as  varied  syntax  to  link  the  major  sections  of  the  text,  create  cohesion,  and  clarify  the  relationships  between  claim(s)  and  reasons,  between  reasons  and  evidence,  and  between  claim(s)  and  counterclaims.  

• I  can  use  syntax  (sentence  fluency)  to  clarify  the  relationships  among  my  claims,  reasons,  and  counterclaims.  

 

d.    Establish  and  maintain  a  formal  style  and  objective  tone  while  attending  to  the  norms  and  conventions  of  the  discipline  in  which  they  are  writing.  

• I  can  use  appropriate  style  and  tone  to  create  a  written  product.  • I  can  use  correct  and  appropriate  conventions  in  my  writing.    

e.  Provide  a  concluding  statement  or  section  that  follows  from  and  supports  the  argument  presented.  

• I  can  provide  a  concluding  statement  that  supports  my  argument.    

Introduce  W.11-­‐12.3:  Write  narratives  to  develop  real  or  imagined  experiences  or  events  using  effective  technique,  well-­‐chosen  details,  and  well-­‐structured  event  sequences.  

• I  can  write  a  logical,  detailed  narrative  about  real  or  imagined  events  or  experiences.  

a.  Engage  and  orient  the  reader  by  setting  out  a  problem,  situation,  or  observation  and  its  significance,  establishing  one  or  multiple  point(s)  of  view,  and  introducing  a  narrator  and/or  characters;  create  a  smooth  progression  of  experiences  or  events.  

• I  can  create  a  problem,  situation,  or  observation  that  is  engaging  and  communicate  its  importance  to  the  reader.  

• I  can  establish  one  or  more  points  of  view  and  introduce  a  narrator  and/or  characters.  

• I  can  create  a  smooth  chain  of  experiences  or  events  throughout  my  narrative.  

b.  Use  narrative  techniques,  such  as  dialogue,  pacing,  description,  reflection,  and  multiple  plot  lines,  to  develop  experiences,  events,  and/or  characters.  

• I  can  use  narrative  techniques  (such  as  dialogue,  pacing,  description,  reflection,  and  multiple  plot  lines)  to  develop  experiences,  events,  and/or  characters.  

c.  Use  a  variety  of  techniques  to  sequence  events  so  that  they  build  on  one  another  to  create  a  coherent  whole  and  build  toward  a  particular  tone  and  outcome  (e.g.,  a  sense  of  mystery,  suspense,  growth,  or  resolution).  

• I  can  use  a  variety  of  techniques  to  sequence  events  that  build  on  one  another  to  create  a  meaningful  whole  and  build  toward  a  particular  tone  and  outcome.  

d.  Use  precise  words  and  phrases,  telling  details,  and  sensory  language  to  convey  a  vivid  picture  of  the  experiences,  events,  setting,  and/or  characters.  

• I  can  use  precise  words  and  phrases,  telling  details,  and  sensory  language  to  convey  a  vivid  picture  of  the  events,  setting,  and/or  characters.  

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e.  Provide  a  conclusion  that  follows  from  and  reflects  on  what  is  experienced,  observed,  or  resolved  over  the  course  of  the  narrative.  

• I  can  write  a  conclusion  that  reflects  on  what  is  experienced  and  resolved  over  the  course  of  the  narrative.  

 

W.11-­‐12.9.  Draw  evidence  from  literary  or  informational  texts  to  support  analysis,  reflection,  and  research.  

 • I  can  draw  evidence  from  literary  or  informational  texts  to  support  

analysis,  reflection,  and  research.  

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

SPEAKING  &    

LISTENING  

SL  11-­‐12.4  Present  information,  findings,  and  supporting  evidence,  conveying  a  clear  and  distinct  perspective,  such  that  listeners  can  follow  the  line  of  reasoning,  alternative  or  opposing  perspectives  are  addressed,  and  the  organization,  development,  substance,  and  style  are  appropriate  to  purpose,  audience,  and  a  range  or  formal  and  informal  tasks.  

• I  can  present  the  information  and  supporting  evidence  to  convey  a  clear  point  of  view.  

• I  can  present  information  so  listeners  can  follow  my  line  of  reasoning.  • I  can  address  alternative  or  opposing  perspectives.  • I  can  use  appropriate  organization,  development,  substance,  and  style  to  

establish  a  purpose  and  audience.  SL  11-­‐12.2  Integrate  multiple  sources  of  information  presented  in  diverse  formats  and  media  (e.g.,  visually,  quantitatively,  orally)  in  order  to  make  informed  decisions  and  solve  problems,  evaluating  the  credibility  and  accuracy  of  each  source  and  noting  any  discrepancies  among  the  data.  

• I  can  include  multiple  sources  of  information,  in  a  variety  of  formats  and  media,  to  make  decisions  and  solve  problems.  

• I  can  evaluate  the  credibility  of  sources  and  note  the  differences  among  the  sources.  

     

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

LANGU

AGE  

L  11-­‐12.4  Determine  or  clarify  the  meaning  of  unknown  and  multiple-­‐meaning  words  and  phrases  based  on  grades  11–12  reading  and  content,  choosing  flexibly  from  a  range  of  strategies.  

• I  can  determine,  through  a  variety  of  strategies,  the  meaning  of  unknown  and  multiple-­‐meaning  words.  

a.    Use  context  (e.g.,  the  overall  meaning  of  a  sentence,  paragraph,  or  text;  a  word’s  position  or  function  in  a  sentence)  as  a  clue  to  the  meaning  of  a  word  or  phrase.  

• I  can  use  context  to  determine  the  meaning  of  a  word  or  phrase.  

b.    Identify  and  correctly  use  patterns  of  word  changes  that  indicate  different  meanings  or  parts  of  speech  (e.g.,  conceive,  conception,  conceivable).  

• I  can  consult  reference  materials  to  find  the  pronunciation  of  a  word  or  determine  or  clarify  its  precise  meaning,  part  of  speech,  development,  or  its  standard  usage.  

                           

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Unit  3  Text  Resources    

Literary   Informational    Numerous  resources  can  be  found  on  the  Canyons  District  wikispace:    Additional  literature  choices  include:    Short  Stories:    “Minister’s  Black  Veil  “,  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  (L  1230)  “Young  Goodman  Brown  “,  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  (L  1070)*  “Tell  Tale  Heart,“  Edgar  Allen  Poe  (L  820)*  “Legend  of  Sleepy  Hollow”,  Washington  Irving  (L  1219)  “The  Fall  of  the  House  of  Usher”,  Edgar  Allen  Poe  (L  1310)  “Rip  Van  Winkle”,  Washington  Irving    (L  930)*  “The  Devil  and  Tom  Walker”,  Washington  Irving  (L  1090)*  Novels:    The  Scarlet  Letter,  Nathaniel  Hawthorne  (L  1340)    Little  Women,  Louisa  Alcott  (L  1210)  *  Uncle  Tom’s  Cabin,  Hariett  Beecher  Stowe  (L  1050)*    Moby-­‐Dick,  Herman  Melville  (L  1200)  *  Poems:    “Midnight  Ride  of  Paul  Revere”,  Henry  Wadsworth  Longfellow    (L  1720)    “I  hear  America  Singing”,  Walt  Whitman    (L  2670)    “Song  of  Myself”,  Walt  Whitman  (L  1490)    Excerpts  from  “Tintern  Abby”,  Wordsworth  (L  1080)*    “The  Raven,”  Edgar  Allen  Poe  (L  1330)    *Various  poems  by  Emily  Dickinson:  see  CSD  wikispace    Walden,  Henry  David  Thoreau  (L  1320)    CAUTION  -­‐  *  Indicates  that  the  Lexile  level  of  the  text  is  below  the  recommended  Lexile  range  for  that  grade  level.  

Essays:    “Nature”,  Ralph  Waldo  Emerson  (L  920)*  “Self-­‐Reliance”,  Ralph  Waldo  Emerson    (L  1020)*  “Civil  Disobedience”,  Henry  David  Thoreau    (L  970)*  “The  Great  Lawsuit.  Man  versus  Men.    Woman  versus  Women”,  Margaret  Fuller  (L  1140)*      “Declaration  of  Sentiments”;  Seneca  Falls  Convention  (L  1275)  The  Biological  Basis  of  Morality;  Atlantic  Monthly  ,  Wilson,  Edward  O.  (L  1230)    "Making  Free":  African  Americans  and  the  Civil  War,  Francis  H.  Kennedy,    (L  1310)    “Manifest  Destiny”,  Frank  Caso,        (L  1320)  

“Tim  DeChristopher's  courageous  bid  to  save  our  world”  http://articles.latimes.com/keyword/civil-­‐disobedience      (L  1690)    

July  26,  2011  The  Los  Angeles  Times  |By  Peter  Yarrow  (L  1320)  (Use  in  connection  with  Civil  Disobedience.)  

                   

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  3  

Glossary  of  Key  Terms  Key  Term   Definition  

FIRESIDE  POETS   The  group  is  typically  thought  to  comprise  Henry  Wadsworth  Longfellow,  William  Cullen  Bryant,  John  Greenleaf  Whittier,  James  Russell  Lowell,  and  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes,  Sr.,  who  were  the  first  American  poets  whose  popularity  rivaled  that  of  British  poets  

INDIVIDUALISM   A  doctrine  holding  that  the  interests  of  the  individual  are  or  ought  to  be  ethically  paramount  to  those  of  others  and  that  all  values,  rights,  and  duties  originate  in  individuals;  a  theory  maintaining  the  political  and  economic  independence  of  the  individual  and  stressing  individual  initiative,  action,  and  interests.  

MANIFEST  DESTINY   A  future  event  justified  by  some  as  inevitable;  specifically,  the  mid-­‐nineteenth-­‐century  expansion  of  the  United  States  to  the  Pacific.  

NATURALISM   A  pronounced  interest  in,  sympathy  with,  or  love  of  natural  beauty.  In  literature,  naturalism  developed  from  realism.  It  is  used  primarily  to  describe  works  that  use  realistic  subjects  and  embody  the  belief  that  everything  in  nature  can  be  explained  by  natural  and  material  causes,  not  by  supernatural  causes.  

OPTIMISM   a  disposition  or  tendency  to  look  on  the  more  favorable  side  of  events  or  conditions  and  to  expect  the  most  favorable  outcome.  

PARADOX   A  statement  that  seems  on  its  face  to  be  self-­‐contradictory  or  absurd  yet  turns  out  to  have  valid  meaning  and  to  reveal  an  element  of  truth.  

REALISM   In  literature  and  art,  the  depiction  of  subjects  as  they  appear  in  everyday  life;  detailed  and  precise  descriptions;  close  adherence  to  what  is  possible  and  plausible;  the  faithful  rendition  of  things,  without  embellishment.  Realism  is  often  found  in  combination  with  other  styles  and  modes.    

ROMANTICISM   A  literary,  artistic,  and  philosophical  movement  beginning  in  the  second  half  of  the  late  eighteenth  century.  Romanticism  reacted  against  the  extremes  of  rationalism  by  emphasizing  strong  emotion,  irrationality,  imagination,  individuality,  and  aspects  of  life  that  cannot  be  determined  or  explained  by  science.  

SELF-­‐RELIANCE   Reliance  on  one's  own  capabilities,  judgment,  or  resources;  independence  

TRANSCENDENTALISM   A  literary  and  philosophical  movement,  associated  with  Ralph  Waldo  Emerson  and  Margaret  Fuller,  asserting  the  existence  of  an  ideal  spiritual  reality  that  transcends  the  empirical  and  scientific  and  is  knowable  through  intuition.  

UTOPIAN  SOCIETY   An  impractical,  idealistic  scheme  for  social  and  political  reform.  

 

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Unit  3  Planning  and  Notes  

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  3  Com

mon  Form

ative  Assessment  

Transcendentalist  Themes    

Prompt:  

After  reading,  “My  Sym

phony”,  “The  Young  American”,  and  view

ing  the  cartoon,  write  an  essay  

identifying  three  Transcendentalist  themes  w

ithin  the  texts  (self-­‐reliance,  optimism

,  individualism,  non-­‐

conformity,  patriotism

,  and/or  the  importance  of  nature).    For  each  body  paragraph,  select  a  them

e  and  use  evidence  from

 the  text  to  demonstrate  how

 the  theme  is  evident  w

ithin  each  text.      Article  #1  Title:    M

y  Symphony  by  W

illiam  Ellery  Channing  

 “To  live  content  with  sm

all  means.    

To  seek  elegance  rather  than  luxury,            and  refinem

ent  rather  than  fashion.    To  be  w

orthy  not  respectable,            and  w

ealthy  not  rich.    To  study  hard,  think  quietly,  talk  gently,            act  frankly,  to  listen  to  stars,  birds,  babes,            and  sages  w

ith  open  heart,  to  bear  all  cheerfully,            do  all  bravely,  aw

ait  occasions,  hurry  never.    In  a  w

ord,  to  let  the  spiritual,            unbidden  and  unconscious,            grow

 up  through  the  common.  

This  is  to  be  my  sym

phony.”    Source:  Channing,  W

illiam  Ellery.  "M

y  Symphony  by  W

illiam  Ellery  Channing  Classic  Fam

ous  Poet  -­‐  All  Poetry.  ."  All  Poetry  -­‐  poets  publish  in  a  free  online  com

munity,  fun  supportive  cash  contests  at  allpoetry.  N

.p.,  n.d.  Web.  11  June  2012.  <http://allpoetry.com

/poem/8557243-­‐M

y_Symphony-­‐by-­‐W

illiam_Ellery_Channing>.  

 

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Article  #2  Title:  The  Young  Am

erican  

A  LECTURE  READ  BEFORE  THE  M

ERCANTILE  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION

,  BOSTON,  FEBRUARY  7,  1844.  -­‐  

Ralph  Waldo  Em

erson,  The  Works  of  Ralph  W

aldo  Emerson,  vol.  1  (N

ature,  Addresses,  and  Lectures)[1909]  

I  call  upon  you,  young  men,  to  obey  your  heart  and  be  the  nobility  of  this  land.  In  every  age  of  the  w

orld  there  has  been  a  leading  nation,  one  of  a  m

ore  generous  sentiment,  w

hose  eminent  citizens  w

ere  willing  

to  stand  for  the  interests  of  general  justice  and  humanity,  at  the  risk  of  being  called,  by  the  m

en  of  the  mom

ent,  chimerical  and  fantastic.  W

hich  should  be  that  nation  but  these  States?  Which  should  lead  that  

movem

ent,  if  not  New  England?  W

ho  should  lead  the  leaders,  but  the  Young  American?  The  people,  and  

the  world,  are  now

 suffering  from  the  w

ant  of  religion  and  honor  in  its  public  mind.  In  Am

erica,  out-­‐of-­‐doors  all  seem

s  a  market;  in-­‐doors  an  air-­‐tight  stove  of  conventionalism

.  Every  body  who  com

es  into  our  houses  savors  of  these  habits;  the  m

en,  of  the  market  ;  the  w

omen,  of  the  custom

.  I  find  no  expression  in  our  state  papers  or  legislative  debate,  in  our  lyceum

s  or  churches,  especially  in  our  newspapers,  of  a  high  

national  feeling,  no  lofty  counsels  that  rightfully  stir  the  blood.  I  speak  of  those  organs  which  can  be  

presumed  to  speak  a  popular  sense.  They  recom

mend  conventional  virtues,  w

hatever  will  earn  and  

preserve  property;  always  the  capitalist  ;  the  college,  the  church,  the  hospital,  the  theatre,  the  hotel,  the  

road,  the  ship  of  the  capitalist,  —  whatever  goes  to  secure,  adorn,  enlarge  these  is  good;  w

hat  jeopardizes  any  of  these  is  dam

nable.  ****The  'opposition'  papers,  so  called,  are  on  the  same  side.  They  attack  the  

great  capitalist,  but  with  the  aim

 to  make  a  capitalist  of  the  poor  m

an.  The  opposition  is  against  those  who  

have  money,  from

 those  who  w

ish  to  have  money.  But  w

ho  announces  to  us  in  journal,  or  in  pulpit,  or  in  the  street,  the  secret  of  heroism

?      “M

an  alone    Can  perform

 the  impossible.”  

 Source:  

"Online  Library  of  Liberty  -­‐  THE  YOUN

G  AMERICAN

.  A  LECTURE  READ  BEFORE  THE  M

ERCANTILE  

LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION,  BOSTON

,  FEBRUARY  7,  1844.  -­‐  The  Works  of  Ralph  W

aldo  Emerson,  vol.  1  

(Nature,  Addresses,  and  Lectures)."  Online  Library  of  Liberty  -­‐  Front  Page.  N

.p.,  n.d.  Web.  11  June  2012.  

<http://oll.libertyfund.org/?option=com_staticxt&

staticfile=show.ph  

 

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Optional  Source  #3  

 Source:  

"Honors  English:  Transcendentalist  Com

ic  Strips."  Honors  English.  N

.p.,  n.d.  Web.  11  June  2012.  

<http://jazzman966.blogspot.com

/2010/10/calvin-­‐and-­‐hobbes-­‐transcendentalism.htm

l>.  

                         

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Nam

e______________________________________________________    

 Transcendentalist  Them

es  Essay  Graphic  Organizer  

Transcendentalist

Theme

Evidence from Text (at least tw

o) C

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  4  Theme:  A  Troubled  Young  Nation    

In  this  unit  students  will  integrate  and  evaluate  several  sources  to  determine  how  the  19th  century  shaped  Americans.    

Essential  Question   Supporting  Questions   Key  Terms   Writing  Focus  

Cross-­‐Curricular  Connections  

How  did  the  19th  Century  shape  what  it  means  to  be  an  American?  

• How  did  regionalism  affect  the  themes,  subject  matter,  dialect,  and  style  of  American  writing  in  the  19th  century?  

• How  did  authors  of  the  time  period,  particularly  Mark  Twain,  reveal  and  reflect  the  culture  and  conflict  of  the  era?  

• How  did  the  Civil  War  reshape  American  society,  beliefs,  and  identity?  

• How  did  the  western  expansion  impact  the  country  and  its  culture?  

• How  did  the  Civil  War  and  the  Reconstruction  period  address  racism  in  America?  

 

Words  for  Review:    Abolition,  Mood    Tier  II:    Autobiography,  Biography,  Dialect,  Naturalism,  Realism,  Regionalism,  Satire      Tier  III:    Abolition,  Antebellum  

Narrative  Argument  

• Where,  how,  and  why  did  pre-­‐Reconstruction  America  expand?  

• Where,  how,  and  why  did  the  United  States  grow  and  divide  from  1820-­‐1877?  

• How  and  why  did  the  United  States  expand  and  grow  from  the  Atlantic  to  the  Pacific?  

• What  sectional  differences  developed  during  the  antebellum  period?  

• What  were  the  causes,  course,  and  consequences  of  the  Civil  War?  

• What  were  the  successes  and  failures  of  the  Reconstruction  period  following  the  Civil  War?  

• What  were  the  successes  and  failures  of  the  Reconstruction  period  following  the  Civil  War?  

• What  were  the  United  States’  policies  relating  to  American  Indians?    

How  did  advancements  in  science  shape  American  during  the  19th  century?

    ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

   

READING  

 

RL  11-­‐12.2  Determine  two  or  more  themes  or  central  ideas  of  a  text  and  analyze  their  development  over  the  course  of  the  text,  including  how  they  interact  and  build  on  one  another  to  produce  a  complex  account;  provide  an  objective  summary  of  the  text.    

• I  can  identify  two  or  more  themes  or  central  ideas  in  a  text  and  identify  how  they  work  together  to  create  a  complex  piece.  

• I  can  provide  an  objective  summary  of  a  text.  

RL  11-­‐12.3  Analyze  the  impact  of  the  author’s  choices  regarding  how  to  develop  and  relate  elements  of  a  story  or  drama  (e.g.,  where  a  story  is  set,  how  the  action  is  ordered,  how  the  characters  are  introduced  and  developed).  

• I  can  analyze  how  the  author's  choices  impact  the  development  of  a  story  or  drama.  

RI  11-­‐12.5  Analyze  and  evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  the  structure  an  author  uses  in  his  or  her  exposition  or  argument,  including  whether  the  structure  makes  points  clear,  convincing,  and  engaging.  

• I  can  analyze  and  evaluate  the  author's  use  of  structure  in  creating  an  effective  argument  or  exposition.  

• I  can  analyze  and  evaluate  the  author's  use  of  structure  to  create  a  clear,  convincing,  and  engaging  piece.    

RI  11-­‐12.4  Determine  the  meaning  of  words  and  phrases  as  they  are  used  in  a  text,  including  figurative,  connotative,  and  technical  meanings;  analyze  how  an  author  uses  and  refines  the  meaning  of  a  key  term  or  terms  over  the  course  of  a  text  (e.g.,  how  Madison  defines  “faction”  in  Federalist  No.  10).  

• I  can  determine  the  meaning  of  words  and  phrases.  • I  can  determine  the  figurative  and  connotative  meaning  of  words  and  

phrases.  • I  can  analyze  how  an  author  can  refine  the  meaning  of  key  terms  in  a  text.  

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RI.11-­‐12.4.  Determine  the  meaning  of  words  and  phrases  as  they  are  used  in  a  text,  including  figurative,  connotative,  and  technical  meanings;  analyze  how  an  author  uses  and  refines  the  meaning  of  a  key  term  or  terms  over  the  course  of  a  text  (e.g.,  how  Madison  defines  faction  in  Federalist  No.  10).  

• I  can  determine  the  meaning  of  words  and  phrases  as  they  are  used  in  a  text,  including  figurative,  connotative,  and  technical  meanings.  

• I  can  analyze  how  an  author  uses  and  refines  the  meaning  of  a  key  term  or  terms  over  the  course  of  a  text.  

RI.11-­‐12.7.  Integrate  and  evaluate  multiple  sources  of  information  presented  in  different  media  or  formats  (e.g.,  visually,  quantitatively)  as  well  as  in  words  in  order  to  address  a  question  or  solve  a  problem.  

 

• I  can  evaluate  multiple  sources  of  information  presented  in  different  media  or  formats  to  solve  a  problem.  

• I  can  integrate  multiple  sources  of  information  presented  in  different  media  or  formats  (e.g.  visually,  quantitatively)  to  address  a  question  or  solve  a  problem.  

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

               

 

Extend  W.11-­‐12.3:  Write  narratives  to  develop  real  or  imagined  experiences  or  events  using  effective  technique,  well-­‐chosen  details,  and  well-­‐structured  event  sequences.  

• I  can  write  a  logical,  detailed  narrative  about  real  or  imagined  events  or  experiences.  

a.  Engage  and  orient  the  reader  by  setting  out  a  problem,  situation,  or  observation  and  its  significance,  establishing  one  or  multiple  point(s)  of  view,  and  introducing  a  narrator  and/or  characters;  create  a  smooth  progression  of  experiences  or  events.  

• I  can  create  a  problem,  situation,  or  observation  that  is  engaging  and  communicate  its  importance  to  the  reader.  

• I  can  establish  one  or  more  points  of  view  and  introduce  a  narrator  and/or  characters.  

• I  can  create  a  smooth  chain  of  experiences  or  events  throughout  my  narrative.  

b.  Use  narrative  techniques,  such  as  dialogue,  pacing,  description,  reflection,  and  multiple  plot  lines,  to  develop  experiences,  events,  and/or  characters.  

• I  can  use  narrative  techniques  (such  as  dialogue,  pacing,  description,  reflection,  and  multiple  plot  lines)  to  develop  experiences,  events,  and/or  characters.  

c.  Use  a  variety  of  techniques  to  sequence  events  so  that  they  build  on  one  another  to  create  a  coherent  whole  and  build  toward  a  particular  tone  and  outcome  (e.g.,  a  sense  of  mystery,  suspense,  growth,  or  resolution).  

• I  can  use  a  variety  of  techniques  to  sequence  events  that  build  on  one  another  to  create  a  meaningful  whole  and  build  toward  a  particular  tone  and  outcome.  

d.  Use  precise  words  and  phrases,  telling  details,  and  sensory  language  to  convey  a  vivid  picture  of  the  experiences,  events,  setting,  and/or  characters.  

• I  can  use  precise  words  and  phrases,  telling  details,  and  sensory  language  to  convey  a  vivid  picture  of  the  events,  setting,  and/or  characters.  

e.  Provide  a  conclusion  that  follows  from  and  reflects  on  what  is  experienced,  observed,  or  resolved  over  the  course  of  the  narrative.    

• I  can  write  a  conclusion  that  reflects  on  what  is  experienced  and  resolved  over  the  course  of  the  narrative.  

 Extend  W  11-­‐12.1  Write  arguments  to  support  claims  in  an  analysis  of  substantive  topics  or  texts,  using  valid  reasoning  and  relevant  and  sufficient  evidence.    

• I  can  write  an  argument  using  valid  reasoning  with  relevant  and  sufficient  evidence.  

 

a.  Introduce  precise,  knowledgeable  claim(s),  establish  the  significance  of  the  claim(s),  distinguish  the  claim(s)  from  alternate  or  opposing  claims,  and  create  an  organization  that  logically  sequences  claim(s),  counterclaims,  reasons,  and  evidence.  

• I  can  identify  significant  and  opposing  arguments.  • I  can  logically  sequence  claims,  counterclaims,  reasons,  and  evidence.    

b.    Develop  claim(s)  and  counterclaims  fairly  and  thoroughly,  supplying  the  most  relevant  evidence  for  each  while  pointing  out  the  strengths  and  limitations  of  both  in  a  manner  that  anticipates  the  audience’s  knowledge  level,  concerns,  values,  and  possible  biases.  

• I  can  develop  claims  and  counterclaims  with  relevant  evidence.  • I  can  identify  the  strengths  and  limitations  of  claims  and  counterclaims  while  

anticipating  the  audience's  knowledge  level,  concerns,  values,  and  possible  biases.  

 

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c.    Use  words,  phrases,  and  clauses  as  well  as  varied  syntax  to  link  the  major  sections  of  the  text,  create  cohesion,  and  clarify  the  relationships  between  claim(s)  and  reasons,  between  reasons  and  evidence,  and  between  claim(s)  and  counterclaims.  

• I  can  use  syntax  (sentence  fluency)  to  clarify  the  relationships  among  my  claims,  reasons,  and  counterclaims.  

 

d.    Establish  and  maintain  a  formal  style  and  objective  tone  while  attending  to  the  norms  and  conventions  of  the  discipline  in  which  they  are  writing.  

• I  can  use  appropriate  style  and  tone  to  create  a  written  product.  • I  can  use  correct  and  appropriate  conventions  in  my  writing.    

e.  Provide  a  concluding  statement  or  section  that  follows  from  and  supports  the  argument  presented.  

• I  can  provide  a  concluding  statement  that  supports  my  argument.    

W  11-­‐12.7  Conduct  short  as  well  as  more  sustained  research  projects  to  answer  a  question  (including  a  self-­‐generated  question)  or  solve  a  problem;  narrow  or  broaden  the  inquiry  when  appropriate;  synthesize  multiple  sources  on  the  subject,  demonstrating  understanding  of  the  subject  under  investigation.  

• I  can  answer  a  question  (including  self-­‐generated)  or  solve  a  problem  through  short  as  well  as  sustained  research.  

• I  can  narrow  or  broaden  inquiry  when  appropriate  and  combine  multiple  sources  to  demonstrate  my  understanding  of  the  topic.  

W  11-­‐12.8  Gather  relevant  information  from  multiple  authoritative  print  and  digital  sources,  using  advanced  searches  effectively;  assess  the  strengths  and  limitations  of  each  source  in  terms  of  the  task,  purpose,  and  audience;  integrate  information  into  the  text  selectively  to  maintain  the  flow  of  ideas,  avoiding  plagiarism  and  over-­‐reliance  on  any  one  source  and  following  a  standard  format  for  citation.  

• I  can  determine  authoritative  and  accurate  sources  from  inferior  sources  and  identify  the  strengths  and  weaknesses  of  each  source.  

• I  can  use  a  variety  of  print  and  digital  sources  and  use  advanced  searches  effectively.  

• I  can  identify  the  task,  purpose,  and  audience  of  my  research.  • I  can  include  balanced  research  information  smoothly  into  my  piece.  • I  can  understand  the  difference  between  plagiarism  and  my  own  work  and  

cite  my  sources  in  a  standard  citation  format.     ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

SPEAKING  &  

LISTENING  

 SL.11-­‐12.2:  Integrate  multiple  sources  of  information  presented  in  diverse  formats  and  media  (e.g.,  visually,  quantitatively,  orally)  in  order  to  make  informed  decisions  and  solve  problems,  evaluating  the  credibility  and  accuracy  of  each  source  and  noting  any  discrepancies  among  the  data.    

• I  can  include  multiple  sources  of  information,  in  a  variety  of  formats  and  media,  to  make  decisions  and  solve  problems.  

• I  can  evaluate  the  credibility  of  sources  and  note  the  differences  among  the  sources.  

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

LANGU

AGE   L  11-­‐12.2  (a-­‐b)  Demonstrate  command  of  the  conventions  of  standard  English  

capitalization,  punctuation,  and  spelling  when  writing.  I  can  demonstrate  an  understanding  of  Standard  English  conventions  including  capitalization,  punctuation,  and  spelling.  

 a.  Observe  hyphenation  conventions.   • I  can  use  hyphens  correctly.  b.  Spell  correctly.   • I  can  use  correct  spelling.  

                   

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Unit  4  Text  Resources  Literary   Informational    

11th  Grade  Common  Core  resources  Wiki  from  CSD    Novel  and  short  stories:  The  Adventures  of  Huckleberry  Finn  by  Mark  Twain  (L  990)*  “The  Notorious  Jumping  Frog  of  Calaveras  County”  by  Mark  Twain  (L  1280)  “To  Build  a  Fire,”  Jack  London  (L  970)*    “An  Occurrence  at  Owl  Creek  Bridge,”  Ambrose  Bierce  (L  930)*    “The  Story  of  an  Hour”  Kate  Chopin  (L  810)*    Call  of  the  Wild,  Jack  London  (L  931)*    Life  on  the  Mississippi  by  Mark  Twain  (L  1080)*  The  Narrative  of  the  Life  of  Frederick  Douglass,  Frederick  Douglass  (L  1080)*  “My  Bondage,  My  Freedom”,    (L  1210)  “A  Wagner  Matinee”,  by  Willa  Cather  (L  1460)  “A  Rose  for  Emily”  by  William  Faulkner  (L  990)*  The  Age  of  Innocence  by  Edith  Wharton  (L  1170)  Ethan  Frome  by  Edith  Wharton  (L  820)*                CAUTION - * Indicates that the Lexile level of the text is below the recommended Lexile range for that grade level.

11th  Grade  Common  Core  resources  wiki  from  CSD  One  Nation,  Out  of  Many;  American  Enterprise  ,  Huntington,  Samuel  (L  1340)    Biographical  articles:  Preface  for  The  Adventures  of  Huckleberry  Finn  by  Keith  Nielson  “The  Seriously  Funny  Man”  by  Richard  Lacayo  (L  1040)*  “America’s  Original  Superstar”  by  Roy  Blount,  Jr.  (L  1040)*  “Man  of  the  World”  by  Jackson  Dykman  (L  1040)*  “Getting  Past  Black  and  White”  by  Stephen  L.  Carter      (L  1040)*  (All  from  Time  Magazine,  July  14,  2008)    Abraham  Lincoln  “Gettysburg  Address”  (L  1350)    Abraham  Lincoln  “Emancipation  Proclamation”  (L  1670)    John  O’Sullivan,  “Manifest  Destiny”  (L  1320)  Chief  Joseph  Surrenders  speech  (L  430)*  Abraham  Lincoln,  Second  Inaugural  Address  (L  1270)  Civil  War  Primary  Sources  New  York  Times  Civil  War  blog  “Disunion”    (L  1250)    13th,  14th,  15th  Amendments  (L  1850)  Reconstruction  political  cartoons    

                         

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  4  

Glossary  of  Key  Terms    

Key  Term   Definition  ABOLITION   The  end  or  banning  of  an  act  or  practice;  often  used  to  refer  to  the  end  of  slavery  in  the  United  States.  ANTEBELLUM   Belonging  to  a  period  before  a  war  especially  the  American  Civil  War  

AUTOBIOGRAPHY   An  account  of  a  person’s  life  written  by  that  person.  BIOGRAPHY   An  account  of  a  person’s  life.  

DIALECT   A  regional  variety  of  a  particular  language  with  phonological,  grammatical,  and  lexical  patterns  that  distinguish  it  form  other  varieties.  

NATURALISM   A  pronounced  interest  in,  sympathy  with,  or  love  of  natural  beauty.    In  literature,  naturalism  developed  from  realism.    It  is  used  primarily  to  describe  works  that  use  realistic  subjects  and  embody  the  belief  that  everything  in  nature  can  be  explained  by  natural  and  material  causes,  not  by  supernatural  causes.  

REALISM   In  literature  and  art,  the  depiction  of  subjects  as  they  appear  in  everyday  life;  detailed  and  precise  descriptions,  close  adherence  to  what  is  possible  and  plausible;  the  faithful  rendition  of  things,  without  embellishment.    Realism  is  often  found  in  combination  with  other  styles  and  modes.  

REGIONALISM   In  literature,  this  refers  to  writing  that  concentrates  on  a  particular  geographical  area,  which  serves  as  the  basis  for  the  work.  

SATIRE   A  literary  art  of  diminishing  a  subject  by  making  it  ridiculous  and  evoking  attitudes  of  amusement,  contempt,  indignation  or  scorn.  It  differs  from  comedy  in  that  comedy  evokes  laughter  as  an  end  in  itself.  Satire  uses  laughter  as  a  weapon  against  a  subject  existing  outside  the  work  itself;  for  example,  social  satire  mocks  existing  social  mores  and  conventions  in  order  to  draw  attention  to  their  limitations  or  hypocrisy.  

           

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Unit  4  Planning  and  Notes  

Eleventh  Grade  Unit  5  Theme:  Emerging  Modernism  

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 In  this  unit  students  will  analyze  texts  that  evaluate  the  results  of  modernization,  particularly  that  of  isolation  and  disillusionment,  in  the  early  American  twentieth  

century.    

Essential  Question   Supporting  Questions   Vocabulary   Writing  Focus  

Cross-­‐Curricular  Connections  

How  did  world  events  influence  isolation  and  disillusionment  in  the  early  American  twentieth  century?  

• How  did  the  historical  events  and  social  issues  of  the  1920’s  affect  the  country?  

• How  did  the  Harlem  Renaissance  shape  the  future  of  African  American  culture  and  civil  rights?    

• How  did  the  changes  in  the  Women’s  movement  affect  politics?  

 

Words  for  Review:    Dialect    Tier  II:  Flashback,  Foreshadowing,  Industrialization,    Tier  III:    Alienation,  Disillusionment,  Harlem  Renaissance,  Interior  Monologue,  Lost  Generation,  Prohibition  Era,  Stream  of  Consciousness  

Informative/  Explanatory  

How  did  the  growth  of  industry  change  the  United  States?    How  did  the  prominent  business  leaders  and  the  business  organizations  influence  the  growth  of  industrialization  in  the  United  States?    How  did  the  growth  of  industry  affect  the  movement  of  people  into  and  within  the  United  States?    How  did  the  United  States  cope  with  rapid  economic  and  technological  advances?    How  did  major  scientific  findings  in  the  20’s  affect  the  country?  

    ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

READING  

RL  11-­‐12.6  Analyze  a  case  in  which  grasping  point  of  view  requires  distinguishing  what  is  directly  stated  in  a  text  from  what  is  really  meant  (e.g.,  satire,  sarcasm,  irony,  or  understatement).  

• I  can  analyze  a  text's  point  of  view  that  specifically  requires  using  satire,  sarcasm,  irony,  or  understatement.  

RI  11-­‐12.1  Cite  strong  and  thorough  textual  evidence  to  support  analysis  of  what  the  text  says  explicitly  as  well  as  inferences  drawn  from  the  text,  including  determining  where  the  text  leaves  matters  uncertain.  

• I  can  cite  strong  and  thorough  textual  evidence  to  support  analysis.  • I  can  cite  specific  material  from  the  text,  draw  inferences  from  the  text,  and  

determine  where  the  text  leaves  matters  uncertain.     ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

 WRITING  

W  11-­‐12.2  Write  informative/explanatory  texts  to  examine  and  convey  complex  ideas,  concepts,  and  information  clearly  and  accurately  through  the  effective  selection,  organization,  and  analysis  of  content.  

• I  can  write  informative/explanatory  texts  to  examine  and  convey  complex  ideas,  concepts,  and  information  clearly  and  accurately.  

• I  can  effectively  select,  organize,  and  analyze  content  in  my  informative/explanatory  writing.  

a.  Introduce  a  topic;  organize  complex  ideas,  concepts,  and  information  so  that  each  new  element  builds  on  that  which  precedes  it  to  create  a  unified  whole;  include  formatting  (e.g.,  headings),  graphics  (e.g.,  figures,  tables),  and  multimedia  when  useful  to  aiding  comprehension.  

• I  can  introduce  a  topic,  and  build  complex  ideas  and  concepts  to  create  an  organized  and  unified  whole.  

• I  can  use  formatting,  graphics  and  multi-­‐media  to  aid  comprehension  when  useful.  

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b.  Develop  the  topic  thoroughly  by  selecting  the  most  significant  and  relevant  facts,  extended  definitions,  concrete  details,  quotations,  or  other  information  and  examples  appropriate  to  the  audience’s  knowledge  of  the  topic.  

• I  can  identify  my  audience  and  use  relevant  concrete  details  (facts,  extended  definitions,  quotations,  or  other  information)  to  develop  the  topic  thoroughly.  

c.  Use  appropriate  and  varied  transitions  and  syntax  to  link  the  major  sections  of  the  text,  create  cohesion,  and  clarify  the  relationships  among  complex  ideas  and  concepts.  

• I  can  use  appropriate  and  varied  transitions  and  syntax  (sentence  fluency)  to  link  major  sections  of  the  text.  

• I  can  create  cohesion  and  clarify  relationships,  complex  ideas,  and  concepts  through  the  use  of  transitions.  

d.  Use  precise  language,  domain-­‐specific  vocabulary,  and  techniques  such  as  metaphor,  simile,  and  analogy  to  manage  the  complexity  of  the  topic.  

• I  can  use  precise  word  choice  and  relevant  vocabulary  to  direct  the  reader  through  the  topic.  

• I  can  use  metaphor,  simile,  and  analogy  to  direct  the  reader  through  the  topic.  

e.  Establish  and  maintain  a  formal  style  and  objective  tone  while  attending  to  the  norms  and  conventions  of  the  discipline  in  which  they  are  writing.  

• I  can  use  correct  and  appropriate  conventions  in  my  writing.  

f.  Provide  a  concluding  statement  or  section  that  follows  from  and  supports  the  information  or  explanation  presented  (e.g.,  articulating  implications  or  the  significance  of  the  topic).  

• I  can  provide  a  concluding  statement  that  supports  the  information  or  explanation  presented.  

• I  can  use  my  conclusion  to  articulate  the  implication  or  significance  of  the  topic.  

W  11-­‐12.4  Produce  clear  and  coherent  writing  in  which  the  development,  organization,  and  style  are  appropriate  to  task,  purpose,  and  audience.  (Grade-­‐specific  expectations  for  writing  types  are  defined  in  standards  1–3  above.)  

• I  can  develop,  organize,  and  create  clear  and  coherent  writing  in  multiple  genres.  

• I  can  write  pieces  that  are  appropriate  to  task,  purpose,  and  audience.  

W.11-­‐12.6.  Use  technology,  including  the  Internet,  to  produce,  publish,  and  update  individual  or  shared  writing  products  in  response  to  ongoing  feedback,  including  new  arguments  or  information.  

 

• I  can  use  technology  to  produce,  publish  and  update  individual  writing  products  in  response  to  ongoing  feedback,  including  new  arguments  or  information.  

• I  can  use  technology  to  produce,  publish  and  update  shared  writing  products  in  response  to  ongoing  feedback,  including  new  arguments  or  information.  

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

SPEAKING  &  

LISTENING  

SL  11-­‐12.5  Make  strategic  use  of  digital  media  (e.g.,  textual,  graphical,  audio,  visual,  and  interactive  elements)  in  presentations  to  enhance  understanding  of  findings,  reasoning,  and  evidence  and  to  add  interest.  

● I  can  use  digital  media  in  presentations  to  increase  understanding  of  evidence  and  reasoning.  

● I  can  effectively  use  digital  media  to  add  interest.  

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

LANGU

AGE  

L  11-­‐12.6  Acquire  and  use  accurately  general  academic  and  domain-­‐specific  words  and  phrases,  sufficient  for  reading,  writing,  speaking,  and  listening  at  the  college  and  career  readiness  level;  demonstrate  independence  in  gathering  vocabulary  knowledge  when  considering  a  word  or  phrase  important  to  comprehension  or  expression.    

● I  can  gather  and  use  academic  words  and  phrases,  sufficient  for  reading,  writing,  speaking,  and  listening  at  the  college  and  career  readiness  level.  

● I  can  independently  determine  a  word  or  phrase's  importance.  ● I  can  independently  acquire  vocabulary  knowledge.  

 Unit  5  Text  Resources  

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 Literary   Informational    

The  CSD  Media  Wiki  site  has  links  to  most  of  the  above  listed  items  plus  additional  links  to  other  texts  that  would  fit  this  unit.    Harlem  Renaissance  –  John  Carroll  University:    Harlem  Renaissance    -­‐  Youtube.com:  The  Harlem  Renaissance:  The  Rise  of  African  American  Literature,  Art,  and  Music  Poetry  Langston  Hughes:  “The  Negro  Speaks  of  Rivers”;  “Trumpet  Player”;  “Ballad  of  the  Landlord”;  “Daybreak  in  Alabama”  ;”Harlem”;  “I,  Too”;  “Mother  To  Son”  (Average  L  880)*  Countee  Cullen:  “Tableau  Incident”    T.S.  Elliot:  “The  Love  Song  of  J.  Alfred  Prufrock”  (L  1300);  “The  Wasteland”  (L=1050)*  Robert  Frost:  “Acquainted  with  the  Night”;  “Design”;  “Out,  Out  “;  “Once  by  the  Pacific”:  “Nothing  Gold  Can  Stay”  ;  “Most  of  It”  ;  “Bereft”:  “Death  of  a  Hired  Man”  (Average    L  660)*  Novels    &  Short  Stories  Excerpts  from  The  Jungle,  Upton  Sinclair  (L  1290)    The  Great  Gatsby  by  F.  Scott  Fitzgerald,  (L  1070)*  “Winter  Dreams”  by  F.  Scott  Fitzgerald  (  L  1420)    Of  Mice  and  Men,  John  Steinbeck,  (L  630)*  “Leader  of  the  People”  John  Steinbeck  “The  Egg”  by  Sherwood  Anderson  (L  1160)  *  “A  Rose  for  Emily,”  William  Faulkner,  (L  990)*  “A  Wagner  Matinee,”  Willa  Cather,  (L  1460)  Old  Man  and  the  Sea  by  Ernest  Hemingway,  (L  940)*    CAUTION  -­‐  *  Indicates  that  the  Lexile  level  of  the  text  is  below  the  recommended  Lexile  range  for  that  grade  level.    

Comparing  Ernest  Hemingway's  Life  to  His  Characters  in  The  Sun  Also  Rises,  Yahoo,  http://voices.yahoo.com/comparing-­‐ernest-­‐hemingways-­‐life-­‐his-­‐characters-­‐33515.html?cat=38      (L  1370)    PURSUED  BY  HAPPINESS  AND  BEATEN  SENSELESS:  PROZAC  AND  THE  AMERICAN  DREAM    by  Carl  Elliott    (L  1270)      

American  Dreamers,  Lisa  Miller,      (L=1290)  

 GENERATION  'X',  Leonard  Pitts  Jr.,  (L  1270)    

An  Examination  of  the  100  Documents  That  Most  Define  America  As  a  Nation  of  Ideas  and  Ideals,  By  Michael  Barone,  Seth  Rosen,  Teresa  Riordan,  Jay  Tolson,  Bernadine  Healy,  M.D.,  Katherine  Hobson,  Angie  C.  Marek,  Joannie  Fischer,  Thomas  K.  Grose,  Charles  

Fenyvesi  and  Michael  Satchell,  (L  1310)    THE  WAR  ON  THE  HOME  FRONT,  Stephen  E.  Ambrose,  (L  1200)    

Harlem  Renaissance,  Wilma  Mankiller,  Gwendolyn  Mink,  Marysa  Navarro,  Barbara  Smith,  and  Gloria  Steinem,  eds.  

           

   

Eleventh  Grade  Unit  5  

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Glossary  of  Key  Terms  Key  Term   Definition  ALIENATION   The  sense  of  estrangement,  or  separation,  from  society  or  self,  identified  in  philosophy,  the  social  sciences,  and  literature  as  a  

central  feature  of  modern  life.  AMERICAN  DREAM   An  American  social  ideal  that  stresses  social  equality,  social  mobility,  and  material  prosperity;  the  prosperity  or  life  that  

is  the  realization  of  this  ideal.  DIALECT   A  regional  variety  of  a  particular  language  with  phonological,  grammatical,  and  lexical  patterns  that  distinguish  it  form  

other  varieties.  DISILLUSIONMENT   The  loss  of  naïve  faith  or  trust.  

FLASHBACK   A  narrative  technique  that  allows  a  writer  to  present  past  events  during  current  events,  in  order  to  provide  background  for  the  current  narration.  By  giving  material  that  occurred  prior  to  the  present  event,  the  writer  provides  the  reader  with  insight  into  a  character’s  motivation  and  or  background  to  a  conflict.  Flashbacks  are  often  conveyed  through  narration,  dream  sequences,  and  memories  presented  of  earlier  conversation.  

FORESHADOWING   In  literature,  the  use  of  hints  about  things  to  come  in  later  plot  developments.  It  can  be  obvious,  or  it  may  be  subtler,  involving  the  use  of  symbols  that  are  connected  to  later  turns  in  the  plot.  

HARLEM  RENAISSANCE    A  literary  and  cultural  movement  among  black  Americans  that  flourished  from  the  early  1920s  to  the  early  1930s  and  emphasized  African  heritage.  Prominent  literary  figures  included  Claude  McKay,  Jean  Toomer,  Countee  Cullen,  and  Langston  Hughes.  

INDUSTRIALIZATION   The  process  of  converting  to  a  socioeconomic  order  in  which  industry  is  dominant.  

INTERIOR  MONOLOGUE   An  extended  representation  in  monologue  of  a  character’s  thought  and  feeling.  

LOST  GENERATION   A  term  that  refers  to  the  host  of  young  men  who  were  killed  in  the  First  World  War,  as  well  as  to  the  young  men  who  survived  but  became  adrift  upon  their  return.  The  mood  of  the  Lost  Generation,  reflected  by  some  American  novelists  of  the  time,  was  disenchantment  and  cynicism.  

PROHIBITION  ERA   The  period  from  1920  to  1933  when  the  sale  of  alcoholic  beverages  was  prohibited  in  the  United  States  by  a  constitutional  amendment  

STREAM  OF  CONSCIOUSNESS  

A  style  or  movement  of  German  literature  of  the  latter  half  of  the  eighteenth  century,  characterized  chiefly  by  impetuosity  of  manner,  exaltation  of  individual  sensibility  and  intuitive  perception,  opposition  to  established  forms  of  society  and  thought,  and  extreme  nationalism.  

       

Unit  5  Planning  and  Notes  

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  5  Common  Formative  Assessment  

Disillusionment  and  isolation  

Prompt:    In  what  ways  are  the  ideas  of  disillusionment  and  isolation  of  the  early  twentieth  century  still  prevalent  today?  After  reading  the  texts  write  a  compare/contrast  essay  that  illustrates  these  ideas  in  both  eras.    Support  your  discussion  with  evidence  from  the  texts.      Article  #1  

   Modernism  and  Experimentation:  1914-­‐1945  

 M  any  historians  have  characterized  the  period  between  the  two  world  wars  as  the  United  States'  traumatic  "coming  of  age,"  despite  the  fact  that  U.S.  direct  involvement  was  relatively  brief  (1917-­‐1918)  and  its  casualties  many  fewer  than  those  of  its  European  allies  and  foes.  John  Dos  Passos  expressed  America's  postwar  disillusionment  in  the  novel  Three  Soldiers  (1921),  when  he  noted  that  civilization  was  a  "vast  edifice  of  sham,  and  the  war,  instead  of  its  crumbling,  was  its  fullest  and  most  ultimate  expression."  Shocked  and  permanently  changed,  Americans  returned  to  their  homeland  but  could  never  regain  their  innocence.    Nor  could  soldiers  from  rural  America  easily  return  to  their  roots.  After  experiencing  the  world,  many  now  yearned  for  a  modern,  urban  life.  New  farm  machines  such  as  planters,  harvesters,  and  binders  had  drastically  reduced  the  demand  for  farm  jobs;  yet  despite  their  increased  productivity,  farmers  were  poor.  Crop  prices,  like  urban  workers'  wages,  depended  on  unrestrained  market  forces  heavily  influenced  by  business  interests:  Government  subsidies  for  farmers  and  effective  workers'  unions  had  not  yet  become  established.  "The  chief  business  of  the  American  people  is  business,"  President  Calvin  Coolidge  proclaimed  in  1925,  and  most  agreed.    In  the  postwar  "Big  Boom,"  business  flourished,  and  the  successful  prospered  beyond  their  wildest  dreams.  For  the  first  time,  many  Americans  enrolled  in  higher  education  -­‐-­‐  in  the  1920s  college  enrollment  doubled.  The  middle-­‐class  prospered;  Americans  began  to  enjoy  the  world  s  highest  national  average  income  in  this  era,  and  many  people  purchased  the  ultimate  status  symbol  -­‐-­‐  an  automobile.  The  typical  urban  American  home  glowed  with  electric  lights  and  boasted  a  radio  that  connected  the  house  with  the  outside  world,  and  perhaps  a  telephone,  a  camera,  a  typewriter,  or  a  sewing  machine.  Like  the  businessman  protagonist  of  Sinclair  Lewis's  novel  Babbitt  (1922),  the  average  American  approved  of  these  machines  because  they  were  modern  and  because  most  were  American  inventions  and  American-­‐made.    

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Americans  of  the  "Roaring  Twenties"  fell  in  love  with  other  modern  entertainments.  Most  people  went  to  the  movies  once  a  week.  Although  Prohibition  -­‐-­‐  a  nationwide  ban  on  the  production,  transport,  and  sale  of  alcohol  instituted  through  the  18th  Amendment  to  the  U.S.  Constitution  -­‐-­‐  began  in  1919,  underground  "speakeasies"  and  nightclubs  proliferated,  featuring  jazz  music,  cocktails,  and  daring  modes  of  dress  and  dance.  Dancing,  moviegoing,  automobile  touring,  and  radio  were  national  crazes.  American  women,  in  particular,  felt  liberated.  Many  had  left  farms  and  villages  for  homefront  duty  in  American  cities  during  World  War  I,  and  had  become  resolutely  modern.  They  cut  their  hair  short  ("bobbed"),  wore  short  "flapper"  dresses,  and  gloried  in  the  right  to  vote  assured  by  the  19th  Amendment  to  the  Constitution,  passed  in  1920.  They  boldly  spoke  their  mind  and  took  public  roles  in  society.    Western  youths  were  rebelling,  angry  and  disillusioned  with  the  savage  war,  the  older  generation  they  held  responsible,  and  difficult  postwar  economic  conditions  that,  ironically,  allowed  Americans  with  dollars  -­‐-­‐  like  writers  F.  Scott  Fitzgerald,  Ernest  Hemingway,  Gertrude  Stein,  and  Ezra  Pound  -­‐-­‐  to  live  abroad  handsomely  on  very  little  money.  Intellectual  currents,  particularly  Freudian  psychology  and  to  a  lesser  extent  Marxism  (like  the  earlier  Darwinian  theory  of  evolution),  implied  a  "godless"  world  view  and  contributed  to  the  breakdown  of  traditional  values.  Americans  abroad  absorbed  these  views  and  brought  them  back  to  the  United  States  where  they  took  root,  firing  the  imagination  of  young  writers  and  artists.  William  Faulkner,  for  example,  a  20th-­‐century  American  novelist,  employed  Freudian  elements  in  all  his  works,  as  did  virtually  all  serious  American  fiction  writers  after  World  War  1.    Source:  VanSpanckeren,  Kathryn.    Outline  of  American  Literature.    United  States  Information  Agency.  Web.  11  June  2012.  http://usa.usembassy.de/etexts/oal/lit6.htm    Article  #2  Title:    Census:  Recession  Turning  Young  Adults  Into  Lost  Generation      WASHINGTON  —  Young  adults  are  the  recession's  lost  generation.  In  record  numbers,  they're  struggling  to  find  work,  shunning  long-­‐distance  moves  to  live  with  mom  and  dad,  delaying  marriage  and  raising  kids  out  of  wedlock,  if  they're  becoming  parents  at  all.  The  unemployment  rate  for  them  is  the  highest  since  World  War  II,  and  they  risk  living  in  poverty  more  than  others  –  nearly  1  in  5.    New  2010  census  data  released  Thursday  show  the  wrenching  impact  of  a  recession  that  officially  ended  in  mid-­‐2009.  There  are  missed  opportunities  and  dim  prospects  for  a  generation  of  mostly  20-­‐somethings  and  30-­‐somethings  coming  of  age  in  a  prolonged  period  of  joblessness.  

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"We  have  a  monster  jobs  problem,  and  young  people  are  the  biggest  losers,"  said  Andrew  Sum,  an  economist  and  director  of  the  Center  for  Labor  Market  Studies  at  Northeastern  University.  He  noted  that  for  recent  college  graduates  getting  by  on  waitressing,  bartending  and  odd  jobs,  they  will  have  to  compete  with  new  graduates  for  entry-­‐level  career  positions  when  the  job  market  does  improve.  "Their  really  high  levels  of  underemployment  and  unemployment  will  haunt  young  people  for  at  least  another  decade,"  Sum  said.    Richard  Freeman,  an  economist  at  Harvard  University,  said  young  people  "will  be  scarred  and  they  will  be  called  the  `lost  generation'  –  in  that  their  careers  would  not  be  the  same  way  if  we  had  avoided  this  economic  disaster."    The  latest  figures  also  show  a  rebound  in  the  foreign-­‐born  population  to  40  million,  or  12.9  percent,  the  highest  share  since  1920.  The  1.4  million  increase  from  2009  was  the  biggest  since  the  mid-­‐decade  housing  boom  and  could  fuel  debate  in  this  election  season  about  immigration  strategy.  Most  immigrants  continue  to  be  low-­‐skilled  workers  from  Latin  America,  with  growing  numbers  from  Asia  also  arriving.  An  estimated  11.2  million  people  are  in  the  U.S.  illegally.    People  age  65  and  older  tended  to  return  to  or  stay  in  their  jobs,  accounting  for  the  few  employment  gains  in  recent  months.  About  1  in  6  older  people  is  now  in  the  labor  force.  That's  the  highest  level  since  the  1960s,  before  more  generous  Social  Security  and  Medicare  benefits  made  it  more  attractive  to  retire.    Employment  among  young  adults  16-­‐29  was  55.3  percent,  compared  with  67.3  percent  in  2000;  it's  the  lowest  since  the  end  of  World  War  II.  Young  males  who  lacked  a  college  degree  were  most  likely  to  lose  jobs  due  to  reduced  demand  for  blue-­‐collar  jobs  in  construction,  manufacturing  and  transportation  during  the  downturn.  Among  teenagers,  employment  was  less  than  30  percent.    The  employment-­‐to-­‐population  ratio  for  all  age  groups  from  2007-­‐2010  dropped  faster  than  for  any  similar  period  since  the  government  began  tracking  the  data  in  1948.  In  the  past  year,  43  of  the  50  largest  metropolitan  areas  continued  to  post  declines  in  employment:  Charlotte,  N.C.,  Jacksonville,  Fla.,  Las  Vegas,  Phoenix,  Los  Angeles  and  Detroit.  Each  experienced  a  severe  housing  bust,  budget  deficit  or  meltdown  in  industries  such  as  banking  or  manufacturing.    Without  work,  young  adults  aren't  starting  careers  and  lives  in  new  cities.  Among  adults  18-­‐34,  the  share  of  long-­‐distance  moves  across  state  lines  fell  last  year  to  roughly  3.2  million  people,  or  4.4  percent,  the  lowest  level  since  World  War  II.  For  college  graduates,  who  historically  are  more  likely  to  relocate  out  of  state,  long-­‐distance  moves  dipped  to  2.4  percent.  

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Opting  to  stay  put,  roughly  5.9  million  Americans  25-­‐34  last  year  lived  with  their  parents,  an  increase  of  25  percent  from  before  the  recession.  Driven  by  a  record  1  in  5  young  men  who  doubled  up  in  households,  men  are  now  nearly  twice  as  likely  as  women  to  live  with  their  parents.  Marriages  fell  to  a  record  low  last  year  of  just  51.4  percent  among  adults  18  and  over,  compared  with  57  percent  in  2000.  Among  young  adults  25-­‐34,  marriage  was  at  44.2  percent,  also  a  new  low.  Broken  down  by  race  and  ethnicity,  31  percent  of  young  black  men  lived  in  their  parents'  homes,  compared  with  21  percent  of  young  Latino  men  and  15  percent  of  young  white  men.  At  the  state  level,  New  York  had  the  highest  share  of  young  men  living  with  their  parents  at  21  percent,  followed  by  New  Jersey  and  Hawaii,  all  states  with  higher  costs  of  living.  Most  of  the  cities  with  low  percentages  of  young  adults  living  at  home  were  in  the  Midwest.    Younger  women  across  all  race  and  ethnic  groups  had  fewer  children  compared  with  2008.  Births  declined  6  percent  among  20-­‐34  year-­‐olds  over  the  two-­‐year  period  even  though  the  number  of  women  in  this  group  increased  by  more  than  1  million,  according  to  an  analysis  of  census  data  by  Kenneth  Johnson,  sociology  professor  and  senior  demographer  at  the  University  of  New  Hampshire.  Never  before  has  such  a  drop  in  births  occurred  when  the  population  of  young  adults  increased  in  at  least  15  years.    "Are  people  just  delaying  births,  or  does  this  represent  a  real  loss  of  babies  that  won't  be  replaced?  During  the  Great  Depression,  there  was  a  permanent  loss  of  births  –  they  were  never  made  up,"  Johnson  said.    Homeownership  declined  for  a  fourth  consecutive  year,  to  65.4  percent,  following  a  peak  of  67.3  percent  in  2006.    "Many  young  adults  are  essentially  postponing  adulthood  and  all  of  the  family  responsibilities  and  extra  costs  that  go  along  with  it,"  said  Mark  Mather,  an  associate  vice  president  at  the  private  Population  Reference  Bureau.  He  described  a  shift  toward  a  new  U.S.  norm,  one  that's  commonly  seen  in  Europe,  in  which  more  people  wait  until  their  30s  to  leave  the  parental  nest.  "Some  of  these  changes  started  before  the  recession  but  now  they  are  accelerating,  with  effects  on  families  that  could  be  long  term,"  Mather  said.    The  District  of  Columbia  plus  14  states  had  the  largest  ratios  of  college  graduates  to  high-­‐school  dropouts,  more  than  3  to  1.  Several  of  these  places,  including  the  District  of  Columbia  and  states  with  larger  immigrant  populations,  had  the  widest  income  gaps  between  rich  and  poor.  The  number  of  Hispanic  children  in  poverty  rose  by  half  a  million  to  6.1  million  last  year,  making  up  a  majority  of  the  increase  in  total  child  poverty.  Hispanics  now  comprise  37  percent  of  children  in  poverty,  compared  with  30  percent  for  whites  and  27  percent  for  blacks.    

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"We  are  really  at  a  crossroads,"  said  William  H.  Frey,  a  demographer  at  the  Brookings  Institution.  "These  new  young  immigrants  and  their  children  need  a  pathway  to  the  middle  class  –  good  educations,  affordable  housing  and  jobs  –  at  the  same  time  federal  and  state  budgets  are  strapped  for  funds.  While  we  face  tough  choices,  the  quality  of  our  future  labor  force  depends  on  meeting  their  needs."    Other  census  findings:    _About  1  in  4  families  with  children  is  headed  by  single  mothers,  a  record.  Among  young  families  with  a  head  of  household  younger  than  30,  the  poverty  rate  jumped  from  30  percent  in  2007  to  37  percent.  In  contrast,  poverty  remained  at  a  low  5.7  percent  for  families  with  a  head  of  household  65  or  older.    _The  number  of  households  receiving  food  stamps  swelled  by  2  million  to  13.6  million,  meaning  that  nearly  1  in  8  receives  the  government  aid.  Among  households  receiving  food  stamps,  more  than  half  have  children.    The  2010  numbers  are  from  the  American  Community  Survey,  which  queries  3  million  households.  In  some  cases,  figures  are  supplemented  with  data  from  the  Current  Population  Survey  to  establish  historical  trends.    Source:  

"Census:  Recession  Turning  Young  Adults  Into  Lost  Generation."  Breaking  News  and  Opinion  on  The  Huffington  Post.  N.p.,  n.d.  Web.  11  June  2012.  <http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/22/census-­‐recession-­‐young-­‐adults_n_975476.html>.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cocooning:  It's  back  and  thanks  to  tech,  it's  bigger  Mike  Snider,  USA  TODAY  10:43  a.m.  EST  February  18,  2013    McLEAN,  Va.  —  Cocooning  is  undergoing  a  metamorphosis:  Call  it  super-­‐cocooning.  

Thanks  to  always-­‐on  wireless  Internet  connectivity  and  bigger,  better  TVs  that  reproduce  pixel-­‐perfect  high-­‐definition  video,  cocooning  is  entering  a  new  evolutionary  stage.  Consumers  are  staying  home  more,  watching  movies  delivered  via  cable,  satellite,  Internet  or  disc,  eating  in  and  transforming  their  apartments  and  houses  into  a  shelter  from  the  daily  social  storm.  

This  new  level  of  super-­‐cocooning  is  affecting  Hollywood,  professional  sports  and  restaurants  across  the  U.S.  "Everybody  is  nervous,  really  nervous,"  says  trend  forecaster  Faith  Popcorn,  who  coined  the  term  "cocooning"  in  1981.  "I  think  we  are  looking  for  protection.  Almost  like  the  Jetsons,  we  want  to  walk  around  in  a  little  bubble.  We  are  moving  toward  that."  

Cocooning  is  not  a  new  behavior.  Born  out  of  a  mix  of  fear  and  fun,  it  became  a  trend  identified  with  Cold  War  unease  that  led  to  stay-­‐at-­‐home  entertainment  such  as  the  first  home  video  game  systems,  rec  rooms  and  the  adoption  of  home  swimming  pools  and  trampolines.  

After  the  9/11  terrorist  attacks,  a  refocus  on  cocooning  occurred.  Homeowners  lined  their  nests  with  media  rooms  and  remodeled  kitchens  meant  for  entertaining.  And  in  the  last  12  months,  with  the  July  20  movie  theater  shooting  in  Aurora,  Colo.,  and  the  Dec.  14  school  shootings  in  Newtown,  Conn.,  many  have  a  heightened  sense  of  unease.  "We  don't  feel  too  safe,  and  people  are  getting  more  and  more  nervous  about  being  vulnerable,"  Popcorn  says.  "Cocooning  is  going  strong  in  2013."  

By  the  numbers  

An  indication  of  super-­‐cocooning  comes  from  a  recent  JPMorgan  Chase  analysis  of  credit  card  spending.  Consumers  with  Chase  Freedom  credit  cards  spent  significantly  more  (65%)  on  electronics  such  as  TVs  and  tablets  during  the  last  three  months  of  2012  than  during  the  same  period  the  year  before,  the  firm  found.  

Overall,  consumers  spent  2%  more  during  the  fourth  quarter  of  2012  than  a  year  before,  but  spent  less  on  hotels  (-­‐21%),  car  rentals  (-­‐26%),  restaurants  (-­‐16%)  and  tolls  (-­‐8%).  "It  does  appear  that  consumers  are  staying  closer  to  home,"  says  Phil  Christian,  general  manager  for  Chase  Freedom.  

That  trend  is  buttressed  by  the  slowed  growth  in  travel  and  tourism  spending,  from  about  5%  growth  in  the  first  three  months  of  2012  to  2.2%  and  0.6%  in  the  second  and  third  quarters,  reported  by  the  Bureau  of  Economic  Analysis  in  December.  

On  the  plus  side,  movie  theaters  set  a  box  office  record  of  $10.8  billion  in  2012.  but  overall  attendance  remained  flat,  according  to  Nielsen.  

That's  in  part  because  Hollywood  is  increasingly  catering  to  consumers  by  getting  films  from  theaters  into  homes  more  quickly  via  on-­‐

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demand  or  pay-­‐TV  services.  Among  those  who  stay  close  to  home,  a  subset  of  about  7%  of  U.S.  homes  with  Internet  access  are  inhabited  by  "heavy  home  entertainment  cocooners,"  says  consulting  and  research  firm  Frank  N.  Magid  Associates.  They  spend  nearly  $300  each  month  on  pay  TV,  Internet  service,  video  games,  on-­‐demand  video,  music,  books,  newspapers  and  magazines,  says  Magid.    These  heavy  cocooners  are  an  affluent,  racially  diverse  group:  More  than  one-­‐third  (35%)  make  $75,000  or  more  annually.  Whites  make  up  57%,  Hispanics  22%,  blacks  14%  and  Asians  7%,  according  to  Magid.  The  firm  conducted  the  nationally  representative  survey  of  2,540  digital  consumers  in  March  2012.  

Even  a  large  portion  of  digital  consumers  in  the  $35,000-­‐$50,000  annual-­‐income  bracket  identified  themselves  as  heavy  cocooners.  

"The  emerging  cocoon  of  home  entertainment  is  being  led  by  a  new,  technologically  sophisticated  and  more  culturally  diverse  American  consumer,"  says  Andrew  Hare,  senior  analyst  for  Magid.  

The  cost  of  cocooning  

While  pay-­‐TV  bills  have  risen  about  6%  annually,  The  NPD  Group  says,  more  homes  are  opting  for  higher-­‐cost  packages.  About  23%  of  homes  pay  more  than  $100  monthly  for  cable-­‐delivered  pay  TV,  up  from  19%  in  2008,  Magid  found.  Homes  paying  more  than  $100  for  satellite  pay-­‐TV  service  rose  to  14%  from  10%.  

But  in  other  ways,  the  price  of  becoming  a  super-­‐cocooner  is  falling.  As  the  average  price  for  an  HDTV  has  plummeted,  now  about  88%  of  homes  have  one,  according  to  the  Consumer  Electronics  Association.  And  bigger  TVs,  those  larger  than  55  inches,  cost  on  average  $1,400,  about  10%  less  than  a  year  ago,  The  NPD  Group  says.  

Consumers  bought  slightly  more  TVs  last  year  than  in  2011,  with  many  upgrading  to  bigger  displays,  says  NPD  analyst  Ben  Arnold.  "The  move  toward  big  screen  is  part  of  that  (cocooning)  story.  You've  got  tons  of  content  options.  You've  got  TVs  that  connect  directly  to  the  Internet,  so  you  don't  even  have  to  get  a  DVD;  you  can  call  up  Netflix  or  Amazon  video  services  directly  on  your  TV."  

There's  more  HD  content  available,  too,  he  says.  "There  are  a  lot  of  reasons  to  stay  home  and  either  watch  movies  or  sports  on  TV.  Picture  quality  has  become  better  and  better.  Actually  being  able  to  see  the  event  or  see  the  game,  one  might  argue  that  it's  a  better  experience  than  in  person."    Among  recent  TV  buyers  is  Kornel  Lelea  of  Hawthorne,  Calif.,  who  bought  a  new  70-­‐inch  Sharp  HDTV  before  his  annual  Super  Bowl  party.  Three  other  screens  also  had  the  game  on,  but  the  new  set  was  the  star  attraction.  "The  technology  is  so  much  better.  It  has  3-­‐D  capability,  the  color  saturation,"  he  says.  "It  is  just  beautiful."  

The  46-­‐year-­‐old  L.A.  housing  inspector  watches  a  lot  of  sports,  movies,  as  well  as  the  Discovery  Channel.  "With  the  (new)  70-­‐inch  now,  it's  

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better  than  a  movie  theater,"  he  says.  

And  it's  safer,  even  for  a  guy  who's  6  foot,  2  inches.  "I'm  a  big  Dodgers  fan,  but  the  last  time  I  was  at  a  game  someone  was  actually  trying  to  get  stupid  with  me,"  he  says.  "I'm  a  fan,  but  I'm  not  going  to  lose  my  career  or  my  life  over  a  game,  either,  you  know."  

Recent  assaults  at  sports  events  have  caught  the  attention  of  the  public  and  fueled  cocooning.  A  post-­‐game  stabbing  occurred  at  the  NFC  Championship  game  in  Atlanta  last  month.  And  in  2011,  national  attention  was  turned  on  Los  Angeles  after  a  San  Francisco  Giants  fan  was  beaten  at  Dodger  Stadium.  The  National  Football  League  in  2008  enacted  a  Fan  Code  of  Conduct;  last  season  it  toughened  the  rule  by  requiring  fans  kicked  out  of  a  stadium  to  take  an  online  behavior-­‐management  course  before  returning.  

While  convenience,  cost  and  quality  of  home  theater  were  the  biggest  factors  cited  for  staying  at  home,  security  was  a  concern  for  several  others  who  responded  to  USA  TODAY  about  the  subject  on  Twitter  and  Facebook.  "Why  leave  the  comfort  of  my  lazy  boy  (sic)  when  I  can  see/watch  a  HD  football  game?"  wrote  Nathan  Tameling.  

Said  Dave  Majewski  of  Columbus,  Ohio,  "It's  cheaper  and  more  comfortable  and  safer."  

That  is  a  growing  consumer  sentiment,  says  Tom  Campbell  of  retailer  Video  &  Audio  Center  in  Los  Angeles.  He  was  surprised  at  the  rate  at  which  consumers  began  snapping  up  new  $17,000,  84-­‐inch  Ultra  HD  televisions  after  LG  Electronics  began  shipping  them  in  late  October.  

"We  called  some  of  them  back  to  ask,  'Why  did  you  buy  it?'  We  found  out  that  with  the  ever-­‐increasing  violence  at  sports  events  people  are  becoming  concerned  about  their  safety,"  said  Campbell,  who  called  several  dozen  customers.  The  three-­‐store  chain  has  sold  more  than  100  Ultra  HD  displays.  

Other  retailers  also  report  an  uptick  in  sales  of  larger-­‐screen  TVs,  he  says:  "It's  beyond  the  cocooning  we  saw  in  the  Jimmy  Carter  years."  

Sales  of  Sony's  first  Ultra  HD  4K  TV,  a  $25,000  84-­‐inch  model  that  it  began  shipping  in  early  December,  have  been  "exceeding  expectations,"  says  Sony  Electronics  Vice  President  Brian  Siegel.  "Over  the  last  few  years,  consumers  have  been  spending  more  time  at  home,  and  their  expectations  are  increasing"  for  TV  quality,  he  says.  

Not  so  super  socially  

Super-­‐cocooning  is  making  us  less  social,  says  analyst  Michael  Greeson  of  The  Diffusion  Group,  a  media  research  group.  

Technology  makes  it  possible  for  us  to  avoid  leaving  our  homes  —  whether  seeing  a  movie  or  getting  food  delivered  —  and,  he  says,  it  can  lessen  our  connections  with  others.  

"With  all  the  information  and  entertainment  at  arm's  reach  at  home,  why  get  out  and  meet  up  with  a  friend  when  you  can  chat  on  Facebook?  

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Why  go  shopping  for  a  book  at  Barnes  &  Noble  when  you  can  search  through  a  virtually  unlimited  bookstore  like  Amazon  and  never  leave  your  couch?"  

Trend  analyst  Popcorn  doesn't  see  an  end  in  sight  for  super-­‐cocooning.  

If  anything,  we  will  line  our  cocoons  with  more  technology  like  the  IllumiRoom  that  Microsoft  showed  off  at  the  Consumer  Electronics  Show  last  month.  Using  a  Kinect  camera  controller  and  projector,  the  IllumiRoom  turns  your  entire  room  into  a  3-­‐D  movie  or  game  environment.  

"You  can  see  the  evolution,"  she  says.  "But  it  all  comes  out  of  the  same  thing:  We're  people  getting  more  and  more  nervous  about  being  vulnerable."  

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Venn  Diagram  –  Disillusionment      

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Venn  Diagram  –  Isolation

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  6  Theme:  Challenges  and  Successes  of  the  Twentieth  Century  

 In  this  unit  students  will  examine  various  postmodern  texts  that  reflect  the  change  in  American  values  and  culture,  specifically  addressing  civil  

rights  issues  and  an  emerging  counter-­‐culture.  Essential  Question  

Supporting  Questions   Key  Terms   Writing  Focus             Cross-­‐Curricular  Connections  

How  does  postmodern  text  reflect  change  in  American  values  and  culture?  

• How  did  the  emergence  of  civil  rights  movements  affect  women,  African  Americans  and  other  minorities?  

• How  did  the  1960’s  and  the  Vietnam  war  impact  the  country?    

• How  have  the  events  of  the  1960’s  affected  the  21st  century?  

 

Words  for  Review:  Culture      Tier  II:    Minimalism,  Postmodernism  Civil  Rights,  Cold  War,  McCarthyism    Tier  III:  Assimilation,  Counter-­‐culture  

Informative/  Explanatory  

• What  was  the  social  reform  that  occurred  at  the  turn  of  the  century?  

• What  were  the  significant  reform  movements  and  who  were  their  prominent  leaders?  

• What  was  the  United  States’  domestic  and  international  position  in  the  Cold  War  era?  

• What  were  the  political,  social,  and  economic  reactions  to  the  Cold  War  in  the  United  States?  

• How  did  the  emergence  and  development  of  human  rights  affect  culture  in  the  modern  era?  

How  do  modern  discoveries  change  American  culture?  

    ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

READING  

RL  11-­‐12.7  Analyze  multiple  interpretations  of  a  story,  drama,  or  poem  (e.g.,  recorded  or  live  production  of  a  play  or  recorded  novel  or  poetry),  evaluating  how  each  version  interprets  the  source  text.  (Include  at  least  one  play  by  Shakespeare  and  one  play  by  an  American  dramatist.)  

• I  can  analyze  multiple  versions  of  a  story,  drama,  or  poem.  • I  can  evaluate  how  multiple  versions  of  a  story,  drama,  or  poem  

interpret  the  source  text.  

RI  11-­‐12.1  Determine  two  or  more  central  ideas  of  a  text  and  analyze  their  development  over  the  course  of  the  text,  including  how  they  interact  and  build  on  one  another  to  provide  a  complex  analysis;  provide  an  objective  summary  of  the  text.  

• I  can  identify  two  or  more  themes  or  central  ideas  in  a  text  and  identify  how  they  work  together  to  create  a  complex  piece.    

• I  can  provide  an  objective  summary  of  a  text.    

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

                                                                                                                                                                                                         

WRITING   W  11-­‐12.2  Write  informative/explanatory  texts  to  examine  and  

convey  complex  ideas,  concepts,  and  information  clearly  and  accurately  through  the  effective  selection,  organization,  and  analysis  of  content.    

• I  can  write  informative/explanatory  texts  to  examine  and  convey  complex  ideas,  concepts,  and  information  clearly  and  accurately.  

• I  can  effectively  select,  organize,  and  analyze  content  in  my  informative/explanatory  writing.  

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a.  Introduce  a  topic;  organize  complex  ideas,  concepts,  and  information  so  that  each  new  element  builds  on  that  which  precedes  it  to  create  a  unified  whole;  include  formatting  (e.g.,  headings),  graphics  (e.g.,  figures,  tables),  and  multimedia  when  useful  to  aiding  comprehension.  

• I  can  introduce  a  topic,  and  build  complex  ideas  and  concepts  to  create  an  organized  and  unified  whole.  

• I  can  use  formatting,  graphics  and  multi-­‐media  to  aid  comprehension  when  useful.  

b.  Develop  the  topic  thoroughly  by  selecting  the  most  significant  and  relevant  facts,  extended  definitions,  concrete  details,  quotations,  or  other  information  and  examples  appropriate  to  the  audience’s  knowledge  of  the  topic.    

• I  can  identify  my  audience  and  use  relevant  concrete  details  (facts,  extended  definitions,  quotations,  or  other  information)  to  develop  the  topic  thoroughly.  

c.  Use  appropriate  and  varied  transitions  and  syntax  to  link  the  major  sections  of  the  text,  create  cohesion,  and  clarify  the  relationships  among  complex  ideas  and  concepts.  

• I  can  use  appropriate  and  varied  transitions  and  syntax  (sentence  fluency)  to  link  major  sections  of  the  text.  

• I  can  create  cohesion  and  clarify  relationships,  complex  ideas,  and  concepts  through  the  use  of  transitions.  

d.  Use  precise  language,  domain-­‐specific  vocabulary,  and  techniques  such  as  metaphor,  simile,  and  analogy  to  manage  the  complexity  of  the  topic.  

• I  can  use  precise  word  choice  and  relevant  vocabulary  to  direct  the  reader  through  the  topic.  

• I  can  use  metaphor,  simile,  and  analogy  to  direct  the  reader  through  the  topic.  

e.  Establish  and  maintain  a  formal  style  and  objective  tone  while  attending  to  the  norms  and  conventions  of  the  discipline  in  which  they  are  writing.  

• I  can  use  correct  and  appropriate  conventions  in  my  writing.  

f.  Provide  a  concluding  statement  or  section  that  follows  from  and  supports  the  information  or  explanation  presented  (e.g.,  articulating  implications  or  the  significance  of  the  topic).  

• I  can  provide  a  concluding  statement  that  supports  the  information  or  explanation  presented.  

• I  can  use  my  conclusion  to  articulate  the  implication  or  significance  of  the  topic.  

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

SPEAKING  &  

LISTENING  

 SL  11-­‐12.3  Evaluate  a  speaker’s  point  of  view,  reasoning,  and  use  of  evidence  and  rhetoric,  assessing  the  stance,  premises,  links  among  ideas,  word  choice,  points  of  emphasis,  and  tone  used.    

 • I  can  evaluate  how  a  speaker  uses  evidence,  reasoning,  point  of  

view,  and  rhetoric.  • I  can  evaluate  the  speaker's  stance,  premises,  word  choice,  

connects  among  ideas,  points  of  emphasis,  and  tone  used.    

  ELA  Core  Standards   Student  Learning  Targets  

LANGU

AGE   L  11-­‐12.6  Demonstrate  understanding  of  figurative  language,  word  

relationships,  and  nuances  in  word  meanings.  • I  can  demonstrate  an  understanding  of  figurative  language,  word  

relationships,  and  the  distinction  in  words  meanings.  a.  Interpret  figures  of  speech  (e.g.,  hyperbole,  paradox)  in  context  and  analyze  their  role  in  the  text.  

• I  can  identify  figures  of  speech  in  the  text.  • I  can  analyze  the  impact  of  figures  of  speech  in  the  text.  

b.  Analyze  nuances  in  the  meaning  of  words  with  similar  denotations.  

• I  can  analyze  the  nuances  (tone)  in  the  meaning  of  words  with  similar  meanings.  

 

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 Unit  6  Text  Resources  

 Literary   Informational    

 Novel  The  Things  They  Carried  by  Tim  O’Brien  (L  880)*  Warriors  Don’t  Cry  Melba  Pattillo  (L  1000)    Short  Story  “The  Lottery”  by  Shirley  Jackson  (L  690)*    “The  First  Seven  Years”  by  Bernard  Malamud  (L  1160)*  “The  Brown  Chest”  by  John  Updike  (L  1300)  “Average  Waves  in  Unprotected  Waters”  by  Anne  Tyler    (L  725)*  “Everyday  Use”  by  Alice  Walker  (L  700)*  “The  Writer  in  the  Family”  by  E.  L.  Doctorow  (L  700)*  “This  Is  What  It  Means  to  Say  Phoenix,  Arizona”  by  Sherman  Alexie  (L  660)*    Drama  A  Raisin  in  the  Sun  by  Lorraine  Hansberry  The  Crucible  by  Arthur  Miller  (could  teach  this  for  Unit  1)    CAUTION  -­‐  *  Indicates  that  the  Lexile  level  of  the  text  is  below  the  recommended  Lexile  range  for  that  grade  level.      

 “Rethinking  the  American  Dream.”  Vanity  Fair.    David  Kamp.    April  2009.    (L  1440)    Various  articles  on  the  Cold  War    Various  articles  on  the  Red  Scare    Current  articles  and  editorials.  Various  Articles  on  Assimilation    “Who's  Coming  to  America,”  Sam  Roberts  Today's  immigrants  come  from  different  places,  but  their  reasons  are  similar  to  those  that  motivated  earlier  immigrants  (L  1360)    Behind  the  Veil  Debate,  Alan  Cowell  in  London  (L  1330)    Rescuing  the  Real  Uncle  Tom,  David  S.  Reynolds  (L  1360)      The  Things  They  Carried  The  Progressive  “What  War  Looks  Like”  by  Howard  Zinn  (L  1450)        The  CSD  Media  Wiki  site  has  links  to  most  of  the  above  listed  items  plus  additional  links  to  other  texts  that  would  fit  this  unit.          

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Eleventh  Grade  Unit  6  

Glossary  of  Key  Terms  Key  Term   Definition  

ASSIMILATION    The  process  of  absorbing  new  ideas  into  an  existing  cognitive  structure  CULTURE   See  Unit  1  COUNTER-­‐CULTURE  

The  counterculture  of  the  1960s  refers  to  a  cultural  movement  that  mainly  developed  in  the  United  States  and  England  and  spread  throughout  much  of  the  western  world  between  1956  and  1974.  The  movement  gained  momentum  during  the  U.S.  government's  extensive  military  intervention  in  Vietnam.  Many  scholars  of  this  era  believe  that  the  peak  years  of  the  counterculture  movement  were  from  1965  to  1972.  As  the  1960s  progressed,  widespread  tensions  developed  in  American  society  that  tended  to  flow  along  generational  lines  regarding  the  war  in  Vietnam,  race  relations,  sexual  mores,  women's  rights,  traditional  modes  of  authority,  experimentation  with  psychoactive  drugs,  and  differing  interpretations  of  the  American  Dream.  New  cultural  forms  emerged,  including  the  pop  music  of  the  British  band  The  Beatles  and  the  concurrent  rise  of  hippie  culture,  which  led  to  the  rapid  evolution  of  a  youth  subculture  that  emphasized  change  and  experimentation.  In  addition  to  the  Beatles,  many  songwriters,  singers  and  musical  groups  from  the  United  Kingdom  and  America  came  to  impact  the  counterculture  movement.  

CIVIL  RIGHTS   1.    The  rights  to  personal  liberty  established  by  the  13th  and  14th  Amendments  to  the  U.S.  constitution  and  certain  Congressional  acts,  especially  as  applied  to  an  individual  or  a  minority  group.  2.  The  rights  to  full  legal,  social,  and  economic  equality  extended  to  blacks.  

COLD  WAR   A  state  of  political  tension  and  military  rivalry  between  nations  that  stops  short  of  full-­‐scale  war,  especially  that  which  existed  between  the  United  States  and  Soviet  Union  following  World  War  II.  

McCARTHYISM     1.    The  practice  of  making  accusations  of  disloyalty,  especially  of  pro-­‐Communist  activity,  in  many  instances  unsupported  by  proof  or  based  on  slight,  doubtful,  or  irrelevant  evidence.  2.    The  practice  of  making  unfair  allegations  or  using  unfair  investigative  techniques,  especially  in  order  to  restrict  dissent  or  political  criticism.  

MINIMALISM   A  technique  in  music,  literature,  or  design  that  is  typified  by  extreme  sparseness  and  simplicity.    

POSTMODERNISM   A  general  term  that  refers  to  the  changes,  developments,  and  tendencies  that  have  taken  place  in  literature,  art,  music,  architecture,  and  philosophy  since  the  1940s  or  1950s;  a  movement  away  from  

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modernism.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                               Unit  6  Planning  and  Notes  

Page 59: SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) CURRICULUM …csdela.weebly.com/uploads/9/5/6/3/9563459/eleventh_grade_map.pdfCanyons School District’s English language arts curriculum maps

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