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Vol. 63 NO.3 www.southphillyreview.com JANUARY 21, 2010 Tiger on the prowl A pugilist from the 1800 block of South Taylor Street returns to the Mecca of Boxing this week- end for a shot at the WBA featherweight championship. By Bill Gelman.............. Page 34 He’s the boss The newly formed Furness choir is performing alongside Tony Danza at Northeast High, where the star has been teaching for an upcoming reality show. By Lorraine Gennaro Review Staff Writer A ll smiles and wearing dress pants, a winter jacket and shirt, Tony Danza and an entourage of A&E producers walked into Furness High School’s auditorium Jan. 14, where the choir was rehearsing. “Hi, I’m Tony Danza,” the 58-year- old actor/singer/dancer said to the 10th- through 12th-graders and their music teacher Ryan Miller, who was at the piano. Perhaps the famous star of the hit com- edies “Taxi” and “Who’s the Boss?” felt See DANZA SHOW page 10 Sports A strong, unpleasant odor described as rotted eggs or burnt garlic filled the air last week following an equipment cleaning at Sunoco. Revamped ! By Amanda L. Snyder Review Staff Writer A nne DeStefano was unexpectedly awakened at 2 a.m. last Thursday, but not from a loud bang or somebody snoring. The resident of Broad and Pollock streets can blame her dis- turbed sleep on her sense of smell. “I was going to throw up,” she said of the unexpected stench that wafted into her home. “It smelled like bad, rotten food,” friend Tina Nardini, of 15th and Pollock streets, who became aware of the odor at about 5:30 a.m., added. Neither found out the source until later that morning. “Everyone thought they had a gas leak,” DeStefano said of conferring with her neighbors. The smell originated at the Sunoco Refinery following an equipment cleaning prior to a scheduled maintenance project, Sunoco spokesman Thomas Golem- beski said. “It appears during the washing process some oil got on the roof of a large storage tank and odor from the roof of the tank drifted into the neighborhood on the wind,” he said. About a dozen calls from residents who deter- mined the odor came from the refinery at 3144 W. Passyunk Ave. were made to Su- noco at about 9:15 p.m. Jan. 13. See SMELL page 9 Redesigned and easier to navigate, www.southphillyreview.com covers it all.
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  • Vol. 63 NO.3 www.southphi l lyreview.com JANUARY 21 , 2010

    Tiger on the prowlA pugilist from the 1800 block

    of South Taylor Street returns to the Mecca of Boxing this week-

    end for a shot at the WBA featherweight championship.

    By Bill Gelman..............Page 34

    Hes the boss The newly formed Furness choir

    is performing alongside Tony Danza at Northeast High, where the star has been teaching for an

    upcoming reality show.

    By Lorraine Gennaro Review Staff Writer

    All smiles and wearing dress pants, a winter jacket and shirt, Tony Danza and an entourage of A&E producers walked into Furness High Schools auditorium Jan. 14, where the choir was rehearsing.

    Hi, Im Tony Danza, the 58-year-old actor/singer/dancer said to the 10th- through 12th-graders and their music teacher Ryan Miller, who was at the piano.

    Perhaps the famous star of the hit com-edies Taxi and Whos the Boss? felt

    See DANZA SHOW page 10

    S p o r t s

    A strong, unpleasant odor described as rotted eggs or burnt garlic fi lledthe air last week following an equipment cleaning at Sunoco.

    Revamped !

    By Amanda L. Snyder Review Staff Writer

    Anne DeStefano was unexpectedly awakened at 2 a.m. last Thursday, but not from a loud bang or somebody snoring. The resident of Broad and Pollock streets can blame her dis-turbed sleep on her sense of smell. I was going to throw up, she said of the unexpected stench that wafted into her home. It smelled like bad, rotten food, friend Tina Nardini, of 15th and Pollock streets, who became aware of the odor at about 5:30 a.m., added.

    Neither found out the source until later that morning. Everyone thought they had a gas leak, DeStefano said of conferring with her neighbors.

    The smell originated at the Sunoco Refi nery following an equipment cleaning prior to a scheduled maintenance project, Sunoco spokesman Thomas Golem-beski said.

    It appears during the washing process some oil got on the roof of a large storage tank and odor from the roof of the tank drifted into the neighborhood on the wind, he said.

    About a dozen calls from residents who deter-mined the odor came from the refi nery at

    3144 W. Passyunk Ave. were made to Su-noco at about 9:15 p.m. Jan. 13.

    See SMELL page 9

    Redesigned and easier to navigate,www.southphillyreview.com covers it all.

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    S o u t h P h i l l y R e v i e w C h r o n i c l e

    in the

    12 Lifestyles:Ground level A former Queen Village

    resident displays his brand of street photography, which highlights his one-time neighborhood, at the Phila-delphia Museum of Art.

    By Amanda L. Snyder

    6 Police Report: Dead in a closet A man was arrested after police found his live-in girlfriend stabbed and strangled to death inside their Graduate Hospital area home. By Lorraine Gennaro

    8 Better to give Martin Luther King Day was a time for many to extend a helping hand in improv-ing communities.By Lorraine Gennaro

    14 Cardella: A brief history of macaroniThe man who came up with the idea for SpaghettiOs died recently and it got me to thinking that Americans will eat pasta in any form, no matter how debased. By Tom Cardella

    I n s i d eBridal Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

    Classi eds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

    Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

    Horoscopes/Puzzles/Comic . . . . . . 30

    Movie Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

    Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

    Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

    Social Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

    Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

    Whats Happening . . . . . . . . . . . 16

    Be sure to check us out on Facebook and Twitter

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    We should send a ship to the out-skirts of Haiti to help send victims back and forth for treatment.

    Tom Henderson,17th and Ritner streets

    They should send heavy equip-ment to the country in order to fi nd survivors. Medical supplies and water would also help a lot.

    Renee Johnson,23rd and Morris streets

    Were doing the best we can in this current economy, but we could send more food and clothing.

    Stephanie Sentyz,15th and McKean streets

    I heard that the streets are being fi lled with stacked corpses and that the gangs in the area have started to take control of the country. We need to send the military to the country in order to secure the streets.

    Jenna White,13th and Jackson streets

    Interviews by Ross BurlingamePhotos by Amanda Thurlow

    Tell us your thoughtswww.southphillyreview.com/opinion.

    L e t t e r s

    The questions of HaitiW o r d o n t h e S t r e e t

    How do you feel the United States should help earthquake-ravaged Haiti?

    To the Editor: For the fi rst time in my life I have

    asked myself the question, are we ready? I had the unfortunate expe-rience on Sunday to see the tragic results of the earthquake in Haiti. The fi rst child from the earthquake-ravaged area arrived to my place of work and it hit me. This child was probably out playing and, with no warning, the Earth unleashed its awesome power, bringing down ev-erything on its rattling crust.

    Wealthy, poor, weak, strong, all colors and religions were effected. Thousands perished and even more are left with nothing. No food, wa-ter or shelter. Panic and lawlessness have set in. Looting and fi ghting for food and water has become the norm. Standing structures have been taken over by bandits. And most of these horror stories are left untold.

    Humans are fi ckle, panic-stricken beings. In an instant, the Earth took Haiti back to primitive times. People were left to survive on animalistic in-stincts alone.

    What can we learn from this? Are we ready? We rely too much on gov-ernment to comfort us. In Haiti, the president is even homeless.

    Have we ever thought of a plan of action in a destructive event? Af-ter 9/11, many plans of action were implemented by the local and federal authorities. We have the luxury of warning services. But do you per-sonally know what to do in the event of a disaster?

    Each home should take time to practice fi re drills involving the en-tire family. Know meeting places outside the home that are safe. Know where the old bomb shelters are (like in schools). Have a battery-powered radio with extra batteries at your front door to take with you as you leave the home. Go through different scenarios fi re, fl ood, earthquake, terror attack, etc.

    Are you ready?

    Marc Ferguson Sr.South Philadelphia

    To the Editor:Why is it, with the unprecedented

    amount of money collected and re-markable amounts of food and sup-plies amassed from America and

    many other countries, Haiti and most of its people still are not be-ing fed?

    We do such a wonderfully colos-sal outpouring of heartfelt giving and responding to countries like Haiti and, even in our country and as critical as the situation is, it takes forever to get supplies to where they are so desperately needed.

    To me, there can be no justifi able reason for dillydallying and daw-dling. For Gods sake, people are dying by the thousands from lack of food, water and medical attention. Isnt there anyone left with brains for the planning and organizational skills necessary to facilitate and ex-pedite life-saving efforts?

    And why is it there is such crip-pling, gut-wrenching poverty in practically all of the black nations, even those with plenty of natural resources that are not being used? Why are there not factories manu-facturing goods needed all over the world? Are their leaders just help-ing themselves at the peril of their people?

    I just dont comprehend the lack of compliance and leadership after so much crucial time has passed. We must do whatever it takes to help bring these countries into the 21st century and to be self-sustaining and productive. After all, they are neces-sary to the world.

    Frank CavallaroSouth Philadelphia

    Living the dream To the Editor:

    I am deeply moved by the outpour-ing of genuine concern and the unifi -cation of people from many areas of the world who are assisting Haiti in their horrendous disaster, which has affected many lives.

    One can witness the fulfi llment of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s vi-sion by observing the collaboration of many races that overtly expressed division not so long ago. This is def-initely a celebration that would have brought tears to Dr. King and those who believed in his vision, if they were alive today.

    Rest assure, those who support

    racial unity today are rejoicing at this glorious expression of human kindness.

    Barbara Ann Mary MackSouthwest Philadelphia

    Out of line To the Editor:

    I met the real queen of mean on New Years Day. She was wearing a brown coat with a hood and had staked out her spot at Broad Street and Washington Avenue to watch the parade. She refused to let an 8-year-old boy stand next to her at the rail. Get away, she told him.

    I have been going to the parade for 50 years and never saw anyone refuse to let a child see the parade. Your face is burned into my memory and I have some choice words for you, but being a Christian woman I cant say them.

    What should have been a pleasant experience for the child was ugly. By the way, karma will get you!

    Margie DomardSouth Philadelphia

    Comment on these letters or topics at http://www.southphillyreview.com/opin-ion/letters.

    Community PapersCirculation Verifi cation Service

    S o u t h P h i l l y R e v i e w C h r o n i c l e

    S O U T H P H I L A D E L P H I A S C O M M U N I T Y N E W S P A P E R

    12th & Porter streets Philadelphia, Pa. 19148 (215) 336-2500 Fax (215) 336-1112

    Web site: www.southphillyreview.comEditorial e-mail: [email protected]

    EDITOR Cynthia Marone-ext. 121

    [email protected]

    MANAGING EDITOR Bill Gelman-ext. 123

    [email protected]

    PUBLISHER John C. Gallo-ext. 101ADVERTISING MANAGER Daniel Tangi-ext. 129

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    ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any advertising submitted. Publisher assumes no responsibility for errors made except to reprint that portion of any ad having an error. Display ad rates available upon request.

    Advertisers: Check your ads weekly. The Review can be responsible only the fi rst time an ad appears.

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    Wewelcomeyour letters The writers full name, phone number with area code and com-plete address must be included for verifi cation purposes. South Philly Review reserves the right to request proof of identifi cation;

    The deadline is noon Monday.

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    By Greg Bezani s9V I E W F I N D E R8

    Comment at www.southphillyreview.com/view nder

    To see more of these posts, as well as our other blogs, visit www.southphillyreview.com/blogs.php

    @

    TRAINING WHEELS: Instead of opening the textbooks, Mastery Charter School Thomas Campus students, 927 Johnston St., chose Cycling 101 under Tuesday afternoons sunset in the empty parking lots of Citizens Bank Park. The introductory lessons, sponsored by the Cadence Cycling Foundation, provide local youths age 9 to 16 the opportunity and guidance to advance to the elite levels of future competitions. SPR a

    Its all about the music at Ed Condrans On that Note, found at http://onthatnotespr.wordpress.com/.

    Heavy as an AnvilJan. 13

    The music industry is unpredictable. Sometimes bands who appear to be headed toward stardom make it, but usu-ally the ride to the top ends abruptly and often right out of the gate.

    Anvil formed in 1973 and appeared to be headed toward heavy metal glory, but it never happened. The Canadian head-bangers, who played at the TLA, 334 South St., Sunday, never enjoyed the spoils of fame, but there is Anvil! The Story of Anvil, an incredibly entertaining DVD.

    The groups ups and mostly downs is fascinating. Its not as funny as This Is Spinal Tap, but its brilliant on another level since its a documentary, not a moc-kumentary. The Anvil story is real.

    Anvil is working on a new album and has appeared on The Tonight Show with Conan OBrien. Anvil is one of the best metal bands youve never heard of.

    New and improved really!Jan. 12

    New and improved might describe the latest laundry detergent, but it rarely

    describes bands who reunite, but those ad-jectives apply to Camper Van Beethoven.

    The group was one of the most idiosyn-cratic, smart and unpredictable alt-rock bands of the 1980s. However, there was a missing element stellar musicianship.

    Ill be the fi rst to admit that, violinist-gui-tarist Jonathan Segal said while calling from Troy, N.Y. I was a crappy-ass player dur-ing the 80s. Theres no debating that. I think were all so much better since we developed our musical skills with other bands.

    One of those other bands was Cracker, which is fronted by CVB vocalist-guitarist David Lowery. The cerebral Lowery pulled double-duty Jan. 13 at World Caf Live, 3025 Walnut St., when Camper Van Beethoven and Cracker co-headlined a show.

    Its a great situation, Segal said. Camper typically opens and Ill join Cracker on stage toward the end of their set. Its a great package. Two solid bands for the price of one.

    Cracker is out behind its latest album, the wry, clever Sunrise in the Land of Milk and Honey. However, CVB isnt showcasing new material.

    Were in between albums, Segal said. David has spent so much time with Cracker that the songs arent there yet for Camper, but they will be. Its all right. I love playing the older material. Its still challenging and fun.

    Segal particularly enjoys delivering cuts from 89s Key Lime Pie. Thats ironic since after cutting the demos, Segal was kicked out of the band SPR

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    P o l i c e R e p o r t

    By Lorraine GennaroReview Staff Writer

    A 27-year-old was taken into cus-tody after police said he stabbed and strangled his live-in girlfriend on the 900 block of South 16th Street and dumped her body in a closet.

    Police responding to a report of someone screaming arrived at the couples second-fl oor apartment in the Graduate Hospital area at about 6:50 p.m. Jan.

    12 and found Ameya Spratley, 28, partial-ly clothed and dead in a bedroom closet, Offi cer Tanya Little of the Police Public Affairs Unit said. A medic pronounced Spratley dead at the scene at 7:02. She had sustained three knife wounds to her left torso and had strangulation marks around her neck, Little said.

    Keith Moore, 23, was charged with murder, possession of an instrument of crime and abuse of a corpse, the latter, police said, was for stuffi ng the body in the closet.

    Homicide detectives cited domestic is-sues as the motive and the weapon was not recovered.

    Some friendA man told police a pal of 43 years

    sliced him with a box cutter following an argument at the accuseds birthday cel-ebration.

    Claudius Dixon, 52, from the 1900 block of South Street, was arrested at his residence in the Graduate Hospital area at about 9:40 p.m. the day of the alleged incident, Detective Danielle Tolliver of South Detective Division said.

    At about 9 p.m. Saturday, the 53-year-old victim and Dixon were celebrating the latters birthday inside his house when an argument broke out, the nature of which investigators did not disclose. During the dispute, Dixon asked the victim to leave, which he did, Tolliver said. While waiting outside for a taxi, Dixon allegedly came up behind him and sliced him on the right shoulder. As the victim turned around, he

    saw the accused placing a long box cutter in his pocket and Dixon walking back into the home, Tolliver said.

    A medic took the man to Pennsylvania Hospital, where he needed 10 stitches to close the wound. Meanwhile, offi cers took Dixon into custody and charged him with aggravated assault, simple assault, reck-lessly endangering another person and possession of an instrument of crime.

    Blood doesnt lie Police found a bloody trail they said

    backs up a victims version of being shot during a home invasion and then attempt-ing to chase one of the offenders down.

    The blood belonged to the victim, who suffered a gunshot to his right leg and was taken via medic to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in stable con-dition.

    At about 1:30 a.m. Tuesday, a friend of the victim paid him a visit on the 1900 block of South Beechwood Street, Detec-tive Danielle Tolliver of South Detectives said. Once inside, the men heard a knock on the door and the pal got up to answer it, at which point two men in black ski masks and dark clothing and armed with 9mms forced their way inside.

    The 23-year-old victim began struggling with one offender, managing to throw him out of the house, but in the process he was shot. Despite his injury, the victim tried to track down his assailant by running north on Beechwood, west on Miffl in, north on 22nd, east on Moore, then fi nally south on 21st Street to Sigel Street.

    A neighbor told police she heard a gun-shot and spotted the victim running north on Beechwood.

    One of the home invaders was described as about 6 foot and 190 to 200 pounds, while the other was about 5-foot-9 and 170 pounds.

    To report information, call South Detec-tives at 215-686-3013.

    Bullets on the block Shots fi red on the 2000 block of Gar-

    net Street luckily missed a grandmother waiting in her vehicle for her grandchil-dren. A 16-year-old was not so lucky, as

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    P o l i c e R e p o r t

    he took a bullet to his right upper arm and was transported via medic to HUP, where he was listed in stable condition, Detective Danielle Tolliver of South De-tectives said.

    The teen told police he was walking with three friends shortly before 7 p.m. Sun-day on McKean Street from 19th towards Garnet when they saw two men walking behind them. As the pair approached, one pulled a handgun and fi red upon the trio, striking the 16-year-old.

    The grandmother was unharmed while sitting inside her red 2005 Hyundai, but three slugs struck her car, police said.

    Detectives recovered ballistics evi-dence on the 2000 block of Garnet and also discovered a bullet hole in the front windshield of a silver 2000 Saab; inside that automobile, investigators found a bullet fragment.

    The perpetrators were described as ages 17 to 20; one was about 5-foot-11, thin, with a gray hoodie and silver handgun, while the other was about 5-foot-6 with a medium build and in a black coat.

    To report information, call South Detec-tives at 215-686-3013.

    Shot and robbedAfter a man complied with a rob-

    bers request, he was shot anyway. The incident happened at about 8 p.m. Jan. 11 on the 1800 block of Snyder Avenue.

    The 18-year-old was walking west on the avenue, approaching 19th Street, when a man ordered him to clean out his pock-ets, Detective Danielle Tolliver of South Detectives said. After the teen handed over $20, the man shot him once in the left thigh.

    The victim was taken by private auto to Methodist Hospital, where he was in stable condition.

    To report information, call South Detec-tives at 215-686-3013.

    A slew of chargesDetectives lobbed nearly a dozen charg-

    es at a man they said tried to mug a 45-year-old at knifepoint Jan. 13 as the lat-ter left a residence on the 1500 block of South 30th Street.

    David Wiggins, 21, from the above block in Grays Ferry, was arrested at his home at about 7:40 p.m., 20 minutes after the al-leged incident occurred, Detective Danielle Tolliver of South Detectives said.

    The victim was walking north on the east side of the 1500 block of South 30th when he was approached from behind by an unknown man in a black ski mask, later believed to be Wiggins.

    Wiggins is accused of sticking a knife in the victims neck and ordering him to give it up, Tolliver said. Instead of com-plying, the victim turned and grabbed the suspects arm, attempting to gain control of the blade. The victim was able to fi ght off his assailant and run across the street, only to be followed by the man. With the alleged offender on his tail, the victim ducked behind a car and eluded the per-son, who took off down an alleyway be-tween 30th and Newkirk streets, Tolliver said.

    The victim called police, who searched the area and rounded up Wiggins. Police found a knife on the suspect and charged him with possession of an instrument of crime, simple assault, aggravated assault, recklessly endangering another person, terroristic threats, robbery, theft and re-lated offenses.

    To report information, call South Detec-tives at 215-686-3013.

    Accosted at the door Two men converged on a child as he was

    walking his bike up the stairs to a second-story apartment on the 700 block of South Randolph Street.

    The armed thugs, whose faces were concealed, forced the 12-year-old inside the Queen Village dwelling at about 2:10 p.m. Monday and sat him down in his liv-ing room while they rummaged through the premises, Detective Danielle Tolliver of South Detectives said. Assorted elec-tronics and household items were swiped by the two, who were last seen running south on South Randolph.

    The victim was unharmed in the attack and police did not place a value on the sto-len goods.

    The offenders were described as about 5-foot-3; one had a black skullcap pulled over his face and wore a red-hooded sweat-shirt and blue jeans, while his accomplice was tall and also had a black skullcap hid-ing his face; that man wore a gray-hooded sweatshirt and baggy blue jeans.

    To report information, call South Detec-tives at 215-686-3013.

    Donate for the homelessThe 3rd Police District is accepting

    donations of new socks, underwear and toiletries for the homeless at its 11th-and-Wharton-streets headquarters.

    For more information, call Community Relations Offi cer Juan Ace Delgado at 215-686-3033. SPR

    Contact Staff Writer Lorraine Gennaro at [email protected] or ext. 124. Comment at www.southphillyreview.com/news.

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    By Lorraine GennaroReview Staff Writer

    After pouring blue and yellow paint into aluminum trays, seven Youth Build Charter School students armed with rollers and brushes began freshening up doors and classrooms Mon-day morning at Dixon Learning Academy, 2201 Moore St., as part of the 15th An-nual Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service.

    For this group of fi ve girls and two boys, painting was a piece of cake having done it many times before and they have performed far more diffi cult tasks, like dry-walling, since their curriculum at the Broad-and-Girard-streets institution re-quires 675 hours of community service a year.

    This is actually a small thing for us, 20-year-old Andrea Dingle from Seventh Street and Snyder Avenue said as her 18-year-old brother Hassan painted a nearby wall.

    Cartier Simmons, 19, from the same area as the Dingles, along with Brittany Fowler, 19, from the Lehigh section; Imin Jones, 18, from the Northeast; Shanaya Bell, 19, from the Northeast; and Janeia Chriswell, 18, from North Philly, rounded out the volunteers who spruced up the Point Breeze based day care and after-school program complex.

    The group is part of more than 200 Youth Build students ages 18 to 21 who are former dropouts that are now putting their lives back together and getting their high school diplomas. Several instructors, including Nina Ball, were on hand at Dix-on to lend a painting hand.

    This is a very motivated group. Doing community service builds character and self-esteem and gives back to the commu-nity. [Youth Build] believe in community service, Ball said.

    Dixon Learning Academy, which is un-der the Diversifi ed Community Services umbrella, welcomed the new look. About 128 kids attend the age 6-weeks-through-sixth-grade day care and nearly 60 partake in after-school programs. Twenty-six full- and part-time staffers are employed by the center.

    I think its great, Dixon Program Di-rector Delores Mills said as she watched the Youth Build students at work. We are

    in the process of re-accreditation and a fresh coat of paint makes everything look nice. We believe its a nice looking center and we take pride in that.

    For Bell and Andrea Dingle, doing work at a facility attended by children and youths was especially meaningful.

    I have a daughter and this is a day care, so I would want somebody to do something nice for my daughters day care. We need to be a good role model to our children. We need to motivate them to help bring about change. The more we come together as a community, it will bring us together and stop all the killing, Bell said.

    Added Andrea Dingle, I feel good be-cause I feel like Im giving back to my neighborhood, adding her 5-year-old cousin Taja Wilkinson attends the day care whose walls and doors Dingle and the others painted.

    Jones philosophy about performing ser-vice on the late Dr. Kings day is simple: I think were making a difference. Each

    one, teach one, he said.

    MORE THAN 65,000 volunteers and hun-dreds of projects were planned around the city Monday in observance of Martin Lu-ther King Day.

    What started 15 years ago as a project has become a growing nationwide move-ment of celebrating Dr. Kings legacy by uniting people of all backgrounds and ages and turning pressing community concerns into ongoing citizen action, Todd Bernstein, president of Global Citi-zen and director and founder of the Great-er Philadelphia King Day of Service, said in a press release.

    In 1994, then-President Bill Clinton signed a law making Jan. 18 a national holiday. About a dozen projects took place in South Philly. Other initiatives included African-American and Asian students at South Philadelphia High participating in a series of workshops to promote racial harmony and healing in the aftermath of

    recent violence at the school; the Cambo-dian Association of Greater Philadelphia engaging in a community cleanup effort in the neighborhood where its located, Seventh and Porter streets; and Sunrise of Philadelphia Inc. cleaning up of teachers desks, handrails and glass at Bok Techni-cal Schools, 1901 S. Ninth St.

    Over at the JCCs Stiffel Senior Center, 604 Porter, volunteers cleaned two food pantries, washed windowsills on the sec-ond fl oor, cleaned keyboards and moni-tors in the computer lab, spruced up the centers thrift store and served lunch to members. Eight of the volunteers were from Congregation Rodeph Shalom, 615 N. Broad St., while one was Stiffel mem-ber Rachel Garber, 66, from Sixth and Ritner streets.

    Volunteerism is a very important part of Judaism. We are commanded and ex-pected to help and were supposed to be grateful for the opportunity to perform a mitzvah, Garber said.

    Some of the Stiffel volunteers were mul-tigenerational families, like 9-year-old Addison Schwarz, his brother Nathaniel, 14, and their mother, Nora.

    This is kind of a tradition. We do it be-cause we care about people who are older. Its fun. I like it, Addison said.

    This was the West Philly familys third year partaking in MLK Day community service at the Stiffel Center, but volunteer-ing runs deep in Noras blood. She has been helping others in various capacities through her synagogue since 94. An inte-gral part of her life and the teachings of her faith, Nora taught her boys accordingly.

    This is why people bring their kids on these things so they can learn. If they do it at school, thats fi ne, but they associate it with school, she said.

    Susan Hoffman, Stiffel site director, oversaw the many activities the congre-gates performed and was appreciative of their efforts.

    I think its terrifi c. Its a way to make members of the community aware of the work that we do. Its in keeping with Mar-tin Luther Kings message of service and giving back, she said. SPR

    Contact Staff Writer Lorraine Gennaro at [email protected] or ext. 124. Comment at www.southphillyreview.com/news/features.

    Better to giveMartin Luther King Day was a time for many to extend

    a helping hand in improving communities.

    Students from the Youth Build Charter School painted doors and classrooms at Dixon Learning Academy, 2201 Moore St., for Martin Luther King Day.

    Staff photo by Greg Bezani s

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    Sunoco looked into the complaints and began monitoring the air inside and out-side its facility.

    The readings all along told us that the situation was safe there, Golembeski said. It was generally a nuisance un-pleasant, but not harmful.

    Joanne S. was unaware of the stench, since she slept through it, but the next morning her coworkers complained about it, she said.

    Then again, a nuclear bomb wouldnt wake me up, the 17th-Street-and-Oregon-Avenue resident added.

    However, she does get severe migraines from various smells and awoke Thursday with a painful headache. She does not believe Sunocos claim the emission was harmless.

    I dont believe them because people lie, she said. They dont want us to wor-ry. If so many people smelled it no, I cant believe it.

    The odor reached parts of Southwest and South Philly, the areas the refi nery strad-dles, and even South Jersey.

    The Girard Estate Neighbors Association is seeking more information from Sunoco, the civic groups President Vince Ricchiu-ti, who received complaints of a rotten egg or burnt garlic smell, said.

    That odor did smell kind of foul, but at this point, we dont know what to be concerned about, the resident of 21st and Shunk streets said, not-ing the siren system, which would sound if a hazardous material were released by the refi nery, did not go off.

    THE FIRE DEPARTMENT was notifi ed and on the scene prior to determining if Sunoco was the cause, Golembeski said. But Su-noco never directly noti-fi ed the Fire Department of the fumes coming from the refi nery last week, Phila-delphia Fire Department Executive Chief Daniel A. Williams said. Many calls were received last Wednes-day evening, but they were

    from across South Philadelphia, which led to eight to 10 fi re companies scouring the communities where the calls originated to determine the source.

    They were basically roaming the streets, he said of the fi re crews.

    Fire department offi cials have met with Sunoco to go over procedures, including notifi cation, even if the refi nery handled the situation internally in the past and will meet in the near future to address the most recent incident, Williams said.

    We can at least get notifi ed, so we dont have our company all over the place, he added.

    Sunoco has complied with procedure in the past, Williams said, adding, Everyone has been on the same page. When theyre

    aware that they have some issue, theyll at least notify the company.

    In a statement last week, state Rep. Robert Donatucci said the refi nery did not inform public safety offi cials until hours later.

    The turmoil could have been greatly reduced if authorities had been informed by the plant hours earlier so area resi-dents who smelled the stench would not be so alarmed that it was poisonous or originating from their home, he said.

    Donatucci, in turn, has called on the states De-partment of Environmen-tal Protection to investi-gate, as well as the City Department of Healths

    Air Management Services. He also will ask the House of Representatives Envi-ronmental Resources and Energy Com-mittee to hold a public hearing to ex-amine the issue and decide if state law should be amended.

    While Sunoco is quick to claim that the situation is safe and that it posed no health or safety hazard, my nose tells me different, Donatucci said. I would like to know exactly what was emitted into the air, at what levels and the degree of contamination that the residents of South Philadelphia were exposed to.

    Sunoco has since been fi ned the maxi-mum of $300 for violating the citys air management code and additional fi nes could be forthcoming if federal violations

    are found, city Department of Health spokesman Jeff Moran said. According to Moran, the health department does not test the air, as that is the fi re departments job. Williams did not confi rm if the air was tested.

    Even Deputy Managing Director for Emergency Management MaryAnn Tier-ney said she was not alerted until 6:30 a.m. last Thursday. Now her offi ce has plans to meet with the fi re department and Sunoco, as well as develop a way to better serve the public in non-emergen-cies since 911 received many calls, as did Philadelphia Gas Works, which got 138 overnight a time when it typically gets six Tierney said.

    What should be done when the incident

    is not an emergency in terms of being a hazard to the public, but still causes alarm or causes a negative impact to the public?, she said of her objective.

    While at Wendys, 2340 W. Oregon Ave., that night, Danielle Ialongo became acutely aware of what was in the air.

    I said, What is that smell?, and I had my jacket up to here, she said as she pulled her collar over her nose. It wasnt an oily smell. I couldnt describe it.

    Ialongo thinks residents need to be in-formed, regardless.

    If something happens like that and there is a leak, people need to be notifi ed, the resident of 15th and Ritner streets said. For years, I didnt think Sunoco should be right there.

    After the origin of the smell was detect-ed, Sunoco took action, Golembeski said.

    We stopped the washing of the equipment and that helped mitigate the odor, and we also started planning a way to get the oil off the roof of the tank, he said.

    Last Thursday, workers cleaned the oil that caused the odor off of the tank and the maintenance project was put on hold, Golembeski said. Sunoco is investigat-ing how the oil got on the tank and, upon completion, will put corrective measures in place to prevent a repeat.

    We are very sorry that this happened, he said. We understand that it inconve-nienced a lot of people and we just want them to know we are sorry. We never want these types of events to occur. Were going to take the appropriate steps to prevent it from happening in the future. SPR

    Contact Staff Writer Amanda Sny-der at [email protected] or ext. 117. Comment at www.southphillyreview.com/news/fea-tures.

    And the readings all along told us that the situationwas safe there. It was generally a nuisance

    unpleasant, but not harmful.

    Sunoco spokesman Thomas Golembeski

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    SMELLcontinued from page 1

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    the need to introduce himself because the kids before him were barely out of diapers when his sitcoms fi rst hit television.

    Danza dropped by to give the students a pep talk and see how rehearsal was going for the show ExtravaDanza! set for 7:30 tonight at Northeast High School, 1601 Cottman Ave., where the star has been co-teaching English to 26 sophomores since August for the reality show, Teach. The Brooklyn native holds a bachelors degree in history education from the University of Dubuque.

    The 30-student Furness choir will per-form Seasons of Love from Rent in the musical/dance show that will have the star tap dancing and singing. Students selected the song they wanted to perform and have been rehearsing daily since the fall. Pupils from George Washington High, 10175 Bustleton Ave., and Northeast also will be singing a Broadway number and taking the stage between Danzas numbers.

    They are defi nitely excited, Miller said. They are really looking forward to singing. Most of these kids, they have never sung in choirs before. Its a new, ex-citing experience.

    Tenor Chaun Evanson, 19, from the 1700 block of Conestoga Street, cant believe he even met Danza last week much less be in his show.

    My mom, she is the reason I know about Tony Danza. My mom and dad watched Taxi and we have Angel in the Outfi eld [starring Danza] on VHS, Evanson said.

    Seeing the star walk in the auditorium made the teen very nervous. My palms

    were sweaty, my knees were shaking, he said with a laugh. I never thought Id see Tony Danza or any type of star.

    Fellow tenor and senior Kavon Cooper, 18, from Sixth and Wolf streets, had a sim-ilar reaction.

    I was mesmerized because it was Tony Danza. I had butterfl ies and stuff, Cooper said.

    The teen said watched Taxi in reruns and, though hes never seen Whos the Boss?, hes heard of it. In addition to those shows, Danza had a New York-based daily talk show called The Tony Danza Show.

    IN THE FALL, Furness, along with students

    from Northeast and Washington, were se-lected by Danza and A&E producers to participate in ExtravaDanza! after all three schools were in the running for the fi lming of Teach.

    Last spring, Danza and producers visited Furness, 1900 S. Third St., to scout the lo-cation, Principal Tim McKenna said.

    We toured the school and talked about all the exciting things going on here, he said.

    But the star and his crew decided on Northeast. McKenna said he doesnt know why Furness was selected as a contender nor why it was passed over, and the School District of Philadelphia did not return phone calls to the Review.

    Despite not choosing Furness for Teach, Danza made a promise to the school something that impressed its principal.

    He made a commitment to stay in touch with us and work with us to support our school even though he was not going to be fi lming Teach here. Were just excited

    about [ExtravaDanza!]. Its a unique op-portunity for our students.

    Tony has been very gracious. He made a commitment to me to not forget about our school and he has not forgotten about us, McKenna said.

    Participating in ExtravaDanza! was important to Furness, especially since this school year marks the launch of its new music program, which has three compo-nents: Music technology, intro to music and chorus.

    Of course we wanted to participate because we just started a music program this year. We had no music program when I took the school over 16 months ago. I believe we need more of the arts. I be-lieve we need more art to help the students become well-rounded students. Music is an important part of education for a high school student, McKenna said.

    Proceeds from the $12-a-ticket show will be split between the participating institu-tions to support school-related programs. Furness principal already knows where their lot is going.

    We need to upgrade the sound system in the auditorium. Its outdated. That will help with the new music program at Fur-ness, McKenna said.

    Any student who wanted to join the choir had to audition. Evanson remem-bers part of that process calling for him and the others to sing the traditional scale Do, Re, Mi, Fa, So, La, Ti, Do. Evan-son, who sang in his elementary school choir at St. Cyprian in West Philly, passed with fl ying colors.

    I really wanted to see if I could still have a voice. Your voice changes from ele-mentary school, he said of why he wanted

    to sing for Furness. Cooper, who has sung for about seven

    years in his church choir, Memorial Gos-pel Crusades Church in West Philly, sim-ply wanted to develop his pipes.

    I wanted to try and bring my voice out, so for the most part its been helping it, Cooper said of his Furness experience.

    The two are looking forward to tonights performance that they hope will be a mem-orable event for all who attend.

    I am excited. Im not nervous. I cant wait. Im going to have family and friends there, Cooper said.

    I feel excited. I feel awesome. Its an honor to be working with [Danza] with his talent. Its amazing knowing that we are performing with him and hes per-forming with us. It makes the City of Brotherly Love look good. It makes me happy and the City of Philadelphia [too], Evanson said. SPR

    Tickets for $12 each for the 7:30 p.m. Jan. 21 show ExtravaDanza! may be purchased at the door of Northeast High School, 1601 Cottman Ave., starting at 5:45 p.m.

    Contact Staff Writer Lorraine Gennaro at [email protected] or ext. 124. Com-ment at www.southphillyreview.com/features.

    DANZA SHOWcontinued from page 1

    Tony Danza, second from left, stopped by Furness High School Jan. 14 to watch the choir rehearse for tonights musical ExtravaDanza! at Northeast High, where the star has been teach-ing English since August for an A&E reality show.

    Staff Photo by Greg Bezani s

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    S o u t h P h i l l y

    Lifestyles

    Ground level

    A former Queen Village resident displays his brand of street photography, which

    highlights his one-time neighborhood, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

    By Amanda L. Snyder Review Staff Writer

    While living in Queen Vil-lage, Will Brown had a show at Swarthmore Col-lege in 1971. In addition to

    being an instructor there, he worked as a freelance photographer for the

    Philadelphia Museum of Art and many of his colleagues came to the exhibit,

    including its then-director, the late Anne dHarnoncourt.Every time there was a show there no one

    ever sold anything, but she wanted to buy one of my photos. So she asked the director of the gal-lery, so what do you do? and the director said, I dont know. No one ever buys any, Brown, formerly of the 400 block of Catharine Street, said with a laugh.

    That transaction led to Brown almost four decades later becoming one of eight photogra-

    phers on display though the end of the month at the museums Common Ground: Eight Philadelphia Photographers in the 1960s and 1970s, which ex-plores the designated decades through experimen-tal works.

    Brown and dHarnoncourt soon became friends and she bought a few more of Browns pieces. In spring 2008, dHarnoncourt informed Brown she and husband Joe Rishel were going to donate the works to the museum. It sparked a conversation between Brown and the museums curator of pho-tography that same year.

    This is all exciting for me because its been a long time since anyone paid attention to any of my photographs, he said of that initial conversation.

    Will Brown made a living capturing the images of life, shown, during the 1960s and 70s.

    Staff Photo at left by Greg Bezani s

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    L i f e s t y l e s

    Time passed and he never heard anything concrete from the curator, but learned the latter had left the museum.

    They were very positive about the pho-tographs, but I thought this was going to be the end of it, he said about the cura-tors departure.

    Current curator Peter Barberie saw the prints and was blown away.

    I think hes one of the fi nest street photographers to work in Philadelphia and his work is very little known, which added to the appeal of showing it now, Barberie said.

    After an exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 73, Brown continued taking photos and freelancing for museums and galleries, but his work didnt get a public showing until Com-mon Ground launched in September with about 20 of his photographs taken from 67 to 73, including Store Front House (South Philadelphia); Catharine Street, Near Leithgow; Floyd & Friend-Ful-ton Street; South Street Fish Market; and Bainbridge & Orianna Streets (2). Common Ground also includes works by Sol Mednick, who founded the pho-tography department at the Philadelphia College of Art, now The University of the Arts; Ray K. Metzker; William Larson, who established the photography depart-

    ment at Temple Universitys Tyler School of Art; Emmet Gowin; David Lebe; Cath-erine Jansen; and Carol Taback.

    Now 72, Brown might reignite his career and come out of retirement.

    They just liked it, which was pretty excit-ing for me, so its got me interested in get-ting busy and doing some more, he said.

    THE LANSDOWNE NATIVE attended Gettys-burg College as a biology major before entering the Army, where he worked for two years in a Baltimore research lab prior to the Vietnam War, but science was not his calling.

    I just didnt like it, Brown recalled. I didnt like working with animals. I just wanted to be an artist. I wanted to paint. I wanted to be Michelangelo.

    He shifted his focus to painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and then the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned a bachelors in fi ne arts.

    At Penn, Brown met his mentor, Rudy Burckhardt, who was a guest lecturer there. Brown followed in the fi lmmaker and photographers footsteps to a certain extent, but maintained his own identity.

    I did my own thing, Brown said. He would see my work and criticize it. He wasnt offhand about things. It was just the fact that he was there and I admired

    him so much. And at Penn Brown met his future wife,

    Emily, a painter, in the same class. She was a student at the Academy, too,

    he said of his wife of 43 years, who is cur-rently showing in Very Very Large Draw-ings at Gallery Joe in Old City through Jan. 30. I noticed her, but never talked to her.

    The couple has a daughter, Eliza, who resides in Brooklyn, N.Y., and is expect-ing the couples fi rst grandchild.

    While working in conservation at the mu-seum, a curator asked Brown to take some photographs. While he was unprepared for the role at the time, he agreed and soon began to taking shots of installations and exhibits for the Fairmount institution.

    During the 70s, when he resided in Queen Village, he often photographed the neighborhood since he liked its historic look.

    I was interested in creating an interest-ing, beautiful photograph, but it also had to have content where it was and also where the light was on whatever I was photographing. Just some sort of record, Brown said. I knew it wasnt going to last. It was going to change.

    Although most of his work consisted of storefronts and rarely included people, he occasionally captured neighbors, such as the kids that lived on Fulton Street near

    his home. I was very interested in the kids that

    played around there because they were re-ally sweet just very nice kids playing games and not getting into trouble at all, he said. Before we moved into our house, they used our house as a clubhouse.

    Saturday mornings, he would help the lo-cal kids by fi xing fl at tires or broken chains on bikes for a quarter before venturing through the neighborhood with his camera.

    I would just go out, he said. I use to go out early morning on Sunday when no one was around and photograph the neigh-borhood things that appealed to me the light and the changing neighborhood, things in fl ux.

    At the current exhibit at the museum, he hopes visitors appreciate his vision and re-late to it in their own way.

    I hope they just look at them and try to see something, he said of the photos. When you look at a work of art, you bring a lot to it as well. Youre bringing your experiences trying to relate to what the art is and ideally Id like them to try to experience the things I saw the light and the way it looks. SPR

    Contact Staff Writer Amanda Snyder at [email protected] or ext. 117. Com-ment at www.southphillyreview.com/news.

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    By R. Kurt OsenlundMovie Rev iewer

    Theres every sign and no sign of Jeff Bridges in Bad Blake, the washed-up, alcoholic country crooner at the center of writer/director Scott Coopers involving debut Crazy Heart. On one hand, theres the kind of rough-hewn, ef-fortless acting viewers have come to ex-pect from Bridges. On the other, theres a performance so naturalistic and complete, the notion of an actor playing a part even-tually disappears.

    In short, Bridges outdoes himself and, if I were an Oscar voter, Id cast my bal-lot for the presumed Best Actor front-run-ner. He already has taken home the Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actor in a Drama.

    Of all the leading men vying for awards attention, Bridges is responsible for creat-ing the most fully formed character. The better parts of Coopers intimate script shouldnt be discounted nor should the fact-derived Thomas Cobb novel on which its based, but its Bridges who brings real fl esh to his role, turning a walking clich into a (barely) living, (barely) breathing and, to be sure, deeply fl awed person. From his ready-to-keel-over gait to his fre-quently unbuckled belt, Bad is, for better or worse, a vivid individual. Since hes in practically every scene, Crazy Heart is one vivid piece of work.

    Somewhat subtracting from the realism is the improbable romance between Bad and Jean (Maggie Gyllenhaal), a Santa Fe re-porter writing an article on the tragic fi gure as he sweeps through town for yet another small-time gig. Gyllenhaal is in top form, but the love story is naggingly plot-serving.

    The movie is best when fi xed on Bridges, especially during genuine, glorious concert

    scenes featuring original music by T-Bone Burnett and the late Stephen Bruton.

    For many, Crazy Heart has called to mind last years The Wrestler, which was surely the intent of Fox Searchlight, the studio behind both fi lms. The paral-lels are unmistakable, but most important is how both are examples of raw, human storytelling.

    Crazy Heart RThree-and-a-half reels out of fourNow playing at the Ritz East

    Bright StarPGAvailable Tuesday

    One of the very best movies of 2009 and certainly the most beautiful, Jane Campi-ons Bright Star, about the fi nal days of English poet John Keats (Ben Whishaw) and the fashionista (Abbie Cornish) who became his muse and true love, is roman-tic in every way.

    An unconsummated passion burns be-tween the young lovers and theres certainly plenty of fi re in Cornishs hot-blooded, star-making performance, but the movie itself is very much like a cool breeze. Its timeless words and ravishing imagery will delicately wash over you. SPR

    Comment on these movies or reviews and see the trailers at www.southphillyreview.com/arts-and-entertainment/movies.

    Country crooner Bad Blake (Jeff Bridges), who has had one too many drinks and failed marriages, nds love albeit improbably with a reporter (Maggie Gyllenhaal) assigned to write his story.

    Playing with Heart L i f e s t y l e s

    Recommended Rental

    A brief historyof macaroni

    The man who came up with the idea for SpaghettiOs died recently and it got me to thinking that Americans will eat pasta in any form, no matter how debased.

    Remember when pasta was just plain old macaroni. Macaroni was cute, com-forting and cheap. Pasta, on the other hand, is pretentious, like folks who go around greeting friends with Ciao! Jap-anese-Americans dont go around saying Sayonara do they? Pasta is everything macaroni is not elitist, aloof, some-thing to which you add truffl e oil. Does this make me anti-pasta?

    The History Channel teaches us macaroni originated with the Chinese. Marco Polo visited China and brought macaroni back to Italy, where he founded the fi rst Olive Garden. Marco Polo later became famous, changed his name from Marco to Ralph and began manufacturing polo shirts with a polo player on a horse as a logo that enabled him to charge $75 a pop. Columnists note: The original Polo shirt used a ravioli for its logo, but wealthy WASPs complained there was little status in a ravioli. Hence, the polo player.

    Meanwhile, the Chinese, ever inscruta-ble, chose to call the macaroni a noodle. It is diffi cult for some of us to take the word noodle seriously and that is why you can buy Chinese noodles in Column A or Column B for even less than macaroni, and a lot less than pasta with truffl e oil.

    To gain revenge, the Italians took Chi-nese dumplings and turned them into ravi-oli. Columnists note: None of this explains why Yankee Doodle Dandy chose to put a feather in his cap and call it macaroni.

    Other nationalities proceeded to make their own versions of dumplings, blintzes, perogies and tamales. As if the caloric content in ravioli was not high enough, the Jews added sour cream and cherries and called them blintzes. The result, over time, is the cholesterol count of Jewish men is so high, their male babies are pre-scribed Lipitor at the bris. All because of the blintz.

    I mean no disrespect to the Poles, but when they chose to stuff their perogies with cabbage and potatoes they irretriev-ably lost their way. Meanwhile, the Mexi-cans decided to use chopped steak and a cheese fi lling in their tamales just to irk

    Joey Vento.Im not sure whether ravioli is singular

    or also can be used as the plural. My aunts and uncles used ravioli interchangeably as singular or plural, but then my family also thought the plural of deer was deers.

    Do we really need for macaroni to come in different shapes and sizes? What is that about anyway? You can purchase it in the shape of bowties (this is the Hurricane Schwartz pasta), little ears and even wagon wheels. When my wife serves me wagon wheels, I insist she dress like Tammy Wynette so after dinner we can play cowgirl and cowboy.

    I sometimes have trouble deciding whether I want linguine, angel hair or spaghetti. Which is thinner? Does it really matter? Some types of macaroni are num-bered, such as linguine No. 4, spaghetti No. 2 and The Beatles Macaroni Revo-lution No. 9. I also like the Bob Dylan pasta, Rainy Day Women # 12 & 35.

    There is a side issue for non-Italians who struggle trying to fi gure out the difference between gnocchi and cavatelli. Gnocchi is made from potato fl our, while cavatelli is created from ricotta cheese and both look similar. The difference is, when you eat a couple of plates of the heavier gnocchi for the fi rst time, you normally have to be rushed to Methodist Hospital with chest pains. It happens so often to non-Italians Methodist actually has a separate gnoc-chi ward.

    The History Channel points out The Da Vinci Code refers to the relationship between Beethovens Symphony No. 9, the secret Masonic recipe for red gravy and the real reason Tom Hanks decided to be in that awful movie.

    Macaroni can be served in a variety of ways. We already have mentioned truffl e oil. The variety only is limited by your imagination. For instance, my grandmother used to put chicken feet in her gravy. When I saw the chicken feet sticking out of the pot, I didnt know whether to grab a fork or a can of Desenex.

    I have noticed since Grandmom went to the great beyond, chicken feet in maca-roni gravy has fallen into disfavor. You cant go to a good Italian restaurant any-more and order up some chicken feet and macaroni in red sauce. Columnists note: In all fairness to my grandmother, she had to appease her Sicilian husband, who also liked to munch on such delicacies as lambs head and a smelly cheese that actu-ally had worms crawling in and out of it. The fi rst time my mother his daughter-in-law saw this cheese, she called an exterminator.

    After eating Sunday dinner with my grandparents, you were inclined to grow up either as an animal rights activist or an ax murderer. SPR

    Comment at www.southphillyreview.com/opin-ion/cardella.

    CardellaBy Tom CardellaColumnist

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    The deadline for calendar submissions is 5 p.m. Thursday before the publication date (no exceptions). Listing information must be

    typed or neatly printed and may be mailed, e-mailed, faxed or delivered in person. Information is not accepted by phone. All listings must include a phone number that can be printed. Materials that do not follow the criteria or arrive by the deadline will not be printed.

    Mail/Deliver to12th and Porter streets Philadelphia, Pa. 19148 Fax: 215-336-1112 E-mail:[email protected]

    Highlights this weekSalsita Studio and Gallery showcases works by Don Hughes and Mikey Madnez through Jan. 23. 1624 South St. 267-687-6886. www.salsitadancestudio.com.

    Concrete Dinosaur graces the stage through Jan. 24. Tickets: $20-$25. Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey St. 215-592-9560.

    Please Touch Museum features The Building Show through Jan. 25 and Exploring Trees Inside and Out, Jan. 23-May 2. 4231 Avenue of the Republic. 215-963-0667. www.pleasetouchmuseum.org.

    Sonic Liberation Front makes an appearance 9:30 p.m. Jan. 21 at the Tritone Bar. Tickets: $5. 1508 South St. 215-545-0475. www.tritonebar.com.

    Energy Workshop , presented by City Council Presi-dent Anna Verna and state Rep. Kenyatta Johnson, takes place 2 p.m. Jan. 22. Preparatory Charter School of Math, Science, Technology & Careers, 1928 Point Breeze Ave. 215-686-3412.

    Termite TVs Yo! Taxi screens 2 p.m. Jan. 23. Sug-gested donation: $5. The Arts Bank, 601 S. Broad St. www.termite.org.

    Fumo Family Library Branch gets cozy with Cud-dly Bear Stories 7 p.m. Jan. 23 for ages 15 months-6 years. Wear pjs and bring a toy. 2437 S. Broad St. 215-685-1758.

    Jerry Blavat Oldies Night is 7 p.m.-midnight Jan. 23. Tickets: $40. Stella Maris, 2929 S. 10th St. Carol Tempesta, 215-463-3410.

    The Spanish Channel performs at Rays Happy Birthday Bar 10:30 p.m. Jan. 23. Free. 1200 E. Passyunk Ave. 215-365-1169. www.thehappybirthday-bar.com.

    Shawn Mullins and Jeffrey Gaines share the spotlight 7:30 p.m. Jan. 27. Tickets: $30-$40. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.world-cafelive.com.

    Respect-A Musical Journey of Women speaks out Jan. 27-April 18. Tickets: $40-$45. Society Hill Playhouse, 507 S. Eighth St. 215-925-3769. www.comcasttix.com.

    Green City, Clean Waters , a free talk by The Philadelphia Water Department, is 7 p.m. Jan. 27. Es-sene Market & Cafe, 719 S. Fourth St. 215-922-1146.

    EntertainmentLive shows

    >Goodnight Lights, The Uglysuit and Levee Drivers: 8 p.m. Jan. 21. Tickets: $10-$18. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    >Arch Enemy: 8 p.m. Jan. 21. Tickets: $15-$23. Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.

    >Enter the Haggis: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 23. Tickets: $23-$33. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    >Bronze Radio Return: 9:30 p.m. Jan. 23. Tickets: $13-$15. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    >The Smithereens: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 24. Tickets: $30-$40. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    >Matt Hires: 8 p.m. Jan. 26. Tickets: $13-$15. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    >Epica: 6:30 p.m. Jan. 27. Tickets: $17-$45. Trocadero, 1003 Arch St. 215-922-6888. www.thetroc.com.

    Wale: 8 p.m. Jan. 28. Tickets: $18-$21. Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.

    > Items beginning with this symbol are happening this week.

    continued on page 18

    The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

    presents its 29th Annual Chinese New Year Celebration, ringing in the Year of the Tiger, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Jan. 23. 3260 South St. 215-898-

    4000. www.museum.upenn.edu.

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    17

    1100 S. Columbus Blvd. #18A

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    PUBLIC HEARINGS ON SCHOOL VIOLENCE

    BE A PART OF THE SOLUTION!

    x Have you experienced bullying or violence at your school because of your race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability, sex, gender identity, or sexual orientation?

    x How did your school respond? x Who helps to reduce violence and conflict and create

    harmony at your school (teachers, staff, classmates, outside programs, community organizations)?

    x What suggestions do you have to make your school safer?

    The Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations (PCHR) is holding public hearings to hear from students, parents, faculty, police, community members, and youth-service organizations about

    violence in Philadelphias public schools.

    The hearings will focus on violence motivated by race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability, sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation.

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    4pm-7pmGuerin Recreation Center

    2201 S. 16th street (16th and Jackson Streets) Language interpretation services will be available.

    Come Out and Be Heard!

    x For more information go to: www.phila.gov/humanrelations.x You must register to testify: e-mail Naarah Crawley at [email protected]

    or call 215-686-4674. x You can also submit your testimony in any language via e-mail to:

    [email protected] x Your testimony will help us to create a report with recommendations that will be

    submitted to the School District. x If you are deaf or hard of hearing and need an ASL interpreter, or other

    accommodation please call TTY: 215-686-3238 or e-mail [email protected]

    17

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    Expendables: 8 p.m. Jan. 29. Tick-ets: $11.25-$18. Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.

    Angela Meade: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 29-30. Tickets: $28-$48. Kimmel Center, Broad and Spruce streets. 215-735-1685. www.avaopera.org.Musical Box: Trick of the Tail, 8 p.m. Jan. 29-30. Tickets: $39.50. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.Sting and The Philadelphia Or-chestra : 7:30 p.m. Jan. 30. Tickets: $200. Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. 215-893-1999. www.philorch.org. Jerry Blavats Legends of Rock n Roll and R&B: 8 p.m. Jan. 30. Tickets: $41-$81. Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center, 300 S. Broad St. 215-893-1999. www.kimmelcenter.org.

    State Radio: 8:30 p.m. Jan. 30. Tickets: $28-$30. Electric Factory, 421 N. Seventh St. 215-336-2000. www.electricfactory.info.

    Transistor Rodeo: 9 p.m. Jan. 30. Tickets: $9. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    School of Rock Suburban Best of Season: 1 p.m. Jan. 31. Tickets: $12. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    Between the Buried and Me: 6:30 p.m. Jan. 31. Tickets: $17-$19. Trocadero, 1003 Arch St. 215-922-6888. www.thetroc.com.

    Elon Gold: 7 p.m. Jan. 31. Tickets: $25-$37.50. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.

    Xande Cruz: 8 p.m. Jan. 31. Tickets: $10. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    Mariah Carey: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 1. Tick-ets: $59.75-$135.75. Tower Theater, 69th and Ludlow streets, Upper Darby. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.

    Anti-Flag: 7 p.m. Feb. 3. Tickets: $15. Trocadero, 1003 Arch St. 215-922-6888. www.thetroc.com.

    Scary Kids Scaring Kids with The Sleeping and The Scenic: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 3. Tickets: $9.75-$16. The-ater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.

    Galactic: 9 p.m. Feb. 4. Tickets: $18.75-$25. Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.

    Mike Epps, Bruce Bruce & Friends: 8 p.m. Feb. 5. Tickets: $43-$73. Liacouras Center, 1776 N. Broad St. 800-298-4200. www.liacourascenter.com.

    Kansas: 8 p.m. Feb. 5. Tickets: $37.50-$47.50. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.

    WWE RAW: The Road to Wrestle-Mania: 8 p.m. Feb. 5. Tickets: $15-$70. Wachovia Center, 3601 S. Broad St. 800-298-4200. www.ComcastTIX.com. Zydeco-A-Go-Go: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 6. Tickets: $13. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com. Classic Albums Live: Bob Mar-leys Legend, 8 p.m. Feb. 6. Tickets: $19.50-$32.50. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.Residents: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 8. Tickets: $25-$38. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com. Trace Bundy: 8 p.m. Feb. 10. Tickets: $10. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com. Michael & Michael Have Live Tour: 8 p.m. Feb. 12. Tickets: $24. Trocadero, 1003 Arch St. 215-922-6888. www.thetroc.com. Murder City Devils: 9 p.m. Feb. 12. Tickets: $20-$23. Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.Rebelution: 8 p.m. Feb. 13. Tickets: $17-$20. Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.Kathleen Madigan: 8 p.m. Feb. 13. Tickets: $22.50-$27.50. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.Valentines Soul Jam: 3 p.m. Feb. 14. Tickets: $35.50-$67.50. The Liacouras Center, 1776 North Broad St. 1-800-298-4200. www.liacourascenter.com. Solid Gold Memories: 7 p.m. Feb. 14. Tickets: $42.50-$52.50. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.Peekaboo Revue: 7 p.m. Feb. 14. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com. Tegan & Sara: 8 p.m. Feb. 16. Tick-ets: $35-$38. Tower Theatre, 69th and Ludlow streets, Upper Darby. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.Citizen Cope: 9 p.m. Feb. 18-19. Tickets: $27.50-$30. Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic: 8 p.m. Feb. 20. Tickets: $29-$45. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.Editors: 8:30 p.m. Feb. 20. Tickets: $16-$18. Trocadero, 1003 Arch St. 215-922-6888. www.thetroc.com. John Mayer: 8 p.m. Feb. 21. Tick-ets: $51-$76. Wachovia Center, 3601 S. Broad St. 800-298-4200. www.ComcastTIX.com.

    Verve Pipe: 8 p.m. Feb. 23. Tick-ets: $21-$23. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    Omara Portuondo and The Roberto Fonseca Quartet: 8p.m. Feb. 23. Tickets: $38.50. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.

    Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus: Feb. 24-28. Tickets: $10-$90. Wachovia Center, 3601 S. Broad St. 800-298-4200. www.ComcastTIX.com.

    Flogging Molly: 8:30 p.m. Feb. 26. Tickets: $28-$30. Electric Factory, 421 N. Seventh St. 215-336-2000. www.electricfactory.info.

    Twiztid: 9 p.m. Feb. 26. Tickets: $20-$23. Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.

    Fresh Fest 2010: 9 p.m. Feb. 27 with Salt n Pepa, Biz Markie, Whodini, Rob Base and Slick Rick . Tickets: $42.50-$73. Liacouras Center, 1776 N. Broad St. 800-298-4200. www.liacourascenter.com.

    Howie Day: 8:30 p.m. Feb. 27. Tickets: $24-$34. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    Muse: 7 p.m. March 2. Tickets: $35-$59.50. Wachovia Center, 3601 S. Broad St. 800-298-4200. www.ComcastTIX.com. Black Eyed Peas: 7:30 p.m. March 3. Tickets: $46.50-$89.50. Wachovia Center, 3601 S. Broad St. 800-298-4200. www.ComcastTIX.com.St. Patricks Day Celebration: 7:30 p.m. March 3. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com. Bob Mould: 8 p.m. March 3. Tickets: $25-$35. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com. Sesame Street Lives Elmos Green Thumb: March 4-7. Tickets: $17-$52. Susquehanna Bank Center, 1 Harbor Blvd., Camden, N.J. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com. Ronan Tynan: 8 p.m. March 6. Tickets: $29.50-$49.50. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.One: 7:30 p.m. March 10. Tickets: $13. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafe-live.com. Joe Henry: 8 p.m. March 10. Tickets: $25. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. www.worldcafelive.com.

    Alice in Chains: 8 p.m. March 13. Tickets: $40-$43. Tower Theatre, 69th and Ludlow streets, Upper Darby. 877-598-8696. www.livenation.com.Phil Vassar: 8 p.m. March 13. Tickets: $32.50-$39.50. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.Harlem Globetrotters: Noon and 5 p.m. March 14. Tickets: $20-$160. Wachovia Center, 3601 S. Broad St. 800-298-4200. www.ComcastTIX.com.Irish Rovers: 7:30 p.m. March 15. Tickets: $29.50-$35. Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. 215-572-7650. www.keswicktheatre.com.Taylor Swift : 7 p.m. March


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