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South Philly Review 7-23-2015

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The Bicycle Coalition is spurring Avenue neighbors to ask their city councilmen for a safer street. Plus more South Philly news, opinions, and entertainment.
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Review Staff Writer ashington Avenue is one complex beast. From Co- lumbus Boulevard to Grays Ferry Avenue, it’s a 2.3-mile corridor with 29 signalized intersec- tions. And it’s evolving quickly, es- pecially west of South 13th Street, projects are in the works for Bart Blatstein and Toll Brothers proper- ties at Broad and Washington; 2401 Washington Ave. is pushing forward to expand a mixed-use vision for the corridor; a Habitat for Humanity Re- Store is officially open at 2318; and Gus’s World Famous Fried Chicken is on its way at 20th Street and Wash- ington Avenue. But what about the actual road? The state it’s in, with faded and often invisible striping, and issues around parking and businesses’ load-in zones, has positioned the avenue in a semi-permanent state of chaos. En- ter the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia (BCGP). There are loose plans for a grand repaving of the avenue in four or five years’ time, but BCGP isn’t willing to wait five years to have key temporary fixes implemented to make the street safer for everyone, but especially cyclists and pedestrians. “Your help is needed to let Mayor Nutter, City Council and the Streets Department know that there is strong public support for expediting a plan to reconfigure Washington Avenue to make it safer for all users,” reads a call to action from BCGP’s deputy director Sarah Clark Stuart. She and BCGP posted a “TAKE ACTION” post on their site July 17, and its intention is to get citizens in- terested, again, in the fate of the Av- enue. It must be said that this is a long, drawn-out and complex process with an immense amount of stakeholders. It actually began back in 2011, but when the City Planning Commission received a grant to study the avenue more seriously, urgency took a back- seat to efficiency and long-term vi- sion. “The Washington Avenue Trans- Photo Provided by Philadelphia Planning commission
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    N0g0WZZ1VS\SdS`bReview Staff Writer

    Eashington Avenue is one complex beast. From Co-lumbus Boulevard to Grays Ferry Avenue, its a 2.3-mile corridor with 29 signalized intersec-tions. And its evolving quickly, es-pecially west of South 13th Street, projects are in the works for Bart Blatstein and Toll Brothers proper-ties at Broad and Washington; 2401 Washington Ave. is pushing forward to expand a mixed-use vision for the

    corridor; a Habitat for Humanity Re-Store is officially open at 2318; and Guss World Famous Fried Chicken is on its way at 20th Street and Wash-ington Avenue.

    But what about the actual road? The state its in, with faded and often invisible striping, and issues around parking and businesses load-in zones, has positioned the avenue in a semi-permanent state of chaos. En-ter the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia (BCGP). There are loose plans for a grand repaving of the avenue in four or five years time,

    but BCGP isnt willing to wait five years to have key temporary fixes implemented to make the street safer for everyone, but especially cyclists and pedestrians.

    Your help is needed to let Mayor Nutter, City Council and the Streets Department know that there is strong public support for expediting a plan to reconfigure Washington Avenue to make it safer for all users, reads a call to action from BCGPs deputy director Sarah Clark Stuart.

    She and BCGP posted a TAKE ACTION post on their site July 17,

    and its intention is to get citizens in-terested, again, in the fate of the Av-enue.

    It must be said that this is a long,drawn-out and complex process withan immense amount of stakeholders.It actually began back in 2011, but when the City Planning Commissionreceived a grant to study the avenuemore seriously, urgency took a back-seat to efficiency and long-term vi-sion.

    The Washington Avenue Trans-

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    2448 S. 12th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19148 (215) 336-2500 Fax (215) 336-1112Website: southphillyreview.comEditorial e-mail: [email protected] Bill Gelman-ext. 121 [email protected] EDITOR Joseph Myers-ext. 124 [email protected] WRITER Bill Chenevert-ext. 117 [email protected] MANAGER Daniel Tangi-ext. 129 @

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    ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any advertising submitted. Publisher assumes no responsibility for errors made except to reprint that portion of any ad having an error. Display ad rates available upon request.Advertisers: Check your ads weekly. The Review can be responsible only the first time an ad appears. 2015 R.P.M. Philly, LLC.

    Police Report: Running on E

    $ 0g8]aS^V;gS`aPolice arrested a Point Breeze man for supposedly vandalizing a home in East Passyunk Crossing.Cardella: The homefront: Korea

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    I think Donald Trump has no P.R. at all. He tweets right from his brain, and thats a scary thing. He should apologize, although he never will.

    Jeff Kiniery, East Passyunk Avenue

    and Moore Street

    I think Trump dem-onstrated in his latest Twitter comment that he has no desire to apolo-gize. I suppose he should, but I just think he has no self-awareness of what he should or shouldnt do.

    Liz Kiniery, East Passyunk Avenue

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    It wasnt McCains fault that he got cap-tured, and I think the way people attributed his heroism was through the way he conducted himself in leading his men while captured.

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    To the Editor:

    Does anyone care to know why Tom Cardella is going to find a very long life and much more that is allocated to most of us? Attitude! The man is blessed and should be an inspiration to everyone one of us.

    The way he manages to handle physi-cal and demoralizing infirmities is noth-ing short of amazing. Just read and play close attention to his last column (The recuperator, July 16). He elucidates so compellingly on not bowing to physical, moral and mental pressure. It feels like I have accompanied him through his many

    bouts of absolute horror. There is just no other description for it. He makes it most-ly seem so ho-hum!

    Tom Cardella, I simply love you and how you can take such appalling situa-tions with such a stalwart stance. Take care of yourself, my friend. I want you around for a very long time because I love how goofy you can be at times. Again, I simply love it.

    4`O\Y1OdOZZO`]A]cbV>VWZORSZ^VWO

    Comment on these letters or topics at south-phillyreview.com/opinion/letters.

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    Tom -- I wish you all the best and a complete recovery. My dad died of colon cancer at 57. There were no colonoscopies in 1967. I have had two, and both times precancerous adenomas were found. I feel very fortunate. You have brightened my life for years. I love your column. I am a Temple grad and a South Philly girl. I live in Central Pennsylvania now, and your columns take me back to my home. Philly is always in my heart. Your wit, your love of your wife, your family and your heritage and neighborhood touch me deeply because I miss it. Godspeed, Tom Cardella. All the best to you.

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    It took a great deal of courage to disclose the uncomfortable, but accu-rate details of your recent experience at [Thomas] Jefferson University Hospital. A friend of mine had skin cancer surgery on July 14 at the same facility and, like you, had high praise for those who treated him. I am scheduled for a consultation for my recently discovered prostate cancer on July 22, and can meet the subsequent sur-gery with more confidence, being more at-ease, after reading your column.

    I can only hope to go forward and be as brave as you, to write such a revealing and somewhat, embarrassing story. Your story moved me, I would like to think the ripple effect of your article has impacted a great many more. Your efforts are to be commended, no doubt emulated.

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    Review Ma naging Ed itor

    / t approximately 2:20 a.m. Friday, the complainants reported they were in their home on the 1600 block of South Seventh Street when sounds of breaking glass woke them, Detective Dan-ielle Tolliver of South Detective Division said. They went outside and observed an unknown man smashing their windows.

    The offender allegedly asked Where is E? and proceeded to walk into the build-ing to search for the figure. The victims ran into their apartment and locked the door, but the individual supposedly kicked their door in, pointed a gun at the first complain-ant and again demanded to know Es whereabouts. He responded that he just moved to the residence and was not aware of anyone named E. He told authorities the man left the abode and went to search for E in the back of the building.

    At 2:28 a.m., police responded to a van-dalism in progress call, with a female offi-cer being the first on location. She observed broken front windows, shattered glass on the ground and an open front door, Tolliver said. She exited her vehicle and walked up to the door, observing the reported offender bleeding from his right hand and glimpsing the handle of a revolver in his waistband. When she confiscated the weapon, the man allegedly left the building on foot, with the officer giving chase until she lost sight of him on Eighth Street.

    While authorities were surveying the area for the offender, a witness flagged them down and stated she believed the man they were looking for was in another com-plainants backyard trying to break into her home. They went to that site on the 1600 block of South Eighth Street and observed a man attempting to enter the sliding glass door to the rear of the property.

    Authorities detained the individual, and the female officer positively identified him as the one from whom she took the gun. The other complainants then identified him as the one who kicked in their door and pointed a gun. Police arrested Her-man Grey, of the 2200 block of Watkins Street, and charged him with possession of an instrument of crime, firearms viola-tions, robbery, burglary, criminal mischief,

    simple assault and recklessly endangering another person.

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    A Sunday fire in Lower Moyamensing has authorities looking to determine if someone committed arson.

    At about 3 a.m., emergency personnel responded to a report of a fire inside an unoccupied property on the 2000 block of South Juniper Street. The three-alarm inci-dent prompted officers to evacuate the area, with 15 adults and two children receiving shelter through the American Red Cross.

    Shortly before 6 a.m., firefighters gained control over the blaze, and law enforce-ment officials soon engaged in conversa-tion with a witness. The individual said he heard glass break and glimpsed a man go-ing inside the property approximately 20 minutes before the matter began, accord-ing to police. He also relayed having seen a second man standing on the buildings roof.

    The man added that the first figure exited to run south along South Juniper Street, then east on Snyder Avenue. A minute later, the witness, who could not determine what became of the other male, noted the explo-sion occurred. The Fire Marshal deemed the blaze suspicious the same day, with police not being able to provide a detailed description of the first man but noting the second as a 5-foot-4, 150-pound Hispanic with bushy curly hair and a goatee and wearing a black hoodie and jeans. To re-port information, call the Fire Department at 215-686-1300, text PPDTIP (773847) or visit phillypolice.com/forms.

    /R]e\ZWTbAuthorities arrested a Point Breeze man

    for allegedly stealing the phone of a wom-an who had offered to give him a ride.

    At 3:45 a.m. Saturday, the complainant was driving to 15th and Reed streets a man whom she had met at an event in Penns Landing, Detective Danielle Tolliver of South Detective Division said. En route, he called someone, believed to be his childs mother, and began an argument with her. The witness, who was riding in the front seat, reported she heard a female tell the passenger not to come over or she would call the police.

    After hearing the spat, the motorist, who had offered her phone for him to make the call, asked for the gadget back, with the male reportedly saying What do you think, Im going to take off with it? Just hold on a second. When she asked for it again, he allegedly barked Dont either of you make any sudden movements. Im tak-

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    ing your phone and your wallet, or I will shoot both of you.

    The witness reported that she slowly went to hand over her phone to him, with the male supposedly exiting the vehicle to walk to her side of the car. The complain-ant quickly drove off and called the police from a gas station near Broad and Bain-bridge streets. An hour after the incident, police responded to a radio call of a do-mestic dispute on the 1300 block of South Mole Street, and when they arrived, there was a male inside the home reportedly yelling at a female for calling authorities.

    While they spoke with the woman, they realized the male fit the description of a robbery suspect and detained him. The victim and her friend received transport to the location and positively identified him as the culprit. Authorities arrested Khalil Clinton, of the same block, and retrieved the phone for the complainant. They charged him with making terroris-tic threats, theft-receiving stolen property, theft-unlawful taking and robbery. He had not posted his $50,000 bail as of press time and awaits an Aug. 4 preliminary hearing.

    S`WZW\>]W\b0`SShSA 25-year-old man died after suffering

    gunshot wounds in Point Breeze.At an undisclosed time July 14, an un-

    identified figure shot Saqanne Stanford on the 1700 block of Tasker Street, with authorities finding him on the sidewalk at 11:48 a.m., police said. He received transport to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, with personnel pronouncing him dead at 6:13 p.m.

    As of press time, officials had no motive and had established no leads in the mat-ter.

    To report information, call the Homicide Division at 215-686-3334, text PPDTIP (773847) or visit phillypolice.com/forms.

    6STbgVO`[Three offenders made off with cash after

    one struck a man with a gun in Dickinson Square West.

    While on the 1700 block of South Sixth Street at 10:15 a.m. Saturday, the com-plainant stopped for a stop sign and had three unknown males approach him, De-tective Danielle Tolliver of South Detec-tive Division said. The lead stranger pro-duced a small black gun and demanded his money, with the second criminal standing in front of the vehicle and the third placing himself at the passenger side door.

    The victim gave them $600, but the head thief struck him two times with the fire-arm, leading to a black eye and a bump on his head. He described the first figure as black, in his mid 20s and 6 foot; having a dark complexion, a thin build, a teardrop tattoo under his right eye and a tattoo on his right forearm; and wearing red cargo shorts, a white T-shirt and black sneakers; the second as black and in his mid 20s; having a thin build and a dark complexion; and wearing a dark shirt and blue jeans; and the final one as black and in his mid 20s; and wearing a whit shirt and tan cargo shorts.

    To report information, call South De-tectives at 215-685-1635, text PPDTIP (773847) or visit phillypolice.com/forms.

    BOYW\UOabOPAuthorities are searching for clues in a

    stabbing that occurred in Grays Ferry Fri-day.

    At approximately 9:24 p.m., police re-sponded to the 1900 block of Dickinson Street for a male down on the highway, Detective Danielle Tolliver of South De-tective Division said. Finding him with a stab wound to the right side of his neck, they arranged transport to the Penn Pres-byterian Medical Center and are looking for any information regarding the culprit and motive.

    To report information, call South De-tectives at 215-685-1635, text PPD-TIP (773847) or visit phillypolice.com /forms. +(*

    Contact Managing Editor Joseph Myers at [email protected] or ext. 124. Comment at southphillyreview.com/news/police-report.

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    portation and Parking Study is a Trans-portation and Community Design Initia-tive grant funded by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, as a memorandum from Kittleson & Associ-ates, Inc. reads, a transportation and en-gineering firm in Baltimore. They were charged with summarizing the project and recommending action to Jeannette Brugger, Philadelphias Bike and Pedes-trian coordinator for the Mayors Office of Transportation and Utilities (MOTU).

    Several forms of analysis, evaluation, and on-site review/data collection were completed to support and inform recom-mendations for the Washington Avenue corridor. These include an evaluation and inventory of the existing parking and loading supply, demand, and operations; a review of all crash date for a 3-year time frame (10-2012); and detailed traffic op-erations analysis of each signalized in-tersection along the study corridor for all proposed conceptual configurations.

    And there have been crashes. The BCGP prompt to take action includes these star-tling facts: The Planning Commissions consultant found that between 2010-2012, 900 (reportable and non-reportable) crash-es of motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists occurred on Washington Avenue. In par-ticular, crashes cluster between 5th Street and 9th Street and between 9th Street and 17th Street, likely due to the high number of conflicts in these areas. Bicyclists and pedestrians have become vulnerable users

    along the corridor, particularly between 5th Street and 15th Street. On average, six crashes occur along the corridor per week; one crash every 10 days requires towing or involves injury and one pedes-trian or cyclist is injured every 3 weeks due to a crash.

    WHEN ASKED, CLARK Stuart can rattle off a very long list of invested stakeholders: the Planning Commission, Streets Depart-ment, MOTU, the Washington Avenue Business Association and property own-ers associations, the Ninth Street Busi-ness Association, and then theres all the civic groups. South Philly Homes, Haw-thorne Empowerment Coalition, South of South Neighborhood Association, Queen Village Neighbors Association and Bella Vista Town Watch to name just a few, all have their eyes on Washington Avenues awkward maturation.

    The reason its been stalled is that theres been a lot of disagreement about

    the proposed plans, Clark Stuart said. Its time to break the log jam. A number of years have passed, its time to decide what to do. We felt the voices of those who support making a change hadnt been heard from in a while, and they needed to have an opportunity to speak up and let those decision-makers know.

    Steve Cobb, 1st District Councilman Kenyatta Johnsons director of legisla-tion, agrees that its a complicated issue but that progress is in sight.

    We have more work to do, but were making progress. We can do much better here. We started a couple months ago, we urged the Philadelphia Parking Authority to get people to stop parking in the me-dian and weve been reasonably success-ful, Cobb said. I think were getting to a compromise that everyone is agreeable to and will greatly increase safety, especially for bicyclists and pedestrians, and were hoping for that compromise to include a

    narrow median and a wider bike lane.Washington Avenue is huge. Its four

    lanes with a turn lane, similar to Oregon Ave., is actually wider than South Broad Street. Daily Traffic Comparison numbers show that 9,800 cars pass through Wash-ington; 22,000 on Broad Street; 15,000 on Oregon; and 12,000 on East Passyunk Av-enue (with only two lanes).

    And yet, the primary concern is motor-ist traffic. Clark Stuart lays out the three primary objections to the slightest of tin-kering with lane reductions: A fear that fewer travel lanes will greatly increase travel time across the corridor or that it will increase more traffic on side streets; a fear about the back-in angle parking being problematic and dangerous; and then the confusion or fear that there isnt enough loading zones for the commercial property owners. She said all of those combined have created a lot of sense of doubt.

    Yeah, its a complex issue, definitely, Cobb admitted. The major point of con-tention was a lane reduction, he added, but in all likelihood thats just not hap-pening. Too many people will freak out. But in the meantime, Clark Stuart and the Coalition are saying that theres much that can and should be done quickly and immediately to make it a little better for pedestrians and cyclists.

    I think with a very quickly changing nature of Washington Avenue, there is a recognition on the property owners part that having a more complete street with better bike lanes and safer crossings is part of attracting more customers, residents, and that it would be good for Washington Ave., Clark Stuart said. +(*

    Contact Staff Writer Bill Chenevert at [email protected] or ext. 117. Com-ment at southphillyreview.com/news/features.

    E/A67

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    D ; M I N a]cbV^VW Z Zg`SdWSeQ][

    6O\YagOU`OTbWO\Rab`SSbO`bWabcaSaOA]cbV>VWZZgQ]\\SQbW]\b]^ZOQSO`bbVObZO[^]]\abVS5=>QO\RWRObS

    N0g0WZZ1VS\SdS`bReview Staff Writer

    2onald Trump surely has been making headlines for the past few weeks. The Donald J. Trump for Presi-dent campaign is up, running and, surprisingly to some, thriving. The Queens, N.Y. native, Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania graduate, best-selling author and co-producer of 14-season strong The Apprentice is making a run for the President of the Unit-ed States again, and hes already made some really big waves.

    In a July 20-released Washington Post-ABC poll, Trump emerged as a leader amongst nearly 12 declared candi-dates. Simultaneously, in the last three weeks, Trump has made disparaging comments about Latinos and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). On the former, he said in a late-June speech: When Mexico sends its people, theyre not send-ing their best Theyre sending people that have lots of problems, and theyre bringing those problems with us. Theyre bringing drugs. Theyre bringing crime. Theyre rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.

    The backlash has been pretty mighty, and its even mani-fested into some Trump for Presidente posters that start-ed popping up around New York City and Philadelphia in July. The artist responsible for them is a law school drop-out who goes by the name Hanksy, stylized as such due to one of his first projects in which he used Tom Hanks face with a Banksy-style work. Banksy is a pseudonymous ac-tivist, painter and graffiti artist from the United Kingdom.

    My girlfriends from Philly and her familys from Philly and her sister lives in South Philly, Brandon Rosenblatt,

    Hanksys assistant, said of the Trump poster connection. He sort of thought it would be funny to make up this fab-ricated story that Donald had called him to run his adver-tising campaign to win the votes of Hispanics.

    Somewhere between 15 and 20, six to 10 in each city, went up in NYC and Philly and South Philly got about half of those. A lot of them got taken down pretty quickly by people that want them, Rosenblatt added.

    The connection is Angela DePersia, the sister of Rosenb-latts girlfriend, who lives near the Italian Market on Ninth Street. Shes been a really good way for him to sneak into Philly for a couple days and [poster] easily and quickly and shell house him for a day or so.

    Many pop culture icons have spoken up to rail against Trumps anti-immigrant rhetoric, from Rosie Perez to America Ferrera. There are many locals who are just as frustrated and who see Trump as a sign of a greater prob-lem in American culture.

    Jasmine Rivera, lead organizer for soon-to-be-Sixth-and-Tasker-streets-based Juntos, a Latino immigrant rights organization, said simply Trump is a like a symptom of a much larger disease thats starting to get worse.

    Ben Miller, with his wife Cristina Martinez, just offi-cially opened South Philly Barbacoa in the former Vegan Commissary storefront at 1703 S. 11th St. Its a traditional Mexican cooking method of roasting whole lambs for ta-cos and consomm. They used to run a food cart on the sidewalk by Eighth and Watkins streets, but neighbors complained. Millers taken his and his wifes business as a way to advocate for fairness in immigrant policies.

    Were here to be an example that undocumented im-migrants are contributing to the economy. We pay taxes. Were a family thats trying to support ourselves and build community, Miller explained. And raise aware-ness among people in the restaurant industry to not fail to acknowledge the contribution of undocumented workers that work alongside them and to recognize the people that they know as good family people to stand up to people like Trump, who perpetuates a myth, and it is a myth.

    Miller aptly noted that Trump has a factory in Mexico that produces clothing with cheap labor and encourages Americans to imagine policies in place that prevent people from ever leaving their country, even if its to feed their children.

    Theres more poor people than rich people in this country, Miller added, and the poor people need a voice. +(*

    Contact Staff Writer Bill Chenevert at [email protected] or ext. 117. Comment at southphillyreview.com/news/features.

    Photo by Hanksy

    >`SaWRS\bWOZ^]abS`abOc\bB`c[^

    /ZZOP]cbbVSR]Ua

    7n coordination with National Hot Dog Month, South Street Headhouse District put on the Fourth Annual Dog Days of Summer Cook Off Saturday. Several Society Hill and Queen Village eateries en-tered dogs into a contest that awarded cash and pres-tige to the winner. With a five-judge panel, myself one of them, Cavanaugh Headhouse won first place and $1,000 for a dog with pork sausage and bacon, queso and jalapeno. Second place and Peoples Choice hon-ors went to Bridget Foy, 200 South St., for its Nitty Gritty Dog with watermelon rind, crispy basil, onions and a barbecue sauce. Girard Estates Taproom on 19th, 2400 S. 19th St., secured third place honors for its Polish Dog with keilbasa, pierogi, fried cabbage, onions and tomato. My personal favorite was from a restaurant thats not open yet, Hungry Pigeon, 743 S. Fourth St., a fairly traditional Philly Poppins dog with red onion, banana pepper, spicy brown mustard and a bit of cream. By Bill Chenevert +(*

    Comment at southphillyreview.com/news/briefs. --- Pho-tos by South Street Headhouse District

    ! UOZZ]\aRSS^

    @esidents of the Sports Complex Special Services District received a giant up-grade earlier this month, as new 32-gallon recycling carts were delivered to each home in the area, replacing the 22-gallon blue bins. Present for the big unveiling were 3rd Police District Captain Frank Milillo, back left, along with SCSSD Executive Director Shawn Jalosinski and Deputy Streets Commissioner Donald Carlton, front row, from left.

    Comment at southphillyreview.com/news/briefs. Photo Provided by Bastiaan Slabbers

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    D ; M I N southph i l l y rev iew.com

    PHOTOS PROVIDED BY ALEX STYER, PHILADELPHIAS MAGIC GARDENS, REV. DAN MCLAUGHLIN, GEORGE W. NEBINGER HOME AND SCHOOL ASSOCIATION, COLUMBUS SQUARE PARK AND GENOS STEAKS

    Photo 1: Chickies & Petes, 1526 Packer Ave., crowned Dave Tiger Wings & Things Brunelli the winner of its Crabfries Eating Contest during July 13s National French Fry Day celebration. Photo 2: On July 12, Philadelphias Magic Gardens, 1020 South St., celebrated the opening of the Lynn B. Denton: Personal Symbols exhibition, which will run through Sept. 13. Photo 3: Rev. Rich-ard Cannuli, a Point Breeze native, returned to South Philly two weeks ago, visiting the National Shrine of Saint Rita of Cascia, 1166 S. Broad St., for the unveiling of a replica of a religious habit associated with the Augus-tinian nun. Photo 4: The Home and School Association for George W. Nebinger School, 601 Carpenter St., oversaw a Summer Fun Fest on the 900 block of South Sixth Street Saturday. Photo 5: As part of their summer experience, camp registrants at Columbus Square Park, 1200 Wharton St., visited South Bowl, 19 E. Oregon Ave., July 14. Photo 6: On July 15, a day before their home opener against the Boston Lobsters at the Villanova University Pavilion, members of the Philadel-phia Freedoms, including 2015 French Open mens doubles champion Marcelo Melo, dined at Genos Steaks, 1219 S. Ninth St. +(*

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    N%bV>]ZWQS2Wab`WQb, 20th and Fed-eral streets, holds a PSA 1 meeting 6 p.m. July 23 at the South of South Neighbor-hood Association office, 1901 Christian St.; and a PDAC Meeting 6:30 p.m. July 28 at the station. 215-686-3170. phillypo-lice.com/districts/17th.

    Nab>]ZWQS2Wab`WQb, 24th and Wolf streets, holds a PSA 1 meeting 6 p.m. July 23 at Guerin Rec Center, 1600 Wolf St. 215-686-3010. phillypolice.com/districts/1st.

    N /Z/\]\ 5`]c^ meets Wednesday nights 7:30 p.m. at 1549 S. 29th St. 215-200-8575.

    N 3Oab >Oaagc\Y/dS\cS 0caW\Saa7[^`]dS[S\b 2Wab`WQb, 1904 E. Passyunk Ave., hosts Passyunk Passeg-giata every Wednesday through Labor Day with shops and happy hours running until 8 p.m. along the Avenue; and PassyunkShops, a promotion where punchcards (10 per card, $10 per punch) are pulled for gift certificates and prizes; and holds Queers on the Avenue (QOTA) 6 to 9 p.m. July 28 at Stogie Joes, 1801 E. Passyunk Ave. 215-336-1455. [email protected] visiteastpassyunk.com.

    N4`WS\Ra]T0O`ROaQW\]>O`Y holds a Kids Fest! 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 25 with music, kids activities, art projects and bocce.

    N4`WS\Ra]T8STTS`a]\A_cO`S>O`Y holds a Kids Night 6 to 10 p.m. July 29 at the park, 300 Washington Ave. jefferson-squarepark.org.

    N4`WS\Ra]T8cZWO\/PSZS>O`Y rec-ommends the Julian Abele Park Farmers Market 2 to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays.

    N4`WS\Ra]T;O`W]:O\hO>O`Y hold Mario at the Movies, screening Match Point, July 29 at the park, S. Second and Queen streets.

    N4`WS\Ra]TEVWb[O\:WP`O`g hold Yoga @ your Library every Wednesday. Kids at 5:30 p.m. and adults at 6:30 p.m. at the Library, 200 Snyder Ave. 215-685-1754.

    N5W`O`R3abObS

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    RiverRink.com/SouthPhillyTICKETS ON SALE NOW

    @River_Rink Blue Cross RiverRink Blue_Cross_RiverRink

    Ready, Set, SKATE.

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    >[email protected]@/ 7B >6=B= 0G @ 716/@2 0/@@=2C1B 7=< >6=B=A >@=D 7232 0G [email protected]=19 D [email protected]

    4ollowing his undergraduate days at Allentown College of St. Francis de Sales, now DeSales University, Damon Bonetti, though pleased with his performance record, realized he needed more immersion into the theatri-cal world to craft consistent executions of roles. Also desiring directing distinction, the native of the 2200 block of South Bonsall Street has two Barrymore Award nominations as proof of his progress, yet he has not allowed the serious nature of the business to detract from its humorous aspects. In a neat example of irony, the man so enthralled with the development of characters is helming No Sex Please, Were British, a farce with matters of the flesh as the star.

    People shouldnt be seeing this one hoping for much depth, the 40-year-old overseer said laughing. Its such a fun

    piece and a wonderful opportunity to en-joy a summer show.

    The West Passyunk product is guiding the comedy through Aug. 23 at the Rose Valley-situated Hedgerow Theatre Co. space. A hybrid of humor that one would find in Benny Hill, Monty Python and The Pink Panther franchise, the script is helping Bonetti to fall more in love with farce, which he recently explored with South Philly dwellers Daniel Fre-drick and Dave Johnson in The Hound of the Baskervilles, and to ponder the mathematics of comedy.

    There are sexual situations, mistak-en identities and terrible puns, and the combination is just great, he said of the work, which debuted in Londons West End in 1971 and received 16 Broadway performances two years later. Throw in that Ive made The Kinks the soundtrack,

    /ESab>Oaagc\Y\ObWdSWaRW`SQbW\UO0`WbWaVQ][SRgQS\bS`W\U]\aSf

    N0g8]aS^V;gS`aReview Managing Ed itor

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    and it all makes for something not too tax-ing but nonetheless exciting.

    While enhancing his association with the Delaware County-based entity, Bonet-ti is simultaneously strengthening his bond with Commonwealth Classic The-atre Co., which will have him direct the world premiere of Rage of Achilles next month. Skewing heroic personas, the lat-ter demands a much more theatrical approach, but regardless of a projects identity, he appreciates each occasion to add to the diverse professional plate that keeps him constantly courting compelling material.

    Its often feast or famine in this field, Bonetti said. Whichever one that peo-ple are going through, they have to trust that what theyre doing is placing them or keeping them on the right path. In a way, you have to be a fan of yourself, so to speak. From that, so many possibilities can flow.

    LIVING IN SOUTH Philly until 12, Bonetti relocated with his family to Washington Township, with friend-assisted cinematic projects providing an initial outlet for

    his creativity. Senior year of high school yielded adoration for poetry and William Shakespeare, with community college and undergraduate studies breeding belief in his brand.

    I felt I had really good instincts and could articulate certain elements of a role, but I knew I needed polishing, Bonetti, who became a hire for the Walnut Street Theatre, among others, before acquiring his masters at Florida State University/Asolo Conservatory for Actor Training, said. I wanted to perform at a high level consistently because there has to be a true appreciation for the text to help someone not only to stand out but to advance the whole acting scene.

    His birth city and surrounding environs have proven extremely welcoming to his enthusiasm, with his rsum featuring in-teractions with such revered employers as Inis Nua Theatre; Luna Theatre Co., 620 S. Eighth St.; and Theatre Exile, 1340 S. 13th St., which come October will cast him as Sal Paolantonio in Rizzo. He returned to South Philly in 2003, living on the 2600 block of South Jessup Street with his Barrymore Award-winning bride,

    Charlotte Northeast, before moving to Collingswood, N.J., five years later.

    There are just so many opportunities to do great work in this area, the thankful thespian said of his fortune. That means meeting many excellent people, too.

    Having always yearned to unite his af-finities for acting and directing and to ex-plore more vintage pieces, he teamed with peer Dan Hodge, of the 900 block of Sigel Street, to found the Philadelphia Artists Collective, which enlists Northeast, Krista Apple-Hodge and Dickinson Square West inhabitant Katherine Fritz to promote rarely performed classical plays through workshops and readings.

    Its ideal for me to do a bit of both each season, Bonetti said of handling and of-fering direction, the former which he will engage in for the collectives September FringeArts Festival entry The Captive and the latter which he will honor for Aprils He Who Gets Slapped, a col-laboration with The Philadelphia School of Circus Arts and West Passyunk denizen Terry Brennan. I want to be a part of tell-ing great stories, and each chance to do that is something I wish to nail as part of

    this big juggling act of making a living.Enthused about fostering fellow stage

    enthusiasts dreams, he has also enjoyed a busy academic career through instructing budding minds at Drexel, Rowan and Rut-gers universities, noting how teaching in-forms all of his passions, including father-hood, which he absolutely cherishes as the patriarch of 4-year-old Julian, music, which he intensifies as the lead guitarist of Jawbone Junction, featuring South Phila-delphians Jake Blouch and Sarah Gliko, and film and television assignments.

    There are many outlets available to me, and that just blows me away, Bonetti, who next month will also play in the Souder-ton-headquartered Montgomery Theater production of God of Carnage, said. You definitely want that when youre at any point in your life, but this is an excit-ing time for me, and I like balancing all these responsibilities. SPR

    For tickets, call 610-565-4211, or visit hedgerowtheatre.org.

    Contact Managing Editor Joseph Myers at [email protected] or ext. 124. Com-ment at southphillyreview.com/news/lifestyles.

    B ? < ; I J O B ; I N a]cbV^VW Z Zg`SdWSeQ][

    Quality programming serving children and families

    From the collection of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem

    Exclusive U.S. Venue Closing August 2Richard Avedons striking photographs helped define Americas

    perceptions of beauty, politics, and power. Come see more than 70

    works by the renowned photographer, including a massive mural

    of beat poet Allen Ginsberg and his family, a group portrait of

    Andy Warhol and the Factory, and a series of portraits published by

    Rolling Stone on the eve of the 1976 presidential election. 5th and Market | NMAJH.org

    Richard Avedon: Family Affairs is based on a 2014 exhibition organized by the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Major support for this exhibition has been provided by The David Berg Foundation, The Directors Fund, and Lynne and Harold Honickman. Additional support has been provided by The Abstraction Fund, Gagosian Gallery, Macys, The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Annette Y. and Jack M. Friedland, the Consulate General of Israel to the Mid-Atlantic Region, Gwen and Alan Goodman, and Marsha and Stephen Silberstein. Image: Allen Ginsbergs Family, Paterson, New Jersey, May 3, 1970. Photograph by Richard Avedon. Richard Avedon Foundation. Gift of the American Contemporary Art Foundation, Leonard A. Lauder, President, to American Friends of the Israel Museum.

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    BVSV][ST`]\b(9]`SO(On July 27, 1953 the Korean War ended)

    Bhey call it The Forgotten War. Nothing worse than to fight in a forgotten war. The Korean War dragged on for three years; almost 34,000 American soldiers died in the fighting. Maybe it happened too soon after the shock of World War II and got lost in the aftermath. Maybe the war was over-looked so easily because it became the poster child of the new kind of war the kind we subsequently faced in Vietnam and later in Iraq the kind of war where there was no victory and no declaration of war. Some wars end only with exhaustion.

    No final peace was ever declared in Korea. No peace treaty is in place, even today. It ended in a declared cease-fire dividing Korea into North and South, separated by a demilitarized zone across the 38th parallel. Not the kind of end that creates ticker-tape parades and the clang-ing of pots and pans. No photos of an unknown sailor kissing a pretty girl as jubilation erupts around them. When we look back today at the years 1950 to 53, folks think it was all Happy Days and Grease the good old days when things were simpler. Only they werent.

    I was 15 when the war ended in a stalemate. As silly and shallow as any 15-year-old that one could find. None of our family fought in the Korean War. If there were hardships here at home, I was blissfully unaware of them. We had a political debate in my senior year of el-ementary school with the upcoming 52 presi-dential election. Dwight Eisenhower versus Adlai Stevenson. At Furness Junior High, I de-bated for Ike. My junior high school reasoning: Ike wasnt an egghead like Adlai. Ike was the hero of the Normandy invasion that helped end World War II. Ike promised to end the un-popular war and bring the troops home. That was good enough for me. I defamed Stevenson as a book-reading, pipe-smoking intellectual without a plan to get us out of Korea. I do not remember who won that debate. Ike won the election. The war ended a year later. Not all of our American troops came home. We still have about 30,000 troops stationed in South Korea some 62 years after that war ended.

    Those times are a blur. No chronology to them in my memory. Joe McCarthy bellow-ing about Commies in the State Department. Scared the hell out of my father. He thought the Commies were all around us. If there were Communists at high levels of the government, they could be anywhere ... some person or per-sons tried and failed to shoot Harry S. Truman ... watching I Love Lucy in our living room

    as Mom stroked my hair unusual because Mom didnt believe in all that huggy-kissy stuff ... The Catcher in the Rye had a curse word in it. Scrambled through the pages just to find it. Excited just seeing the forbidden word in print.

    Dave Garroway on The Today Show, but who watched television in the morning? Our TV was a three-way Admiral combination with a 12-inch screen. Kids did not have their own television. Hell, you got a radio and a phono-graph player for one price. We purchased the TV in 51. Remember the year because on our TV set, I saw Bobby Thomson hit the miracle home run to beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in the playoffs at the Polo Grounds. I was a forlorn Dodgers fan. Did not show up around the cor-ner for two weeks afterward...

    Tropic Of Cancer by Henry Miller, our generations dirty book. In paperback. Pa-perbacks were all considered dirty books back then ... Bring the Troops Home...The Rosenbergs executed for giving the secrets of the atomic bomb to the Russians. Shrouded in controversy. I wondered, why the hell would they do that?...

    Before we got our own television, we watched The Texaco Star Theater. Nobody called it that. It was the Milton Berle Show. Tuesday nights. Our family took a taxi to Aunt Jennys house to watch it. The TV picture was reflected in a mirror of some sort. Sometimes Uncle Georgie Blair placed a plastic multi-colored screen over the picture and presto we had color TV! Colors were a little off. The grass might be blue and the faces green, but it was color ...

    Hand-dipped ice cream at Maxies at Fifth and Jackson streets. Take out sundaes in our own cereal bowl. Malted milkshakes if you wanted to take out a malted, you brought Maxie an empty milk bottle. Tastykakes with icing thick and down the sides of the cake ... digging Sinatra rather than Elvis .... first full year of the war, the Phillies win the pennant. Im the only unhappy kid in town a sore loser a Dodgers rooter- decimated by Richie Ashburns throw that cut down Cal Abrams at the plate.

    Truman fires Gen. Douglas MacArthur. A haberdasher fires a war hero. America was outraged. MacArthur wanted to drop an atom-ic bomb on China. Stop the Chinese before its too late. The Chinese troops pouring across the Yalu River. Looked as if we lost the war before we got our stalemate...

    Hanging on corners in South Philly, play-ing pinball machines for money. Untroubled times? We thought an atomic war with Russia was inevitable. Dad built a bomb shelter in our basement ... Rock and roll coming on to save us. SPR

    Comment at southphillyreview.com/opinion/cardella.

    9WhZ[bbW0gB][1O`RSZZOColumnist

    [email protected]`b=aS\Zc\RMovie Rev iewer

    7 t seems preposterous to suggest that, at 76, after so much stunning work, Ian McKellen has given the performance of his career. But thats the sense one gets when leaving Mr. Holmes, the gorgeous new mystery that reunites McKellen with his Gods and Monsters director, Bill Condon. From stage to screen, McKellen has uncannily embodied characters cre-ated by Shakespeare and Tolkien, yet hes never quite brought such world-weary pa-thos to a role as he does to that of an aging Sherlock Holmes.

    Mr. Holmes plays it straight, acknowl-edging the now 93-year-old sleuth as a real, retired detective, whose famed per-sona was built via case accounts penned and published by his late partner, Dr. John Watson. Now, Holmes is attempt-ing to write a book of his own, haunted by a particular case involving a woman and her miscarried children, and suffer-ing from dementia that worsens by the day. Fresh from a trip to Hiroshima where he sought out herbal remedies, Holmes is staying in a rural home in Sussex with his housekeeper (Laura Linney) and her son (Milo Parker), whos deftly, if somewhat unwittingly, easing himself into becoming Holmess successor.

    From the painterly shots of sweeping gardens to the narratives slow, delicate burn, Mr. Holmes is consummately graceful, and a glorious rebound for a filmmaker who oddly, if somewhat ex-citingly, opted to wrap up the bumbling Twilight saga. The film is a paean to memory, loss and memory loss, all tied to a fictional icon made vividly realistic. McKellen playfully relishes lines that de-bunk common myths (Holmes never wore a deerstalker, for example), but also loses

    himself in moments of crushing vulner-ability and regret.

    Admittedly, McKellens performance may have more profound impact given his age, and that weve seen him evolve on screen for so long. Theres emotional baggage in his turn as Holmes, which is no doubt informed by the weathered ex-periences that every actor brings to his work. But not every actor can, or needs to be, so bare and bold and exquisite in his realization of a role. McKellen isnt just showing us Holmes, hes showing us him-self and, just maybe, that hes the finest actor alive today.

    ; `6]Z[Sa>54]c``SSZa]cb]TT]c`

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    Serving Philadelphia, Montgomery and Bucks

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    1Z]aS`BVO\3dS`( Through July 25. Tickets: $25. Chist Church Neighborhood House, 20 N. American St. 215-922-1695. mazeppa.org.BVSBVW`R/\\cOZ1][SB]USbVS`2O\QS4SabWdOZ( Through July 26. Tickets: $20-$99. The Suzanne Roberts Theatre, 215-985-0420. koreshdance.org.>ZOg>S\\ #ZOg2SdSZ]^[S\b1]\TS`S\QS`SORW\Ua( Through July 26. Free (RSVP required). Drexel Universitys URBN Black Box Theatre, 3401 Filbert St. 484-482-8180. playpenn.org. A][SbVW\U1]]Z( Through July 29. Free. Da Vinci Art Alliance, 704 Catharine St. 215-829-0466. davinciartalliance.org.

    :cZca5]ZRS\AV]Sa( Through Aug. 2. Tickets: $22-$25. Caplan Studio Theater at the University of the Arts, Terra Hall, 16th Floor, 211 South Broad St. 215-665-9720. flashpointtheatre.org.

    :SUS\RO`g(7\aWRSbVS6]caS0OZZ`]][AQS\S( Through Aug. 16. Tickets: Free-$14. The African American Museum in Philadel-phia, 701 Arch St. 215-574-0380. aampmuseum.org.

    AbSZZOO\R:]c: Through Aug. 23. Tickets: $27-$77. Peoples Light & Theatre, 39 Conestoga Rd., Malvern. 610-644-3500. peoples-light.org.

    2STS\RW\UbVS1OdS[O\( Through Aug. 30. Tickets: $45-$65. Penns Landing Playhouse, 211 S. Columbus Blvd. 855-448-7469. plplayhouse.com.

    1`SObW\U1O[SZ]b(BVS9S\\SRg>V]b]U`O^Vg]T8OQ_cSa:]eS( Through Sept. 7. Tickets: $8-$14.50. National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St. 215-409-6600. constitutioncenter.org.

    AVSZZSgA^SQb]`(9SS^bVS6][S4W`Sa0c`\W\U( Through Sept. 27. Tickets: Free-$20. Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2600 Benja-min Franklin Parkway. 215-763-8100- philamuseum.org.

    0S\SObVbVSAc`TOQS(:WTS2SObVO\R5]ZRW\/\QWS\b>O\O[O( Through Nov. 1. Tickets: $10-$15. University of Penn-sylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3260 South St. 215-898-4000. penn.museum.

    A^SOYW\U=cbT]`3_cOZWbg(BVS1]\abWbcbW]\[email protected]\RbVSAc^`S[S1]c`b( Through Jan. 3. Tickets: $8-$14.50. National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St. 215-409-6600. constitutioncenter.org.A^SQWOZ3dS\b(8]aV0ZcS( July 23-25. Tickets: $16-$34. Helium Comedy Club, 2031 Sansom St. 215-496-9001. heliumcomedy.com.>`W[caeWbV2W\]aOc`8 `( 7 p.m. July 23. Tickets: $39.50. River Stage at Great Plaza, Penns Landing, 101 S. Christopher Columbus Blvd. 215-629-3200. festivalpierphilly.com.

    BVS;OQVW\SC\^ZcUUSR( 8 p.m. July 23. Tickets: $32. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. worldcafelive.com.

    BVWa7a6O`RQ]`S4Sab( July 24-26. Tickets: $35-$95. Electric Fac-tory, 421 N. Seventh St. 215-627-1332. electricfactory.info./`b/TbS`#(6OdO\O`g]`( 7 p.m. July 24. Tickets: $5-$10. Painted Bride, 230 Vine St. 215-925-9914. paintedbride.org.

    BVSRSORZW\ST]`QOZS\RO`acP[WaaW]\aWa#^[BVc`aROgPST]`SbVS^cPZWQObW]\RObS\]SfQS^bW]\aD E A D L I N E fLWabW\UW\T]`[ObW]\[cabPSbg^SR]`\SObZg^`W\bSRO\R[OgPS[OWZSRS[OWZSRTOfSR]`RSZWdS`SRW\^S`a]\7\T]`[ObW]\Wa\]bOQQS^bSRPg^V]\S/ZZZWabW\Ua[cabW\QZcRSO^V]\S\c[PS`bVObQO\PS^`W\bSR;ObS`WOZabVObR]\]bT]ZZ]ebVSQ`WbS`WO]`O``WdSPgbVSRSORZW\SeWZZ\]bPS^`W\bSR;OWZ2SZWdS`acP[WaaW]\ab]( bVO\R>]`bS`ab`SSba>VWZORSZ^VWO>O'"&N4Of( #!!$ N3[OWZ(QOZS\RO`.a]cbV^VWZZg`SdWSeQ][

    T H I S W E E K

    Ariana Grande takes the stage, all 5 feet of her, to entertain thousands of adoring fans who will know every word to every song 7:30 p.m. July 29. Tickets: $29.50-$79.50. Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St. 215-336-3600. wellsfargocenter-philly.com.

    ;SUO0OR;]dWS]`SaS\bA:DO\R2O\WSZRS8Saca( 7:30 to 11 p.m. July 24. Tickets: $12. Fleisher Sanctuary, 719 Catharine St. 215-922-3456. fleisher.org.

    2WO\O9`OZZeWbVbVS>VWZORSZ^VWO=`QVSab`O(8 p.m. July 24. Tickets: $25-$85. Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 5201 Parkside Ave., Fairmount Park. 215-546-7900. manncenter.org.

    ;S[]`gBO^Sa(8 p.m. July 24. Tickets: $10-$12. Boot & Saddle, 1131 S. Broad St. 267-639-4528.bootandsaddlephilly.com.

    2`SeVWZORSZ^VWO=`QVSab`O(8 p.m. July 25. Tickets: $25-$35. Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 5201 Park-side Ave., Fairmount Park. 215-546-7900. manncenter.org.0==H3B/BB==A(BVSEWZRSab>O`bg]\A]cbVAb`SSb(8 p.m. July 25. Tickets: $10. Theatre of the Living Arts, 334 South St. 215-922-1011. lnphilly.com.BVSEVWaYSg9WbbS\a0c`ZSa_cS( 9 p.m. July 25. Tickets: $10. The Trocadero, 1003 Arch St. 215-922-6888. thetroc.com.

    :WdSBO^W\U=T:OcUVa4]f( 7 and 9:30 p.m. July 27. Tickets:$15. Helium Comedy Club, 2031 Sansom St. 215-496-9001. helium-comedy.com.

    [email protected]]gOZBS\S\POc[a( 8 p.m. July 27. Tickets: $3. The Troca-dero, 1003 Arch St. 215-922-6888. thetroc.com.BVSAQV]]Z][email protected]]QY/ZZabO`a( 7 p.m. July 28. Tickets: $10-12. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. 215-222-1400. worldcafelive.com.;WZYg1VO\QSeWbVF/[POaaOR]`a(7:30 p.m. July 28. Tickets: $30. The Skyline Stage at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 5201 Parkside Ave., Fairmount Park. 215-546-7900. manncenter.org.

    3Z1O`WPSTc\Y( 5 to 8 p.m. July 29. Tickets: Free-$10. University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3260 South St. 215-898-4000. penn.musuem.

    0]\SBVcUa]a\S`C\^ZcUUSR(8 p.m. July 29. Tickets: $10-$12. Milk-boy Philly, 1100 Chestnut St. 215-925-6455. milkboyphilly.com.

    5V]ab2]U(BVSEOg]TbVSAO[c`OW(8:30 p.m. July 29. Free. FringeArts, 140 N. Columbus Blvd. 215-375-7744. fringearts.com. +(*

    Cd]ddei^Zh]ZgZ

    The 10th Annual Passyunk Avenue Car Show & Street Festival is here! And its free. Over 140 clas-sic, custom and antique cars, trucks and motor-cycles will populate the Avenue between Broad and Dickinson streets for ve hours with live DJs, music, and acitivities for kids plus loads of street eats and bars, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 26. Free. 215-0336-1455. visiteastpassyunk.com.

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  • 20

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    Chinese Restaurant

    (215)271-0552Great Food at Really Great Prices!

    Qt. of Wonton Soupw/ $20.00 purchase

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    2WabWZZ[gPSObW\UVSO`b1af Ynez, 2025 Washington Ave., will mark National Tequila Day to-morrow by allowing patrons to combine fresh drink mixers and their favorite bottle of the distilled beverage for $10. Guests can also pair the concoctions with the Mexicano sandwich, classic soft ta-cos or the Tinga burrito. Followers of @CafeYnez will receive a secret word for the celebration and can use that to score $2 off any cocktail mixer. Call 215-278-7579, or visit cafeynez.com. SPR

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    > atience can be rewarding, especially when it comes to Terry Ianellis Signa-ture Basil Chicken. The resident of the 2600 block of South Mildred Street gives the chicken plenty of time to soak in the combination of basil, Parme-san cheese and garlic to provide her lucky samplers with the best favor experience possible.

    The Lower Moyamensing inhabitant suggested that readers serve this moist and tender dish, which she deems her favorite way to bake chicken, with spaghetti, but if that offering, another member of the pasta family or something else joins ones plate, the results figure to be fantastic. SPR

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    TIRE REPAIRS, WHILE YOU W

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    JOSEPH V. CUFFARI

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    "#!!#"#!("$""""#!#

    "$!!#&&%"!!#!&!"#%!!$$&!'

    " !#"#!#!#&!#$#

    Beloved husband, loving father, proud grandfather and great grandfather,dearest brother, uncle and cousin.

    Sadly missed but forever in our hearts.

    Beloved husband, loving father, proud grandfather and great grandfather,dearest brother, uncle and cousin.

    Sadly missed but forever in our hearts.

    1928 ~ 2014

    FIRST ANNIVERSARYANTHONY F. BUSILLO

    All our love always, Mella, Tony, Carmel, Michael, Donna, Joe, Ginny, grandchildren, great grandchildren,family and friends

    In Loving Memory of

    ConcettaPeluso

    Mom, I miss you so much.

    I love you. And as you would say to me

    I love you more.

    Love forever and a dayRockyXoxo

    P.S. HAPPY BIRTHDAY!xoxo

    In Loving Memory of

    7.20.31 - 7.06.15

    ConcettaPeluso

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    Cedrones Flowers

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    !

    SocialsSocials

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    JF:@8C8E;[email protected];

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    aLEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): A carefully planned trip or event is about to be turned upside down, as a loved one upsets plans and throws some surprises into the mix. Be flexible and pre-pared. Everything will work out; just go with the flow. Lucky number: 386.

    sVIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): Curiosity, restlessness and nervous energy are high, so Take the time to investigate issues properly. Do not be reluctant about asking questions and pushing for answers. If someone is answering freely, it is a sign that the person is not giving all the facts. Lucky num-ber: 750.

    dLIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): Avoid limiting yourself to the same old routine and people. The wider your circle of family, friends, colleagues and acquaintances, the more influence you will have in the big, wide world outside your door. Anticipate being amazed and delighted at what you uncover. Lucky number: 217.

    fSCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): You are eas-ily bored at this time, but resist the temptation to spark things up by being dramatic, upsetting oth-ers and rocking the boat. Find less disruptive ways to make life more interesting. Find new interests, or take a trip. Lucky number: 132.

    gSAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): Stop procrastinating, and start doing! This is a good time to take inspiring creative ideas and turn them into practical, productive projects. Take that first step, and great things will be accomplished. Lucky number: 810.

    hCAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): Use your abundant energy to fire up projects and follow through with plenty of passion and purpose.Resist the urge to blurt out something totally inap-

    propriate. Others are inspired by your charisma and want to join in the effort. Lucky number: 917.

    AAQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): Put your trust in people who have been honest with you in the past. Be careful about what you believe, and resist the urge to participate in gossip. Keep your head down in the workplace, and do not let anything you hear darken your mood. Lucky number: 401.

    SPISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): Communi-cation and travel are the buzz words as your restless side kicks in. You have amazing multi-task-ing skills right now, but avoid taking on too much and scattering your energy. Its OK to say no once in a while and focus on what is really important. Lucky number: 726.

    DARIES (March 21 to April 20): Your energy magnifies your confidence levels, and you are keen to solve problems for everyone else. Do not talk things up too much and end up promising more than you can deliver. Other peoples problems are not yours. Sometimes, just listening is all you need to do. Lucky number: 957.

    FTAURUS (April 21 to May 20): The more proactive and vocal you are about a current relationship issue, the smaller the problem will be. It will help if you have the inner confidence to tell a loved one how you really feel. Lucky number: 605.

    GGEMINI (May 21 to June 20): Expect to feel on edge this week, as you are sensitive to everything going on around you. Do all you can to worry less and relax, as your to-do list will still be there in the morning. Lucky number: 647.

    HCANCER (June 21 to July 22): Focus on boosting your finances in practical ways, do-ing something you are very good at. Think outside the box, and look for new and unusual opportunities. Consider setting up a class and tutoring others or starting a mini business from home. Lucky number: 024. SPR

    To inquire about a personal reading, call Mystic Terry at 215-467-5162. Comment at southphilly-review.com/arts-and-entertainment/horoscopes.

    COMPOSERSACROSS 1. Wow! 4. Bad air 8. Figure expert:

    abbr. 11. Turmoils 15. __ mufn 16. Chiles neighbor 17. __ of; next to 19. Composer

    of Sweet Caroline

    22. Composer of Moonlight Sonata

    23. Pub order 24. Preposition 25. Separated 27. Motionless 28. Rule 30. Fuming 33. Square root of

    12,100 35. Joins 36. Composer of

    Grande Valse Brillante

    42. Letter opener 44. Gave up 45. Accumulated 47. Jai __ 50. Hurray 52. __ Abner 54. Roof pieces 55. Mute 57. Response: abbr. 60. Ending for eight

    or Hallow 61. Declare 62. Dispatch boat 63. Embroidery yarn 65. Deadly viper 67. Gerbil or puppy 68. Composer of

    Oh! Susannah

    72. Risk cash 75. Numerical prex 76. Dutch Boy cans 77. Wipe away 79. Take __ of;

    share in 84. Made a lap 86. Born 87. Colorful bird 88. Horned animal 89. Assembly: abbr. 90. Great sorrow 92. Close 93. 1/100 of a franc 95. Fertile spot 100. Limits 102. Composer of

    Requiem 105. Irani coin 108. Middle le

    drawer, maybe 109. White poplar 110. Head topper 112. Lunches 117. Russian ruler

    from 1328-40 119. Spanish painter 121. Prex for cuspid

    or angle 122. Composer of

    Yesterday 124. Composer of

    Over There 128. Intermix 129. 1st name in

    daredevils 130. Garden shed

    items 131. Arrow poison 132. Draft board:

    abbr. 133. Mulgrew or

    Winslet 134. Kippurs

    forerunner

    DOWN 1. Mourn 2. Sufx for arbor

    or ether 3. Sign 4. Row 5. Autobiographical

    sketch 6. Spanish gold 7. BB __ 8. Priest 9. Like a sonnet 10. Crawling bug 11. ...thou shalt

    conceive in thy womb and shalt bring forth __ ... (Luke 1:31)

    12. Disreputable saloon

    13. Baltic feeder 14. Transmitted 15. Under 17. Lawyers org. 18. Alphabetic trio 19. Henpeck 20. Holiday __ 21. Went out with 26. Dijon dad 29. Whirlpools 31. __ room 32. Cooler for kids 34. Electrical unit 36. Italian monk 37. Lounging 38. Stable fare 39. Fraternity letters 40. Cruise ship

    stop, perhaps 41. __-do-well; bum 43. College major 46. Summer on the clock: abbr.

    47. Urgent letters 48. TVs One Life

    to __ 49. Dismounted 51. Angel, perhaps 53. Very upset 56. Denials 58. Old Testament

    bk. 59. Cleaned the

    oor 60. Wee 61. Jungle beast 63. Middle: abbr. 64. Last queen of

    Spain 66. Nov. 1 honorees

    69. U.S. voting day: abbr.

    70. Small bill 71. Classic Olds 72. Composer

    of The Brandenberg Concertos

    73. Famous twin 74. Canvas shelter 78. Stravinskys

    birthplace 79. Part of a circle 80. Demonstrate,

    biblically 81. Brit. ooring 82. Global: abbr.

    83. Hairdo 85. Very eager 87. Afternoon social 89. Denitions 91. Calendar abbr. 94. Movie co. 96. To __;

    unanimously 97. Ferber novel 98. Sufx for real or

    nal 99. Dali, to friends 101. Like one who

    moralizes 103. Fictional works 104. Rue 106. Ball game start

    107. Turkeys dollars 110. Adieu 111. German article 112. Early year in the

    next century 113. Univ. course 114. Peak 115. Handicapped 116. __ Lanka 118. Afrmative 120. Make eyes at 123. 2000-lb. wts. 125. Wimpy cry of fear 126. Eggs: Lat. 127. Tic-tac-toe win

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    N0g8]aS^V;gS`aReview Managing Ed itor

    9eli Engleson has never lacked a fer-vent focus on the benefits of physi-cal activity, with the devotion bod-ing well for her body. Also blessed with a helpful heart, the 35-year-old will combine her allegiance to fitness with the allure of aiding others Sunday by compet-ing in IRONMAN Lake Placid, a Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation event that will find her lauding the courage of an aunt who is battling the affliction and reflecting on the influence of a friend who last year succumbed to breast cancer.

    I love to challenge myself, but this endeavor has many more rewards than that, the Passyunk Square dweller said of her Upstate New York journey. I want to acknowledge two very special individuals and make as many people as possible aware of the efforts to combat multiple myeloma.

    Engleson will be participating in her third Ironman triathlon, with this marking her debut as an MMRF Team for Cures constituent. Set to cover 140.6 miles through swim-ming, biking and running duties, she is going to rely on her mind as much as her frame to fete her loved ones.

    Theres never any reason to complain when youve said youre going to do this, Engleson noted of the temptation to tab the test too taxing. Think of what people are enduring in their lives, and youll realize that you can likewise face your fears by contributing to a great cause.

    In conjunction with her age, the agile altruist established a fundraising goal of $35,000, 85 percent of which she had reached at press time. Having dealt with outside doubts that she would be able to finish her inaugural triathlon, March 2014s venture to Los Cabos, which she conquered in just over 16 hours, Engle-son is not daring to indulge in hubris but remains confident she will conclude her chores well before entrants 17-hour allot-ment has elapsed.

    Im passionate about helping to make a difference, the composed competitor, who

    also traveled to Maryland last year for a triathlon, said. This foundation is doing amazing work to spread a


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