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Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching Module: Instructional Design © 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 1 Section A: Lesson Plan (40%) Instructional Goals/Course Outcome Title: Types of Retailers Lesson 1 of 7 lessons of Principles of Retailing Management Module (Bachelor of Science in Retail Management programme) Total Duration: 4hours (6.30pm to 10.30pm), Twice weekly A statement of overall goal of the lesson. The goal of this lesson is to enable students to appraise the concepts underlying retail formats Learning Objectives Statements that specify what learners will know or be able to do as a result of a learning activity. At the end of the lesson you will be able to: 1. Explain the different types of retail formats 2. Identify the differences between service and merchandise retailers 3. Critically evaluate the various factors contributing to successful retail operations of various retail formats 4. Analyse the trends that are shaping today’s retail formats Learner Characteristics/Pre-requisites Specify a range of learners’ characteristics that will inform instructional strategy. Adult learners aged 25 to 50 years Fresh graduates seeking management careers in the retail industry Industry practitioners (Diploma holders as stipulated by University) with over 2 years of supervisory and managerial experience seeking theoretical knowledge, academic credentials for career progression
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Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 1

Section A: Lesson Plan (40%)

Instructional Goals/Course Outcome

Title: Types of Retailers

Lesson 1 of 7 lessons of Principles of Retailing Management Module (Bachelor of Science in Retail Management programme)

Total Duration: 4hours (6.30pm to 10.30pm), Twice weekly

A statement of overall goal of the lesson.

The goal of this lesson is to enable students to appraise the concepts underlying retail formats

Learning Objectives

Statements that specify what learners will know or be able to do as a result of a learning activity.

At the end of the lesson you will be able to:

1. Explain the different types of retail formats 2. Identify the differences between service and merchandise retailers 3. Critically evaluate the various factors contributing to successful retail operations of various retail formats 4. Analyse the trends that are shaping today’s retail formats

Learner Characteristics/Pre-requisites

Specify a range of learners’ characteristics that will inform instructional strategy.

Adult learners aged 25 to 50 years

Fresh graduates seeking management careers in the retail industry

Industry practitioners (Diploma holders as stipulated by University) with over 2 years of supervisory and managerial experience seeking theoretical knowledge, academic credentials for career progression

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 2

Variety of thinking and learning styles e.g. conceptual, reflective / visual, environmental1

http://online.rit.edu/faculty/teaching_strategies/adult_learners.cfm

Prerequisite: Students would need to passed the Principles of Marketing module (encompassing environmental forces impacting business i.e. PESTLE)

Instructional Strategy

Outline details of the instructional strategy of one lesson from the unit. This would include:

sequencing of lesson segments and activities;

the use of teaching resources (media/technology) to achieve the desired learning objectives and goals; and

an estimate of the time allocated (duration) to each lesson segment

considerations of possible implementation issues

Lesson Segment / Activity

(Based on BSCS 5E Instructional Model)

Resources (media/technology) Duration

Engage

1. Video Presentation

History of retail formats

Discussion of key learning points (variety, history, context)

Questions and Answers (Q&A)

5 mins ‘Types of retailers” You-Tube

video2

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-uzG_bp5qA.) embedded in PowerPoint

6.30pm to 6.45pm

(15 mins)

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 3

Engage

2. Outline of Lesson Goal and Learning Outcomes

Chapter and Topics Coverage (Rationale, Relevancy, Applicability)

Lesson linkage with other lessons and Module

Expected learning outcomes

Topic 1& 2

Explain

3. Different types of retail formats

Each type of retailer offers a different set of value propositions for customers. Thus different retail formats arise for meeting the varying needs of the customers. The various retail formats includes:

Mon and Pop

Convenience

Chain Stores

Speciality

Supermarkets

Departmental

Hypermarket

Big Box concepts Students (random) will be asked to furnish local examples of

retail format

Interactive seminar with PowerPoint presentation with handouts (Appendix 1)

Michael Levy Barton Weitz (2011)

‘Retailing Management’ McGraw-

Hill/Irwin, New York, Chapter 2, 3, 4,

6

Interactive seminar with PowerPoint presentation with handouts

Michael Levy Barton Weitz (2011)

‘Retailing Management’ McGraw-

Hill/Irwin, New York, Chapter 2

3 mins edited The World of Retailing:

6.45pm to 7.00pm

(15 mins)

7.00pm to 7.20pm

(20 mins)

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 4

Explain

4. Differences between service and merchandise retailers

Four important differences in the nature of the offering provided by services and merchandise retailers are:

Intangibility

Simultaneous production and consumption

Perishability

Inconsistency of the offering to customers 5 mins discussion on video (contextualise to Singapore examples of service and merchandise retailers)

5. Break 1

Evaluate 6. Online Quiz

Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ) – 9 questions covering Topic 1&2

Web portal provide instant results generation with score and correct answers Teacher will provide feedback on common mistakes committed by students

Different Type of Retailers & Multichannel

Retailing You-Tube video3

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smixeBxRSe8) embedded in PowerPoint Interactive seminar with PowerPoint presentation with handouts

Michael Levy Barton Weitz (2011)

‘Retailing Management’ McGraw-

Hill/Irwin, New York, Chapter 2

Wi Fi coverage

Student’s Laptops with Wi Fi function

Levy Weitz Retailing Management

Chapter 2 Self Quix4

Source: http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0073530026/student_vi

7.20pm to 7.40pm

(20 mins)

7.40pm to 7.55pm

(15 mins)

7.55pm to 8.20pm

(25 mins)

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 5

Topic 3

7. Factors contributing to successful retail operations of various retail formats

An understanding of the macro- and microenvironments (PESTLE) framework are needed to formulate and implement a retail strategy. The retail strategy indicates how the firm plans to focus its resources to accomplish its objectives. The retail strategy identifies:

The target market

The nature of merchandise and services to be offered

How the retailer will build a long-term advantage over competitors.

Seven important opportunities for retailers to develop sustainable competitive advantages are:

Customer loyalty

Location

Human resource management

Distribution and information systems

Customer service **Topic for Final examination**

ew0/chapter2/self_quiz.html

Interactive seminar with PowerPoint presentation with handouts

Michael Levy Barton Weitz (2011)

‘Retailing Management’ McGraw-

Hill/Irwin, New York, Chapter 6

8.20pm to 8.50pm

(30 mins)

8.50pm to 9.20pm

(30 mins)

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 6

Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate 8. Case Study (Facilitation by Teacher ) Evaluate the various factors underpinning Sheng Shiong successful retail operations

Group discussion

World Cafe Teacher will provide feedback in the process of the hands-on exercise

9. Break 2

Topic 4

10. Trends that are shaping today’s retail formats

The retail industry is changing rapidly. Some of the most important changes involve:

The greater diversity of retailers

Increasing industry concentration

Globalization

Use of multiple channels for consumer interaction Evaluate

11. Short Written Test

2 short written questions covering:

PESTLE framework

Flip Charts, Markers, Note Pads

Sheng Shiong Case Study Handouts Source: Mind your p’s and Queues

http://img49.imageshack.us/img49/9453/shengsiongui9.jpg

(Appendix 2)

Interactive seminar with PowerPoint presentation with handouts

Michael Levy Barton Weitz (2011)

‘Retailing Management’ McGraw-

Hill/Irwin, New York, Chapter 4

9.20pm to 9.35pm

(15 mins)

9.35pm to 9.55pm

(20 mins)

9.55pm to 10.15pm

(20 mins)

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 7

Globalisation

Types of trends shaping retail format To be commented and utilise for discussion during the following lesson for “focus areas of examination” Engage

12. Lesson Revision

Recap of key learning points

Recommended further readings on Topics

Outline of following lesson topics coverage

Answering of queries

Interactive seminar with PowerPoint presentation with handouts

Michael Levy Barton Weitz (2011)

‘Retailing Management’ McGraw-

Hill/Irwin, New York

Further readings

Berman B and Evans JR (2009) Retail Management , a strategic approach London Pearson Books

Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services

http://www.inc.com/articles/2001/01/21930.html

10.15pm to 10.30pm

(15 mins)

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 8

Assessment Approach

Provide a description of the assessment approach in terms of assessment objective, methods and levels assessed.

Assessment Objective(s)

Outline the skills, competencies and knowledge/understanding you want your learners to demonstrate.

Assessment Method(s)

Select an appropriate assessment method to allow you to assess the specific areas outlined in your “Assessment Objective” (such as MCQ, essay, case discussion, portfolio etc.)

Assessment Level(s)

Identify the level of assessment you are seeking to gather as evidence about the quality of learning (e.g. lower-level recall of SOP; mid-level explanation of XYZ theory; high-level evaluation of an application of idea).

Learning Objectives (LO)

1. Explain the different types of retail formats

Formative

Quiz

Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ)

Bloom Taxonomy5

(Continuum from Lower Order Thinking Skills (LOTS) to Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) )

http://ctl.utexas.edu/teaching-resources/design-your-course/design-for-specific-learning/bloom-s-taxonomy-revised/

LO1, LO2 : Understand (Level 5), LOTS

Classify-determine types of retail formats, identifying differences between service and merchandise retailers

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 9

2. Identify the differences between

service and merchandise retailers

3. Critically evaluate the various factors contributing to successful retail operations of various retail formats

4. Analyse the trends that are shaping today’s retail formats

Case Study on Sheng Shiong successful retail operations

Short Written Test

Summative assessment centred on a 3 hour closed book examination (100% of marks) with student selecting 5 out of 7 questions (one from each lesson topics) as per University stipulations.

LO3 : Evaluate (Level 2), HOTS

Make judgements based on criteria

Check and critique factors contributing to Sheng Shiong success

LO4: Analyse (Level 3), HOTS

Distinguish, organise and attribute relevant from irrelevant trends shaping retail formats

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 10

Section B Justification of Instructional Strategy and Assessment Approach

(40%)

In formulating the instructional strategy, recognition is given to key elements of

Instructional Design (ID) for generating effective learning, for instance “beliefs about

how learning takes place” which in the lesson centred on learning theories of

cognitivism and constructivism i.e. thought process and learner’s active engagement

in processing information.

The strategy reflect Gustafson and Branch “classroom orientation” 6

model i.e. small

scale lesson where the teacher and students interact for a few hours and Chellman7

ID4T (Instructional Design for Teachers) model given its emphasis on the

“connectedness’ of the various processes during development of a lesson plan, for

example, the link between learner characteristics i.e. learning styles and lesson goal.

Here, delivery of learning content cater to the different learning styles of learners

through a mixture of instructional methods such as video, lectures, group

discussions aligning to visual, auditory and kinaesthetic learners.

Adaption of Wiggins8 ‘results-focused design’ enable “planned” appropriate learning

activities for achieving ‘implied performances that should make up the

assessment…all teaching and learning should point’ as seen in the activity of short

questions for reinforcing students’ understanding of trends impacting retail formats.

The lesson plan incorporated BSCS 5E Instructional Model 9

for instructional

materials for ‘organise content within a conceptual framework’ i.e. the various topics

in the lesson linkage with the concept of retail formats and developing of students’

metacognitive skills (individual mental process in learning), what is taught (subject

matter), why it is taught (understanding) and what competence or mastery looks like.

Sequencing of the various lesson events are guided by elements of the model for

equipping students to engage, develop and demonstrate the desired learning

outcomes. For example, engagement from screening of video for promoting curiosity

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 11

and interest in the topic, evaluation of understanding of concepts through performing

on-line quiz by learners.

Selection of teaching resources (media / technology) factors the variables of

characteristics of media, learners, task/learning and practicality of usage. Media

application focuses on supporting the instruction via effective communication of

“intended learning” and caters to the variety of learners’ learning styles. For example,

video cater to visual learners while presentation handouts facilitate theorist and

reflectors learners.

Sequencing of lesson segments and activities centred on achieving the goal of

lesson via focus on meaningful performance as ‘learner and their performances are

focal point of all teaching and learning activities’ 10

which is achieved through

engaging and effective learning, appropriate use of teaching resources within a

learner centred environment.

Learning that is engaging “pulls” learners by its degree of interests, challenge and

relevancy resulting in deep intellectual engagement, effective learning occurs when

learners are able to develop greater understanding which facilitates competence

development. This can be seen in the sequencing of a 5 minutes discussion on

service and merchandise retailers after the video screening for relating to local retail

context given the “Indian / western countries oriented” nature of the video.

For achieving learning goal “appraise concepts of retail format” the teaching

approach centred on developing student’s cognition (knowing and understanding)

and cognitive (ability to apply in different situations) skills via Posner11

‘integrate new

knowledge with existing knowledge’

Hence, principal consideration lies in provision of elaboration through creation of

multiple opportunities for engaging new content, for instance group discussion on

Sheng Shiong case study for ‘think with materials in a variety of ways’ after the

interactive seminar on factors contributing to successful retail operations of various

retail formats.

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 12

Morrison12

pointed out the importance of understanding relevant characteristics’ of

learners for identification of variables providing opportunities or constraint in

designing of lesson plan. In the lesson plan, the work experience of the students are

“tapped” towards attainment of learning objectives through collaborative learning

between novice learners and practitioners (during discussions) and building on pre-

requisite knowledge i.e. Marketing module contents of PESTLE framework apply in

retailing context.

The assessment methods in the lesson plan is based on Biiggs & Tang concept of

‘constructive alignment’ where the assessment serves to verify meeting of learning

objectives from gathering appropriate evidence of student learning. For instance, the

learning objective of “Analyse the trends that are shaping today’s retail formats”

require evidence of the student’s ability to distinguish and explain nature of the

trends which is done through usage of written test which enable “scooping” of

needed evidence from the demonstration of cognitive skills by students.

Given the goal of the lesson lies in cognitive learning, multiple sources of evidence

on the quality of learning are needed for matching the levels of assessment from the

variety of learning outcomes.

Based on Bloom continuum, the learning objectives: “Explain the different types of

retail formats” constitute lower order thinking skills (level 5: understanding) and

“Critically evaluate the various factors contributing to successful retail operations of

various retail formats” constitute higher order thinking skills (level 2: evaluating).

Hence, on-line quiz (recall of types of retail formats) and case study (evaluation of

ideas) are applied for matching test items to the different learning objectives, given

the cognition skills inherent in the assessment objectives.

The lesson assessment approach provides avenues for feedback on process and

product of student’s thoughts through formative assessment. Here, the evidence

gathered will enable the teacher to provide “remedial actions” such as revision;

towards students attainment of the needed implied performance for the summative

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 13

assessment (examination) as one of the topic i.e.” Analyse the trends that are

shaping today’s retail formats” serve amongst the examination questions

Section C Evaluation of Lesson Plan (20%)

Stufflebeam 13

postulate evaluation entails measurement and interpretation of merit

and worth of course for aiding decision on continuing, modifying or refocusing of

teaching contents and assessment methodologies for continual improvement.

Both formative (during development of instructional plan and lesson delivery)

evaluation aiming at improvement and summative evaluation (immediately after

completion of instruction) aiming at decision making / effectiveness is carried out for

ascertaining the lesson:

Merit: Is the intended learning objectives achieved? For example, have the

students achieved competence in explaining the different types of retail

formats (learning objectives 1)

Worth: Is the lesson necessary? For example, is the lesson necessary or

useful for the students or other stakeholders i.e. institution / industry partners

The evaluation is based on CIPP model and centred from the perspectives of

learner, teacher cum lesson developer. The objective of evaluation lies in

determining the effectiveness of the lesson in engagement of students and aligning

to the learning objectives through process and product dimensions.

Types of Evaluation Focus of Evaluation

Process (How well was the lesson designed and

implemented?)

✔ Actions

Product (Are the learning objectives attained?) ✔ Outcomes

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 14

The selection of product evaluation lies in assessing the course intended outcomes.

For example, information gathered can assist in evaluating the relevancy; reliability

and authenticity of the lesson assessment methods towards the intended learning

outcomes i.e. do the assessment method test the appropriate thinking skills?

Process evaluation assists in guiding the lesson developer towards improvements of

the course from both the students and teacher perspectives, for example the

effectiveness of the lesson via the level of engagement and sequencing of lesson’s

events.

For obtaining the relevant data, determining types and methods of information is of

critical importance as illustrated below:

Questions to be answered

Process , Product oriented

Information needed Examples of Data

collection method(s)

Does the instructional

strategy provide for effective

and engaging learning?

(Process)

Information on learning

objectives, sequencing of

activities and assessment

methods

Documents review by

ID specialist

Observation by

Programme Manager

Informal conversation

with students by

teacher

Is the lesson well organized

and properly sequenced?

(Process)

Compare lesson segments

and activities with BSCS 5E

Instructional Model

In-class observation by

Programme Manager

Documents review by

ID specialist

Feedback of teacher

after completion of

lesson

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 15

Are there opportunities for

practicing of acquired skills?

(Process)

Information on learning

objectives, sequencing of

activities and assessment

methods

Documents review

(Lesson Plan)

Informal conversation

with students by

student affairs staff

End of module survey

Are the lesson topics

meaningful to students?

(Product)

Meeting of students’

expectations.

Relevancy, quality of

lecturers cum learning

contents

Informal:

Conversation with

student by student

affairs staff

Formal: focus group /

interview, survey

Are the assessment methods

aligned to the levels of

tthinking Skills

(Product)

Methods of assessment

employed

Types of evidence sought

by assessment

Relationship of

assessments to learning

objectives

Analyse of formative

assessment results by

ID on assessment

methods employed

against levels of

thinking skills posed by

assessment

Interview with students

Feedback of assessor

Are the students able to

demonstrate the cognitive

skills

(Product)

Ability to answer questions,

formative assessment

Analysis of formative

student work

Discussion with

teacher after

completion of

assessment

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 16

Analysis of collated data is based on approaches of:

Quantitative: statistical methods i.e. measurement of mean, median, trend analysis of assessment against previous cohorts results, students evaluation of course (based on linkert scale).

Qualitative: comments, suggestions from minutes of focus group, discussion, reports of teacher, students and Programme Manager for recurring viewpoints those posses elements of validity, authenticity and reliability.

The information gathered from evaluation exercise will be used by the relevant

stakeholders for improvement of the lesson based on the identified “gaps”. For

example, learning challenge that surfaces i.e. “lack of analysis skills” by students

may be resolved through application of scaffolding technique of breaking down the

question to smaller parts and getting students to articulate the objective of the

question in relation to the problem

Users of evaluation How will they use the information

Lesson Developer Improve lesson plan by devising

appropriate activities / strategies in

identified area of weakness, e.g. “chunk”

size delivery of topics, scaffolding

techniques i.e. collaborative learning

Teacher Effective execution of lesson segments

and activities towards achievement of

intended learning objectives.

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 17

The types of resources needed for conducting of evaluation include:

Types of resources Detailed resources needed

Human Resources e.g. Instructional

designers, teachers, students

Oral and written feedback on “process

and product” of lesson i.e. end of

module ratings on relevance of topics,

level of challenges posed by

assessments.

Time Need for correlation of feedback from

several “runs” of lesson for added validity

of lesson segments and activities.

Review of the strengths and weaknesses of the lesson plan serve to measure its

level of effectiveness and engagement of the learners. This will enable surfacing of

reasons for strengths and of greater importance, issues for the weaknesses and

enable improvement of future lesson albeit some of the issues may not be resolved

due to constraints factors, for instance time period of lesson (4 hours) arising from

the commercial decisions of maximization of classroom utilization rate / numbers of

cohorts.

Lesson plan’s strengths and weaknesses

Strengths Weaknesses

Variety of teaching methods i.e.

video, interactive seminars,

discussion catered for different

learning styles

Presence of reinforcement of

learning through formative

assessments with feedback

Danger of information overload

from need of topics coverage

within specific hours especially for

novice learners without industry

experience

Practical difficulty of satisfying

learner “zone of proximal

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 18

Sequencing of lesson segments

and activities based on ID4T and

BSCS 5E model enable coverage

for zones of students

engagement, explain, explore,

elaborate and evaluate that

provide incremental seps for

students’ understanding of topics

while devloping cognitive skills for

meeting summative assessment.

development” (Vygosky, 1978)

given the mixture of students’

characteristics i.e. students with

sound academic background

(Degree holders) versus that of

practitioners (Non degree

holders)

Level of effectiveness and

engagement subject to the

“expertise” of teacher, e.g. does

his/her teaching philosophy

aligned to learner centred

learning, favoured instructional

approach i.e. transmission,

apprenticeship etc.

Possibility of Incidental learning, ‘unintentional or unplanned learning’’ 14

occurring

during the lesson that are not necessarily identified by the learning objectives can

result in improved competence, changed attitudes, and growth in interpersonal skills,

self-confidence, and self-awareness (McFerrin 1999; Mealman 1993; Ross-Gordon

and Dowling 1995).

Here, interaction amongst students with different life experiences generate “social

learning” and sequencing of activities enable development of reflective skills, for

example Q & A, hypothetical illustrations by teacher coerce students to “link”

knowledge gained with their own viewpoints of the topic under discussion.

The structure of the planned lesson create the fundamentals of a “ideal learner

centred environment” and with the presence of good physical learning space /

“effectiveness” of teacher, students may well subconsciously learn many additional

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 19

non taught skills, for example, working with others, dealing with difficult people,

teamwork, and general life and learning skills ..

For improving the lesson plan, expertise and practitioners experience are tapped

from peers that include Programme Manager and other lecturers which are

incorporated into this lesson plan.

No.

Suggestion(s) made by

peer(s)

Follow-up

My View* Rationale Changes I can /

will make

1 Factoring of learner

characteristics i.e.

Students often attend

class after a whole day of

work which affect their

attention span due to

fatigue

Agreed and

Incorporated

Engagement of

student learning

and effectiveness

of “transfer of

knowledge” is

subjected to the

physical well being

of the students

particularly in

cognition teaching.

Having 2 break

session lower the

“mental fatigue” of

students attending

session after a full

working hours

To split up 30

minutes lesson

break to 2

sessions

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 20

2 Lack of opportunity for

students in practising

“transfer of cognition” into

examination writing skills

given the needed writing

nature of examination.

Agreed and

Incorporated

Advent of

technology has

reduced

opportunities for

writing even in the

work environment

(typing of keyboard

instead of

traditional pen and

paper).

Review of past

examination scripts

surfaces lack of

skills in transferring

“cognitive thoughts”

into actual

wordings which is

the criteria for

gaining marks in

examination.

To allocate

segment of

lesson for

stimulated exam

conditions for

developing

students

“transfer of

cognition” into

writing skills for

examination

References

1. Rochester Institute of Technology : Adult Learners http://online.rit.edu/faculty/teaching_strategies/adult_learners.cfm (accessed :20/12/2012)

2. Parmjeet Kaur Patran, Types Of retailer, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-uzG_bp5qA. (download:20/12/2012)

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 21

3. Devon Poyer, The World of Retailing: Different Type of Retailers & Multichannel Retailing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smixeBxRSe8 (download:20/12/2012)

4. Levy Weitz Retailing Management Chapter 2 Self Quix http://highered.mcgrawhill.com/sites/0073530026/student_view0/chapter2/self_quiz.html

5. Bloom Taxonomy Revised, http://ctl.utexas.edu/teaching-resources/design-your-course/design-for-specific-learning/bloom-s-taxonomy-revised/

6. Gustafson, K. and Branch, R. (1977) Revisioning Models of Instructional Development . Educational Technology Research and Development. Vol.45, No. 3, pp.73-89.

7. Carr-Chellman, A. A. (2011). What is the Instructional Design for Teachers (ID4T) Model? Instructional Design for Teachers : Improving Classroom Practice (pp. 23-84). New York: Routledge

8. Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2005). Backward Design. Understanding by design (Expanded 2nd ed., pp. 13-23). Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.

9. BSCS Center for Professional Development. (2002). Learning Theory and the BSCS 5E Instructional Model. Retrieved December 2012, from http://www.asms.sa.edu.au/pd/atip/Documents/Learning%20Theory%20and%20the%20BSCS%205E%20Instructional%20Model.pdf

10 Branch, R. M., & Merill, M. D. (2006). Characteristics of Instructional Design Models. In R. A. Reiser & J. V. Dempsey (Eds.), Trends and Issues in Instructional Design and Technology (2nd ed., pp. 8-16). Boston: Pearson.

11. Posner, G. J., & Rudnitsky, A. N. (2006). Developing General Teaching Strategies. Course Design : a Guide to Curriculum Development for Teachers (7th ed., pp. 171-178). Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

12. Morrison, G.R., Ross, S.M., & Kemp,J.E. (2007). Designing effective instruction (5th edition). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

13. Stufflebeam, D. L. (2003). The CIPP Model For Evaluation. Paper presented at the 2003 Annual Conference of the Oregon Program Evaluators Network (OPEN), Oregan.

14. Sandra Kerka (2000) Incidental Learning ERIC, No.18 http://www.calpro-online.org/eric/docs/tia00086.pdf

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 22

Appendix 1: PowerPoint slides based on Michael Levy Barton Weitz (2011) ‘Retailing

Management’ McGraw-Hill/Irwin, New York

Specialist Diploma in Applied Learning and Teaching

Module: Instructional Design

© 2013 Adrian Chow All rights reserved Page | 23

Appendix 2: Sheng Shiong Case Study: Mind your p’s and Queues, http://img49.imageshack.us/img49/9453/shengsiongui9.jpg


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