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Station Gossip the firehouse scene Dec Complete.pdfadditional safety precautions during the holiday...

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  • Station Gossip By Sheryl Drost

    Now for our monthly, “Here’s your sign moment.” Remember how last month in the funnies I put in the quote by Abraham Lincoln, “The trouble with quotes on the internet is that it’s diffi cult to determine if they are true or not?” Well, Chief was proofi ng the newsletter and says, Sheryl, Abraham Lincoln couldn’t say that, he wasn’t around with the internet! Everyone all together now, “Here’s your sign!”

    Josh grab a shovel, Josh forget it, Josh grab a ....

    Let’s see how many of us know which one of our fi refi ghters said this, “It’s a good day, the Chiefs beat the Bears!

    The wheelbarrows are back on board ....I am soo happy!

    Firefi ghter Joe Quast is the best Ho Ho Hoer ever!

    When dealing with those stressful friends and family during the holidays, remember the Pause. Really, mastery in so many things comes from taking the time to be conscious; taking the time to consider the choice before making it. Get that last part: it is a ‘choice’ you make, even if it is so automatic that you’ve lost the element where choice is obvious. If you choose to stop and not jump into your ‘knee jerk’ reaction to these relatives or family friends who just ‘set you off’ you can have a moment to respond instead of react. I’m not the fi rst one to encourage people to ‘count to 10’ at the moment of ‘pain’, and it can be a really effective tool. James M. Lynch.

    PostageHarlem-Roscoe FirePO Box 450Roscoe, IL 61073

    The Firehouse Scene - Page 12www.harlemroscoefi re.com

    December 2011 Fire Chief Don Shoevlin Editor Sheryl Drost

    Photo by Sheryl Drost

    the firehouse sceneIs a monthly publication of the

    Harlem-Roscoe Fire Protection District

    Duty, Pride, Tradition!

    Boys will be boys!

    If Capt. Tom Aaker were a snowman!

    A big Thank you to Firefi ghter Joe Quast and his elves for participating in three lighted Christmas Parades this month.

  • From the Chief’s DeskBy Fire Chief Don Shoevlin

    Wow! Another year is coming to a close. It seems just like yesterday that I embarked on my new adventure as your Fire Chief.

    With everyone’s continued support, the fi re department continues to make improvements in our buildings, equipment, the personal growth of our fi refi ghters and response.

    This past year has been a very busy one with a multitude of projects and challenges. I say that not only on the fi re department but personally as well. As I write this our calls are up 10 % .

    This past year I had two of my children get married. What a joyous and proud moment for Tammy and I as we witnessed our daughter Michelle and son Steve be married. We are also very proud and delighted to welcome our son-in-law Dan and daughter-in-law Sarah into our family. Then on my birthday last month, I get a gift second to none. I was told by my daughter that I was going to be a grandfather (again). Wow, what a gift!

    We participated in numerous community events, parades and visits to schools and clubs this year. Even though it has been a busy year, I assure you that we continue to be proactive in our approach to services and our outlook to the future. I remain committed to the excellence, integrity, and caring in the performance of emergency fi re, medical and rescue services.

    The Roscoe Lion’s Club held another successful senior turkey dinner. The opportunity to work with them is gratifying. We served 248 dinners that day.

    It’s that time of the year again. Our media division and photographers (Sheryl and Marcia) have completed another outstanding calendar. The colored photos show your fi re department at it’s best. Stop by Station One to get a copy. Hurry, because they go fast.

    As the holiday season is upon us, let us take time to remember those safety tips that we tend to take for granted. Our annual “Keep the Wreath Red” campaign has begun with a wreath in front of all three stations. Please see the article on this program found on page 11.

    Congratulation to our seven new fi refi ghters who were sworn in last month. They have successfully completed the requirements placed on them and their probationary time.

    We will be starting a new recruit class in February 2012. The orientation meeting for this class will be held on December 20 at 7 P.M. It will be held at Station One on Main Street in Roscoe.

    If you are interesting in becoming a Harlem-Roscoe volunteer fi refi ghter pick up an application at Station One or attend the meeting to learn more about it.

    happy holidays!

    I wish everyone in our communities a safe and joyous holiday season and thank you for the continuous support to our fi refi ghters.

    To all the members of the Harlem Roscoe Fire Protection District and their families, Tammy and I wish:

    That your Christmas Season fi ll your Home with Joy, Your Heart with Love & Your Life with Laughter.

    The gratitude for the commitment all of you make is second to none. Thank you! We are who we are because of ALL of you!!

    Harlem-Roscoe Fire Chief Don Shoevlin

    CongratulationsPhotos by Sheryl Drost

    After successfully completing the requirements placed on them and their probationary time, Trustee Jerry Ocker gives the Firefi ghter Oath to six of the new fi refi ghters.

    New Firefi ghters Nino Girardin, Justin Harwood, Chad Miller, Stefani Layman, Ryan Sarver, and Brett Parrish. The seventh new fi refi ghter, Phillip Besoiu, was unable to make the Association meeting, but was sworn in during the monthly Trustee’s meeting. Congratulations to all seven, great job!

    Birthdays

    December19th Eric Schweitzer20th Phillip Besoiu26th Ron Klaman January 4th Bill Hyde5th Matt Bush10th Chad Miller17th John Presley25th Jerry Lund26th Reety Radke31st Mark Soppe

    Total Calls for 2011 To date - 2243

    Firehouse Scene is a monthly newsletter produced by the Harlem-Roscoe Fire Prot. Dist.

    Editor-in-Chief - Don ShoevlinEditor & Layout - Sheryl Drost

    The Firehouse Scene is available at Station One - 10544 Main Street in Roscoe and on the department’s website after the second Sunday each month. www.harlemroscoefi re.com

    E-mail submissions to:Sheryl @ [email protected]

    The Firehouse Scene - Page 2 The Firehouse Scene - Page 11 www.harlemroscoefi re.comwww.harlemroscoefi re.com

    “Keep the Wreath Red” Program

    This holiday season we will again participate in the Illinois Fire Chiefs Association’s (IFCA) adopted “Keep the Wreath Red” Program.

    The “Keep the Wreath Red” program was established in 1954 by Naperville, IL Paid-On-Call Firefi ghter Paul Boecker.

    Annually the “Keep the Wreath Red” Program is endorsed by the IFCA Board of Directors to alert residents of fi res caused by holiday decorations

    The “Keep the Wreath Red” Program is a visual reminder to citizens to take additional safety precautions during the holiday season to make this a safe and happy holiday season.

    As the holiday season begins, a holiday wreath decorated with red bulbs was placed in public view at all three of our fi re stations. The wreaths are illuminated constantly. If a fi re is directly caused by holiday decorations, one red bulb will be changed to a white bulb.

    Please use our wreaths as a reminder to have a Fire Safe Holiday. Help us to “Keep the Wreaths Red!”

    Roscoe Lions Club Annual Senior Turkey DinnerPhotos by Marcia Soppe

    Harlem-Roscoe hosted the annual Senior Turkey Dinner held by the Roscoe Lions Club on November 17. 248 dinners were served to the seniors. It is always such a joy to host this event; our fi re personnel love to see all of them each year and to hear the stories!

  • Propane LeakPhotos by Marcia Soppe

    Dryer FirePhotos by Marcia Soppe

    Firefi ghters responded to yet another dryer fi re. This time it was on Monarch Dr. on Nov. 20. The culprit seems to again be the exhaust vent clogged with lint (left).

    Firefi ghters remove the dryer from the home.

    Firefi ghters use a positive pressure fan to rid the home of smoke.

    Report of Explosion UnfoundedPhoto by Sheryl Drost

    Firefi ghters responded to an early morning report of an explosion at a Olson Park School on Minahan Dr. on Dec. 3. Firefi ghters laddered the building and checked out the units on the roof as well as searched the building; nothing was found.

    Firefi ghters laddered the building to check HVAC units on the roof top during a pouring rain.

    11/30/11 - Mophie Recalls iPod Touch Rechargeable External Battery Case Due to Burn Hazard

    Hazard: The battery case’s integrated circuit switch can overheat, posing a burn hazard to consumers.

    Incidents/Injuries: Mophie has received 110 reports of the product becoming warm to the touch, 44 reports of the product deforming and nine reports of minor burns.

    Description: The recalled product is a Mophie Juice Pack Air rechargeable external battery which consists of a lithium polymer battery built into a plastic case designed to snap onto the back of an iPod Touch 4G music player. The battery cases come in black, blue or red. Only battery cases with serial numbers that have the fi rst fi ve alphanumeric characters of TR113 through TR120 are subject to this recall. The serial number can be found inside the housing of the product.

    Sold at: B& H Photo, Barnes & Noble, InMotion Entertainment, J&R Music World, Marine Corps Exchange stores, Amazon.com and mophie.com since April 2011 for about $50.

    Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled product and contact Mophie for instructions on receiving a replacement product.

    Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Mophie toll-free at (877) 308-4581 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or visit the fi rm’s website at www.mophie.com/exchange

    The Firehouse Scene - Page 10 The Firehouse Scene - Page 3 www.harlemroscoefi re.comwww.harlemroscoefi re.com

    Firefi ghters were dispatched to a home on Burr Oak Rd. on Nov. 20. for a gas odor investigation. Firefi ghters found a small leak on one of the appliances and the gas had to be shut off at the propane tank. (photo left)

    Firefi ghter’s kids had a great time Dec.3 during their annual Christmas party. Here are some snapshots of the day!

    Safe with mom! Is he still there? Who are you? Pfffft! Please....

  • The Firehouse Scene - Page 4 The Firehouse Scene -Page 9 www.harlemroscoefi re.comwww.harlemroscoefi re.com

    Chimney FirePhotos by Sheryl Drost

    Firefi ghters responded to a report of a chimney fi re in a large shed behind a home on Second St. Firefi ghters removed the burning wood in the stove and the chimney stack that went through the roof. They also removed a section of roof to reach the fi re

    that had spread into the three layers of metal roofi ng.

    Firefi ghter Chad Miller hands a water extinguisher to Firefi ghter Sean Laurent; the fi re was small.

    The chimney stack to a wood burning stove was the culprit.

    Firefi ghters Sean Laurent and Mark Soppe remove three layers of metal roofi ng to get to the fi re extension.

    Chimney Fire Preventionhttp://www.westmorelandfi re.com/news.html?view=1&id=36155&print=1

    A chimney fi re may not sound like much of a risk or much of a problem. After all, the chimney is well insulated. It may seem unlikely that the fi re will get to the rest of the house if it even gets started in the fi rst place. But dirty chimneys are susceptible to fi res that, at their worst, can destroy homes and kill the inhabitants.

    Chimney fi res can catch on explosively, shooting fl ames and dense smoke out the top. Or they can be slow-burning and barely noticeable until they’ve gotten hot enough to damage the chimney irreparably and even catch your house on fi re. With a little care, chimney fi res are easily preventable.

    First, let’s understand how chimney fi res happen. The wood you burn sends smoke up your chimney. That much is obvious. But it may not be obvious that the smoke doesn’t have to remain in a gaseous form. Wood smoke contains signifi cant amounts of material that can condense on the sides of the chimney’s interior. The result is a tar-like or fl aky substance called creosote. Once it’s formed, the creosote remains stuck to the inside of the chimney, just waiting for a fl ame or spark to reach up and set it off.

    Any wood can create creosote, but unseasoned wood is the worst culprit. Colder than normal temperatures can encourage higher than normal condensation of creosote. And restricted air supply can add to the problem.

    Unseasoned FirewoodBurning green wood isn’t an easy task. Green wood contains a lot more moisture than seasoned wood, and that moisture has to be removed somehow in order for the wood to burn. The resulting smoke is cooler than if seasoned wood had been used. Cooler smoke is more likely to come out of its gaseous state, condensing on the inside of the chimney.

    Cold TemperaturesCold on the outside of the chimney can also help cool the smoke down to the point where it condenses and forms creosote. If it’s an exterior chimney, running up the side rather than through the center of the house, this adds to the possibility.

    Air SupplyIt helps to have good currents of air to lift the smoke out of the chimney before it condenses. If the fi replace can’t draw air in freely, this interrupts the fl ow and, again, creosote forms. Closing the fi replace’s glass doors or not opening the damper all the way are the main ways in which air supply gets restricted.

    In addition to all this, remember that large, compact bundles of wood tend to produce cooler fi res. Build smaller, hotter fi res instead. And don’t burn cardboard boxes or wrapping paper in your fi replace. It’s too easy for a fl aming piece of paper to waft up the chimney and catch things on fi re.

    But most importantly, have your chimney inspected and cleaned regularly. Nothing can completely prevent the creation of creosote. But a certifi ed chimney sweep can keep the problem from getting out of hand.

    Training Level RaisedBy Capt. Tom AakerPhotos by Marcia Soppe

    Harlem - Roscoe Fire’s Training Bureau has been busy this fall with furthering our fi refi ghters education in the Fire Service through Firefi ghter Level 2 and Level 3 Classes. These are Offi ce of the IL State Fire Marshal Certifi cations.

    In October, we had 14 members start the classes and practical training for their Firefi ghter 2. This is not an easy certifi cation as it requires 240 hours of classroom and hands on training to complete. This certifi cation teaches basic fi re tactics and life saving skills that are invaluable to the fi refi ghter and the community that they protect. Once the members complete their certifi cation our department will be at 99% member certifi cation for FF2. Seven years ago we were less than 20%.

    In November we started a Firefi ghter 3 class with 19 members of the department. This 40 hour plus class goes over more advanced fi refi ghting skills and is the next step for a seasoned fi refi ghter. Some of the skills learned include more Advanced Building Construction information, Vehicle Extrication, and Foam Operations. These skills learned are just another set of tools they can use during emergencies in the area. In 2006 we had just one member certifi ed. The department is very proud that once this class is completed almost 50% of our fi refi ghters will be certifi ed to this advanced skill level. We will continue to raise our level of training and knowledge in hopes that we can better serve our community and protect their property.

  • The Firehouse Scene -Page 8 The Firehouse Scene - Page 5 www.harlemroscoefi re.comwww.harlemroscoefi re.com

    12/05/11 Rockton Rd. & Pleasant Valley Rd.

    11/22/11 Hwy 251

    11/12/11 Hwy 173 & N. Alpine Rd.

    Accidents Photos by Sheryl Drost & Marcia Soppe

    11/27/11 Hwy 251 & McCurry Rd. - Fatal

    12/05/11 Rockton Rd. & Pleasant Valley Rd.

    Your Source for SAFETY InformationNFPA Public Education Division • 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169 www.nfpa.org/education

    FACTHalf of home heating fires are reported during the months of

    December, January,and February.

    Heating Equipment SmartsInstall wood burning stoves following manufacturer’s instructions or have a professional do the installation. All fuel-burning equipment should be vented to the outside to avoid carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning.

    Install and maintain CO alarms to avoid the riskof CO poisoning. Ifyou smell gas inyour gas heater, dodo not light theappliance. Leave thehome immediatelyand call your local firedepartment or gas company.

    HeatingHeatingSafety

    There is something about the winter months and curling up with a good book by the fireplace. But did you know that heating equipment is a leading cause of home fire deaths? With a few simple safety tips and precautions you can prevent most heating firesfrom happening.

    Safety

    BE WARM AND SAFE THIS WINTER!

    Keep anything that can burn atleast three-feet away fromheating equipment, like thefurnace, fireplace, woodstove, or portable space heater.

    Have a three-foot “kid-free zone”around open fires and space heaters.

    Never use your oven to heat your home.

    Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment, water heaters or central heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions.

    Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional.

    Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.

    Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.

    Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.

    Test smoke alarms monthly.

  • 8 Unconventional Ways to De-stress and Release Tensionhttp://zenhabits.net/8-unconventional-ways-to-de-stress-and-release-tension

    1. Massage your ears. The ear massage is a fantastic way to release endorphins in your brain and make you feel good. The beauty is that it only takes a few minutes. Start by gently rubbing your ear lobes with your thumb and index fi nger. Then squeeze the outer edges of your ears all the way to the top. These parts

    of your ears have tiny refl ex points that can relax specifi c areas of your body. Finish by using your index fi ngers and middle fi ngers to massage behind the ears on the bony part of your skull.

    2. Finger paint. If you thought that getting messy and painting with your fi ngers was strictly for kids, think again. Finger painting allows you to have fun, be artistic and play in a child like way. It gives you permission

    to express your creativity and spontaneity without expectations. So why not be the creator of some new abstract art pieces. Visit a nearby children’s store and pick up a set of fi nger paints – ages 10 and up.

    3. Strip down your living room. Take note and see how much stuff you have laying around your house, especially your living room – the place where you often wind down and relax. Then, declutter and learn the powerful art of

    Minimalism. Get rid of anything and everything you don’t use or need. Give away or donate decorations and household items. An open and clean space creates a place of peace and tranquility. It’s also easier to relax when you are not surrounded by stuff such as laundry, work, electronics and even reading materials because your subconscious mind doesn’t feel like you have things to do.

    4. Try laughing yoga. We all know that the power of laughter has a wonderful effect on our mood and is one of the best feel good things we can do. However, the opportunity to laugh like this doesn’t always come easily and often.

    A fun and crazy way to make yourself laugh uncontrollably is to fi nd (google) a class, club or yoga studio in your area that offers laughing yoga. You may have to step out of your comfort zone but you will be in for a wonderful and hilarious surprise.

    5. Procrastinate. Make a list of things to do and then don’t do it. Call it your procrastination list. Then make the decision to engage in something you really feel like doing. If and when you become inspired to do something on your procrastination list then go for it. Maybe

    you really don’t have to do those things on your procrastination list or perhaps someone else may want to do those things for you. I believe that if you’re not accepting, enjoying or enthusiastic about what you’re doing then you shouldn’t do it. By procrastinating you often let go of resistance and become more relaxed.

    6. Be brutally honest. Have you ever felt frustrated with yourself because you wanted to say something to someone but didn’t in fear of what might happen, what that person might think or how you might make them feel. Instead of bottling things up inside you, which causes stress and tensions, why not let it go

    through the power of honest speech. Express your emotions and tell people how you really feel without being rude or obnoxious. Be loud and bold. Notice how relieved you feel.

    7. Dance in the rain. How often do you see people getting upset and running for cover when it starts to pour? Next time it rains, have a little fun, get wet and do a little dance. Engage all your senses and enjoy the moment. Even sing if you want to. You will be surprised how refreshing and rejuvenating it is. For those of you who live in colder climates, try dancing in the snow or making snow angels.

    8. Enjoy a staycation. Instead of travelling somewhere on a holiday, stay at home and enjoy a local vacation. To make it an adventure, get a map of some nearby hiking trails and plan some day hikes. If you’re in a colder climate consider cross-country skiing or snow-shoeing. Try a new activity such as

    outdoor photography. Visit some local cafes that sounds interesting and that you’ve never been to before. If you need a break from your kids, recruit a friend or relative to baby-sit. Have fun and get to know your area.

    Surrendering to Griefhttp://www.recover-from-grief.com/index.htmlThere are three major points for you to keep in mind as you go through your “work of mourning”:

    You will have your own unique way of expressing and experiencing grief. As long as it is changing, and moving, and “fl uid”, it is normal grieving. You are in for the roller coaster ride of your life. It is the nature of the beast. Grief is not orderly and predictable. It will wax and wane. You may reach a period of relative calm, and a break from the tears. “What a relief” you’ll think, “Maybe I’m fi nally reaching the stage of acceptance”. And then, WHAMO! Brought to your knees again by intense grief. And you’ll wonder if you are making any progress at all. You are. The passage of time assures this. It really will come to an end. In it’s own time. You will come back to life with loving remembrance in your heart, ready to embrace life again without your beloved at your side. You will gradually feel stronger and more in charge of your life. It really does end.

    Grief Coping StrategiesBe gentle with yourself-- and patient. It takes a long time to heal. Some days will be better than others.Take care of your body-- You’ll need it later. Eat healthy, even though you might fi nd it hard to even eat right now. Get some stress vitamins and take one every day. Get some exercise. You don’t have to get crazy with this. Just make yourself get out in the fresh air for a brisk walk or jog every day or two Be selfi sh-- demand the right to grieve in your own way. It is not their bereavement, it’s yours. You have nothing to offer other people right now anyway. Focus on yourself and your needs. Surround yourself with supportive loved ones.Cling to hope-- Things will get better, honest. Don’t tell yourself “It’s going to be alright”. Instead, tell yourself “I will survive”.Trust the grief-- It’s your best friend right now. Go where it leads you. Don’t duck the system-- It may be tempting to numb the pain of grief with alcohol or drugs, even prescription drugs. But everything will have to be faced and experienced sooner or later. Sooner is much better. Look for the gifts-- They may be tiny, but they are life-sustaining, and they are there.One of the easiest and most effective ways to help your grief move along is to express it.

    The Firehouse Scene - Page 6 The Firehouse Scene - Page 7

    Tis the Season…….By Captain Jay Alms

    It’s Christmas time - time for holiday parties, winter and snow activities and time to get together with family and friends. A time when everything is joyous, spirits are high and everyone’s moods seem to improve.

    Unfortunately, this is not true of everyone. This time of year, for obvious reasons and sometimes not so obvious reasons, we seem to see a spike in ambulance responses that deal with depression. There are patients that have been diagnosed with clinical depression and obviously those that have not been identifi ed. Some signs are clear and unmistakable and others that are not so evident.

    Depression may be described as feeling sad, blue, unhappy, miserable or down in the dumps. Most of us feel this way at one time or another. True clinical depression is a mood disorder in which feelings of sadness, loss, anger or frustration interfere with everyday life for weeks or longer. This is a very real condition that needs to be treated with medication and counseling.

    Whether the cause is a loss of a loved one, loss of job, separation or divorce, a post traumatic response, or even just failing a class or getting a bad grade, the least we can do for those affected is lend a compassionate ear. Sometimes the cause maybe underlying, past neglect or abuse, that has fi nally surfaced.

    There are a multitude of signs and symptoms, and I don’t claim to be an expert by any means, just some observations I have made over the past years, that we should take note of in no particular order:

    Change in appetite, weight loss or gain. Withdrawn, quieter than normal. Irritable or easily agitated.Avoidance of certain people or subject matter.Complaints of pain or sickness, that can’t be diagnosed.Emotional.Untidy house, that’s ordinarily kept.Sleeping all the time.Unable to sleep.Alcohol or drug abuse.Feelings of worthlessness and guiltThoughts of death or suicide

    There are activities and conditions that may contribute to depression as well, such as, alcohol or drug abuse, cancer, long term pain, sleeping problems and stressful life events. Medications like steroids have also been linked to a cause of depression.

    The exact cause of depression is not known. Research fi nds that the cause is chemical changes in the brain. This may be due to a problem with genes, or triggered by stressful events. Most likely, it’s a combination of both. Anyone can develop depression, even kids.

    Please make yourself aware of those loved one’s in your life, that elderly neighbor, those close to you that have lost their job and have been looking for a while, or the obvious ones that come right out and tell you that they no longer want to live.

    They need help, immediately. Do your best to convince them to seek help. If you can’t, call someone that can. Have a Happy Holiday Season!

    ••••••••••••

    Stress Quotes“There cannot be a stressful crisis next week. My schedule is already full.” Henry Kissinger

    “Stress is an ignorant state. It believes that everything is an emergency.” Natalie Goldberg

    “More important, you have to stay happy and positive or the stress will kill you - but at least it will make you skinny!” Joely Fisher

    “Reality is the leading cause of stress for those in touch with it.”Jane Wagner

    The Penguin Theory

    An iceberg can only hold so many penguins. When it gets full, and another penguin comes along, one of the other

    penguins has to jump off. If you ask my kids, however, they just say that my iceberg is melting.

    Lt. Ramona Baldoni-Lake

  • 8 Unconventional Ways to De-stress and Release Tensionhttp://zenhabits.net/8-unconventional-ways-to-de-stress-and-release-tension

    1. Massage your ears. The ear massage is a fantastic way to release endorphins in your brain and make you feel good. The beauty is that it only takes a few minutes. Start by gently rubbing your ear lobes with your thumb and index fi nger. Then squeeze the outer edges of your ears all the way to the top. These parts

    of your ears have tiny refl ex points that can relax specifi c areas of your body. Finish by using your index fi ngers and middle fi ngers to massage behind the ears on the bony part of your skull.

    2. Finger paint. If you thought that getting messy and painting with your fi ngers was strictly for kids, think again. Finger painting allows you to have fun, be artistic and play in a child like way. It gives you permission

    to express your creativity and spontaneity without expectations. So why not be the creator of some new abstract art pieces. Visit a nearby children’s store and pick up a set of fi nger paints – ages 10 and up.

    3. Strip down your living room. Take note and see how much stuff you have laying around your house, especially your living room – the place where you often wind down and relax. Then, declutter and learn the powerful art of

    Minimalism. Get rid of anything and everything you don’t use or need. Give away or donate decorations and household items. An open and clean space creates a place of peace and tranquility. It’s also easier to relax when you are not surrounded by stuff such as laundry, work, electronics and even reading materials because your subconscious mind doesn’t feel like you have things to do.

    4. Try laughing yoga. We all know that the power of laughter has a wonderful effect on our mood and is one of the best feel good things we can do. However, the opportunity to laugh like this doesn’t always come easily and often.

    A fun and crazy way to make yourself laugh uncontrollably is to fi nd (google) a class, club or yoga studio in your area that offers laughing yoga. You may have to step out of your comfort zone but you will be in for a wonderful and hilarious surprise.

    5. Procrastinate. Make a list of things to do and then don’t do it. Call it your procrastination list. Then make the decision to engage in something you really feel like doing. If and when you become inspired to do something on your procrastination list then go for it. Maybe

    you really don’t have to do those things on your procrastination list or perhaps someone else may want to do those things for you. I believe that if you’re not accepting, enjoying or enthusiastic about what you’re doing then you shouldn’t do it. By procrastinating you often let go of resistance and become more relaxed.

    6. Be brutally honest. Have you ever felt frustrated with yourself because you wanted to say something to someone but didn’t in fear of what might happen, what that person might think or how you might make them feel. Instead of bottling things up inside you, which causes stress and tensions, why not let it go

    through the power of honest speech. Express your emotions and tell people how you really feel without being rude or obnoxious. Be loud and bold. Notice how relieved you feel.

    7. Dance in the rain. How often do you see people getting upset and running for cover when it starts to pour? Next time it rains, have a little fun, get wet and do a little dance. Engage all your senses and enjoy the moment. Even sing if you want to. You will be surprised how refreshing and rejuvenating it is. For those of you who live in colder climates, try dancing in the snow or making snow angels.

    8. Enjoy a staycation. Instead of travelling somewhere on a holiday, stay at home and enjoy a local vacation. To make it an adventure, get a map of some nearby hiking trails and plan some day hikes. If you’re in a colder climate consider cross-country skiing or snow-shoeing. Try a new activity such as

    outdoor photography. Visit some local cafes that sounds interesting and that you’ve never been to before. If you need a break from your kids, recruit a friend or relative to baby-sit. Have fun and get to know your area.

    Surrendering to Griefhttp://www.recover-from-grief.com/index.htmlThere are three major points for you to keep in mind as you go through your “work of mourning”:

    You will have your own unique way of expressing and experiencing grief. As long as it is changing, and moving, and “fl uid”, it is normal grieving. You are in for the roller coaster ride of your life. It is the nature of the beast. Grief is not orderly and predictable. It will wax and wane. You may reach a period of relative calm, and a break from the tears. “What a relief” you’ll think, “Maybe I’m fi nally reaching the stage of acceptance”. And then, WHAMO! Brought to your knees again by intense grief. And you’ll wonder if you are making any progress at all. You are. The passage of time assures this. It really will come to an end. In it’s own time. You will come back to life with loving remembrance in your heart, ready to embrace life again without your beloved at your side. You will gradually feel stronger and more in charge of your life. It really does end.

    Grief Coping StrategiesBe gentle with yourself-- and patient. It takes a long time to heal. Some days will be better than others.Take care of your body-- You’ll need it later. Eat healthy, even though you might fi nd it hard to even eat right now. Get some stress vitamins and take one every day. Get some exercise. You don’t have to get crazy with this. Just make yourself get out in the fresh air for a brisk walk or jog every day or two Be selfi sh-- demand the right to grieve in your own way. It is not their bereavement, it’s yours. You have nothing to offer other people right now anyway. Focus on yourself and your needs. Surround yourself with supportive loved ones.Cling to hope-- Things will get better, honest. Don’t tell yourself “It’s going to be alright”. Instead, tell yourself “I will survive”.Trust the grief-- It’s your best friend right now. Go where it leads you. Don’t duck the system-- It may be tempting to numb the pain of grief with alcohol or drugs, even prescription drugs. But everything will have to be faced and experienced sooner or later. Sooner is much better. Look for the gifts-- They may be tiny, but they are life-sustaining, and they are there.One of the easiest and most effective ways to help your grief move along is to express it.

    The Firehouse Scene - Page 6 The Firehouse Scene - Page 7

    Tis the Season…….By Captain Jay Alms

    It’s Christmas time - time for holiday parties, winter and snow activities and time to get together with family and friends. A time when everything is joyous, spirits are high and everyone’s moods seem to improve.

    Unfortunately, this is not true of everyone. This time of year, for obvious reasons and sometimes not so obvious reasons, we seem to see a spike in ambulance responses that deal with depression. There are patients that have been diagnosed with clinical depression and obviously those that have not been identifi ed. Some signs are clear and unmistakable and others that are not so evident.

    Depression may be described as feeling sad, blue, unhappy, miserable or down in the dumps. Most of us feel this way at one time or another. True clinical depression is a mood disorder in which feelings of sadness, loss, anger or frustration interfere with everyday life for weeks or longer. This is a very real condition that needs to be treated with medication and counseling.

    Whether the cause is a loss of a loved one, loss of job, separation or divorce, a post traumatic response, or even just failing a class or getting a bad grade, the least we can do for those affected is lend a compassionate ear. Sometimes the cause maybe underlying, past neglect or abuse, that has fi nally surfaced.

    There are a multitude of signs and symptoms, and I don’t claim to be an expert by any means, just some observations I have made over the past years, that we should take note of in no particular order:

    Change in appetite, weight loss or gain. Withdrawn, quieter than normal. Irritable or easily agitated.Avoidance of certain people or subject matter.Complaints of pain or sickness, that can’t be diagnosed.Emotional.Untidy house, that’s ordinarily kept.Sleeping all the time.Unable to sleep.Alcohol or drug abuse.Feelings of worthlessness and guiltThoughts of death or suicide

    There are activities and conditions that may contribute to depression as well, such as, alcohol or drug abuse, cancer, long term pain, sleeping problems and stressful life events. Medications like steroids have also been linked to a cause of depression.

    The exact cause of depression is not known. Research fi nds that the cause is chemical changes in the brain. This may be due to a problem with genes, or triggered by stressful events. Most likely, it’s a combination of both. Anyone can develop depression, even kids.

    Please make yourself aware of those loved one’s in your life, that elderly neighbor, those close to you that have lost their job and have been looking for a while, or the obvious ones that come right out and tell you that they no longer want to live.

    They need help, immediately. Do your best to convince them to seek help. If you can’t, call someone that can. Have a Happy Holiday Season!

    ••••••••••••

    Stress Quotes“There cannot be a stressful crisis next week. My schedule is already full.” Henry Kissinger

    “Stress is an ignorant state. It believes that everything is an emergency.” Natalie Goldberg

    “More important, you have to stay happy and positive or the stress will kill you - but at least it will make you skinny!” Joely Fisher

    “Reality is the leading cause of stress for those in touch with it.”Jane Wagner

    The Penguin Theory

    An iceberg can only hold so many penguins. When it gets full, and another penguin comes along, one of the other

    penguins has to jump off. If you ask my kids, however, they just say that my iceberg is melting.

    Lt. Ramona Baldoni-Lake

  • The Firehouse Scene -Page 8 The Firehouse Scene - Page 5 www.harlemroscoefi re.comwww.harlemroscoefi re.com

    12/05/11 Rockton Rd. & Pleasant Valley Rd.

    11/22/11 Hwy 251

    11/12/11 Hwy 173 & N. Alpine Rd.

    Accidents Photos by Sheryl Drost & Marcia Soppe

    11/27/11 Hwy 251 & McCurry Rd. - Fatal

    12/05/11 Rockton Rd. & Pleasant Valley Rd.

    Your Source for SAFETY InformationNFPA Public Education Division • 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169 www.nfpa.org/education

    FACTHalf of home heating fires are reported during the months of

    December, January,and February.

    Heating Equipment SmartsInstall wood burning stoves following manufacturer’s instructions or have a professional do the installation. All fuel-burning equipment should be vented to the outside to avoid carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning.

    Install and maintain CO alarms to avoid the riskof CO poisoning. Ifyou smell gas inyour gas heater, dodo not light theappliance. Leave thehome immediatelyand call your local firedepartment or gas company.

    HeatingHeatingSafety

    There is something about the winter months and curling up with a good book by the fireplace. But did you know that heating equipment is a leading cause of home fire deaths? With a few simple safety tips and precautions you can prevent most heating firesfrom happening.

    Safety

    BE WARM AND SAFE THIS WINTER!

    Keep anything that can burn atleast three-feet away fromheating equipment, like thefurnace, fireplace, woodstove, or portable space heater.

    Have a three-foot “kid-free zone”around open fires and space heaters.

    Never use your oven to heat your home.

    Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment, water heaters or central heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions.

    Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional.

    Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.

    Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.

    Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.

    Test smoke alarms monthly.

  • The Firehouse Scene - Page 4 The Firehouse Scene -Page 9 www.harlemroscoefi re.comwww.harlemroscoefi re.com

    Chimney FirePhotos by Sheryl Drost

    Firefi ghters responded to a report of a chimney fi re in a large shed behind a home on Second St. Firefi ghters removed the burning wood in the stove and the chimney stack that went through the roof. They also removed a section of roof to reach the fi re

    that had spread into the three layers of metal roofi ng.

    Firefi ghter Chad Miller hands a water extinguisher to Firefi ghter Sean Laurent; the fi re was small.

    The chimney stack to a wood burning stove was the culprit.

    Firefi ghters Sean Laurent and Mark Soppe remove three layers of metal roofi ng to get to the fi re extension.

    Chimney Fire Preventionhttp://www.westmorelandfi re.com/news.html?view=1&id=36155&print=1

    A chimney fi re may not sound like much of a risk or much of a problem. After all, the chimney is well insulated. It may seem unlikely that the fi re will get to the rest of the house if it even gets started in the fi rst place. But dirty chimneys are susceptible to fi res that, at their worst, can destroy homes and kill the inhabitants.

    Chimney fi res can catch on explosively, shooting fl ames and dense smoke out the top. Or they can be slow-burning and barely noticeable until they’ve gotten hot enough to damage the chimney irreparably and even catch your house on fi re. With a little care, chimney fi res are easily preventable.

    First, let’s understand how chimney fi res happen. The wood you burn sends smoke up your chimney. That much is obvious. But it may not be obvious that the smoke doesn’t have to remain in a gaseous form. Wood smoke contains signifi cant amounts of material that can condense on the sides of the chimney’s interior. The result is a tar-like or fl aky substance called creosote. Once it’s formed, the creosote remains stuck to the inside of the chimney, just waiting for a fl ame or spark to reach up and set it off.

    Any wood can create creosote, but unseasoned wood is the worst culprit. Colder than normal temperatures can encourage higher than normal condensation of creosote. And restricted air supply can add to the problem.

    Unseasoned FirewoodBurning green wood isn’t an easy task. Green wood contains a lot more moisture than seasoned wood, and that moisture has to be removed somehow in order for the wood to burn. The resulting smoke is cooler than if seasoned wood had been used. Cooler smoke is more likely to come out of its gaseous state, condensing on the inside of the chimney.

    Cold TemperaturesCold on the outside of the chimney can also help cool the smoke down to the point where it condenses and forms creosote. If it’s an exterior chimney, running up the side rather than through the center of the house, this adds to the possibility.

    Air SupplyIt helps to have good currents of air to lift the smoke out of the chimney before it condenses. If the fi replace can’t draw air in freely, this interrupts the fl ow and, again, creosote forms. Closing the fi replace’s glass doors or not opening the damper all the way are the main ways in which air supply gets restricted.

    In addition to all this, remember that large, compact bundles of wood tend to produce cooler fi res. Build smaller, hotter fi res instead. And don’t burn cardboard boxes or wrapping paper in your fi replace. It’s too easy for a fl aming piece of paper to waft up the chimney and catch things on fi re.

    But most importantly, have your chimney inspected and cleaned regularly. Nothing can completely prevent the creation of creosote. But a certifi ed chimney sweep can keep the problem from getting out of hand.

    Training Level RaisedBy Capt. Tom AakerPhotos by Marcia Soppe

    Harlem - Roscoe Fire’s Training Bureau has been busy this fall with furthering our fi refi ghters education in the Fire Service through Firefi ghter Level 2 and Level 3 Classes. These are Offi ce of the IL State Fire Marshal Certifi cations.

    In October, we had 14 members start the classes and practical training for their Firefi ghter 2. This is not an easy certifi cation as it requires 240 hours of classroom and hands on training to complete. This certifi cation teaches basic fi re tactics and life saving skills that are invaluable to the fi refi ghter and the community that they protect. Once the members complete their certifi cation our department will be at 99% member certifi cation for FF2. Seven years ago we were less than 20%.

    In November we started a Firefi ghter 3 class with 19 members of the department. This 40 hour plus class goes over more advanced fi refi ghting skills and is the next step for a seasoned fi refi ghter. Some of the skills learned include more Advanced Building Construction information, Vehicle Extrication, and Foam Operations. These skills learned are just another set of tools they can use during emergencies in the area. In 2006 we had just one member certifi ed. The department is very proud that once this class is completed almost 50% of our fi refi ghters will be certifi ed to this advanced skill level. We will continue to raise our level of training and knowledge in hopes that we can better serve our community and protect their property.

  • Propane LeakPhotos by Marcia Soppe

    Dryer FirePhotos by Marcia Soppe

    Firefi ghters responded to yet another dryer fi re. This time it was on Monarch Dr. on Nov. 20. The culprit seems to again be the exhaust vent clogged with lint (left).

    Firefi ghters remove the dryer from the home.

    Firefi ghters use a positive pressure fan to rid the home of smoke.

    Report of Explosion UnfoundedPhoto by Sheryl Drost

    Firefi ghters responded to an early morning report of an explosion at a Olson Park School on Minahan Dr. on Dec. 3. Firefi ghters laddered the building and checked out the units on the roof as well as searched the building; nothing was found.

    Firefi ghters laddered the building to check HVAC units on the roof top during a pouring rain.

    11/30/11 - Mophie Recalls iPod Touch Rechargeable External Battery Case Due to Burn Hazard

    Hazard: The battery case’s integrated circuit switch can overheat, posing a burn hazard to consumers.

    Incidents/Injuries: Mophie has received 110 reports of the product becoming warm to the touch, 44 reports of the product deforming and nine reports of minor burns.

    Description: The recalled product is a Mophie Juice Pack Air rechargeable external battery which consists of a lithium polymer battery built into a plastic case designed to snap onto the back of an iPod Touch 4G music player. The battery cases come in black, blue or red. Only battery cases with serial numbers that have the fi rst fi ve alphanumeric characters of TR113 through TR120 are subject to this recall. The serial number can be found inside the housing of the product.

    Sold at: B& H Photo, Barnes & Noble, InMotion Entertainment, J&R Music World, Marine Corps Exchange stores, Amazon.com and mophie.com since April 2011 for about $50.

    Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled product and contact Mophie for instructions on receiving a replacement product.

    Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Mophie toll-free at (877) 308-4581 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or visit the fi rm’s website at www.mophie.com/exchange

    The Firehouse Scene - Page 10 The Firehouse Scene - Page 3 www.harlemroscoefi re.comwww.harlemroscoefi re.com

    Firefi ghters were dispatched to a home on Burr Oak Rd. on Nov. 20. for a gas odor investigation. Firefi ghters found a small leak on one of the appliances and the gas had to be shut off at the propane tank. (photo left)

    Firefi ghter’s kids had a great time Dec.3 during their annual Christmas party. Here are some snapshots of the day!

    Safe with mom! Is he still there? Who are you? Pfffft! Please....

  • From the Chief’s DeskBy Fire Chief Don Shoevlin

    Wow! Another year is coming to a close. It seems just like yesterday that I embarked on my new adventure as your Fire Chief.

    With everyone’s continued support, the fi re department continues to make improvements in our buildings, equipment, the personal growth of our fi refi ghters and response.

    This past year has been a very busy one with a multitude of projects and challenges. I say that not only on the fi re department but personally as well. As I write this our calls are up 10 % .

    This past year I had two of my children get married. What a joyous and proud moment for Tammy and I as we witnessed our daughter Michelle and son Steve be married. We are also very proud and delighted to welcome our son-in-law Dan and daughter-in-law Sarah into our family. Then on my birthday last month, I get a gift second to none. I was told by my daughter that I was going to be a grandfather (again). Wow, what a gift!

    We participated in numerous community events, parades and visits to schools and clubs this year. Even though it has been a busy year, I assure you that we continue to be proactive in our approach to services and our outlook to the future. I remain committed to the excellence, integrity, and caring in the performance of emergency fi re, medical and rescue services.

    The Roscoe Lion’s Club held another successful senior turkey dinner. The opportunity to work with them is gratifying. We served 248 dinners that day.

    It’s that time of the year again. Our media division and photographers (Sheryl and Marcia) have completed another outstanding calendar. The colored photos show your fi re department at it’s best. Stop by Station One to get a copy. Hurry, because they go fast.

    As the holiday season is upon us, let us take time to remember those safety tips that we tend to take for granted. Our annual “Keep the Wreath Red” campaign has begun with a wreath in front of all three stations. Please see the article on this program found on page 11.

    Congratulation to our seven new fi refi ghters who were sworn in last month. They have successfully completed the requirements placed on them and their probationary time.

    We will be starting a new recruit class in February 2012. The orientation meeting for this class will be held on December 20 at 7 P.M. It will be held at Station One on Main Street in Roscoe.

    If you are interesting in becoming a Harlem-Roscoe volunteer fi refi ghter pick up an application at Station One or attend the meeting to learn more about it.

    happy holidays!

    I wish everyone in our communities a safe and joyous holiday season and thank you for the continuous support to our fi refi ghters.

    To all the members of the Harlem Roscoe Fire Protection District and their families, Tammy and I wish:

    That your Christmas Season fi ll your Home with Joy, Your Heart with Love & Your Life with Laughter.

    The gratitude for the commitment all of you make is second to none. Thank you! We are who we are because of ALL of you!!

    Harlem-Roscoe Fire Chief Don Shoevlin

    CongratulationsPhotos by Sheryl Drost

    After successfully completing the requirements placed on them and their probationary time, Trustee Jerry Ocker gives the Firefi ghter Oath to six of the new fi refi ghters.

    New Firefi ghters Nino Girardin, Justin Harwood, Chad Miller, Stefani Layman, Ryan Sarver, and Brett Parrish. The seventh new fi refi ghter, Phillip Besoiu, was unable to make the Association meeting, but was sworn in during the monthly Trustee’s meeting. Congratulations to all seven, great job!

    Birthdays

    December19th Eric Schweitzer20th Phillip Besoiu26th Ron Klaman January 4th Bill Hyde5th Matt Bush10th Chad Miller17th John Presley25th Jerry Lund26th Reety Radke31st Mark Soppe

    Total Calls for 2011 To date - 2243

    Firehouse Scene is a monthly newsletter produced by the Harlem-Roscoe Fire Prot. Dist.

    Editor-in-Chief - Don ShoevlinEditor & Layout - Sheryl Drost

    The Firehouse Scene is available at Station One - 10544 Main Street in Roscoe and on the department’s website after the second Sunday each month. www.harlemroscoefi re.com

    E-mail submissions to:Sheryl @ [email protected]

    The Firehouse Scene - Page 2 The Firehouse Scene - Page 11 www.harlemroscoefi re.comwww.harlemroscoefi re.com

    “Keep the Wreath Red” Program

    This holiday season we will again participate in the Illinois Fire Chiefs Association’s (IFCA) adopted “Keep the Wreath Red” Program.

    The “Keep the Wreath Red” program was established in 1954 by Naperville, IL Paid-On-Call Firefi ghter Paul Boecker.

    Annually the “Keep the Wreath Red” Program is endorsed by the IFCA Board of Directors to alert residents of fi res caused by holiday decorations

    The “Keep the Wreath Red” Program is a visual reminder to citizens to take additional safety precautions during the holiday season to make this a safe and happy holiday season.

    As the holiday season begins, a holiday wreath decorated with red bulbs was placed in public view at all three of our fi re stations. The wreaths are illuminated constantly. If a fi re is directly caused by holiday decorations, one red bulb will be changed to a white bulb.

    Please use our wreaths as a reminder to have a Fire Safe Holiday. Help us to “Keep the Wreaths Red!”

    Roscoe Lions Club Annual Senior Turkey DinnerPhotos by Marcia Soppe

    Harlem-Roscoe hosted the annual Senior Turkey Dinner held by the Roscoe Lions Club on November 17. 248 dinners were served to the seniors. It is always such a joy to host this event; our fi re personnel love to see all of them each year and to hear the stories!

  • Station Gossip By Sheryl Drost

    Now for our monthly, “Here’s your sign moment.” Remember how last month in the funnies I put in the quote by Abraham Lincoln, “The trouble with quotes on the internet is that it’s diffi cult to determine if they are true or not?” Well, Chief was proofi ng the newsletter and says, Sheryl, Abraham Lincoln couldn’t say that, he wasn’t around with the internet! Everyone all together now, “Here’s your sign!”

    Josh grab a shovel, Josh forget it, Josh grab a ....

    Let’s see how many of us know which one of our fi refi ghters said this, “It’s a good day, the Chiefs beat the Bears!

    The wheelbarrows are back on board ....I am soo happy!

    Firefi ghter Joe Quast is the best Ho Ho Hoer ever!

    When dealing with those stressful friends and family during the holidays, remember the Pause. Really, mastery in so many things comes from taking the time to be conscious; taking the time to consider the choice before making it. Get that last part: it is a ‘choice’ you make, even if it is so automatic that you’ve lost the element where choice is obvious. If you choose to stop and not jump into your ‘knee jerk’ reaction to these relatives or family friends who just ‘set you off’ you can have a moment to respond instead of react. I’m not the fi rst one to encourage people to ‘count to 10’ at the moment of ‘pain’, and it can be a really effective tool. James M. Lynch.

    PostageHarlem-Roscoe FirePO Box 450Roscoe, IL 61073

    The Firehouse Scene - Page 12www.harlemroscoefi re.com

    December 2011 Fire Chief Don Shoevlin Editor Sheryl Drost

    Photo by Sheryl Drost

    the firehouse sceneIs a monthly publication of the

    Harlem-Roscoe Fire Protection District

    Duty, Pride, Tradition!

    Boys will be boys!

    If Capt. Tom Aaker were a snowman!

    A big Thank you to Firefi ghter Joe Quast and his elves for participating in three lighted Christmas Parades this month.

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December 2011 Fire Chief Don Shoevlin Editor Sheryl Drost Photo by Sheryl Drost the firehouse scene Is a monthly publication of the Harlem-Roscoe Fire Protection District
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