Home >Documents >Subject: Chemistry (CHEM) Special Course Units Status CHEM ...

Subject: Chemistry (CHEM) Special Course Units Status CHEM ...

Date post:09-Feb-2017
Category:
View:220 times
Download:1 times
Share this document with a friend
Transcript:
  • Subject: Chemistry (CHEM) Special

    Course Units Status CHEM 43214 Advanced Analytical Chemistry C

    CHEM 43224 Advanced Biochemistry I C

    CHEM 43234 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I C

    CHEM 43244 Advanced Organic Chemistry I C

    CHEM 43254 Advanced Physical Chemistry I C

    CHEM 43262 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory C

    CHEM 43272 Biochemistry Laboratory C

    CHEM 43282 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory C

    CHEM 43292 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory C

    CHEM 43302 Organic Chemistry Laboratory C

    CHEM 43312 Physical Chemistry Laboratory C

    CHEM 43323 Recent Advances in Chemistry C

    Year3

    CHEM 43332 Industrial / Professional Placement1 C

    CHEM 43344 Advanced Biochemistry II C

    CHEM 43354 Advanced Environmental Chemistry C

    CHEM 43364 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II C

    CHEM 43374 Advanced Organic Chemistry II C

    CHEM 43384 Advanced Physical Chemistry II C

    CHEM 43394 Materials Chemistry C

    CHEM 43406 Research Project - Dissertation C

    Year 4

    CHEM 43411 Seminar C

    1 Credits not counted for the GPA calculation.

    1

  • Jump to Main Page

    Chemistry Course code : CHEM 43214 Course title : Advanced Analytical Chemistry Learning outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to; explain the function of the components of instruments and capabilities and limitations in their

    analytical applications explain the importance of the effects of the experimental conditions in analysis and modify the method

    used or correct the data accumulated using their knowledge of conditional constants. use the knowledge in fundamentals to design analytical methodologies for analyzing of samples with

    complex matrices use statistical methods for reporting analytical results with required levels of confidence.

    Course content: Principles of instrumentation (10 h) Instrument performance characteristics; UVvisible spectrometers, atomic spectrometers, Fourier transformed infrared spectrometers, gas chromatographs and high performance liquid chromatographs, mass spectrometers. Analytical measurements; quality assurance and quality control in measurements. Signals, noise and signal to noise ratio. Basic operational amplifier circuits and their applications. Data quality and reporting. Analytical electrochemistry (10 h) Control potential microelectrode techniques; potential step methods and potential sweep methods. Controlled current microelectrode techniques. Methods involving forced convection. Hydrodynamic methods. Techniques based on concept of impedance. Electrochemical quartz crystal micro and nano balance techniques. Analytical spectroscopy and radiochemical methods of analysis (10h) Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, laser ablation in atomic spectrometry. Microwave induced plasma systems for atomic spectrometry. X-ray fluorescence specrtrometry, -spectrometry and neutron activation analysis. Complex chemical equilibria (10 h) Importance of conditional equilibrium constants and non ideal systems, activity and activity coefficients, conditional solubility product and its application in non ideal systems, acid-base eqilibria in polyprotic systems, conditional constants in complexometry, redox and precipitation titrations. Non aqueous solvents and their applications in chemical analysis, speciation, importance and difficulties in analysis. Analytical separations (10 h) Solvent extraction, distribution constant and distribution ratio, conditional effects on the efficiency of analytical separations, chromatography; concepts, terms, definitions and tools used, gas chromatography (GC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), ion exchange chromatography (IEC), method development in separational analysis. Thermal methods in chemical analysis (10 h) Definitions & tools used in thermal analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) & temperature programmed oxidation (TPO), combustion analysis, thermo mechanical analysis(TMA), thermometric titrations. Method of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures, assignments and tutorial discussions. Assessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination. Recommended reading: 1. Harris, D.C., (2006) Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Freeman 2. Willard, H.H., Merritt, L., Dean, J., Settle, F., (1988) Instrumental methods of analysis. Wadsworth. 3. Flaschka, H.A., Barnard, A.J., Sturrock, P.E.., (1969) Quantitative Analytical Chemistry, Vol 1, Banes &

    Noble.

    2

  • 4. Mendham, J., Denney, R.C., Barnes, J.D., (2002) Vogels textbook of Quantitative Chemical analysis. Prentice Hall.

    5. Currel, G., (2000) Analytical Instrumentation: Performance Characteristics and Quality, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    Jump to Main Page

    3

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43224 Course title : Advanced Biochemistry I Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    demonstrate knowledge of protein structure elucidation using physical methods, computational methods and understand the structure-function relationship in proteins

    apply the principles of organic chemistry and chemical kinetics to explain the mechanisms of enzyme action describe the nature and properties of biomolecules in processed food demonstrate the methods and skills used in food analysis demonstrate the knowledge of naturally occurring toxin and toxin form during the food

    processing explain the role of nutrients and food in the achievement and maintenance of human health and well-being.

    Course content: Structure-functional relationship in proteins (20 h) Protein structure prediction based on homology and modeling, Protein folding mechanisms. Analysis of protein function by protein engineering, structural genomics, solving macromolecular structure by X-ray diffraction, NMR, circular dichroism methods, proteins in solutions and in membranes. Interaction of proteins with other molecules, relationship between conformation and binding, kinetics of ligand-protein interactions Mechanism of enzyme action (15 h) Enzyme diversity, transition state structures. Hammond postulate. Principles of catalysis; acid/base, metal ion, covalent. Structure reactivity relationship of enzymes, break down of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, kinetics of multisubstrate systems, detection of enzyme intermediates, structure and mechanisms of selected enzymes. Food and nutritional biochemistry (25 h) Biochemical changes in raw foods; meat and fish, fruits and vegetables, cereals, milk etc. Biochemistry of food processing, biochemistry of food spoilage. Enzymes in the food industry, dispersed systems in foods, food additives, antioxidants, food colors , flavors and odors, food contaminants, AOAC methods in food analysis, GM foods, food laws, safety and regulations Energy balance and body composition; nutritional significance of sugars, starch and fibers. Artificial sweeteners and their potential risks and benefits. Various measures of protein quality; complementary proteins, risks associated with vegetarian diets, recommended intake of proteins for various population groups, protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), kwashiorkor and marasmus. Fat diets, weight management; overweight and underweight, eating disorders. Fat soluble and water soluble vitamins. Major minerals and trace elements; function, recommended intakes, deficiencies, toxicities, nutrition in pregnancy and lactation, nutrition in infancy, childhood and adolescence. Method of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination Recommended reading:

    1. Creighton, T.E., (1993) Proteins, Structure & Properties, W.H. Freeman & Company, New York 2. Fersht, A., (1985) Enzyme Structure and mechanism, W.H. Freeman & Company, New York 3. Potter, N. N. and Hotchkiss, J. H., (1997) Food Science, Aspen. 4. Eskim, N.A.,(1990) Biochemsitry of foods, Academic press 5. Garrow, J.S. and thames W.P.J, (1997) Human Nutrition, Churchil living stone 6. Walker, A.F., Rolls B.A., (1998) Infant nutrition, Chapman Hall 7. Truswell, A., (1998) ABC of nutrition, British Library cataloguing and publishing data 8. Stryer, L., (1995) Biochemistry, Freeman.

    Jump to Main Page

    4

  • Jump to Main PageCourse code : CHEM 43234 Course title : Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    analytically use knowledge in advanced topics in inorganic chemistry with the exposure to resent advances in the relevant areas

    describe and explain electronic spectra, highlighting the atomic/molecular level structural environmental features that give rise to them

    explain and postulate reaction mechanisms for inorganic reactions using experimental data and structural features of compounds involved.

    apply knowledge of solid state reactions and physical properties of solids to explain the mechanics of solid state devises.

    use x-ray diffraction techniques to analyze inorganic material and thereby extract structural information of compounds.

    Course content: Coordination chemistry (15 h) Theories of metal-ligand bonding in complexes; valance bond theory, crystal field theory, factors effecting metal coordination, octahedral site stabilization energy (OSSE) calculations, structural properties of spinels and inverse spinels, tetrahedral distortion of octahedral complexes (Jahn-Teller distortion), square planner geometry, molecular orbital theory of coordination complexes. Spectral properties of coordination compounds; electronic spectra, types of transitions, term symbols, micro energy states and ground state determination, Russell-Saunders coupling, Orgel energy diagrams of transition metal complexes, Racah parameters, non-crossing rule, Tanabe-Sugano energy diagrams. Charge transfer transitions in metal complexes. Magnetic properties of transition metal compounds. Inorganic reaction mechanisms (10 h) Reaction kinetics and mechanism; stioicheometric and intimate mechanisms, ligand substitution reactions of inorganic complexes, associative and dissociative pathways, ligand exchange reactions of square planner complexes; rate law mechanisms, factors controlling the rate of square planner substitutions, trans effect theories, trance influence, cis-effect. Substitution reactions of octahedral complexes; rate law mechanisms, study of acid hydrolysis, base hydrolysis and anation reactions, steriochemical changes in substitution reactions. Electron transfer processes; outer-sphere and inner-sphere mechanisms; rates of water exchange, Frank-Condon factors, factors effecting inner-sphere reactions, two electron transfer reactions. Nuclear and radiochemistry (10 h) Structure of atomic nucleus, binding energy, nuclear stability, nuclear energy, radioactivity and decay, nuclear reactions and applications, radio-analytical techniques, environmental radiochemistry. Crystallography (10 h) Macromolecular crystallography, x-ray diffraction patterns in one, two and three dimensions, the structure and the atomic structure factor, the phase problems, direct methods for solving phase problem, the Patterson maps, isomorphous replacement, model building, refinement and evaluation of models. Solid state chemistry (15 h) Crystal structures of binary compounds, crystals defects, free electron model, Fermi-Dirac distribution, band theory. Electrical transport in solids; conductivity, metals, semiconductors and insulators and their applications, semiconductor junctions, diodes and transistors, superconductivity. Thermal and magnetic properties, solid state reactions, techniques used in solid state synthesis, conducting organic polymers. Method of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination Recommended reading:

    1. Sharpe, A.G., (2005) Inorganic Chemistry, Pearson 2. Cotton, F.A., Wilkinson, G., (1999) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Wiley 3. Lee, J.D., (1996) Concise Inorganic Chemistry , Blackwell 4. Prakash,. S., Basu. S.K., Tuli. G.D. and Madan.R. D., (1999) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.

    Vol (II) Chand, India 5. Atkins, P. W., (2006) Physical Chemistry, Oxford University Press

    5

  • 6. Ladd, M. F. C. and Palmer, R. A., (2003) Structure Determination by X-ray Crystallography , Kluwer 7. West, A. R., (1998), Solid State Chemistry and its Applications, John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    Jump to Main Page

    6

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43244 Course title : Advanced Organic Chemistry I Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    predict the occurrence and stereochemical outcomes of electrocyclic, sigma tropic and cycloaddition reactions under thermal and photochemical conditions

    explain the formation of products in pericyclic reactions by frontier orbital, aromatic concept and conservation of orbital symmetry theories.

    apply advanced spectroscopic techniques to structure elucidation of organic compounds. explain theoretical basis of advanced techniques in NMR and MS spectroscopy apply suitable strategies and design a synthetic pathway for a target molecule select the most appropriate reaction conditions and reagents for a particular synthetic process.

    Course content: Physical organic chemistry (15 h) Stereochemical principles; stereospecific and stereoselective reactions, dynamic stereochemistry, prochiral relationships, homotopic and heterotopic nuclei, enetiotopic, diastereotopic relationships. Reaction mechanisms; thermodynamic and kinetic data, substituent effects and linear free energy relationships, Hammett equation, reaction constants and substituent constants, kinetic and thermodynamic control, Hammonds postulate, Curtin-Hammett principle, isotope effects, nucleophilic substitution, quantitative measurements of the stabilities of cations, heat of ionization measurements, nucleophilicity and solvent effects, leaving groups, steric effects, substituent effects, neighboring group participation, norbornyl and other non-classical carbocations. Addition and elimination reactions: E1, E2, E1cb mechanisms of elimination reactions. Carbaions: acidity of hydrocarbons, kinetic and thermodynamic acidity, carbanions as nucleophiles in SN2 reactions. Free radicals; stable free radicals, persistent free radicals etc., free radical reaction mechanisms. Concerted reactions (10 h) Characteristic features of concerted reactions, WoodwardHoffmann rules, pericyclic reactions and their classifications as electrocyclic, sigma tropic and cycloaddition reactions, theoretical predictions of occurrence and stereochemical outcome of percyclic reaction (under thermal and photochemical conditions) using frontier orbital, aromatic concept and conservation of orbital symmetry theories. Advanced organic spectroscopy (15 h) Principles of pulsed Fourier transform spectrometry, instrumentation, non-first order spectra, effect of magnetic field on resolution of NMR spectra, simplification of complex spectra (shift reagents), nuclear overhauser effect (NOE), DEPT, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC and HMBC, mass spectrometry; components in modern mass spectrometers, isonization methods (EI, CI, FAD, ESI, MALDI etc), mass analyzers (magnetic sector, quadrapole analyzer, FTICR, TOF etc.), detection of molecular formula using high resolution molecular ion, interfacing of MS with GC (GCMS) and LC (LCMS), fragmentation patterns of some chemical classes of organic compounds. Other methods; use of FTIR, CD and ORD in structure elucidation of organic compounds. Advanced organic synthesis (20 h) Directed carbonyl condensations, specific enolates, 1,3 dicarbonyls, use of non-nucleophilic bases, strategies in controlled alkylations, reactions of -thiocarbanions, dipole inversions (umpolung), strategies in stereochemical control of Wittig and related reactions, Diels-Alder reaction in synthesis, regiospecificity, stereospecificity, synthetic applications of organocopper reagents, -allylnickelhalide reagents, organosilicone reagents, organoboron compounds, carbenes in synthesis, advanced aspects of oxidation and reduction, strategies in synthesis of target molecules, retrosynthetic analysis, linear vs. convergent synthesis, concept of protecting groups, target molecule syntheses. Method of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination Recommended reading:

    1. Firebolin, H., (2004) Basic One and two dimentional NMR spectroscopy, VCH

    7

  • 2. Silverstein, R.M., Webster, F. X., (1997) Spectrometric identification of organic compounds, John Willey

    3. Sanders, J. K. M. and Hunter, B. K., (1993) Modern NMR spectroscopy, Oxford University Press 4. Williams, D. and Fleming I., (1989) Spectroscopic methods in Organic chemistry, McGraw-Hill

    International (UK) limited 5. Thomas, S.E., (1991) Organic Synthesis: The role of Boron and silicon, Oxford Chemistry Primers 6. Jenkins, P.R., (1992) Organometallics Reagents in Synthesis, Oxford Chemistry Primers 7. Carruthers, W., (1996) Modern Aspects of organic synthesis, Cambride press

    Jump to Main Page

    8

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43254 Course title : Advanced Physical Chemistry I Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    use basic aspects of group theory to describe molecular orbitals of small molecules and coordination complexes

    use group theory to generate and factor reducible representations for molecular vibrations, rotations, translations

    s use theories to identify, formulate, and solve problems related to chemical kinetichanics identify and describe some chemical aspects that depend on quantum mec

    use operators in quantum mechanics and thereby calculate eigen values principles and concepts used to analyze thermodynamic systems and

    rocesses.

    d systems, phase equilibrium and reaction res and third law of thermodynamics.

    principle, spatial and spin parts of wave function, olecules, approximation methods.

    liquid phase reactions, rolled reactions and determination of reaction rates.

    ble lication of group theory in chemical bonding and molecular spectroscopy

    ermodynamics of ideal monoatomic, iatomic and polyatomic gases, entropy and the third law of thermodynamics.

    ethod of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials.

    ssessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination

    ll.

    y. illan Press Ltd.

    rd. d.

    . Brouard

    describe thep

    Course content: Advanced thermodynamics (10 h) Material equilibrium, partial molar quantities, multiphase closeequilibrium in ideal gas mixtuQuantum mechanics (15 h) Schrodinger equation and its applications, Pauli exclusion Schrodinger equation for mReaction kinetics (15 h) Review of fundamental laws of kinetics. Theories of reaction rates; collision theory and ctivated complex theory, Eyring equation, thermodynamic parameters, potential energy surfaces. Theories of unimolecular reactions; Lindemann theory, Hinshelwood theory and Kassel's modifications of Lindemann theory, diffusion controlled and activation-contSymmetry and group theory (10 h) Determination of point groups set up a matrix to perform a given transformation, reducible and irreducirepresentations, character tables, appStatistical thermodynamics (10 h) Quantum states, Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi- Dirac statistics, canonical ensemble and partition functions, Boltzmann distribution law for noninteracting particles, statistical thd M A Recommended reading: 1. Levine, N., (2001) Physical Chemistry, McGraw-Hi2. Atkins, P. W., (2006) Physical Chemistry, Oxford. 3. Reid, C. E., (1990) Chemical thermodynamics, McGraw-Hill. 4. Cotton, F. A., (1990) Chemical Applications of Group Theory, John Wile5. Davidson, G., (1991) Group Theory for chemists, Macm6. Laidler. K. J., (1995) Chemical Kinetics, Prentice Hall. 7. Pilling. M. J., Seakins. P. W., (1995) Reaction Kinetics, Oxfo8. Cox. B. G., (1994) Modern Liquid Phase Kinetics, Oxfor9 . M., (1998) Reaction Dynamics, Oxford.

    Jump to Main Page

    9

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43262 Course title : Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    operate common analytical instruments properly and optimize experimental conditions to achieve high sensitivity, selectivity, accuracy and reproducibility in chemical analysis

    apply analytical techniques to measure analytes in non ideal conditions and hence will be able to analyze natural and industrial samples.

    Course content: Calibration of glassware, direct measuring instruments and analytical instruments. Use of spectrometers;UV-visible, atomic emission and atomic absorption spectrophotometers. Electro-analtycal instruments (voltammeters, ion selective electrodes) and chromatographic equipment (gas chromatograph and liquid chromatograph) fro analysis of natural samples. Use of basic software packages for data processing and reporting of analytical results. Conditional effects on titrimetry and gravimetry, non-aqueous titrations.

    Method of teaching and learning: Two 7 hour laboratory classes per week for 5 Weeks, prelabs and assignments

    Assessment: Continuous assessment and end of course unit examination. Recommended reading:

    1. Skoog, D.A., James F.H., Nieman. T. A., (1998) Principles of Instrumental Analysis, Harcourt Brace College Publishers

    2. Willard, H.H, Merritt, L, Dean, J, Settle, F., (1988) Instrumental methods of analysis. Wadsworth. 3. Harris, D.C. (2006) Quantitative Chemical Analysis, 6th or 7th edition, Freeman 4. Mendham, J; Denney, R.C.; Barnes, J.D., (2002) Vogels textbook of Quantitative Chemical analysis,

    Prentice Hall.

    Jump to Main Page

    10

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43272 Course title : Biochemistry Laboratory Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    demonstrate the ability to isolate proteins and enzymes from biological sources develop methods to evaluate and estimate functional properties of proteins demonstrate kinetic characterization of enzymes isolate and characterize DNA and RNA rationalize the behavior of lipids in membranes.

    Course content: Methods of protein and enzyme purification; ammonium sulphate precipitation, gel exclusion chromatography, ion exchange chromatography. Kinetic characterization of enzymes, Protein folding dynamics, transport properties of membranes and its characterization, purification and characterization of DNA, RNA and plasmids, analysis of nutritional quality parameters of foods. Method of teaching and learning: Two 7 hour laboratory classes per week for 5 Weeks, pre-labs and

    assignments Assessment: Continuous assessment and end of course unit examination. Recommended reading: 1. Robyt, J.F., White B.J., (1990) Biochemical Techniques theory and practices, Waveland Press, Illinois. 2. Kirk R.S., Sawyer R., (1997) Pearsons Composition and Analysis of Foods, ninth edition, Longman Group UK 3. Plummer, D. T., (1987) An Introduction to Practical Biochemistry, McGraw Hill. 4. Minch, M. M. J., (1989) Experiments in Biochemistry, Prentice Hall.

    Jump to Main Page

    11

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43282 Course title : Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    apply the knowledge in chemical principals and skills acquired in laboratory techniques to investigate chemical processes occurring in the environment and monitor pollutants in the environment.

    Course content: Techniques of environmental sample collection, sample preparation and sample storage. Study of inorganic and organic chemical properties of natural and wastewaters. Study of processes of generation, propagation and transformation of environmental pollutants in the geosphere and biosphere. Investigations on pollution mitigation methods. Method of teaching and learning: Two 7 hour laboratory classes per week for 5 Weeks, pre-labs and assignments Assessment: Continuous assessment and end of course unit examination. Recommended reading: 1. Keith, L. H., (1991) Environmental sampling and Analysis. A Practical Guide, Lewis. 2. Azara, J. et.al. (1997) ASTM standards on Environmental Sampling, 2nd edition. 3. Radojevic, M. and Bashkin, V. N., (1999) Practical Environmental analysis, RSC 4. Boehnke, D. N. and Delumyea, R. D., (2000) Laboratory Experiments in Environmental Chemistry, Prentice

    Hall. 5. Maria, C. and Saba, C., (2002) Environmental Sampling and Analysis Metals,Lewis Publishers 6. Eugene,R.W.,(2000) Applications of Environmental Chemistry. A practical guide for environmental

    professionals, CRC

    Jump to Main Page

    12

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43292 Course title : Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    apply and demonstrate laboratory skills in techniques used in synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds.

    Course content: Synthesis and analysis of the coordination complexes, UV-visible and IR spectroscopy of coordination complexes and characterization of organometalic compounds. Method of teaching and learning: Two 7 hour laboratory classes per week for 5 Weeks, pre-labs and

    assignments Assessment: Continuous assessment and end of course unit examination. Recommended reading:

    1. Mendham, J; Denney, R.C.; Barnes, J.D.; (2002) Vogels textbook of Quantitative Chemical analysis, Prentice Hall.

    2. Harris, D.C. (2006) Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Freeman

    Jump to Main Page

    13

  • Jump to Main Page

    Course code : CHEM 43302 Title : Organic Chemistry Laboratory Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    perform phytochemical screening for natural products use of modern chromatographic techniques to isolate compounds and bioassay guided fractionation. design and perform multi-step synthesis of selected organic compounds use alternative methods of environmentally friendly synthesis interpret spectra of complex organic molecules using advanced NMR and MS.

    Course content: Phytochemical screening of natural products; chemical tests for the detection of natural products (carbohydrates, tannins, alkaloids, glycosides, steroids, saponins, terpenes and flavonoids), semi-micro scale multi-step synthesis of organic compounds, microwave synthesis of heterocyclic organic compounds, isolation, purification, quantification and characterization of natural products using chromatographic techniques (normal and reversed phase TLC, normal and reversed phase column chromatography, gel permeation chromatography, GLC, HPLC, 1D, 2D NMR, IR, mass spectrometry etc), bioassay guided fractionation of natural products, chemical modification and synthesis of potentially active drugs. Method of teaching and learning: Two 7 hour laboratory classes per week for 5 Weeks, pre-labs and assignments Assessment: Continuous assessment and end of course unit examination. Recommended reading:

    1. Schoffstall, A. M., Barbara, B. A., Gaddis, A., Druelinger, M.L., Schoffstall, A., Gaddis, B., Druelinger, M., (2007) Microscale and Miniscale Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiments, Brooks/Cole

    2. Pavia, D.L., Lampman, G.L., Kriz, G.S., Engel, R.G., (2007) Introduction to Organic Laboratory Techniques: A Microscale Approach, Brooks/Cole

    3. Moting, J. R., Mofrrill, T. C., Hammond, C. N. and Neckers, D. C., (1999) Experimental Organic Chemistry, Freeman.

    4. Williamson, K.L., Macroscale and Microscale Organic Experiments, Heath and company.

    Jump to Main Page

    14

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43312 Course title : Physical Chemistry Laboratory Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    reinforce concepts and exploit applications by relating the experiments to fundamental physical chemistry concepts

    explain limitations associated with data and experimental uncertainties develop scientific judgment and ability to innovate and think critically. perform, analyze, and describe in writing quantitative physical measurements on chemical systems that illustrate the principles of physical chemistry.

    Course content: Advanced experiments based on thermodynamics of gases and solutions, transport properties and kinetics, thermodynamics of phase equilibrium, chemistry of surfaces, chemical equilibrium and electrochemistry. Review of use of Excel, computer-assisted data acquisition and analysis, plot a function using Excel, plotting the solutions to the 1-D and 2-D Schrdinger equation. Method of teaching and learning: Two 7 hour laboratory classes per week for 5 Weeks, pre-labs and assignments Assessment: Continuous assessment and end of course unit examination. Recommended reading:

    1. Garland, C. W., Nibler, J. W. and Shoemaker, D. P., (2001) Experiments in Physical Chemistry, McGraw Hill

    2. Halpern, A. M., McBane. G., (2006) Experimental Physical Chemistry, Macmillan.

    Jump to Main Page

    15

    http://catalogs.mhhe.com/mhhe/viewProductDetails.do?isbn=0072828420http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/search-handle-url?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books-uk&field-author=Arthur%20M.%20Halpernhttp://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/search-handle-url?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books-uk&field-author=George%20McBane

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43323 Course title : Recent Advances in Chemistry Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to;

    apply basic chemistry concepts in modern applications and develop skills in critical and self directed learning.

    Course content: Selected, recent developments in chemistry and related fields, which are based on basic chemistry concepts, thought in the curriculum. Method of teaching and learning : Survey of related literature, Self studying Assessment: End of semester examination Recommended reading: review papers and journal articles related to current topics prescribed by the staff members. Reading material recommended for all core chemistry courses.

    Jump to Main Page

    16

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43332 (The credits earned will not be counted for the GPA) Course title : Industrial / Professional Placement Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit the student should be able to;

    use laboratory skills in industrial applications accumulate work place skills that will help them in their future careers.

    Course content: The students will be placed in selected industries and institutions that carryout chemistry related work/research for a period of six weeks. The required resource material will be supplied by the relevant institution/industry. Method of teaching and learning : Training under the supervision and guidance of research/industrial

    personnel .

    Assessment : Oral presentation and report.

    Jump to Main Page

    17

  • Jump to Main Page

    Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43344 Course title : Advanced Biochemistry II Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit the student should be able to;

    describe advance techniques of gene manipulation and apply techniques to manipulate organisms and their products for human benefit

    explain the biochemical basis of neuronal function and explain the biochemical basis of various neurological disorders

    describe the concepts of natural and acquired immunity and their roles and interaction in immune responses discuss processes involved in drug leads discovery, in modern-day rational drug design and

    development discuss the importance of biotechnology in drug industry.

    Course content: Gene technology (25 h) Cloning genes in E.coli, and in higher organisms, various gene transfer methods, various strategies of isolating genes, gene sequencing and synthesis, mutagenesis, analysis of gene structure and function, over production of proteins in E. coil and in higher organisms. PCR and its various applications in gene technology, molecular probes, markers and their uses, fingerprinting of genomes. Impact of gene technology, disease diagnosis, human gene therapy, valuable products from cell culture. Transgenic technology, various strategies of generating transgenic organisms for crop and livestock improvement, metabolic engineering, fermentation methods, biofertilisers, biopesticides, industrial uses of enzymes, protein engineering, biosensors and chips, biomass energy, biogas and biodiesel, gene technology, biosafety, hazards and ethics, intellectual property rights and protection. Immunology (10 h) Cells and organs of the immune system, Innate vs. acquired immunity antigens, antibody structure and the generation of B-cell diversity, antigen-antibody reactions, monoclonal antibodies antibody genes. Major histocompatibility complex, T-cell mediated immunity B- cell mediated immunity. Cytokines, the complement system cell-mediated effector responses (CTL, NK, DH), immune responses to infection vaccines, hypersensitive reactions (immunopathologies) AIDS and other immuno-deficiencies autoimmunity transplantation, cancer and the immune system. Neurobiology (10 h) Biochemistry of excitatory and electrical excitability and ion channels, myelin formation, structure and biochemistry, chemically mediated synaptic transmission, receptors and signal transduction, molecular genetic approach to inherited neurological degenerative disorders, biochemical changes in ischemia and hypoxia, biochemical aspects of mood disorders. Pharmaceutical chemistry (15 h) Drugreceptor theories, drug development, lead discovery, lead optimization, forces related to drug binding, chiral drugs, QSAR, Hansch equation and its uses, drugs targeting nucleic acids and enzymes, antibacterial drugs, cholinergics and anticholinergics, acetylcholinesterases, NSAIDS and opium analgesics, mechanisms of development of drug resistance, drug synergism, pharmacogenomics, biotechnology based drugs, antisense oligonucleotides and RNA interference, as therapeutic agents, drug absorption and distribution, pharmacokinetics, metabolism of drugs, drug excretion phase, target based rational drug discovery. Plants as sources of drugs, traditional medicines and aromatherapy. Method of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination Recommended reading:

    1. Brown, T. A., (1990) Gene cloning, An introduction, Chapman.

    18

  • 2. Old, R. W. and Primrose, S. B., (1989) Principles of Gene Manipulation, an Introduction to Genetic Engineering, Blackwell.

    3. Smith J. E., (1997) Biotechnology, Cambridge university press 4. Siegel, G. J., Agranoff, B. W., Alber, R. W. and Molinoff, P. B., (1993) Neurochemistry, Reven. 5. Johnstone, A. P. and Turner, M. W., (1997) Immunochemistry, Oxford 6. Patrick, G. L., (1998) An introduction to medicinal chemistry, Oxford. 7. King F.D., (2001) Medicinal chemistry principles and practice, RSC 8. Krogsgaard-Larsen P., Liljefors T. and Madsen, U., (1996) A Text Book of Drug Design and

    Development, Harwood academic publishers

    Jump to Main Page

    19

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43354 Course title : Advanced Environmental Chemistry Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit the student should be able to;

    demonstrate and describe the knowledge and understanding of the atmospheric, aquatic and soil chemistry identify and recognize sources, reactions and fate of chemical pollutants in the environment and demonstrate skills of regulating such pollutants

    explain the importance of waste minimization and cleaner production describe the chemical interactions between organisms in an ecosystem demonstrate skills in detecting and making use of such interactions in pest management strategies.

    Course content: Aquatic chemistry (10 h) Characterization of different water bodies; physical, chemical and biochemical properties of water in different conditions. Interactions of water and ai, interactions of water and soil, chemical reactions in water, aquatic microbial chemistry, transformation of different elements, colloids and sedimentation, water quality parameters, water pollution and water quality assessments, water purification techniques. Atmospheric chemistry (10 h) Physical characteristics of the atmosphere; temperature and pressure profiles. Chemistry of stratosphere; Chapman mechanism, polar ozone depletion. Chemistry of troposphere; one-box model, organic and inorganic pollutants, chemical and photochemical reactions, effect of air pollutants on health and ecosystem, control strategies. Sources and transformations of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols and particulate matter. Soil chemistry (10 h) Soil formation, soil minerals and organic matter, profile, texture, acidity, alkalinity and salinity of soil, base saturation and cation exchange capacity, natural and anthropogenic soil pollution. Chemical ecology (10 h) Chemical interactions in eco-systems; semiochemicals and their classification. Inter species communications; pheromones, intra species communications. Allelochemicals; host plant compounds, plant and animal defense compounds. Stereochemistry-bioactivity relationship; methodologies in chemical ecology, isolation of volatiles, electrophysiological assay, detection of biological activity, GC-EAD and GC-MS, semiochemicals as a pest control agents. Waste management (10 h) Nature, sources and classification of waste, waste in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere. Reduction, treatment and disposal of waste. Waste minimization and cleaner production Pesticides (10 h) Classification, toxicity, mode of action, synthesis, bio pesticides, fate of pesticides in the environment, pesticide risk assessments, best management practices. Method of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination

    Recommended reading: 1. Carde, R. T. and Minks, A. K., (1996) Insect Pheromone Research new directions, Chapman. 2. Hummel, H. E. and Miller, T. A,. (1994) Techniques in Pheromone Research, Springer. 3. Bunce, N., (1998) Environmental Chemistry, Wuerz. 4. Williams, I., (1999) Environmental Chemistry, A modular Approach, John Wiley. 5. Hassal, K. A., (1990) The Biochemistry and Uses of Pesticides, Macmillian. 6. Green, M. B., Hartley, G. S. and West, T. F., (1987) Chemicals for Crop Improvement and Pest Management, Pregaman.

    20

  • 7. Coping, L. G. and Hewitt, H. G., (1998) Chemistry and Mode of Action of Crop Protection Agents, RCS. 8. Evangelou, V. P., (1998) Environmental soil & water Chemistry. Principle and Applications, John Wiley. 9. Harrison, R. M., (1999) Understanding our Environment. An introduction to Environmental Chemistry and Pollution, RSC.

    Jump to Main Page

    21

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43364 Course title : Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit the student should be able to;

    explain inorganic spectra and use spectroscopic data in elucidating structures of inorganic compounds explain and postulate reaction mechanisms for organometallic reactions using the knowledge of

    transition metal based organic compounds describe bioinorganic materials and their functions in biological systems postulate structures of cluster compounds and thereby predict properties of such compounds describe structural features of inorganic polymers and their relevance to structural properties of these

    compounds.

    Course content: Spectroscopic methods (15 L) Principles of NMR (19F, 31P, 13C, 14N and 11B), ESR, pulse NMR, spin lattice relaxation time, variable temperature NMR, NQR, Mossbaur spectroscopic techniques and their applications in structural elucidation of inorganic and organometallic compounds. Organometallic chemistry (15 h) Formal oxidation state and d electron configurations, 18 electron rule, classification of ligands, metal ligand bonding, survey of organometallic complexes according to ligand reactivity patterns, ligand substitution, oxidative addition, reductive elimination, insertion, hydride elimination, nucleophilic and electrophilic attack on coordination ligands, homogeneous catalysts. Bio inorganic chemistry (10 h) Metals in biological systems, metalloenzymes, dinitrogen carriers, biological redox reactions, distribution and functions of metals, metal induced toxicity and chelation therapy, environmental bioinorganic chemistry. Structural chemistry (10 h) - Electron deficient compounds; beryllium and aluminium compounds, polymerization through bridging. Chemistry of boron compounds; boron hydrides, borides and carboranes; structure, nomenclature, styx analysis, properties, reactions. Metal clusters; quadruple bond, binuclear to polynuclear metal clusters, structure elucidation methods. Inorganic polymers (10 h) Zeolites, silicones, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes; structure, properties, preparation, characterization and applications. Method of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination Recommended reading: 1. Friebolin, H., (1991) Basic one and two dimension NMR spectroscopy, VCH. 2. Ayscough, P. B., (1967) Electron spin resonance in chemistry, Methu. 3. Bancroft, G. N., (1973) Mossbauer spectroscopy, McGraw Hill. 4. Parkins and Poller., (1986) An introduction to Organometallic Chemistry: Hampshire, McMillan. 5. Sharpe, A .G., (2005) Inorganic Chemistry, Pearson 6. Cotton,F.A., Wilkinson, G.,(1999) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Wiley 7. Kaim, W and Schwerderski, B., (1994) Bioinorganic Chemistry- Inorganic elements in the Chemistry of Life

    John Wiley 8. Schubert, U. and Husong, N., (2000) Synthesis of Inorganic Material VCH.

    Jump to Main Page

    22

  • Jump to Main PageCourse code : CHEM 43374 Course title : Advanced Organic Chemistry II Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit the student should be able to;

    explain the reactivity and major synthetic pathways of heterocyclic compounds identify different stereochemical representations and describe the reactions and synthesis of mono- and

    disaccharides explain various molecular recognition mechanisms in different functional processes explain the interactions between electromagnetic radiations and matter and mechanisms that control

    these interactions describe the contemporary use of natural products describe commercially important terpenoids and their possible use and explain the interconnectivity of

    biosynthetic pathways of terpenes, steroids and alkaloids Course content: Advanced heterocyclic compounds (10 h) Reactions and synthesis of five membered heterocyclic compounds with one hetero atoms and two heteroatoms; electrophilic reactions on hetero atom (protonation, nitration, sulfonation, amination, halogenation, alkylation, acylation), electrophilic substitution reactions on carbon atom (nitration, sulfonation, halogenation), reactions with nucleophiles (hydride transfer, displacement of good leaving group), metallation and reactions with electrophiles, Palladium catalyzed coupling reactions, radical reactions, carbonyl condensation type reactions; Knorr synthesis, Paar-Knorr synthesis. Cyclo additions nitrene insertion; pyridines, pyridones, alkylpyridines, quaternary pyridinium salts, pyridine N-oxides, quinolenes, isoqunolenes, pyrrole, pyrylium ions, pyrones, diazenes, indoles, thiophenes, oxithiophenes, furans, 1,3-azoles. Carbohydrates (10 h) Stereochemistry of carbohydrates; Fischer projections, Haworth formulae, D & L and R/S nomenclature. Conformational analysis; anomeric and reverse anomeric effects, preferred conformations of pyranoses. Reactions at anomeric center; formation and hydrolysis of glycosides. Reactions of hydroxyl groups; ethers, esters, blocking groups. Reaction sat non-anomeric carbon atoms; nucleophillic displacement of leaving groups, ring opening reactions, amino, thio and de-oxy sugars. Synthesis of monosaccharides and disaccharides, structure determination of carbohydrates. Supramolecular chemistry (10 h) Concepts and language of supramolecular chemistry. Non-covalent bonds involved in supramolecular complexes; hydrogen bonding, electrostatic forces, - stacking interactions, Van derWaals bonds, hydrophobic / solvophobic forces. Introduction to molecular recognition; recognition, information, complementarity, molecular receptors and substrates. Supramolecular reactivity and catalysis and transport processes and carrier design (ionophores), cations, anions and neutral molecules binding hosts (crown ethers, cryptands, spherands) and spherical and tetrahedral recognition shown by these hosts, coreceptor molecules and multiple recognition (dinuclear and polynuclear metal ion cryptates, recognition of molecular length by ditopic coreceptors, heterotopic coreceptors and metalloreceptors). Organic photochemistry (10 h) Photodissociation; photodissociation of carbonyl compounds, photochemical chlorination of methane. Fundamental photochemistry of simple carbonyl compounds and enones; excited states of the carbonyl group, intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen abstraction, photochemical additions to alkenes and alkynes with and without sensitizers-oxetane formation. Photochemistry of simple olefins, polyenes and aromatic compounds; geometrical isomerisation, cycloaddition of non-conjugated alkenes, Zimmerman rearrangement, photoisomerisation of benzavalene, fulvalene, Dewar benzene and prismane intermediates. Applications of photochemistry; photochromism, simple, photochemistry of vision. Natural products (20 h) Natural products of contemporary interests, terpenes and their characteristics, synthesis and uses of commertially important monotepenes, important sesquiterpenes, dipetepenoids, triperpenoids, biological function of tri terpenoid and steroids. Modern methodologies in isolation of natural products; oleoresins & supercritical extractions etc. Steroids; nomenclature and medicinal uses of bile acids, plant sterols, cardiac glycosides, vitamins, steroid hormones, chemistry and interconnectivity of biosynthetic pathways of key intermediates, monoterpenes via mavolonic acid pathway, biosynthesis of di and tri terpenoids, biosynthesis of squalene via cyclopropane. Elucidation of biosynthetic pathways; feeding experiments, biosynthesis of selected examples of steroids.

    23

  • Alkaloids; Major reactions in biosynthesis (oxidative deamination, decarboxylation, transamination, reductive amination etc.), alkaloid methylation patterns, origin of heterocyclic rings from specific amino acids, biosynthesis and pharmacognostic studies of pyridine, piperidine, tropane, imidazole, isoquinoline, quinoline , indole, purine, steroidal , diterpene and phenethylamine groups. Other bioactive natural products; selected examples for biosynthesis of natural products using polyketide pathway; anticancer compounds, macrolide antibiotics, antioxidants, anti AIDS agents and immunostimulants. Method of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination Recommended reading:

    1. Dewick, P. M., (2000) Medicinal Natural Products: A Biosynthetic Approach, John Wiley. 2. Mothes, K., Schutte, H.R. and Luckner, M., (1985) Biochemistry of alkaloids, VCH 3. Mann J, (1995) Chemical Aspects of Biosynthesis Oxford Chemistry Primers 4. Bohl, M. and Duax, W. L., (2000) Molecular structure and biological activity of steroids, CRC press 5. Robyt, J.F., (1998) Essentials of Carbohydrate Chemistry, Springer 6. Steed J.W., Atwood J.L., (2000) Supramolecular Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons 7. Lehn J.M., (1995) Supramolecular Chemistry, Concepts and Perspectives, VCH. 8. Nicholas J. T., (1991) Modern Molecular Photochemistry, University Science Books. 9. Coyle, J. D., (1986) Introduction to Organic Photochemistry, John Wiley.

    Jump to Main Page

    24

    http://www.uscibooks.com/turro.htmhttp://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471909750.html

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43384 Course title : Advanced Physical Chemistry II Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit the student should be able to;

    use the knowledge in fundamentals of electrochemistry for interpretation of equilibrium and non equilibrium electrochemical processes and apply the knowledge on industries base on electrochemistry phenomena

    apply the fundamentals of rotational, vibrational and Raman spectroscopy to diatomic and poly atomic molecules and calculate basic structural parameters.

    apply the basic principles of photochemistry and explain examples of the effects of photochemistry in nature and in various industrial applications.

    visualise molecular structure and built optimised molecular model with computers. describe the physical structure of solid surfaces and the behavior of gases on adsorption at surfaces. demonstrate knowledge of quantitative and qualitative surface analysis techniques.

    of corrosion, Pourbaix rrosion control methods.

    and other related techniques.

    els of polyatomic

    ls, lings, vibration of polyatomic molecules.

    le aman spectroscopy; rotational and vibrational Raman spectra.

    s: uantum yield, lifetime, quenching, Stern-Volmer plots; lasers, chemiluminescence, vision and photoimaging.

    atalysis; Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, Ely-Rideal mechanism, supported catalysts, olloid systems

    tions, ab-initio calculation f molecular properties, Basics of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations.

    ethod of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials.

    ssessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination

    Course content: Electrochemistry (15 h) Ionsolvent interaction; models for ionsolvent interactions, solvation enthalpy, entropy and free energy. Ion-ion interaction; Debye-Huckel theory for mean activity coefficients of electrolytes. Electro-capillary phenomenon and model for the charge distribution at the electrodeelectrolyte interface. Kinetics of electrode reactions; ButlerVolmer formalism. Tafel relation ship. Corrosion of metals; thermodynamics and kineticsand Evans diagrams, corrosion current and corrosion potential, coElectro-technology; electroplatingMolecular spectroscopy (15 h) Rotational spectroscopy; rigid rotor, rotational spectra of diatomic molecules, rotation levmolecules: spherical, symmetric, and asymmetric tops, spectral line widths and intensities. Vibrational spectroscopy; vibration of diatomic molecules. harmonic and anharmonic oscillator, fundamentaovertones, combination bands, hot bands, vibrational-rotational coupVibrational and rotational fine structure, FranckCondon principR Photochemistry (10 h) Basic principles of photochemistry; photophysical processes and photodissociation, absorption and emission of radiation; selection rules of electronic excitation, Jablonski diagram, singlet and triplet states, fluorescence and phosphorescence, intersystem crossing, radiative and non radiative decays; kinetics of photophysical processeq Surface & colloid chemistry (10 h) Adsorption & desorption at surfaces, adsorption isotherms and desorption kinetics, Surface analysis; pumping systems; ultra high vacuum, photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, laser induced desorption, electron energy loss spectroscopy, reflectance IR spectroscopy. Chemical bonding and chemical reactions at surfaces; heterogeneous cc Theoretical and computational chemistry (10 h) Quantum mechanical methods for treating molecules, basis sets, Hartree-Fock calculao M A

    25

  • Rec m

    2. 93) Electrode Kinetics for Chemists, Chemical Engineers, and Materials Scientists,

    shers Plenum.

    al consultancy. s

    om ended reading: 1. Donald, T.S., Andrzej, S., Julian, L.R. Jr., (1995) Electrochemistry for Chemists, John Wiley.

    Eliezer, G., (19Wiley-VCH.

    3. Nestor, P., (2004), Electrochemistry & Corrosion, Kluwer Academic Publi . 4. Bockris, J. O. M. and Reddy, A. K. N. (1973), Modern Electrochemistry, Vol 1 and 2,5. Pletcher, D. (1991) A First Course in Electrode Processes, Electrochemic6. Birdi, K.S., ((1997) Handbook of Surface and colloid chemistry, CRC Pres7. Grant, G. H., Richards, W. G., (2004) Computational Chemistry, Oxford. 8. Banwell, C. N., (1983) Fundamentals of Molecular Spectroscopy, McGraw Hill.

    y. , Oxford.

    11. Atkins, P. W., (2006) Physical Chemistry, Oxford.

    9. Hollas, J. M., (1998) High Resolution Spectroscopy, John Wile10. Wayne, C. E., Wayne, R. P., (1996) Photochemistry

    Jump to Main Page

    26

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43394 Course title : Materials Chemistry Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit the student should be able to;

    demonstrate the knowledge of industrially important polymers determine structure-property relationships of polymers and demonstrate understanding of their

    environmental effects describe how liquid crystal relates to other states of matter and the behavior of liquids crystals

    in an electric field give an overview of how an LC panel works describe processing and utilization of various materials and minerals analyze critically regarding the application and development of physical and chemical proceeding

    methods of related materials. Course content: Polymers (20 h) Brief overview of polymer synthesis, characterization and properties. Industrially important polymers; their synthesis and structure-property relationship. Environmental effects of polymers; degradation and stabilization. Minerals (10 h) Chemistry and identification of mineral resources: ores and deposits, physiochemical properties and uses of minerals and deposits of commercial values: mineral sands, appetite, dolomite, graphite, quartz and mica, introduction to extraction of metals such as titanium, iron, aluminium, and magnesium, inorganic pigments and ceramics. Metallurgy (10 h) Mineral processing methods such as magnetic, electrical, gravitational and floatation techniques, pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, metallic bonding, alloys and steel, Ellingham diagrams, phase diagrams and related chemical properties, testing methods for metals and alloys. Novel Materials (20 h) Structure, properties, characterization and applications of nematic, smectic, discotic liquid crystals. Optical, electronic and magnetic materials. Method of teaching and learning: A combination of lectures and tutorials. Assessment: Continuous assessment and/or end of course unit examination Recommended reading: 1. Ravve, A., (1995) Principles of Polymer Chemistry, Plenum. 2. Billmeyer, F. W., (1984) Textbook of Polymer Science, John Wiley. 3. Seymour, R.D. and Carraher Jr. E.R., (1992) Polymer Chemistry; An Intorduction, Marcel Dekker

    Inc., New York 4. Turback, E. J. and Lutgens, F. K., (1999) An Introduction to Physical Geology, Merrill. 5. Collings, P.J., (2000) Liquid Crystals, Princeton University Press. 7. Barry A. Wills., (2007) Mineral Processing Technology, Pergamon Press

    Jump to Main Page

    27

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43406 Course title : Research project-Dissertation Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit the student should be able to;

    demonstrate skills to plan and carryout a research project on chemistry, according to the scientific methods, accumulate and analyze experimental data, interpret and report the results in a scientific manner and to present and defend findings to the scientific community.

    Course content: A research project in chemistry or in a related area of chemistry Method of teaching and learning: Literature survey, laboratory and/or field work, data analysis and interpretation, dissertation, presentations. Assessment: Continuous assessments; dissertation, progress reports, presentations, viva - voce examination.

    Jump to Main Page

    28

  • Jump to Main Page Course code : CHEM 43411 Course title : Seminar Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of the course unit, the student should be able to:

    develop knowledge and presentation skills in delivering a scientific seminar on a selected topic.

    Course content: Search, select and gather information on a given topic based on a review article selected by an academic staff member. Make a suitable presentation and present to an audience of academics. Method of teaching and learning: Self study, small group discussion and through feedback from appointed academic staff member. Assessment: Seminar presentation and oral examination Recommended reading: A review article identified by a senior academic staff member and other related literature.

    Jump to Main Page

    29

    Course code : CHEM 43214Course code : CHEM 43224 Course code : CHEM 43234Course code : CHEM 43244Course code : CHEM 43254Course code : CHEM 43262Course code : CHEM 43272Course code : CHEM 43282 Course code : CHEM 43292Course code : CHEM 43302Course code : CHEM 43312Course code : CHEM 43323Course code : CHEM 43332 (The credits earned will not be counted for the GPA)Course code : CHEM 43344Course code : CHEM 43354Course code : CHEM 43364Course code : CHEM 43374Course code : CHEM 43384Course code : CHEM 43394Course code : CHEM 43406Course code : CHEM 43411

of 29/29
Subject: Chemistry (CHEM) Special Course Units Status CHEM 43214 Advanced Analytical Chemistry C CHEM 43224 Advanced Biochemistry I C CHEM 43234 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I C CHEM 43244 Advanced Organic Chemistry I C CHEM 43254 Advanced Physical Chemistry I C CHEM 43262 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory C CHEM 43272 Biochemistry Laboratory C CHEM 43282 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory C CHEM 43292 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory C CHEM 43302 Organic Chemistry Laboratory C CHEM 43312 Physical Chemistry Laboratory C CHEM 43323 Recent Advances in Chemistry C Year3 CHEM 43332 Industrial / Professional Placement 1 C CHEM 43344 Advanced Biochemistry II C CHEM 43354 Advanced Environmental Chemistry C CHEM 43364 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II C CHEM 43374 Advanced Organic Chemistry II C CHEM 43384 Advanced Physical Chemistry II C CHEM 43394 Materials Chemistry C CHEM 43406 Research Project - Dissertation C Year 4 CHEM 43411 Seminar C 1 Credits not counted for the GPA calculation. 1
Embed Size (px)
Recommended