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Tao of I Ching(Taoism)Jou Tsung Hwa

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I

THE TAO O F CHIN G Way to Divinatio nJou, Tsung Hwa .

Tai Chi Foundation

II

Dedicated to : Tai Chi FoundationAll rights reserved .

First Printing in Taiwan March 198 3 Third Printing in Taiwan January 198 6 Fifth Printing in Taiwan December 199 1 Sixth Printing June 2000 ISBN 0-8048-1423- 1 Published b y Tai Chi Foundatio n 7199 E . Shea Blvd . Ste 109-225 Scottsdale, AZ 85254

IV

Contents

1

by Jou, Tsung Hwa

THE TAO SERIE S

1 . The Tao of Tai Chi Chua n Way to Rejuvenatio n Third revised edition is availabl e

2. The Tao of Meditatio n Way to Enlightenmen t Shows you how to open your mind an d spirit . For the frist time in English, the Wa y to enlightenmen t

CONTENTS INTRODUCTION Chapter One : RAISING THE VEIL OF MYSTER Y 1 -1 Returning to the Roots 1 -2 Ancient Chinese Wisdom 1 -3 The Four Symbols

1 7

15 18 23 38

1-4 The Eight Trigrams : Heaven, Earth and Humanity 2 73. The Tao of I Chin g Way to Divinatio n A new and refreshing way to understand an d utilize the I Ching .

1-5 The Structure of the I Ching Chapter Two : THE MIRACLE OF DIVINATION 2-1 The Rationale for Divination 2-2 The Traditional Approach 2-3 The Master-key to Sound Judgment 2-4 The Plum Flower Mind I Ching

55 62 69 86

More informations on page 405, 406, 407 and 408 .

2

The Tao Of 1-Ching 2-5 The Hu Tien Method : Shao's marvelous Pillow 2-6 The Hsien Tien Method : Entering the Fourth Dimension 94 104 13 . RA 14 . 11 3 15 . Gidn Heaven - -_ Kun Earth = Tim First difficulty _ Meng Covering Waiting Song Lawsuit 11 7 16 . 17 . 18 . 19 . 20 . 21 . 22. 23 . 24. 25. 26 . 27 . -

Contents

3

- - TOngre'n Fellowship D'y6u Great possession Qian Modesty Yu Joy = Sul -- Following GU Decay I Lin Approach Guan Observation Heshi . Bite through - - Pen Grace

169 174 179

Chapter Three : THE CRADLE OF CHINESE CULTURE 3-1 How to Read the 64 Hexagrams 3-2 Part I 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. /j

/h

184 18 8 19 2 19 6 20 0 20 4 20 9 21 3 21 7 22 1 22 5 22 9

122 1 16 130 13 4 139

-

-

Rt _ _ Shi '- Army == .L - - Bi Loyalty Xiaox Small saving Lu' Stepping Tai -- Positive

14 3 14 7 15 1 15 5 1 59 164

*q

- _ _

Bao Peeling

.... _ - - Fu Return = = Wwdng Innocence Dax Great saving Yi -- Jaws

10. 11. 12 .

EE

Negative

4 .3a

The Tao Of I-Ching

Contents

5

28 . 29 . 30.

DAgub Great passing Kan Water

23 4 23 8 24 2

42. 43 . 44. 45.

==

- Increase Kui Decision GO-u Meeting

29 6 30 0

Nt - - Li Fire Hexagram 31-6 4 Xian Influence _ Heng Constancy

30 5 31 0 31 5 31 9

3-3 Part II 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39 . 40. 41.

= 1-f-

Cal Gathering Shag -- Ascending Kan Oppression Jing Well

24 6 25 0 25 4 25 8

46.

47. _ 12 48. 49. 50. - -

- - Tun Yielding Dazhuing Great vigor 2x _ _ 1E1 )in Advancing - - Mingyi Darkening Jiaren Family Kui Opposition CU Limping Jie Loosening Sun Decrease

32 4 32 9 33 4 33 9 344

Revolution Ding Caldron

26 3 26 8 27 3 27 7 28 2 28 6 291

Zhen Thunder = Yin Mountain 53. 54. 55. 56. Jian Gradually Guimei Married sister Feng Prosperity Lu Traveler

34 9 354 35 9 364

6

The Tao Of I-Chin g

Introduction

7

57 .

Sun Wind

36 8

58 .

Dui Lake

37 3

59 .

Huan Dispersion

37 7

60 .

_

Ji Bamboo joint Zhongf Central sincerity

38 2

61 .

't'

r

38 6

62 . d ~

Xiaoguo

Small passing

39 1

63 .

=

Jiji Finished

39 6 It is my intention that this book will encourage students to pursue a course of self-development and to study life and nature, as it was th e pursuit and study of these things that led to the creation of the I Chin g in the first place . Most English translations of the I Ching emphasiz e academic approach and therefore highlight the Judgments of the 6 4 hexagrams and their individual lines or Yao . In such books, divination i s simplistically explained and the student uses coins or yarrow stalks t o derive a reading consisting of general advice with respect to the hexagram s and lines selected . Although students using the I Ching in such a manner may receiv e useful information and advice, the reading is very often general an d composed of archaic language . More often, students are left with doubt s regarding proper interpretation and cannot use their own intelligenc e to determine the true meaning . In addition, serious students hav e unanswered questions, such as the following : "How were the hexagrams derived and their meanin g determined ? What is Yin and Yang and what relation do these concepts have to the hexagrams ?

64 .

Weiji Unfinished

400

8

The Tao Of 1-Ching Why does divination work and for what purpose ? What relation does the I Ching have to my life ? How can I learn to divinate better? "

Introduction

9

Finally, the student puts all of his or her questions together an d summarizes as follows : "The I Ching claims to be derived from nature in the simplest way , yet I do not find it simple . If the principles are simple, why can I no t use the same principles to understand my life better? " Anyone who ha s encountered these roadblocks and asked these questions will find th e answers in this book . I would like to give some hints here on th e approach to understanding the I Ching that will be most effective . First in order to understand the I Ching, we must be free of a scientific or regimented type of thinking . Taoist philosophy, in general , and the I Ching, particularly, are very different from modern science . The philosophy of the I Ching goes beyond the scope of "science ." The goa l of the traditional scientist is to achieve standards of knowledge and then expand upon those standards . To standardize, the scientist uses a "scientific method ." That which cannot be measured, demonstrated i n rigidly controlled experiments, or proven by meticulous observatio n cannot be used by the scientist to expand his knowledge . A scientifi c study is a careful exploration of what is popularly called the "fiv e senses ." Through ingenuity, a scientist may find it possible to measur e the "invisible," however, even this must be done with tools that ar e perceived by the five senses . Taoism, like science, approaches life with this type of curiosit y and desire for knowledge, but it goes beyond the limits of scientifi c standardization . Taoism recognizes that there is no single standard, of a scientific sort, for some of the most important and humanly meaningfu l things in life . The I Ching describes spheres that are a great deal mor e intangible than the five senses ; they are most often referred to as the "mental" or "spiritual". The I Ching reveals the great wisdom and understanding of th e ancient Chinese philosophers . They looked at the world around the m and sought to understand why and how change occurs . They did no t look beyond reality or ascribe all events to the "hand of God . " Instead, they found enlightenment through the very practical process of examining the concepts of space and time.

By understanding time and the cycle of life, they could explain al l events . Because they did not assume that everything was caused by God , they sought to find the explanation of change in the person, thing, o r event itself. Second, the I Ching deals with that which is intangible . Therefore , the mental and spiritual preoccupation of the individual using the I Ching will necessarily influence the meaning to be derived . In studyin g the I Ching's methods of interpreting life, one must keep this in mind . For example, suppose two people look at the full moon and appreciat e the atmosphere and energy it creates . Although one person may feel awe d by a sense of the beauty and peace and feel a boundless gratitude an d happiness towards life ; another person may appreciate the power of th e moon, but be moved to misery and tears . Why? He may be saddene d by the memory of a friend that died and how they had once enjoye d full moon evenings together . Everything has this quality . A man ma y lose all of his possessions and laugh carelessly, only because he has jus t come from the doctor and learned that he does not have a fatal diseas e after all . Another man may cry at good luck because the bad luck tha t preceded has devastated him . Because of this fundamental fact , whenever there is an event, one must relate it to the existing situatio n in a thorough way to truly understand its meaning . The same principle is true for the divination of Yin and Yang lines . Consider the following simple divination : a broken line is drawn (yin) , meaning presently unfavorable, and a solid line is drawn (yang) meanin g very active right now, a time to move . One person may draw yang an d interpret it to mean "it is time to ask the boss for a raise ." Anothe r person may draw yang and decide that it is finally the right time for hi m to climb that mountain in China he had alway wanted to try . Anothe r person may draw yang and uses it for guidance in a major busines s decision . Thus, the same simple line has given self-guidance to thre e people in totally different situations . The philosophy of the I Ching is that this multiplicity and variety is a natural part of life, and that if w e want to learn to live more effectively, we need only study the I Chin g and work with it. The third point, a

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