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Teaching Grammar and Mechanics Table of Contents Sections Page Numbers 1. Introduction 1—2 2. Learn How to Teach This Program in 10 Minutes 3—4 3. Sequence of Instruction: Grammar and Mechanics Worksheets, 5—9 Sentence Lifting 4. TGM Grammar Assessment: Parts of Speech and Essential Grammar 10—19 Directions, Mastery Criteria, and Answers Assessment Matrix 4. TGM Mechanics Assessment: Punctuation and Capitalization 20—24 Directions, Mastery Criteria, and Answers Assessment Matrix 5. TGM Parts of Speech and TGM Grammar Worksheets 25—69 6. TGM Mechanics Worksheets 73—108 7. TGM Sentence Lifting 109—238 Appendix: Student Resources A. Parts of Speech 239 B. Parts of Speech Rap 240 C. Irregular Verbs 241 D. Grammatical Sentence Openers 242—243 E. The Mechanics Rules That Really Work 244 F. The Spelling Rules That Really Work 245
Transcript
Page 1: Teaching Grammar and Mechanics Table of Contentscustom.buyitsellit.com/1268/Teaching Grammar and Mechanics Sample… · Grammar Toolkit ©2009 Pennington Publishing ... (a, an, and

Teaching Grammar and Mechanics

Table of Contents

Sections Page Numbers

1. Introduction 1—2

2. Learn How to Teach This Program in 10 Minutes 3—4

3. Sequence of Instruction: Grammar and Mechanics Worksheets, 5—9

Sentence Lifting

4. TGM Grammar Assessment: Parts of Speech and Essential Grammar 10—19

Directions, Mastery Criteria, and Answers

Assessment Matrix

4. TGM Mechanics Assessment: Punctuation and Capitalization 20—24

Directions, Mastery Criteria, and Answers

Assessment Matrix

5. TGM Parts of Speech and TGM Grammar Worksheets 25—69

6. TGM Mechanics Worksheets 73—108

7. TGM Sentence Lifting 109—238

Appendix: Student Resources

A. Parts of Speech 239

B. Parts of Speech Rap 240

C. Irregular Verbs 241

D. Grammatical Sentence Openers 242—243

E. The Mechanics Rules That Really Work 244

F. The Spelling Rules That Really Work 245

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Grammar Toolkit ©2009 Pennington Publishing www.penningtonpublishing.com

Grammar Toolkit Table of Contents

Topic Pages

Introduction……………………………………………………………… 1-2

Learn How to Teach This Program in 10 Minutes………………………. 3

Sequence of Instruction………………………………………………….. 4

Parts of Speech #1 Common Nouns…………………………. 5

#2 Proper Nouns…………………………….. 6

#3 Pronouns…………………………………. 7

#4 Adjectives………………………………… 8

#5 Verbs……………………………………… 9

#6 Adverbs…………………………………… 10

#7 Prepositions………………………………. 11

#8 Conjunctions……………………………… 12

Answers………………………………………………………………….. 13

Subject / Predicate #9 Simple Subject……………………………. 14

#10 Compound Subject……………………….. 15

#11 Simple Predicate…………………………. 16

#12 Compound Predicate……………………… 17

Answers………………………………………………………………….. 18

Sentence Structure #13 Simple Sentences…………………………. 19

#14 Compound Sentences…………………….. 20

#15 Complex Sentences………………………. 21

#16 Compound-Complex Sentences………….. 22

Answers………………………………………………………………….. 23

Fragments / Run-ons #17 Identifying Fragments……………………. 24

#18 Revising Fragments………………………. 25

#19 Identifying Run-Ons……………………… 26

#20 Revising Run-Ons………………………… 27

Answers………………………………………………………………….. 28

Pronouns #21 (Subject) Nominative Case……………….. 29

#22 Objective Case……………………………. 30

#23 Pronoun-Antecedents…………………….. 31

#24 Pronoun Pests…………………………….. 32

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Answers………………………………………………………………….. 33

Subject-Verb #25 Pronoun-Base Form Verb………………… 34

Agreement #26 Pronoun-Present Participle Verb Agreement 35

#27 Pronoun-Past Tense Verb Agreement…….. 36

#28 Pronoun-Past Participle Verb Agreement…. 37

Answers………………………………………………………………….. 38

Comparative #29 The Short Comparative Modifiers…………. 39

Modifiers #30 The Short Superlative Modifiers…………... 40

#31 The Long and __ly Comparative Modifiers 41

#32 The Long and __ly Superlative Modifiers 42

Answers………………………………………………………………….. 43

Verb Tense / Mood / #33 Present Tense Verbs……………………….. 44

Voice #34 Present Perfect Tense Verbs………………. 45

#35 Past Tense Verbs………………………….. 46

#36 Past Perfect Tense Verbs………………….. 47

#37 Future Tense Verbs………………………… 48

#38 Future Perfect Verbs……………………….. 49

#39 Mood………………………………………. 50

#40 Voice………………………………………. 51

Answers…………………………………………………………………… 52

Simple Subjects…………………………………………………………… 53

Compound Subjects………………………………………………………. 54

Simple Predicates…………………………………………………………. 55

Compound Predicates……………………………………………………… 56

Simple Sentences………………………………………………………….. 57

Compound Sentences……………………………………………………… 58

Complex Sentences……………………………………………………….. 59

Compound-Complex Sentences…………………………………………… 60

Fragments…………………………………………………………………. 61-62

Run-On Sentences………………………………………………………… 63-64

Parts of Speech……………………………………………………………. 65

Parts of Speech Rap……………………………………………………….. 66

(Audio found on http://www.penningtonpublishing.com/blog)

Irregular Verbs……………………………………………………………. 67

Grammatical Sentence Openers…………………………………………… 68-69

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Grammar Worksheet #2 Proper Nouns Name ________________________

Definition: A proper noun is the name of a person, place, or thing. It can be acted upon and is

capitalized. A proper noun may be a single word, a group of words (with or without

abbreviations), or a hyphenated word.

Examples: Josh was honored person

at U.S. Memorial Auditorium place

with the Smith-Lee Award. thing

Writing Hints

Capitalize all words that make up proper nouns, except articles (a, an, and the),

prepositions, such as of, to, and from, and conjunctions, such as and, or, and but.

Practice

Circle the proper nouns in the following story. Make sure to circle all words belonging to each

proper noun.

John Francis left his home in Beatrice, Nebraska in 1941, shortly before the start of

World War II. Traveling first by bus to Chicago, he then boarded the Southwestern Chief to ride

to Los Angeles. At Grand Central Station, John met his sister, Jane, and immediately began

looking for part-time work and an apartment. He found employment at Blix Hardware on

Western Avenue and a room to rent in nearby South Hollywood.

When war was declared, John enlisted in the army and was stationed at Fort Ord. He

played trumpet in the Army Band and was promoted to the rank of Staff Sergeant. The United

States was fortunate to have so many young men, like John, serving their country.

After the war in 1945, John enrolled in the University of Southern California, paying his

tuition with money from the G.I. Bill. Graduating Cum Laude with degrees in Business and

Social Science, he continued to play trumpet in clubs all over Southern California. Upon

marrying Janice Jones, he took a job at California Federal Savings and Loan and was promoted

to Senior Vice-President. He and his wife raised two children, who both graduated from the

University of California at Los Angeles. John retired in 1980 to travel and play his trumpet.

Application

Compose your own sentence with person, place, and thing proper nouns.

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

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TGM Answers: Parts of Speech

#1 Parts of Speech Common Nouns

Practice: idea: friendship, self-image, freedom, self-confidence, world peace

person: teacher, fire-fighter, cousin, police officer, brother-in-law

place: mountain, neighborhood, country, football stadium, family room

thing: food, toy, rock, lamp stand, grandfather clock

#2 Parts of Speech Proper Nouns

Practice: John Francis, Beatrice, Nebraska, World War II, Chicago, Southwestern Chief, Los

Angeles, Grand Central Station, John, Jane, Blix Hardware, Western Avenue, South Hollywood,

John, Fort Ord, Army Band, Staff Sergeant, United States, John, John, University of Southern

California, G.I. Bill, Cum Laude, Business, Social Science, Southern California, Janice Jones,

California Federal Savings and Loan, Senior Vice-President, University of California at Los

Angeles, John

#3 Parts of Speech Pronouns

Practice: I, you, my, your, It, me, mine, yours, We their, They, us, ours, himself, them, She,

him, hers, her, he, his, theirs, its

#4 Parts of Speech Adjectives

Practice: How Many? twenty-story, most, dozen, few, thousands

Which One? these, that, this, those, certain

What Kind? juicier, muddy, navel, spicy, loud

#5 Parts of Speech Verbs

Practice: A, B, C, D, D, A, B, C, C, B, D, A

#6 Parts of Speech Adverbs

Practice: How: slowly, carefully, easily When: often, one o’clock, later

Where: everywhere, nearby, here What Degree: mostly, less, mainly

#7 Parts of Speech Prepositions

Practice: to [flag], of [United States], of [America], to [republic], for [which], under [God],

with [liberty], for [all], in [schools], throughout [America], over [heart], on [flag], to [country]

#8 Parts of Speech Conjunctions

Practice: Whenever C he walks or A runs, Mike either B brings water, or B he brings a sports

drink. If C he will be gone a long time, Mike carries both B a nutritious snack and B an energy

bar. He enjoys the exercise and A Nature, so A he tries to go three times each week.

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Subjects and Predicates Compound Predicate Name ________________________

Definition: The compound predicate consists of two or more connected verbs that act upon the

same subject of the sentence. These verbs do the work of the “do-er” or the “be-er” of the

sentence. The compound predicate shows a physical or mental action or it describes a state of

being. Examples: Michael fell and hurt his hand.

She had become and still remained a young lady.

They should have asked but then listened to me.

Writing Hints

To find the compound predicate, first identify the subject and ask “What?” The answer to this

question should be the predicate. A connecting word such as “and,” “or,” or “but” is usually

placed between the verbs.

Using compound predicates can help your writing become more concise (to express much in a

few words), clear, and readable.

Example: Instead of the following: Rob studied the textbook for the exam. Then, he

practiced the vocabulary for the exam. After practicing the vocabulary, he memorized the

poem—all to prepare for the exam. Try a compound predicate such as this: Rob studied

the textbook, practiced the vocabulary, and memorized the poem to prepare for the exam.

Practice

• Underline the subjects and circle the compound predicates found in the story below.

Of all the books by Mark Twain, two works stand out and are remembered as his best. Twain’s

description of life as a riverboat captain in Life on the Mississippi both entertains and informs.

After reading this book, one will learn what the phrase “Mark Twain” means. A second novel,

Huckleberry Finn, teaches and preaches about how badly people can treat each other. The

book’s hero, Huck Finn, wrestles with and eventually triumphs over the evils of slavery.

• Re-Write the following sentences into one sentence with a compound predicate.

Debbie walked into the room. Next, she sat down in the chair. Then, she heaved a sigh of relief.

_____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Application

Compose your own sentence with a compound predicate.

______________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

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Parts of Speech

1. A common noun is a person, place, idea, or thing. It can be acted upon and is capitalized only

at the start of a sentence. It can be a single word, a group of words, or a hyphenated word.

Examples: The girl was learning to drive person

next to the ocean; place

it takes self-control idea

to earn a driver’s license. thing

2. A proper noun is the name of a person, place, or thing. It can be acted upon and is

capitalized. It may be a single word, a group of words (with or without abbreviations), or a

hyphenated word.

Examples: Josh was honored person

at U.S. Memorial Auditorium place

with the Smith-Lee Award. thing

3. A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun(s).

Examples: Hello. This is she.

Is it her basket?

4. An adjective describes a proper noun, a common noun, or a pronoun by describing how many,

what kind, or which one.

Examples: The five teammates How Many?

took the tiring trip What Kind?

to that arena across town. Which One?

5. A verb shows a physical or mental action or it describes a state of being.

Examples: She works long hours, physical action

but knows that mental action

there is more to life than work. state of being

6. An adverb describes a verb, an adjective, or another adverb by describing how, when, where,

or what degree.

Examples: Trey walked slowly

because he had arrived early

to the place where

he knew very well his entire future could be decided.

7. A preposition is a word that has a relationship with a common noun, a proper noun, or a

pronoun. The preposition is always part of a phrase comes and comes before its object. The

preposition asks “What?” and the object provides the answer.

Examples: The politician voted against the law against what? …the law

through the secret ballot. through what? …the secret ballot

8. A conjunction joins words, phrases, or clauses together. There are three kinds:

� Coordinating conjunctions connect words, phrases, or clauses used in the same way.

Example: The student tries, but does not always succeed.

� Correlative conjunctions are paired conjunctions that connect words, phrases, or clauses used

in the same way.

Example: Either you must tell the police, or I will.

� Subordinating conjunctions come at the beginning of adverb clauses. These clauses restrict

the meaning of the rest of the sentence.

Example: Although he is often late, Ryan shows up to work every day.

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Parts of Speech Rap

A proper noun is capitalized

to give a name to a person, place, or thing.

A common noun is categorized

as an idea, person, place, or thing.

A pronoun is used to take their place

in the subject or object case.

An adjective will make them define

How Many, Which One, or What Kind.

A verb can mentally or physically act

or states what a subject is to be.

An adverb describes an adjective, adverb, or verb

with How, When, Where, or What Degree.

A conjunction uses FANBOYS to coordinate

or connects ideas to subordinate.

A preposition shows a relationship

between the word and a pronoun or a noun.

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Irregular Verbs

Common Irregular Verb Forms

Present Past Past Participle

(has, have, had)

am was been

are were been

begin began began

blow blew blown

break broke broken

bring brought brought

catch caught caught

choose chose chosen

come came come

do did done

draw drew drawn

drink drank drunk

drive drove driven

eat ate eaten

fall fell fallen

feed fed fed

fly flew flown

forget forgot forgotten

get got got or gotten

give gave given

go went gone

grow grew grown

has had had

hear heard heard

hide hide hidden

is was has been

keep kept kept

know knew known

lay laid laid

lie lay lain

ride rode ridden

ring rang rung

rise rose risen

see saw seen

sing sang sung

speak spoke spoken

stand stood stood

take took taken

throw threw thrown

write wrote written

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Grammatical Sentence Openers

� Prepositional Phrase

Start with a phrase beginning with one of these common prepositions:

aboard, about, above, according to, across, after, against, along, among, around, as, as to,

aside from, at, because of, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, between, beyond, by,

despite, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, instead of, into, in addition to, in place of,

in spite of, like, near, next to, of, off, on, on account of, onto, outside, out of, over, regardless

of, since, through, throughout, to, toward, under, underneath, until, up, upon, with, within,

without, but when it means "except," and past when it means "by."

Place a comma after a prepositional phrase that begins a sentence when a noun immediately

follows.

Example

Behind the cabinet, he found the missing watch

� Adjective

Start with a word, phrase, or clause that describes a noun or pronoun. Place a comma after an

adjective or adjective phrase sentence opener.

Examples

Angry, the neighbor refused to leave.

Happy as always, the child played in the park.

� Adverb

Start with a word, phrase, or clause that answers these questions: Where? When? Why?

How? How much? or How often? Many adverbs end in __ly. Usually place a comma after an

adverb sentence opener if the adverb is emphasized. Always place a comma after an

adverbial clause sentence opener.

Examples

Elsewhere, the flowers were blooming.

Everywhere that Mary went, the lamb was sure to go.

� Subordinating Conjunction

Start with after, although, as, as if, as long as, as much as, as soon as, as though, because,

before, even if, even though, how, if, in order that, once, since, so that, than, that, though,

unless, until, when, whenever, where, wherever, whether, or while. Place a comma after a

subordinate clause that the subordinating conjunction opens.

Example

Although better known for its winter activities, Lake Tahoe offers much during the summer.

� __ed or __en Verbs

Start with an __ed verb, acting as an adjective, when combined with a prepositional phrase,

or an __en verb, when combined with an adverb. Usually place a comma after the sentence

opener.

Examples

Frightened by the noise, I sat up straight in my bed.

Taken quickly, the pill did not dissolve for minutes.

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� To + Verb

Start with To and then add a verb, or start with To have and then add a verb. The verb

following To have frequently ends in __en or __ed. Place a comma after the sentence opener,

if a noun follows.

Examples To smile takes great effort.

To have broken the promise would have been terrible.

To play the game, Mark had to sign a contract.

� __ing Adjectives and Nouns

Start with an __ing word that acts as an adjective. Usually place a comma after the sentence

opener. Start with an __ing word that acts as a noun. Usually do not place a comma after the

sentence opener.

Examples (Adjective) Falling rapidly, the climber hopes the rope will hold.

(Noun) Tasting the sauce makes them hungry for dinner.

� Having Adjectives and Nouns

Start with Having and then add a verb that ends in __en or __ed to act as an adjective or a

noun, referring to something that happened in the past. Usually place a comma after the

sentence opener.

Example (Adjective) Having listened to his teacher, the student knew how to study.

(Noun) Having beaten around the bush, the worker avoided the problem.

� Noun Clause

Start with a group of words that acts as the subject of a sentence beginning with: How,

However, What, Whatever, When, Whenever, Where, Wherever, Which, Whichever, Who,

Whoever, or Whomever. Usually place a comma after the sentence opener.

Example However the students answered, the scores were marked wrong.

� Apposition

Start with an appositive. Appositives are nouns or pronouns, used as single words or in a

group of words, to define or explain nouns or pronouns that come before. When used as part

of a person’s name or as a title, they require no punctuation. Otherwise, commas, dashes, or

parentheses are used to set apart the apposition.

Example

Peter the Great, trained in European customs, expanded the Russian Empire.

� Direct Object

Start with a direct object. A direct object is the “whom” or “what” of a sentence and receives

the action. It is not the predicate—which does the action. No commas follow the sentence

opener.

Example

Perfect relaxation she promised for Laura’s next vacation.

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Sentence Lifting

Sentence Lifting is a whole class instructional activity that takes 15 minutes to complete

and is designed to be used twice per week. This activity will help introduce or reinforce

mechanics, spelling, and grammar skills. Sentence Listing uses both error analysis and sentence

modeling to teach these skills. The mechanics and grammar skills complement the Grammar

and Mechanics Worksheets, found in Teaching Grammar and Mechanics. The spelling skills

emphasize the spelling rules found in the companion work, Teaching Spelling and Vocabulary.

1. Make overhead transparencies of the Sentence Lifting pages. Of course, you can use the

board, poster paper, an LCD or opaque projector instead of the overhead.

2. From any class readings and your students’ written work, keep a notepad handy to copy down

sentences to serve as a models of exceptional mechanics, spelling, or grammar. Write down one

of these sentences in the appropriate category on the transparency with an erasable marker.

3. Copy, run-off, and distribute the Sentence Lifting Worksheets (copy follows). After the first

worksheet, older students can certainly use their own binder paper to replicate these worksheets.

4. Display the Sentence Lifting overhead transparency, and read the mechanics sentence aloud

exactly as written (including mistakes). Ask, “What do you see?” Encourage specific comments

about what is good and what needs revision in the sentence. Remind students to confine their

comments to the skills covered in that category. 5. Refer to the Sentence Lifting Teaching Tips and Answers on the Sentence Lifting Teacher

Resource Page to guide your discussion. Spend about three minutes discussing the mechanics

sentence. With an erasable marker, make editing marks and revisions on the mechanics sentence.

Also, write down any rules and examples that you wish to emphasize in a concise and

memorable form on the Rules Reminder section.

6. Instruct your students to write down all Rules Reminders in that column of the Sentence

Lifting Worksheet as you discuss the mechanics sentence. Students may choose to write down

examples, as well.

7. Spend the same amount of time (three minutes) discussing the spelling sentence and about

four minutes discussing the grammar sentence. Some sentences will take more time and some

will take less. Read and briefly emphasize what is exceptional about the model sentence, chosen

from your student writing.

8. Turn off the projector and dictate the three Dictations, found on the Sentence Lifting

Teacher Resource Page. Instruct your students to reference their Rules Reminders notes and

write these sentences in the Dictations column of their Sentence Lifting Worksheet. The

grammar dictation requires the students to adjust the sentence.

9. When finished, turn on the projector and display the Dictations on the Sentence Lifting

Teacher Resource Page transparency. Have the students proofread their own work, marking and

correcting any errors with a colored pen or pencil. Tell students that they will earn back points

for any of their errors, if they correct them.

10. Collect the Sentence Lifting Worksheets once a week to record student scores.

Mechanics Spelling Grammar

He spoke Spanish to the She was sickly, but still basickly The teacher remembered

indians. fit. I and Lewette and wanted

we to help.

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Sentence Lifting Worksheet Name _______________________

Date __________

Rule Reminders Dictations

1. _______________________ 1. _______________________________________

_________________________ _______________________________________

2. _______________________ 2. _______________________________________

_________________________ _______________________________________

3. _______________________ 3. _______________________________________

_________________________ _______________________________________

Date __________

Rule Reminders Dictations

1. _______________________ 1. _______________________________________

_________________________ _______________________________________

2. _______________________ 2. _______________________________________

_________________________ _______________________________________

3. _______________________ 3. _______________________________________

_________________________ _______________________________________

Date __________

Rule Reminders Dictations

1. _______________________ 1. _______________________________________

_________________________ _______________________________________

2. _______________________ 2. _______________________________________

_________________________ _______________________________________

3. _______________________ 3. _______________________________________

_________________________ _______________________________________

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Sentence Lifting #1

Mechanics Spelling Grammar

She said, “Call I beleive you They sat

me at home.” when you say quietly on the “Go to sleep” you recieved beach.

he replied. the sliegh as a

present. Place the simple subject in a

different part of the

declarative sentence.

Rule Reminders

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Sentence Lifting #1 Teacher Resource Page

Sentence Lifting Teaching Tips and Answers

Mechanics—Use commas after and/or before speaker tags.

Answer: She said, “Call me at home.” “Go to sleep,” he replied.

Spelling—Spell i before e (believe), but spell e before i after a c (receive) and when the letters

are pronounced as a long /a/ sound (neighbor). There are a few weird exceptions to this rule.

Answer: I believe you when you say you received the sleigh as a present.

Grammar—The simple subject is a proper noun, common noun, or pronoun that serves as the

“do-er” of the sentence. It is usually found at the start of a declarative sentence. To find the

simple subject of the sentence, first identify any prepositional phrases and eliminate the nouns

and pronouns found in these phrases from consideration.

Example: After lunch, the teacher assigned us homework. The simple subject is teacher.

A declarative sentence— 1. tells a complete thought.

2. has both a subject and a predicate.

3. has the voice drop down at the end of a statement.

Make declarative sentences more complex, add variety, or change the focus of the sentence by

placing the simple subject after an introductory word, a phrase (a group of related words acting

as a single part of speech) or a clause (a group of related words having a subject and predicate).

Answer Options: On the beach they sat quietly. Quietly they sat on the beach. Quietly on the

beach they sat.

Dictations

Mechanics

She explained, “It wasn’t hard to do.”

Spelling

My neighbor’s height deceived me.

Grammar Place the simple subject at the start of this declarative sentence: Along the road she ran.

She ran along the road.

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Teaching Grammar and Mechanics www.penningtonpublishing.com 11

Grammar Mastery Matrix

Directions: Record any un-mastered grammar skills with a / in the appropriate column for each student.

Assessment Categories Parts of Speech Subject—Predicate Sentence Structure Fragments—Run-ons

TGM Worksheet #’s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Teacher ___________________

Class ___________________

Student Names Common Nouns

Proper Nouns

Pronouns

Adjectives

Verbs

Adverbs

Prepositions

Conjunctions

Simple Subject

Compound Subject

Simple Predicate

Compound Predicate

Simple Sentences

Compound Sentences

Complex Sentences

Compound-Complex

Sentences

Identifying Fragments

Revising Fragments

Identifying Run-ons

Revising Run-ons

Totals

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Grammar Mastery Matrix

Directions: Record any un-mastered grammar skills with a / in the appropriate column for each student.

Assessment Categories Pronouns Subject-Verb Comparative Verb Tense/Mood/Voice

Agreement Modifiers

TGM Worksheet #’s 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

Teacher ___________________

Class ___________________

Student Names Subject (Nominative)

Case

Object Case

Pronoun-Antecedents

Pronoun Pests

Pronoun-Base Form

Verb Agreement

Pronoun-Present

Participle Agreement

Pronoun-Past Tense

Verb Agreement

Pronoun-Past Participle

Agreement

Short Comparative

Moifiers

Short Superlative

Moifiers

Long Comparative and

ly Moifiers

Long Superlative and

ly Moifiers

Present Tense Verbs

Present Perfect Tense

Verbs

Past Tense Verbs

Past Perfect Tense

Verbs

Future Tense Verbs

Future Perfect Verbs

Mood

Voice

Totals

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1

Grammar Assessment Name ______________________

Directions: Place the letter of the word from this sentence that best matches the part of speech.

A strange man saw her run quickly down the road to the Red River and then dive in.

___1. common noun A. strange B. man C. her D. the E. Red River

___2. proper noun A. man B. her C. road D. to E. Red River

___3. pronoun A. man B. her C. the D. and E. in

___4. adjective A. strange B. saw C. quickly D. then E. in

___5. verb A. saw B. quickly C. down D. to E. then

___6. adverb A. run B. quickly C. down D. road E. to

___7. preposition A. run B. road C. the D. to E. and

___8. conjunction A. strange B. quickly C. down D. to E. and

Directions: Place the letter that best matches in the space to the left of the number.

___9. Identify the simple subject in this sentence: She watched the movie three times.

A. She B. watched C. movie D. three E. times

___10. Identify the compound subject in this sentence: The train and ship arrived at noon.

A. The train B. ship C. train, ship D. The train and ship E. noon

___11. Identify the simple predicate in this sentence: The clown was smiling at the children.

A. was B. was smiling C. The clown was smiling D. smiling E. children

___12. Identify the compound predicate in this sentence: Mariel sat down and crossed her legs.

A. sat down B. crossed her legs C. sat down and crossed D. sat, and E. sat, crossed

Directions: Place the letter that identifies the sentence type in the space to the left of the number.

___13. Mr. Nelson looked at the photograph. This is a _______ sentence.

A. simple B. compound C. complex D. compound-complex

___14. She failed the test twice, but she passed it the third time. This is a _______ sentence.

A. simple B. compound C. complex D. compound-complex

___15. Although dated, Tom Sawyer is fun and it has a good lesson. This is a _______ sentence.

A. simple B. compound C. complex D. compound-complex

___16. Carla went to the store after she watched the television show. This is a _______ sentence.

A. simple B. compound C. complex D. compound-complex

Directions: Place the letter that best identifies the problem in the space to the left of the number.

___17. While we waited for the jet to land. This is a _______.

A. sentence fragment B. run-on sentence C. compound sentence D. complex sentence

___18. Jeremy and Emily walking. This is a _______.

A. sentence fragment B. run-on sentence C. compound sentence D. complex sentence

___19. That was a great movie, I really enjoyed the ending. This is a _______.

A. sentence fragment B. run-on sentence C. compound sentence D. complex sentence

___20. Mark plays football he is captain of the team. This is a _______.

A. sentence fragment B. run-on sentence C. compound sentence D. complex sentence

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2

Directions: Place the letter that best matches in the space to the left of the number.

___21. The students who got into trouble are _____.

A. them B. me and she C. I and he D. they E. those

___22. The teacher yelled at two students, Rachel and _____.

A. I B. me C. it D. he E. us

___23. He stirred the sauce, and then let John taste _____.

A. them B. this C. it D. these E. that

___24. That movie _____we watched was entertaining.

A. this B. those C. it D. which E. that

___25. She should _____ whenever she has her picture taken.

A. smile B. have smiling C. have had smiled D. smiled E. have smiled

___26. Ismelda _____ three miles to her school today.

A. had been walking B. has walking C. is walking D. will walked E. walk

___27. John and Jean _____ their father on his lunch hour.

A. visits B. been visiting C. were visited D. have been visited E. visited

___28. Both Annie and Debra _____ their opponents.

A. has defeated B. have defeated C. had been defeated D. defeats E. had defeating

___29. Compared to her happy sister, she is _____.

A. happier B. most happy C. happiest D. more happier E. most happiest

___30. Of all the happy people, he was _____.

A. happier B. most happy C. happiest D. more happier E. most happiest

___31. This can be dangerous; please be _____ than the last time.

A. most careful B. more carefuller C. carefulest D. more careful E. carefuller

___32. He is the _____ of any firefighters when facing dangerous situations.

A. most careful B. more carefuller C. carefulest D. more careful E. carefuller

___33. Please _____ as much as possible.

A. will have been studied B. will study C. study D. are studied E. studied

___34. Yesterday, she must _____ more than he did.

A. will have been studying B. had studied C. study D. were studied E. have studied

___35. After she planned for two hours, she then _____ even harder.

A. studied B. will study C. study D. had studied E. have studied

___36. I _____ for two hours when she called.

A. will have been studying B. will study C. study D. had studied E. studied

___37. We _____ more later this afternoon.

A. will have been studying B. will study C. study D. are studied E. have studied

___38. By the time the clock strikes three, we _____ for four long hours.

A. will have been studying B. will study C. study D. are studied E. will study

___39. If he _____, he might have a better chance at passing the test.

A. will have been studying B. will be studying C. study D. are studied

E. were studying

___40. The chapter notes _____ by the whole class.

A. will have been studying B. will study C. have studied D. are studied

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3

Grammar Assessment Answers

If the student misses an item, mark a / in the same number column on the TGM Grammar

Mastery Matrix.

1. C

2. E

3. B

4. A

5. A

6. B

7. D

8. E

9. A

10. C

11. B

12. E

13. A

14. B

15. D

16. C

17. A

18. A

19. B

20. B

21. D

22. B

23. C

24. D

25. A

26. C

27. E

28. B

29. A

30. C

31. D

32. A

33. C

34. E

35. A

36. D

37. B

38. A

39. E

40. D

Find whole-class diagnostic grammar and mechanics assessments with 72 targeted

worksheets to differentiate instruction based upon these assessments and a full year of 15-

minute sentence lifting lessons with standards-based mechanics, spelling, and grammar skills

in Teaching Grammar and Mechanics at www.penningtonpublishing.com.

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Teaching Grammar and Mechanics www.penningtonpublishing.com 20

Mechanics Assessment Name _____________________________

Directions: Rewrite each of the following with correct punctuation and capitalization. Do not

add, remove, or switch around any words. Carefully proofread your work when finished.

1. a friend named john said I am glad I dont need any help on my homework

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

2. that new student paula is from south africa she told me she had never seen the star wars movie

in that country

Note: Don’t place a comma or a period after “africa.”

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

3. she saw pictures of the costumes robots and ship models in the newsweek article the one that

featured space camp Note: Don’t place a comma or colon after “article.”

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

4. yes you should listen to that song called the one monsters howl before halloween

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

5. bring both girls best dresses to atlanta georgia to see the play titled fiddler on the roof

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

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6. joe please read these chapters knots and cooking to prepare for the boy scouts meeting tonight

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

7. mr wong put on his glasses and then he read the magazine article titled my dog spoke english

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

8. dear mary

what a complete surprise no one had read the short story titled yankees and rebels

about the civil war

yours truly

amy

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

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Mechanics Assessment Directions, Mastery Criteria, and Answers

Directions and Mastery Criteria: Each of the following eight assessment problems has four

targeted items in enlarged boldface, one from each of the four punctuation and capitalization

sections. The numbers above each item represent the corresponding skill number on the TGM

Mechanics Matrix. Mark a / for each error in the student’s row on the matrix and assign that

worksheet for remediation. Ignore errors unrelated to the targeted assessment items.

49 41 57 (needs both) 65

1. a friend named John said, “I am glad I don’t need any help on my homework”

42 (needs both) 50 (needs both) 66 58 2. that new student, paula, is from South Africa; she told me she had never seen the star wars

movie in that country

43 (needs both) 59

3. she saw pictures of the costumes, robots, and ship models in the newsweek article

67 (needs both) 51 (needs both)

(the one that featured Space Camp)

44 60 (needs both) 68 52

4. yes, you should listen to that song called “the one monster’s howl” before Halloween

69 45 53 (needs both) 61

5. bring both girls’ best dresses to atlanta, georgia to see the play titled Fiddler on the Roof

46 70 62 (needs both sets) 54 (needs both)

6. joe, please read these chapters: “knots” and “cooking” to prepare for the Boy Scouts

meeting tonight

71 47 63 (needs both)

7. mr. wong put on his glasses, and then he read the magazine article titled “my dog spoke

55

English”

48 (needs both salutation and closing)

8. dear mary, 72 64 (needs both)

what a complete surprise! no one had read the short story titled “yankees and

56 (needs both)

rebels” about the Civil War

yours truly, amy

Find whole-class diagnostic grammar and mechanics assessments with 72 targeted

worksheets to differentiate instruction based upon these assessments and a full year of 15-

minute sentence lifting lessons with standards-based mechanics, spelling, and grammar skills

in Teaching Grammar and Mechanics at www.penningtonpublishing.com.

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Teaching Grammar and Mechanics www.penningtonpublishing.com 23

Mechanics Mastery Matrix

Directions: Record any un-mastered mechanics skills with a / in the appropriate column for each student.

Assessment Categories Commas Capitalization

TGM Worksheet #’s 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56

Teacher ___________________

Class ___________________

Student Names Speaker Tags

Appositives

Lists

Introductions

Geography

Direct Address

Conjunctions

Letters

Persons

Places

Things

Holidays/Dates

Titles

Organizations/

Businesses

Languages/Peoples

Events/H

istorical

Periods

Totals

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Mechanics Mastery Matrix

Directions: Record any un-mastered mechanics skills with a / in the appropriate column for each student.

Assessment Categories Quotation Marks and Underlining Other Punctuation

TGM Worksheet #’s 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72

Teacher ___________________

Class ___________________

Student Names Direct Quotations

(Quotation M

arks)

Movie / Television Titles

(Underline)

Books / Magazine Titles

(Underline)

Song / Poem Titles

(Quotation M

arks)

Plays / Works of Art Titles

(Underline)

Book Chapter Titles

(Quotation M

arks)

Magazine Article Titles

(Quotation M

arks)

Short Story / Document

Titles (Q

uotation M

arks)

Contractions

Semicolons

Parentheses

Singular Possessive

Apostrophes

Plural Possessive

Apostrophes

Colons

Periods for abbreviations,

initials, and acronyms

Exclamation Points

Totals


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