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The Downward Spiral:

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The Downward Spiral:. Don't Set Yourself up for Failure with Your Boss (or Your Client!). Presented by: Rob Orr, SPHR HR Consultant. “We’re running as an economy at 30% efficiency”. Curt Coffman Employee Engagement Global Practice Leader, The Gallup Organization - PowerPoint PPT Presentation
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  • The Downward Spiral:Don't Set Yourself up for Failure with Your Boss (or Your Client!)Presented by:Rob Orr, SPHRHR Consultant

  • Were running as an economy at 30% efficiencyCurt CoffmanEmployee Engagement Global Practice Leader,The Gallup OrganizationHRMagazine, February 2004

  • When people need help getting a job done, they will choose a lovable fool over a competent jerk.Tiziana Casciaro & Miguel Sousa LoboCompetent Jerks, Lovable Fools, and the Formation of Social NetworksHarvard Business Review, June 2005

  • The environment has changedTechnical skills not as critical for executivesActuarial integrity less valuedFocus on profitabilityCapitalism demutualization, non-paternalisticSource: Sim Segal, FSA, MAAA Deloitte Consulting, LLP - used with permission

  • Session ObjectivesIdentify the specific problems Actuaries face Identify cues to watch out forRecognize how Actuaries might contribute to the problemIdentify steps to take to turn the situation around By the end of the session, you will be able to:

  • AgendaReview purpose and desired outcomesDifficult Bosses Difficult ClientsThe Set-Up-To-Fail SyndromeHow Individuals ContributeTaking ResponsibilitySummary

  • Your Difficult Boss / Difficult ClientUse the worksheet to describe a difficult boss (or client) that you have known.

  • The Difficult Boss / Difficult ClientNegative, mean spiritedAutocratic____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  • The Set-Up-To Fail SyndromeWidespreadInsidious & PerniciousBased on Common Wisdom

  • Common WisdomThree GroupsStronger PerformersWeaker PerformersDeadwood

  • Different Strokes for Different FolksBosses consciously treat stronger and weaker performers differentlyStronger performers get autonomyWeaker performers get helpDeadwood gets ignored (or an invitation to leave)

  • The Downward Spiral

  • General Session: Actuarial Communication-Is Anyone Listening? If They Are, What Do They Hear? Communication (how to deliver the tough messages) Opinion changes (are they effective enough?)Actuaries' images and roles in organizationsPeer reviewsActuarial standardsProfessionalismBackbone

  • Labels, Biases, & MisperceptionsHaving formed an opinion, our minds draw on all possible evidence to support it. When confronted with evidence that contradicts our viewpoint, we overlook it or denigrate it, or find some other way of writing it off. That way we can cling to our original opinion as though it were a universal truth.Francis Bacon, 1620(updated language by Manzoni & Barsoux.)

  • How does this start?Loss of Confidence in Subordinates

  • Triggers of Lost ConfidenceWhat would you say?

  • Triggers of Lost ConfidenceDisloyaltyComplainingNegative attitudeLow engagement or energyLow-self-confidenceInsensitivity to signalsKnow-it-allDisrespect for Bosss timeBlatantly politicalExtrinsic motivationTrying too hard

  • Perceiving PerformanceWhat about objective performance measures ?

  • Perceiving Performance

    Chart2

    -0.83-0.19

    0.7-0.26

    In-Group

    Out -Group

    Goal Commitment

    Standardized Sales Performance

    Goal Commitment and Sales Performance

    0.7 In-GroupStronger Perf.

    -0.83

    -0.19

    - 0.26 Out -Group Weaker Perf. -

    Sheet1

    Standardized Sales performance

    In-GroupOut -Group

    Low-0.83-0.19

    High0.7-0.26

    Sheet1

    00

    00

    In-Group

    Out -Group

    Goal Commitment

    Standardized Sales Performance

    Goal Commitment and Sales Performance

    -0.83

    0.7 In-Group

    0.26 Out -Group -

    -0.19

    Sheet2

    Sheet3

  • Source: Sim Segal, FSA, MAAA, Deloitte Consulting, LLP- used with permission

  • Actuaries have lost industry dominance Fewer actuaries in C-Level positionsHighly-technical actuaries not fast-trackedReserved for those presentable to C-suiteFewer automatic promotions upon ASA, FSANarrower roles, fewer opportunitiesSource: Sim Segal, FSA, MAAA, Deloitte Consulting, LLP- used with permission

  • In-Groups and Out-Groups80-90% of managers have sharply differentiated relationships with subordinates.In-Group members have close partnerships as trusted assistants.Out-Group members have low-quality relationships as hired-hands.

  • Performance PerceptionsNo correlation between objective performance & relationship quality: 1993 Duarte, Goodson, & KlichVery high correlation between liking and in-group status: 1990 Wayne & FerrisBoss expectation in 1st week a better predictor of in-group status than actual performance at end of 2nd week 1993 Liden, Wayne, & Stilwell

  • The Self-Reinforcing Dynamic

  • RealityGood people can quickly end up with bad labels. That neednt be a problem. The bosss inaccurate label becomes a problem because it is so hard to change.

    Jean-Franois Manzoni & Jean-Louis BarsouxThe Set-Up-To-Fail Syndrome

  • Are You in the Out-Group?

    Lets take a look!

    Refer to the answers on Your Difficult Boss worksheet

  • Your Difficult BossIn small groups, share:the situations you described on page 5the factors that contributed to the situationAgree on the common factors ( Write on page 20.)

  • What is there in your approach or way of managing the situation that might be contributing to the problem or getting in the way of its resolution?Peter BlockFlawless Consulting, Second Edition2000, Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer

  • Cues for SubordinatesAttribution of negative personal characteristics Tendency to reduce contact with BossDiminished self-confidenceHyper vigilance of Boss behaviorTakes feedback with a grain of saltTendency to bring up the pastReputation as the person most likely to disagree with the bossTendency to engage in covert lobbying

  • The Difficult BossNegative, mean spiritedAutocraticStickler for details, intolerant, impossible to pleaseIntimidating, treats people as resourcesUnrealisticStubborn; impossible to influenceManipulativeMeddlesome; untrustingControl freak; micro manager; evaluativeUncommunicative; aloof; unsupportiveWeak, prone to favoritism; low performance standardsImpatient; temperamental; unpredictableIgnorant bureaucrat; clueless; defensiveStifling my development

  • The Great BossDevelopment-orientedIntuitive; decisiveHas high expectations and aspirationsDrivenDemanding; has high aspirationsSingle-minded; focusedPolitically astuteHelpful; caringEncouraging; coaching; informed; close to the pulse

    Thoughtful, busyAllows self-discoveryPassionate; incisive; mercurial; (at worst) impulsiveRealistic; better judge; aware of interdependencies; victim of a poorly sold changeConsiderate; letting me recover

  • The Observed BehaviorsGiving critical feedbackMaking a unilateral decisionInstructing work to be redoneImposing disciplineSetting stretch targetsSticking with a doubtful course of actionSending mixed signals Giving unsolicited adviceAsking specific questionsDelaying response to proposal/ requestNot condemning a big mistakeLosing temper in publicResisting a proposed changeGiving a routine assignment

  • Perception is Reality

  • Cues for SubordinatesAttribution of negative personal characteristics Tendency to reduce contact with BossDiminished self-confidenceHyper vigilance of Boss behaviorTakes feedback with a grain of saltTendency to bring up the pastReputation as the person most likely to disagree with the bossTendency to engage in covert lobbying

  • Taking ResponsibilityStop diggingStart talkingAccomplish some tasks

  • Taking ResponsibilityStop diggingGet your job in orderGet your head in orderDont rush itStart talkingAccomplish some tasks

  • Taking ResponsibilityStop diggingStart talkingIncrease contact with bossMake it easy for the bossInvite your boss to a meetingHave a new conversationAccomplish some tasks

  • Taking ResponsibilityStop diggingStart talkingAccomplish some tasksMaintain your own self-confidenceFight the urge to withdrawDont overreach

  • Things to RememberKnow when to hold em, know when to fold em.There is no one to blame.Let go of expectations of your boss.Offer the benefit of the doubt.Produce hope, rather than pursue it.

  • The Set-Up-To Fail SyndromeLoss of Confidence WidespreadInsidious & PerniciousBased on Common Wisdom

  • The Downward Spiral:Don't Set Yourself up for Failure with Your BossPresented by:Rob Orr, SPHRHR Consultant

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