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THE SERVICES.

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1590 uncertified deaths were registered in Nottingham, Blackburr Preston, and Hull. - HEALTH OF SCOTCH TOWHS The annual rate of mortality in the eight Scotch towne which had been 19 3 and 19-2 per 1000 in the two pre ceding weeks, was again 19-2 last week, and was 1’6 per 100 bove the mean rate during the same period in th hirty-three large English towns. The rates in the eigh Scotch towns ranged from 14 3 in Greenock and 15.2 2 in Edinburgh to 22 5 in Dundee and 27-4 in Perth. Th 560 deaths in these towns included 27 which were referred to whooping-cough, 20 to measles, 17 to diar rhcea, 10 to " fever" (principally enteric), 6 to scarle fever, and 3 to diphtheria. In all, 83 deaths resulte( from these principal zymotic diseases, against 72 and 8: in the two preceding weeks. These 83 deaths were equa to an annual rate of 28 per 1000, which was slightly above the mean rate last week from the same diseases in the thirty three large English towns. The fatal cases of whooping cough, which had been 38 and 29 in the two preceding weeks further declined to 27 last week, of which 17 occurred ii Glasgow, 4 in Edinburgh, 3 in Aberdeen, and 3 in Paisley. Th, 20 deaths from measles, were within one of the number in the preceding week, and included 19 in Glasgow. Th, deaths referred to different forms of "fever," which hac been 4 and 6 in the two preceding weeks, further rose tc 10 last week, of which 6 occurred in Glasgow, and 2 ir Edinburgh. The fatal cases of scarlet fever, which had beer 3 and 5 in the two preceeding weeks, further rose to 6 las1 week, and included 2 in Edinburgh and 2 Greenock. The ’, deaths from diphtheria corresponded with the number in the preceding week, and included 2 in Glasgow. The deaths referred to diseases of the respiratory organs in these towns, which had been 92 and 109 in the two preceding weeks, declined again to 97 last week, and were 21 below the number in the corresponding week of last year. The causes of 33, or nearly 6 per cent., of the deaths in these eight towns last week were not certified. HEALTH OF DUBLIN. The death-rate in Dublin, which had increased in the three preceding weeks from 21’9 to 23 7 per 1000, further rose to 23’9 during the week ending May 30th. During the past nine weeks of the current quarter the death-rate in the city has averaged 23-4 per 1000, the rate during the same period being 18 4 in London and 17’4 in Edinburgh. The 160 deaths registered in Dublin during the week under notice were within 1 of the number in the pre- ceding week, and included 9 which were referred to the principal zymotic diseases, against 5 and 9 in the two preceding weeks; of these, 5 resulted from "fever," 3 from diarrhoea, and 1 from scarlet fever, and not 1 either from small-pox, measles, diphtheria, or whooping- cough. These 9 deaths were equal to an annual rate of 1-3 per 1000, the zymotic death-rate during the same period being 3’0 in London and 2’3 in Edin- burgh. The 5 deaths referred to different forms of "fever" exceeded by 2 the number recorded in the pre- ceding week. The 3 fatal cases of diarrhoea exceeded the number in any recent week, while the mortality from scarlet fever corresponded with that recorded in the preceding week. The 160 deaths in Dublin last week included 26 of infants under one year of age, and 40 of persons aged upwards of sixty years; the deaths both of infants and of elderly persons exceeded the numbers returned in the pre- ceding week. Four inquest cases and 4 deaths from violence were registered; and 53, or nearly a third, of the deaths occurred in public institutions. The causes of 15, or more than 9 per cent., of the deaths in the city last week were not certified. THE SERVICES. ROYAL MILITARY TOURNAMENT. THAT the Royal Military Tournament, under what is practically new management, is a success the announce- ment which was posted up in the Royal Agricultural Hall on Tuesday afternoon last fully testifies: "House full; every seat sold" ; and in spite of the fact that Wednesday was Derby Day the Hall filled at both after- noon and evening performances. It is to be noted, too, that since the opening on Thursday, May 28th, the number of visitors exceeded those who visited the tournament on corresponding days last year. We, therefore, offer our congratulations to the members of the executive committee- Major-General Lord Methuen, C.B., C.M.G. (chairman) Colonel W. H. Mackinnon, A.A.G. (vice - chairman)’ Lieutenant.Colonel R. S. S. Baden-Powell, 13th Hussars ; Major J. S. S. Barker, R.A. ; Major Irvine, R.E. ; Captain Bramhall, A.S.C. ; Colonel E. Villiers, lst Surrey Rifles; Colonel G. M. Fox (commandant); Lieutenant - Colonel E. Blaksley, R.H.A. ; Lieutenant - Colonel E. W. D. Ward, C.B., D.A.A.G. (hon. treasurer); and to Major Eyre Crabbe, Grenadier Guards (hon. secretary) - on whom the responsibility for the excellent management mainly rests. It is also gratifying to know that under the presidency of the new Commander-in-Chief, Lord Wolseley, the proceeds of the tournament, which bid fair to be unprecedented, will this year be distributed among all the military charities and not given to one institution as hitherto, and that the naval charities will also receive a share. The object of the seventeenth Royal Military Tournament, as set forth in the general rules, is " to encourage and develop skill at arms in all ranks of Her Majesty’s Regular and Auxiliary Forces and to benefit various military charities "; but incidentally it must be a powerful factor in popularising the various departments of the Services as well as in promoting true patriotic pride. This is particularly shown in the bursts of applause which usher into the arena each detachment which takes part in the brilliant pageant " Sons of the Empire." In this display it has been the endeavour of the committee to give some idea to the general public and to the world at large of the enormous reserves which lie ready for action behind our iron walls- our first line of defence-and also behind the comparatively small permanently armed force which is commonly accepted as the English army, and which guards 277 million British subjects in an Empire covering nearly nine million square miles. The pageant is divided into six divisions com- prising representatives of the home army, Indian army, Canadian army, Cape army, Australian army, and Colonial forces. In addition to the various feats of skill, tent- pegging, lemon-cutting, heads and posts, &c., there is a musical ride by the Royal Scots Greys (who will give place to the 2nd Life Guards next week) and a musical drive by the Royal Horse Artillery. From a practical point of view nothing is worthy of greater praise than the display by non-commissioned officers from the gymnasium at Alder- shot, of which Colonel Fox is Inspector. Wrestling on horseback, the melee, sword v. sword, sword v. bayonet, sword v. lance, &c., mounted and on foot or mounted v. foot, are received with the same applause that has always characterised these exhibitions. The display by the Queen’s Own Hussars strikingly brings out the difference between civilised and uncivilised warfare in regard to the wounded. The closing item of the programme represents the storming of an Afghan fort and involves a display of all arms. The Royal Military Tournament will remain open till Thursday next, June llth, but intending visitors will do well to book their seats at once, as many applicants for seats are now turned away daily. With regard to the medical and sanitary arrangements they are as perfect as circum- stances will permit, and the comfort and welfare of the general public are well looked after. Next week we hope to refer to the medical aspects of the tournament in fuller detail. ___ MOVEMENTS OF THE ARMY MEDICAL STAFF. SURGEON - LIEUTENANT - COLONEL A. ADAMS of the Madras Medical Service, Residency Surgeon at the Court of H.H. The Maharajah of Jodhpore, has reported himself at Netley to join the Class of Bacteriology in _the Army Medical School. VOLUNTEER CORPS. Artillery : lst Kent (Eastern Division, Royal Artillery): Surgeon-Major R. R. Brown to be Surgeon-Lieutenant- Colonel. -Rifle : 5th (the Hay Tor) Volunteer Battalion the Devonshire Regiment: Surgeon-Captain W. G. Scott, M.B., to be Surgeon-Major. 3rd (Sunderland) Volunteer Battalion the Durham Light Infantry; Surgeon-Captain R. J. Burns resigns his commission. 3rd (The Blythswood) Volunteer Battalion the Highland Light Infantry: Surgeon-
Transcript
Page 1: THE SERVICES.

1590

uncertified deaths were registered in Nottingham, BlackburrPreston, and Hull.

-

HEALTH OF SCOTCH TOWHS

The annual rate of mortality in the eight Scotch townewhich had been 19 3 and 19-2 per 1000 in the two preceding weeks, was again 19-2 last week, and was 1’6 per 100bove the mean rate during the same period in th

hirty-three large English towns. The rates in the eighScotch towns ranged from 14 3 in Greenock and 15.2 2 inEdinburgh to 22 5 in Dundee and 27-4 in Perth. Th560 deaths in these towns included 27 which were

referred to whooping-cough, 20 to measles, 17 to diarrhcea, 10 to " fever" (principally enteric), 6 to scarlefever, and 3 to diphtheria. In all, 83 deaths resulte(from these principal zymotic diseases, against 72 and 8:in the two preceding weeks. These 83 deaths were equato an annual rate of 28 per 1000, which was slightly abovethe mean rate last week from the same diseases in the thirtythree large English towns. The fatal cases of whoopingcough, which had been 38 and 29 in the two preceding weeksfurther declined to 27 last week, of which 17 occurred ii

Glasgow, 4 in Edinburgh, 3 in Aberdeen, and 3 in Paisley. Th,20 deaths from measles, were within one of the numberin the preceding week, and included 19 in Glasgow. Th,deaths referred to different forms of "fever," which hacbeen 4 and 6 in the two preceding weeks, further rose tc10 last week, of which 6 occurred in Glasgow, and 2 ir

Edinburgh. The fatal cases of scarlet fever, which had beer3 and 5 in the two preceeding weeks, further rose to 6 las1week, and included 2 in Edinburgh and 2 Greenock. The ’,deaths from diphtheria corresponded with the number in thepreceding week, and included 2 in Glasgow. The deathsreferred to diseases of the respiratory organs in these towns,which had been 92 and 109 in the two preceding weeks,declined again to 97 last week, and were 21 below thenumber in the corresponding week of last year. Thecauses of 33, or nearly 6 per cent., of the deaths in theseeight towns last week were not certified.

HEALTH OF DUBLIN.

The death-rate in Dublin, which had increased in thethree preceding weeks from 21’9 to 23 7 per 1000, furtherrose to 23’9 during the week ending May 30th. During thepast nine weeks of the current quarter the death-rate inthe city has averaged 23-4 per 1000, the rate during thesame period being 18 4 in London and 17’4 in Edinburgh.The 160 deaths registered in Dublin during the weekunder notice were within 1 of the number in the pre-ceding week, and included 9 which were referred to theprincipal zymotic diseases, against 5 and 9 in the twopreceding weeks; of these, 5 resulted from "fever,"3 from diarrhoea, and 1 from scarlet fever, and not 1either from small-pox, measles, diphtheria, or whooping-cough. These 9 deaths were equal to an annualrate of 1-3 per 1000, the zymotic death-rate duringthe same period being 3’0 in London and 2’3 in Edin-burgh. The 5 deaths referred to different forms of"fever" exceeded by 2 the number recorded in the pre-ceding week. The 3 fatal cases of diarrhoea exceeded thenumber in any recent week, while the mortality from scarletfever corresponded with that recorded in the precedingweek. The 160 deaths in Dublin last week included 26 ofinfants under one year of age, and 40 of persons agedupwards of sixty years; the deaths both of infants and ofelderly persons exceeded the numbers returned in the pre-ceding week. Four inquest cases and 4 deaths from violencewere registered; and 53, or nearly a third, of the deathsoccurred in public institutions. The causes of 15, or morethan 9 per cent., of the deaths in the city last week werenot certified.

THE SERVICES.

ROYAL MILITARY TOURNAMENT.THAT the Royal Military Tournament, under what is

practically new management, is a success the announce-ment which was posted up in the Royal AgriculturalHall on Tuesday afternoon last fully testifies: "Housefull; every seat sold" ; and in spite of the fact that

Wednesday was Derby Day the Hall filled at both after-noon and evening performances. It is to be noted, too,that since the opening on Thursday, May 28th, the numberof visitors exceeded those who visited the tournamenton corresponding days last year. We, therefore, offer our

congratulations to the members of the executive committee-Major-General Lord Methuen, C.B., C.M.G. (chairman)Colonel W. H. Mackinnon, A.A.G. (vice - chairman)’Lieutenant.Colonel R. S. S. Baden-Powell, 13th Hussars ;Major J. S. S. Barker, R.A. ; Major Irvine, R.E. ; CaptainBramhall, A.S.C. ; Colonel E. Villiers, lst Surrey Rifles;Colonel G. M. Fox (commandant); Lieutenant - ColonelE. Blaksley, R.H.A. ; Lieutenant - Colonel E. W. D.Ward, C.B., D.A.A.G. (hon. treasurer); and to MajorEyre Crabbe, Grenadier Guards (hon. secretary) - onwhom the responsibility for the excellent managementmainly rests. It is also gratifying to know that under thepresidency of the new Commander-in-Chief, Lord Wolseley,the proceeds of the tournament, which bid fair to beunprecedented, will this year be distributed among allthe military charities and not given to one institution ashitherto, and that the naval charities will also receive a share.The object of the seventeenth Royal Military Tournament, asset forth in the general rules, is " to encourage and developskill at arms in all ranks of Her Majesty’s Regular andAuxiliary Forces and to benefit various military charities ";but incidentally it must be a powerful factor in popularisingthe various departments of the Services as well as in

promoting true patriotic pride. This is particularly shownin the bursts of applause which usher into the arenaeach detachment which takes part in the brilliant pageant" Sons of the Empire." In this display it has beenthe endeavour of the committee to give some idea to thegeneral public and to the world at large of the enormousreserves which lie ready for action behind our iron walls-our first line of defence-and also behind the comparativelysmall permanently armed force which is commonly acceptedas the English army, and which guards 277 million Britishsubjects in an Empire covering nearly nine million squaremiles. The pageant is divided into six divisions com-

prising representatives of the home army, Indian army,Canadian army, Cape army, Australian army, and Colonialforces. In addition to the various feats of skill, tent-pegging, lemon-cutting, heads and posts, &c., there is amusical ride by the Royal Scots Greys (who will give placeto the 2nd Life Guards next week) and a musical drive bythe Royal Horse Artillery. From a practical point ofview nothing is worthy of greater praise than the displayby non-commissioned officers from the gymnasium at Alder-shot, of which Colonel Fox is Inspector. Wrestling onhorseback, the melee, sword v. sword, sword v. bayonet,sword v. lance, &c., mounted and on foot or mounted v.foot, are received with the same applause that has alwayscharacterised these exhibitions. The display by the Queen’sOwn Hussars strikingly brings out the difference betweencivilised and uncivilised warfare in regard to the wounded.The closing item of the programme represents the stormingof an Afghan fort and involves a display of all arms.

The Royal Military Tournament will remain open till

Thursday next, June llth, but intending visitors will dowell to book their seats at once, as many applicants for seatsare now turned away daily. With regard to the medicaland sanitary arrangements they are as perfect as circum-stances will permit, and the comfort and welfare of the

general public are well looked after. Next week we hope torefer to the medical aspects of the tournament in fullerdetail.

___

MOVEMENTS OF THE ARMY MEDICAL STAFF.

SURGEON - LIEUTENANT - COLONEL A. ADAMS of theMadras Medical Service, Residency Surgeon at the Courtof H.H. The Maharajah of Jodhpore, has reported himselfat Netley to join the Class of Bacteriology in _the ArmyMedical School.

-

VOLUNTEER CORPS.

Artillery : lst Kent (Eastern Division, Royal Artillery):Surgeon-Major R. R. Brown to be Surgeon-Lieutenant-Colonel. -Rifle : 5th (the Hay Tor) Volunteer Battalionthe Devonshire Regiment: Surgeon-Captain W. G. Scott,M.B., to be Surgeon-Major. 3rd (Sunderland) VolunteerBattalion the Durham Light Infantry; Surgeon-CaptainR. J. Burns resigns his commission. 3rd (The Blythswood)Volunteer Battalion the Highland Light Infantry: Surgeon-

Page 2: THE SERVICES.

1591

Lieutenant J. S. McConville, M.D., to be Surgeon-Captain.3rd (the Buchan) Volunteer Battalion the Gordon High-landers : The undermentioned officers resign their com-missions :-Surgeon-Captain A. Blackhall, M.D., and Sur-

geon-Lieutenant P. B. H. Macleod, M.B.VOLUNTEER MEDICAL STAFF CORPS.

The London Companies : Stuart Oliver, gent., to be Sur-geon-Lieutenant.

VOLUNTEER INFANTRY BRIGADES.Aberdeen Brigade: Surgeon - Lieutenant - Colonel W.

Paterson, 4th Volunteer Battalion the Gordon Highlanders,to be Brigade - Surgeon - Lieutenant - Colonel. PlymouthBrigade : Surgeon-Major J. R. Thomas, M.D., 4th VolunteerBattalion the Devonshire Regiment, to be Brigade-Surgeon-Lutenant-Colonel.

THE SOUDAN EXPEDITION.There has been little to chronicle regarding this expedition

during the past week. It seems, however, that there aresigns of a forward movement taking place shortly. We donot think that much, if any, weight should be attached tovarious rumours and reports about the movements or inten-tions of Osman Digna or of the Dervish forces, for there isreally very little reliable information on the subject. In spiteof the great heat the health of the Anglo-Egyptian troopscontinues to be excellent, and the fact is a very creditableone to the medical and other services concerned, for it speakswell for the hygienic, hospital and transport arrangementsof the expedition. But it is well to remember thatthe severe strain and test will come later when reallyactive operations have begun. The latest Anglo-Indianpapers are full of news connected with the dispatchof the Indian brigade for Suakin, which, as we know, hassince arrived at that station. Brigade-Surgeon-Lieutenant-Colonel Calthorp is the principal medical officer of the

brigade, which has been accompanied by the 31st and 32ndNative Field Hospitals. It is possible that the hospitalaccommodation on shore will be supplemented by one of thetransport ships acting as a floating hospital, but we believethe troops composing the Indian contingent prefer to betreated on land.

THE DISPOSAL OF REFUSE AND NIGHT SOIL IN INDIA.As everybody knows the dry earth system and the use of

different forms of trenches for the disposal of night soilby burial are commonly adopted in India. It has oftenbeen suggested that this was open to the objection thatthe buried animal refuse might not be thoroughly dis-infected and purified by the action of the soil and sunbefore the desiccated matters became blown about bythe wind, especially in the case of shallow trenches in ahighly porous soil. We learn from the Pioneer Mail that oflate years the Indian Government has been carrying out

experiments for the incineration of night soil and its re-

duction to ashes. This would no doubt be an excellentplan, especially for hill stations in India, and three kindsof incinerators have been used. Our contemporary speaksof the pattern known as the Henry Campion Incinerator as,on the whole, the simplest, cheapest, and most satisfactory.

ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL, NETLEY, VOLUNTEERMEDICAL STAFF CORPS.

The Manchester Companies of the Volunteer Medical StaffCorps arrived at Netley on Saturday, May 23rd, for theirannual training. The strength consisted of ninety-fournon-commissioned officers and men under the command ofSurgeon-Captain J. R. Renshaw. The other officers of theCompanies present were Surgeon-Captain J. J. K. Fair-clough, M.D., and Surgeon-Lieutenant A. Phillips, who wereattached for duty respectively to the Medical and SurgicalDivisions of the Royal Victoria Hospital. The Companiesparaded daily at 6 15 A M. to join the Medical Staff Corpsparade and again at 8 40 for Hospital duties. The drills,&c., were arranged by the officer commanding and took placedaily. The Companies paraded in drill order on May 29th,and were inspected by Surgeon-Lieutenant-Colonel B. M.Blennerhassett, A.M.S. The Companies left Netley on

May 30th.Examinations for twenty-five commissions in the Army

Medical Staff and for twelve appointments in the IndianMedical Service will be held in London on Aug. 7th next andthe following days. John Alexander McMunn, M.D., Physician and Surgeon to

the Royal Hospital, Chelsea, from Surgeon on Half-pay List"retires on retired pay.

Surgeon-Major James Magill, M.D., of the ColdstreamGuards, is promoted to Surgeon-Lieutenant-Colonel.

Correspondence.

"THE REGISTRATION OF MIDWIVES."To the Editors of THE LANCET.

SIRS,-Dr. Fraser in his otherwise excellent letter pub-lished in THE LANCET of May 30th has fallen into oneor two errors which require correction. He attributes the

responsibility for the Midwives Registration Bill to theMidwives Institute. Now, Sirs, the Midwives Institute isnot responsible for the measure in question. The Bill waspromoted by the Midwives Bill Committee, a representativebody principally composed of medical men and medicalwomen. On this committee are two representatives of theMidwives Institute. These ladies have carefully avoidedany interference apart from looking after the rights whichmidwives already possess. It is only fair to the MidwivesInstitute to make this statement, as it is receiving, andhas received, a good deal of unmerited abuse. The

promoters of the Bill have no objection to the LocalGovernment Board as the supervising body under theState, but this Board is understood to be already over-

burdened with work. Its record, too, in respect to work-house infirmary nursing seems to show that there is insuffi-cient elasticity in it to make it a very suitable body for thegovernance of what Dr. Fraser callus 11 midwifery nurses."The principal difficulty, however, is that the Privy Councilhas imported itself into the matter on the initiative, not ofthe promoters of the Bill, as Dr. Fraser suggests, but of theSelect Committee of the House of Commons on the Registra-tion of Midwives. I do not propose to criticise in detail thepoints raised in the letter, most, if not all, of which havebeen at one time or another fully discussed by the promotersof the Midwives Registration Bill. I am only concerned atpresent to .et Dr. Fraser right on certain questions of fact.

T am Sirs vnnra faithfully

11 Audi alteram partem."

I am, Sirs, yours faithfully,ROWLAND HUMPHREYS.

Midwives Bill Committee, Office, 12, Buckingham-street,Strand, W.C., June 2nd, 1896.

IN PRAISE OF CYCLING.To the Editors of THE LANCET.

SiRS,-As cycling in health and disease is being writtenabout in medical journals perhaps THE LANCET wouldallow me to say that I have found the moderate use of thebicycle to produce the most admirable effects on youngpeople, especially girls who spend the greater part of theday shut up in houses of business and breathing in manycases a more or less vitiated atmosphere. " Spins" into thecountry when the labours of the day are over put strength,vigour, and vivacity into these young women, and the even-ing sun soon tinges their cheeks with the russet and ruddyhues of health. No doubt many people suffering from

organic disease are benefited by judicious bicycle riding.I have a diabetic patient who lives in the country andvisits me from time to time. In January of this yearthe specific gravity of his urine was 40 and he was look-ing and feeling very ill. A few days ago this patientcalled upon me and I was agreeably struck with hisamended and robust appearance, and I was about con-gratulating myself on the Effects the last mixture I hadprescribed for him had produced when he informed methat the specific gravity of his urine was now 22, andthat he had for some time left off taking medicine, hadnearly eschewed the restricted diet, and had taken to thebicycle with energy. As to bicycles in present use, the chiefcomplaint I hear about them is of their behaviour whenridden over a rough or cobbled roads. Then their bumpingsand jarrings produce on their riders sensations of a painfuland most disagreeable character. If this state of thingscould be remedied a boon of comfort would be conferred on


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