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Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

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Time Reversibility and Burke’s Theorem Queuing Analysis: Hongwei Zhang http://www.cs.wayne.edu/~hzhang Acknowledgement: this lecture is partially based on the slides of Dr. Yannis A. Korilis.
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Page 1: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Time Reversibility and Burke’s Theorem

Queuing Analysis:

Hongwei Zhang

http://www.cs.wayne.edu/~hzhang

Acknowledgement: this lecture is partially based on the slides of Dr. Yannis A. Korilis.

Page 2: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Outline

� Time-Reversal of Markov Chains

� Reversibility

� Truncating a Reversible Markov Chain

Burke’s Theorem� Burke’s Theorem

� Queues in Tandem

Page 3: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Outline

� Time-Reversal of Markov Chains

� Reversibility

� Truncating a Reversible Markov Chain

Burke’s Theorem� Burke’s Theorem

� Queues in Tandem

Page 4: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Time-Reversed Markov Chains

� {Xn: n=0,1,…} irreducible aperiodic Markov chain with transition

probabilities Pij

� Unique stationary distribution (πj > 0) if and only if GBE holds, i.e.,

π π , 0,1,...P j∞

= =∑

01, 0,1,...

ijjP i

== =∑

� Process in steady state:

� Starts at n=-∞, that is {Xn: n = …,-1,0,1,…}, or

� Choose initial state according to the stationary distribution

� How does {Xn} look “reversed” in time?

0π π , 0,1,...

j i ijiP j

== =∑

0Pr{ } lim Pr |π { }n

nn j

X XX ij j→∞

= = == =

Page 5: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Time-Reversed Markov Chains

� Define Yn=Xτ-n, for arbitrary τ>0

=> {Yn} is the reversed process.

� Proposition 1:

{Y } is a Markov chain with transition probabilities:� {Yn} is a Markov chain with transition probabilities:

� {Yn} has the same stationary distribution πj with the forward chain {Xn}

� The reversed chain corresponds to the same process, looked at in the

reversed-time direction

, , 0,1,...π

j ji

ij

i

PP i j= =

Page 6: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Time-Reversed Markov Chains

*

1 2 2

1 2 2

1 2 2

1 2 2

{ | , , , }

{ | , , , }

{ | , , , }

{ , , , , }

{ , , , }

ij m m m m k k

m m m m k k

n n n n k k

n n n n k k

P P Y j Y i Y i Y i

P X j X i X i X i

P X j X i X i X i

P X j X i X i X i

P X i X i X i

τ τ τ τ

− − −

− − + − + − +

+ + +

+ + +

= = = = =

= = = = =

= = = = =

= = = ==

= = =

K

K

K

K

K

Proof of Proposition 1:

1 2 2

2 2

{ , , , }

{ , , | ,

n n n k k

n n k k n n

P X i X i X i

P X i X i X j X

+ + +

+ + +

== = =

= = ==

K

K 1 1

2 2 1 1

1

1

1

1

1 1

} { , }

{ , , | } { }

{ , }

{ }

π{ | } { }

{ | } | }

{ } π

{

n n

n n k k n n

n nn n m

n

ji jn

m

n n

n i

i P X j X i

P X i X

P X j X i P Y

i X i P X i

P X j X i

P X i

PP X i X j P

j

X

Y i

j

P X i

+

+ + + +

+

+

+

+

+

= = =

= = = =

= == =

=

= = == =

= = = = =

=

K

*

0 0 0

ππ π π π

π

j ji

i ij i j ji ji i ii

PP P

∞ ∞ ∞

= = == = =∑ ∑ ∑

Page 7: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Outline

� Time-Reversal of Markov Chains

� Reversibility

� Truncating a Reversible Markov Chain

Burke’s Theorem� Burke’s Theorem

� Queues in Tandem

Page 8: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Reversibility

� Stochastic process {X(t)} is called reversible if (X(t1), X(t2),…, X(tn))

and (X(τ-t1), X(τ-t2),…, X(τ-tn)) have the same probability distribution,

for all τ, t1,…, tn

� Markov chain {Xn} is reversible if and only if the transition � Markov chain {Xn} is reversible if and only if the transition

probabilities of forward and reversed chains are equal, i.e.,

� Detailed Balance Equations ↔ Reversibility

*

ij ijP P=

π π , , 0,1,...i ij j jiP P i j= =

Page 9: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Reversibility – Discrete-Time Chains

� Theorem 1: If there exists a set of positive numbers {πj},

that sum up to 1 and satisfy:

Then:

π π , , 0,1,...i ij j jiP P i j= =

1. {πj} is the unique stationary distribution

2. The Markov chain is reversible

� Example: Discrete-time birth-death processes are

reversible, since they satisfy the DBE

Page 10: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Example: Birth-Death Process

One-dimensional Markov chain with transitions only between

0 1 n+1n2

, 1n nP +

1,n nP +,n nP, 1n nP −

1,n nP −01P

10P00P

S Sc

� One-dimensional Markov chain with transitions only between

neighboring states: Pij=0, if |i-j|>1

� Detailed Balance Equations (DBE)

� Proof: GBE with S ={0,1,…,n} give:

, 1 1 1,π π 0,1,...n n n n n nP P n+ + += =

, 1 1 1,

0 1 0 1

π π π π

n n

j ji i ij n n n n n n

j i n j i n

P P P P∞ ∞

+ + += = + = = +

= ⇒ =∑∑ ∑∑

Page 11: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Time-Reversed Markov Chains (Revisited)

� Theorem 2: Irreducible Markov chain with transition probabilities Pij.

If there exist:

� A set of transition probabilities Pij*, with ∑j Pij

*=1, i ≥ 0, and

� A set of positive numbers {πj}, that sum up to 1, such that

0,,*

≥= jiPP jijiji ππ� Then:

� Pij* are the transition probabilities of the reversed chain, and

� {πj} is the stationary distribution of the forward and the reversed

chains

� Remark: Used to find the stationary distribution, by guessing the

transition probabilities of the reversed chain – even if the process is

not reversible

jijiji

Page 12: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Continuous-Time Markov Chains

� {X(t): -∞< t <∞} irreducible aperiodic Markov chain with

transition rates qij, i≠j

� Unique stationary distribution (pi > 0) if and only if:

, 0,1,...j ji i iji j i jp q p q j

≠ ≠= =∑ ∑

� Process in steady state – e.g., started at t =-∞:

� If {πj} is the stationary distribution of the embedded

discrete-time chain:

j ji i iji j i j≠ ≠∑ ∑

limPr{ ( ) Pr{ ( ) | (0)} }t

jXX t t Xp j ij

→∞= = == =

π /, , 0,1,...

π /

j j

j j jii ji ii

p q jν

νν ≠

= ≡ =∑∑

Page 13: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Reversed Continuous-Time Markov Chains

� Reversed chain {Y(t)}, with Y(t)=X(τ-t), for arbitrary τ>0

� Proposition 2:

1. {Y(t)} is a continuous-time Markov chain with transition rates:

* , , 0,1,...,j ji

ij

i

p qq i j i j

p= = ≠

2. {Y(t)} has the same stationary distribution {pj} with the forward

chain

� Remark: The transition rate out of state i in the reversed chain is

equal to the transition rate out of state i in the forward chain

ip

* , 0,1,...j ji i ijj i j i

ij ij ij i j ii i

p q p qq q i

p pν≠ ≠

≠ ≠= = = = =∑ ∑

∑ ∑

Page 14: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Reversibility – Continuous-Time Chains

� Markov chain {X(t)} is reversible if and only if the transition rates

of forward and reversed chains are equal or equivalently

i.e., Detailed Balance Equations ↔ Reversibility

* ,ij ijq q=

, , 0,1,...,i ij j jip q p q i j i j= = ≠

� Theorem 3: If there exists a set of positive numbers {pj}, that sum

up to 1 and satisfy:

Then:

1. {pj} is the unique stationary distribution

2. The Markov chain is reversible

, , 0,1,...,i ij j jip q p q i j i j= = ≠

Page 15: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Example: Birth-Death Process

� Transitions only between neighboring states

0 1 n+1n2

1nµ +

1nλ −

S Sc

� Transitions only between neighboring states

� Detailed Balance Equations

� Proof: GBE with S ={0,1,…,n} give:

M/M/1, M/M/c, M/M/∞

, 1 , 1, , 0, | | 1i i i i i i ijq q q i jλ µ+ −= = = − >

1 1, 0,1,...n n n np p nλ µ + += =

1 1

0 1 0 1

n n

j ji i ij n n n n

j i n j i n

p q p q p pλ µ∞ ∞

+ += = + = = +

= ⇒ =∑ ∑ ∑∑

Page 16: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Reversed Continuous-Time Markov Chains (Revisited)

� Theorem 4: Irreducible continuous-time Markov chain with transition

rates qij. If there exist:

� A set of transition rates qij*, with ∑j≠i qij

* =∑j≠i qij, i ≥ 0, and

� A set of positive numbers {pj}, that sum up to 1, such that

jijiqpqp jijiji ≠≥= ,0,,*

� Then:

� qij* are the transition rates of the reversed chain, and

� {pj} is the stationary distribution of the forward and the reversed

chains

� Remark: Used to find the stationary distribution, by guessing the

transition probabilities of the reversed chain – even if the process is not

reversible

jijiqpqp jijiji ≠≥= ,0,,

Page 17: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Reversibility: Trees

Theorem 5:

01q

0 1

2

6

3

7

4

5

10q

12q

21q

16q

61q

23q

32q

67q

76q

� Irreducible Markov chain, with transition rates that satisfy qij>0 ↔ qji>0

� Form a graph for the chain, where states are the nodes, and for each

qij>0, there is a directed arc i→j

Then, if graph is a tree – contains no loops – then Markov chain is

reversible

Remarks:

� Sufficient condition for reversibility

� Generalization of one-dimensional birth-death process

Page 18: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Kolmogorov’s Criterion (Discrete Chain)

� Detailed balance equations determine whether a Markov chain is

reversible or not, based on stationary distribution and transition

probabilities

Should be able to derive a reversibility criterion based only on the

transition probabilities!

� Theorem 6: A discrete-time Markov chain is reversible if and only if:

for any finite sequence of states: i1, i2,…, in, and any n

� Intuition: Probability of traversing any loop i1→i2→…→in→i1 is equal to

the probability of traversing the same loop in the reverse direction

i1→in→…→i2→i1

1 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 3 2 2 1n n n n n ni i i i i i i i i i i i i i i iP P P P P P P P− −

=L L

Page 19: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Kolmogorov’s Criterion (Continuous Chain)

� Detailed balance equations determine whether a Markov chain is

reversible or not, based on stationary distribution and transition rates

Should be able to derive a reversibility criterion based only on the

transition rates!

Theorem 7: A continuous-time Markov chain is reversible if and only if:� Theorem 7: A continuous-time Markov chain is reversible if and only if:

for any finite sequence of states: i1, i2,…, in, and any n

� Intuition: Product of transition rates along any loop i1→i2→…→in→i1 is

equal to the product of transition rates along the same loop traversed

in the reverse direction i1→in→…→i2→i1

1 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 3 2 2 1n n n n n ni i i i i i i i i i i i i i i iq q q q q q q q− −

=L L

Page 20: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Kolmogorov’s Criterion (proof)

Proof of Theorem 6:

� Necessary: If the chain is reversible the DBE hold

1 2 2 1

2 3 3 2

1 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 3 2 2 1

1 2

2 3

π π

π π

π π

n n n n n n

i i i i

i i i i

i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i

P P

P P

P P P P P P P P

P P− −

=

= ⇒ =

=

M L L

� Sufficient: Fixing two states i1=i, and in=j and summing over all states

i2,…, in-1 we have

� Taking the limit n→∞

1 1

1 1

1

1

π π

π π

n n n n

n n

n i i n i i

n i i i i

P P

P P− −−

=

=

2 2 3 1 1 3 2 2

1 1

, , , ,n n

n n

i i i i i j ji ij j i i i i i ij ji ij jiP P P P P P P P P P P P

− −

− −= ⇒ =L L

1 1lim lim π πn n

ij ji ij ji j ji ij in n

P P P P P P− −

→∞ →∞⋅ = ⋅ ⇒ =

Page 21: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Example: M/M/2 Queue with Heterogeneous Servers

� M/M/2 queue. Servers A and B with service rates µA and µB respectively. When

the system empty, arrivals go to A with probability α and to B with probability

αλ

λ

λ

λ

0

1A

1B(1 )α λ−

Bµ2 3

λ

AµA Bµ µ+ A Bµ µ+

the system empty, arrivals go to A with probability α and to B with probability

1-α. Otherwise, the head of the queue takes the first free server.

� Need to keep track of which server is busy when there is 1 customer in the

system. Denote the two possible states by: 1A and 1B.

� Reversibility: we only need to check the loop 0→1A→2→1B→0:

� Reversible if and only if α=1/2.

What happens when µA=µB, and α≠1/2?

0,1 1 ,2 2,1 1 ,0 0,1 1 ,2 2,1 1 ,0 (1 )A A B B A B B B A A B Aq q q q q q q qαλ λ µ µ α λ λ µ µ= ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ = − ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

Page 22: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Example: M/M/2 Queue with Heterogeneous Servers

αλ

λ

λ

λ

0

1A

1B(1 )α λ−

2 3

λ

A Bµ µ+

A Bµ µ+

S1 S2

S3

S1 S2

2

2 , 2,3,...

n

n

A B

p p nλ

µ µ

= = +

1 0

0 1 1

2 1 1 1 0

1 0 2 2

2 0

( )

2

(1 )( )( ) ( )

2( )

(1 )

2

A BA

A A BA A B B

A BA B A B B

B A B

A A B

A B

A B A B

p p

p p p

p p p p p

p p p

p p

λ λ α µ µ

µ λ µ µλ µ µ

λ λ α µ µµ µ λ

µ λ µ µµ λ αλ µ

λ λ α µ αµ

µ µ λ µ µ

+ +=

+ += +

+ − ++ = + ⇒ =

+ ++ = + + − +

=+ +

12

0 1 1 02

(1 )1 1

2

A BA B nn

A B A B A B

p p p p p

=

+ − ++ + + = ⇒ = + + − + +

∑λ λ λ α µ αµ

µ µ λ µ µ λ µ µ

Page 23: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Outline

� Time-Reversal of Markov Chains

� Reversibility

� Truncating a Reversible Markov Chain

Burke’s Theorem� Burke’s Theorem

� Queues in Tandem

Page 24: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Multidimensional Markov Chains

Theorem 8:

� {X1(t)}, {X2(t)}: independent Markov chains

� {Xi(t)}: reversible

� {X(t)}, with X(t)=(X1(t), X2(t)): vector-valued stochastic process

{X(t)} is a Markov chain{X(t)} is a Markov chain

{X(t)} is reversible

Multidimensional Chains:

� Queueing system with two classes of customers, each having its own

stochastic properties – track the number of customers from each class

� Study the “joint” evolution of two queueing systems – track the number

of customers in each system

Page 25: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Example: Two Independent M/M/1 Queues

� Two independent M/M/1 queues. The arrival and service rates at

queue i are λi and µi respectively. Assume ρi= λi/µi<1.

� {(N1(t), N2(t))} is a Markov chain.

� Probability of n1 customers at queue 1, and n2 at queue 2, at

steady-statesteady-state

� “Product-form” distribution

� Generalizes for any number K of independent queues, M/M/1,

M/M/c, or M/M/∞. If pi(ni) is the stationary distribution of queue

i:

1 2

1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2( , ) (1 ) (1 ) ( ) ( )n n

p n n p n p nρ ρ ρ ρ= − ⋅ − = ⋅

1 2 1 1 2 2( , , , ) ( ) ( ) ( )K K Kp n n n p n p n p n=K K

Page 26: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

� Stationary distribution:

� Detailed Balance Equations:

Example (contd.)

1 2

1 1 2 21 2

1 1 2 2

( , ) 1 1

n n

p n nλ λ λ λ

µ µ µ µ

= − −

µ λ+ =

2λ 2µ2λ 2µ 2λ 2µ 2λ 2µ

02 12 22 32

1λ 1λ 1λ

µ µ µ

03 13 23 33

1λ 1λ 1λ

1µ 1µ 1µ

Verify that the Markov chain is

reversible – Kolmogorov criterion

1 1 2 1 1 2

2 1 2 2 1 2

( 1, ) ( , )

( , 1) ( , )

p n n p n n

p n n p n n

µ λ

µ λ

+ =

+ =2λ 2µ2λ 2µ 2λ 2µ 2λ 2µ

2λ 2µ2λ 2µ 2λ 2µ 2λ 2µ

1µ 1µ 1µ

01 11 21 31

1λ 1λ 1λ

1µ 1µ 1µ

00 10 20 30

1λ 1λ 1λ

1µ 1µ 1µ

Page 27: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Truncation of a Reversible Markov Chain

� Theorem 9: {X(t)} reversible Markov process with state space S, and

stationary distribution {pj: j∈S}. Truncated to a set E⊂S, such that the

resulting chain {Y(t)} is irreducible. Then, {Y(t)} is reversible and has

stationary distribution:

,j

j

pp j E

p= ∈∑

%

� Remark: This is the conditional probability that, in steady-state, the

original process is at state j, given that it is somewhere in E

� Proof: Verify that:

kk Ep

∈∑

, , ;

1

j ij ji i ij ji ij j ji i ij

k kk E k E

j

jj E j Ekk E

p pp q p q q q p q p q i j S i j

p p

pp

p

∈ ∈

∈ ∈

= ⇔ = ⇔ = ∈ ≠

= =

∑ ∑

∑ ∑ ∑

% %

%

Page 28: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Example: Two Queues with Joint Buffer

� The two independent M/M/1 queues of the

previous example share a common buffer

of size B – arrival that finds B customers

waiting is blocked

� State space restricted to

1 2 1 2{( , ) : ( 1) ( 1) }E n n n n B+ += − + − ≤

λ µ

2λ 2µ2λ 2µ

λ µ

λ µ

02 12

03 13

22

� Distribution of truncated chain:

� Normalizing:

Theorem specifies joint distribution up to

the normalization constant

�Calculation of normalization constant is

often tedious

1 2

1 2 1 2 1 2( , ) (0,0) , ( , )n np n n p n n Eρ ρ= ⋅ ∈

1 2

1 2

1

1 2

( , )

(0,0) n n

n n E

p ρ ρ

= ∑

2λ 2µ

2λ 2µ

2λ 2µ

2λ 2µ

2λ 2µ

2λ 2µ 2λ 2µ

01 11 21

1λ 1λ

1µ 1µ

00 10 20 30

1λ 1λ

1µ 1µ

31

State diagram for B =2

Page 29: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Outline

� Time-Reversal of Markov Chains

� Reversibility

� Truncating a Reversible Markov Chain

Burke’s Theorem� Burke’s Theorem

� Queues in Tandem

Page 30: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Birth-death process

� {X(t)} birth-death process with stationary distribution {pj}

� Arrival epochs: points of increase for {X(t)}

Departure epoch: points of decrease for {X(t)}

� {X(t)} completely determines the corresponding arrival and departure

processesprocesses

Arrivals

Departures

Page 31: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Forward & reversed chains of M/M/* queues

� Poisson arrival process: λj=λ, for all j

� Birth-death process called a (λ, µj)-process

� Examples: M/M/1, M/M/c, M/M/∞ queues

� Poisson arrivals → LAA: for any time t, future arrivals are independent

of {X(s): s≤t}

� (λ, µj)-process at steady state is reversible: forward and reversed

chains are stochastically identical

� => Arrival processes of the forward and reversed chains are

stochastically identical

� => Arrival process of the reversed chain is Poisson with rate λ

� + “the arrival epochs of the reversed chain are the departure epochs of the

forward chain” => Departure process of the forward chain is Poisson

with rate λ

Page 32: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Forward & reversed chains of M/M/* queues (contd.)

t

t

t

t

� Reversed chain: arrivals after time t are independent of the chain

history up to time t (LAA)

� => Forward chain: departures prior to time t and future of the

chain {X(s): s≥t} are independent

Page 33: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Burke’s Theorem

� Theorem 10: Consider an M/M/1, M/M/c, or M/M/∞ system with

arrival rate λ. Suppose that the system starts at steady-state. Then:

1. The departure process is Poisson with rate λ

2. At each time t, the number of customers in the system is

independent of the departure times prior to tindependent of the departure times prior to t

� Fundamental result for study of networks of M/M/* queues, where

output process from one queue is the input process of another

Page 34: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Outline

� Time-Reversal of Markov Chains

� Reversibility

� Truncating a Reversible Markov Chain

Burke’s Theorem� Burke’s Theorem

� Queues in Tandem

Page 35: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Single-Server Queues in Tandem

� Customers arrive at queue 1 according to Poisson process with rate

λ.

λ λPoisson

1µ 2µ

Station 1 Station 2

λ.

� Service times exponential with mean 1/µi. Assume service times of a

customer in the two queues are independent.

� Assume ρi=λ/µi<1

� What is the joint stationary distribution of N1 and N2 – number of

customers in each queue?

Result: in steady state the queues are independent and

1 2

1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2( , ) (1 ) (1 ) ( ) ( )n n

p n n p n p nρ ρ ρ ρ= − ⋅ − = ⋅

Page 36: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Single-Server Queues in Tandem

� Q1 is a M/M/1 queue. At steady state its departure process is Poisson

with rate λ. Thus Q2 is also M/M/1.

� Marginal stationary distributions:

λ λPoisson

1µ 2µ

Station 1 Station 2

� Marginal stationary distributions:

To complete the proof: establish independence at steady state

� Q1 at steady state: at time t, N1(t) is independent of departures prior

to t, which are arrivals at Q2 up to t. Thus N1(t) and N2(t)

independent:

� Letting t→∞, the joint stationary distribution1 2

1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2( , ) ( ) ( ) (1 ) (1 )n n

p n n p n p n ρ ρ ρ ρ= ⋅ = − ⋅ −

1

1 1 1 1 1( ) (1 ) , 0,1,...n

p n nρ ρ= − = 2

2 2 2 2 2( ) (1 ) , 0,1,...n

p n nρ ρ= − =

1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2{ ( ) , ( ) } { ( ) } { ( ) } ( ) { ( ) }P N t n N t n P N t n P N t n p n P N t n= = = = = = ⋅ =

Page 37: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Queues in Tandem

� Theorem 11: Network consisting of K single-server queues in tandem.

Service times at queue i exponential with rate µi, independent of

service times at any queue j≠i. Arrivals at the first queue are Poisson

with rate λ. The stationary distribution of the network is:

( , , ) (1 ) , 0,1,...; 1,...,i

Kn

p n n n i Kρ ρ= − = =∏K

� At steady state the queues are independent; the distribution of queue i

is that of an isolated M/M/1 queue with arrival and service rates λ and

µi

�Are the queues independent if not in steady state? Are stochastic

processes {N1(t)} and {N2(t)} independent?

11

( , , ) (1 ) , 0,1,...; 1,...,i

K i i ii

p n n n i Kρ ρ=

= − = =∏K

( ) (1 ) , 0,1,...in

i i i i ip n nρ ρ= − =

Page 38: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Queues in Tandem: State-Dependent Service Rates

� Theorem 12: Network consisting of K queues in tandem. Service times

at queue i exponential with rate µi(ni) when there are ni customers in

the queue – independent of service times at any queue j≠i. Arrivals at

the first queue are Poisson with rate λ. The stationary distribution of

the network is:( , , ) ( ), 0,1,...; 1,...,

K

p n n p n n i K= = =∏the network is:

where {pi(ni)} is the stationary distribution of queue i in isolation with

Poisson arrivals with rate λ

� Examples: ./M/c and ./M/∞ queues

� If queue i is ./M/∞, then:

11

( , , ) ( ), 0,1,...; 1,...,K i i ii

p n n p n n i K=

= = =∏K

/( / )( ) , 0,1,...

!

i

i

n

ii i i

i

p n e nn

λ µλ µ −= =

Page 39: Time Reversibility and Burke's Theorem

Summary

� Time-Reversal of Markov Chains

� Reversibility

� Truncating a Reversible Markov Chain

Multi-dimensional Markov chains� Multi-dimensional Markov chains

� Burke’s Theorem

� Queues in Tandem


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