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To Kenneth. C. Wright Itali In Homer Church Sunday Boy ... 21/Cortland NY... · showed slides of...

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  • HOMER SCOTT - LITTLE YORK - PREBLE

    NEWS REPORTER - Mrs. Josephine Brown, 22 Cherry St. Dial 749-3944. Deadline for news items 9 a.m.

    HOMER CIRCULATION MANAGER - Mrs. Doric S. Mercer

    32 Cayuga St. Dial 749-2294. HOMER RURAL CIRCULATION - Charles A. Burk.

    Dial 749-3851.

    Mayor Harry Calale Notes Boy Scout Achievements

    HOMER — After signing a resolution honoring the B o y Scouts in Homer, Mayor Harry Calale noted that he was es-pecially pleased with the inter-est shown in community affairs by the election of boys to repre-sent the village officials, and the attendance of a number of tbe hoys at the village board meeting Tuesday evening.

    He also noted that Boy Scouts had helped in the community by working with the firemen and keeping the skating rink on the green in good shape. Members of the troop have assumed the responsibility of keeping t h e fire hydrants near their homes clear of snow.

    In proclaiming this B o y Scout Week in the village, May. or Calale spoke of the 53 years of service the Tioughnioga Council has given to the com-munity and noted that over 5,-000 boys have participated in the program of character building, citizenship training and mental and physical fitness.

    SEMGHTLY CLOB HEARS TALK ON EUROPEAN TOUR

    HOMER — The Sennightly Literary Club held its regular meeting_Monday at the home of Mrs. Frederick Green i n Homer. Mrs. John Townley, president, conducted the busi-ness meeting.

    Mrs. John MacNeiU introduc-ed the guest speaker, Mrs. Leo Bailey, of Preble, a member of the Seven Valley Weaver's Guild, who spoke to the group of her travels this past summer in Europe by Campmobile. She showed slides of the famous Bayeux Tapestry of Bayeux, s Normandy made in the Eleventh Century which took many people seven years to complete; It is 231 feet long.

    Another set of slides was shown of a stencilled coverlet over 100 years old and Mrs. Bailey displayed the actual cov-er. Mrs. Bailey also brought two small table looms and different types of shuttles used in weav-ing.

    She demonstrated threading on the looms and spoke of color, design and dying of materials in weaving. Also on display were samples of her work and that of her daughter, Mrs. Catherine Miranda. Mrs. Miranda had been the official weaver and dy-er at Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia.

    At the close of the program refreshments were served by Mrs. Green and ber co-hostess-es, Mrs. William Webster and Mi»s :mimi rvuOreWS.

    The next meeting of Sennight-ly will be held Feb. 17 at the home of Mrs. Newton Williams with Mrs. Donald Steger and Mrs. Walter Spencer as co-hostesses. Mrs. Darwin Johnson has charge of the program, "An American Teacher in France."

    LEGAL NOTICE REPUBLICAN PRIMARY

    To th« Republican Electors of the Village of Homer. Cortland

    subject to Senate confirmation. Sen. William Proxmire, D-

    Wis., a leader in the unsuccess-ful fight against Hickel's confir-mation by tbe Senate, wrote Hickel over the weekend pro-testing the appointment of Watt.

    "Although I realize that you are entitled to hire those whom you wish to work on your staff," Proxmire wrote, "I think the appointment of a man who is so identified with the private inter-ests can only create a credibili-ty gap between your statements of concern for the public inter-est . . . and your actions as sec-retary of the interior . . ."

    Last year when the House Public Works Committee was considering new water pollution control standards written by then Secretary of Interior Stew-art L. Udall, Watt opposed them " on the ground that Udall was overstepping his authority. Ne also argued in written testimony that they would be too expen-sive for industry to implement.

    The standards would have re- -quired a minimum of two stages " of treatment for municipal wastes and "comparable" treat- \ ment for industrial wastes.

    Watt said the standards would require two stages of treatment . for industrial wastes as well—a • point denied by Interior officials \ —and said that if the federal • government insisted on such ; standards, the federal govern- . ment should help pay for them ; and greater annual depreciation '. allowances for industry con-structing new waste treatment \ facilities.

    His position prompted a Capi- ; tol Hill source to remark that . Watt "is willing to accept what- ; ever industry has to do if the \ public will pay for i t"

    Watt also opposed Interior De- ; partment-approved legislation . which would have provided for ; federal-state cooperation in re- ! claiming land mutilated by strip • mining. \

    On May 10, 1968, Watt wrote Sen. Henry M. Jackson, D- ; Wash., chairman of the Senate Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, that the reclama-tion legislation was both im-proper and unnecessary.

    "Local and state governments are constitutionally responsible for regulating land use, not the federal government," he wrote. "The facts indicate that there is no need for the federal govern-ment to preempt the field of land conservation and reclama-tion, and there is reason to be-lieve that the proposed formula for federal-state cooperation, al-though reasonable, would be im-properly administered by the Department of Interior . . . "

    The 90th Congress took no ac-tion on either the water pollu-tion or reclamation legislation, and both issues have been re-submitted this year.

    91st Congress - -(Continued from Page 1)

    on bills dealing with education, airplane hijacking and election law changes.

    Still, the calendars for both chambers are bare for the re-turn to work and, with the ex-ception of Senate consideration of the nuclear nonproliferation treaty, there won't be much ma-jor floor work to do for another six weeks or so.

    The slow opening and the ex-pected volume of proposed bills has congressional leaders re-signed to a long session. They already have announced plans for the customary recesses in addition to something new—a Campaign recers—

    A critic of the Democratic op-eration recalls: "In the last Congress the campaign commit-tee didn't meet Until October 1967, one year before the elec-tion. Mike Kerwan told some stories about serving under Roosevelt. Then the speaker (John W. McCormack) got up and told some stories about serving under Hoover and Roo sevelt. Everybody had heard the stories before. Then it was moved to have the usual fund-raising dinner with the Senate. That's the last meeting we had."

    This year the committee is understood to be opening its doors to wider participation by members and looking for ways to raise more money, too.

    One source insisted the com-mittee would be lucky to raise one-third as much as the Repub-lican budget, but added:

    "We are going to be doing more than we have ever done before. We hope to sharpen our financial operation to improve our political operation. We'll just have to be patient to see if the dollars roll in."

    Calligraphy is the art of firv-writing.

    (other name, if jotnt account)

    State

    CS-2W

    1

    THAT COMPRISES BOTH A

    MATCH AMD AM HOURGLASS IF ONE FAILS. THE OTHER CAN SE USED

    EMIN 6IUN 06LJ A PERSIAN COMMANDER WHO

    TRAITOROUSLY SURRENDERED HIS FORTRESS TO SULTAN AMURATH W OF TURKEY IKJ 1635. WAS

    REWARDED HANDSOMELY gUT WHEN AMURATH DIED IN 1640 AND HIS SUCCESSOR SUED FOR PEACE, THE PERSIAN KIN6 SWORE THAT UNLESS OGLI WAS PUNISHED THE WAR.

    WOULD CONTINUE FOR 100 YEARS THE HEW TURKISH SULTAN

    PROWLY ORDERED 06U ARRESTED -AM> HAD HIM STRANGLED

    - i

    J Untitled Document

    file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Administrator/Desktop/hello.html2/18/2007 11:01:03 AM

    Thomas M. Tryniski 309 South 4th Street Fulton New York 13069

    www.fultonhistory.com

of 1/1
HOMER SCOTT - LITTLE YORK - PREBLE NEWS REPORTER - Mrs. Josephine Brown, 22 Cherry St. Dial 749-3944. Deadline for news items 9 a.m. HOMER CIRCULATION MANAGER - Mrs. Doric S. Mercer 32 Cayuga St. Dial 749-2294. HOMER RURAL CIRCULATION - Charles A. Burk. Dial 749-3851. Mayor Harry Calale Notes Boy Scout Achievements HOMER — After signing a resolution honoring the Boy Scouts in Homer, Mayor Harry Calale noted that he was es- pecially pleased with the inter- est shown in community affairs by the election of boys to repre- sent the village officials, and the attendance of a number of tbe hoys at the village board meeting Tuesday evening. He also noted that Boy Scouts had helped in the community by working with the firemen and keeping the skating rink on the green in good shape. Members of the troop have assumed the responsibility of keeping the fire hydrants near their homes clear of snow. In proclaiming this Boy Scout Week in the village, May. or Calale spoke of the 53 years of service the Tioughnioga Council has given to the com- munity and noted that over 5,- 000 boys have participated in the program of character building, citizenship training and mental and physical fitness. SEMGHTLY CLOB HEARS TALK ON EUROPEAN TOUR HOMER — The Sennightly Literary Club held its regular meeting_Monday at the home of Mrs. Frederick Green in Homer. Mrs. John Townley, president, conducted the busi- ness meeting. Mrs. John MacNeiU introduc- ed the guest speaker, Mrs. Leo Bailey, of Preble, a member of the Seven Valley Weaver's Guild, who spoke to the group of her travels this past summer in Europe by Campmobile. She showed slides of the famous Bayeux Tapestry of Bayeux, s Normandy made in the Eleventh Century which took many people seven years to complete; It is 231 feet long. Another set of slides was shown of a stencilled coverlet over 100 years old and Mrs. Bailey displayed the actual cov- er. Mrs. Bailey also brought two small table looms and different types of shuttles used in weav- ing. She demonstrated threading on the looms and spoke of color, design and dying of materials in weaving. Also on display were samples of her work and that of her daughter, Mrs. Catherine Miranda. Mrs. Miranda had been the official weaver and dy- er at Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia. At the close of the program refreshments were served by Mrs. Green and ber co-hostess- es, Mrs. William Webster and Mi»s :mimi rvuOreWS. The next meeting of Sennight- ly will be held Feb. 17 at the home of Mrs. Newton Williams with Mrs. Donald Steger and Mrs. Walter Spencer as co- hostesses. Mrs. Darwin Johnson has charge of the program, "An American Teacher in France." LEGAL NOTICE REPUBLICAN PRIMARY To th« Republican Electors of the Village of Homer. Cortland <"ounty. New York: Ple»*e take Xi»tle» that an unofficial Repub- lican Primary of the Republican Klectorx <rf the Village of Homer. New York will be held in the Fire Station Building in the Vil- lage of Homer. New York on the 20th day of February. 1969. at 7:30 o'clock p.m. for the pur- jK>xe of making nominations for the Village Offices to be filled at the ensuing Village Election. Said Village Election will b^ held on the ISth day of March. 19fi*t. Offices to be filled at such ele.-tions are: mayor and two trustees. Enrolled Republican voters are eligible, to vote at said unofficial primary. Republican Village Committee 34-2t Mon. He continued by saying that these programs prepare the boys to meet the challenges of the future and enable them to give leadership in the commut nity, state and country levels. BUTTON CLUBS PLMi SATURDAY MEETISfiS HOMER — The regular meet- ing of the David Harum Button Club will be held at 11 a. m. Saturday at the Parish House of Calvary Episcopal Church, Homer. Hostesses for the day will be Mrs. Mildred Huntley of Dryden and Mrs. Connie McKendrick of Cortland. The program for the day is to be a talk on "Textile Buttons," which will be given by Mrs. Lynn Coleman. The regular meeting of the David Harum Juniors will ^ be held at 9 a. m. at the home of Mrs. Lynn Coleman, 111 S. Main St The hostess will be Joni Bod- man. Susan Cooper will present a program on "Glass Buttons." Members are to bring their pearl buttons so they can work on their project for the national convention this fall. There will also be a rehearsal for the play the children are to present in May. Any child who has not made her button for the play should bring a large sheet of bristol board from which to make it. Election of officers will be held at this meeting. •Coming Events- HOMER — Tbe list of com- ing events for Homer win ap- pear each Monday evecag. Dates to be added must be at the home of the correspondent Saturday. Fefcraary Monday 10, Homer Lodge 352 F&AM. 10, Preble Town Board. 10, Lions Club. 10, Homer Hospital Aid. 10, Troop 85. 10, Bible Study — Baptist Church. Tuesday 11, Homer Chapter 222 OES 11, Thoroughly Modern Mil- lies. 11, School Board. 11, Shady Brook Rebekah Lodge. 11, American Legion. 11, 02BS. 11, Sea Explorers. 11, T&C Club. 11, Town and Country Garden Club. 11, Little York Grange. 11, Bible Study, Baptist Church. Wednesday 12, Homer Grange. 12, De Molay. 12, Julia Woodward Club. 12, PL&H Club. 12, PTA Student Adult Panel. Thursday 13, Little York Gar- den Club. 13, Nibble Nots. Saturday, 15, Campers and Hikers Asso. Cong. Church. 15, Rebekah and Oddfellows supper. 15, David Harum Button Club. 15, Glen Haven Lakelanders. 15, Scotties 4H Club. Monday, 17, Washington Chapter 29, RAM. 17, Sennightly Club. 17, Troop 85. Tuesday, 18, Iolanthe Rebekah Lodge. 18, Legion Auxiliary. 18, Sea Explorers. 18, 02BS. Wednesday, 19, Ash Wednes- day. 19, ICOF. Thursday, 20, Nibble Nots. Friday, 21, Leisure Hour Club. Saturday, 22, Sam San Club. 22, Beaver Meadows 4-H Club. Smallest bank pays highest interest 5% Time Account earns 5.13% at Dryden. The bank that does more for its customers is doing it again. This time it's the opportunity to earn the highest legal interest on as little as $1,000. Plus a special bonus. The First National Bank of Dry- dens new PLUS-5 Time Deposit Account pays ¥Xt>. but because we compound the interest daily, you get a bonus, your annual return will be 5.13% when held for I year. You don't have to be a Big Shot to earn highest interest at First Na- tional of Dryden. Other banks re- quire as much as $5,000. $10,000 or even $15,000 to earn top rates. But First National of Dryden is the smallest bank, so they make it eas- ier for you. Start with as little as $1.000—add to it in any amount as often as you please. You earn guaranteed interest from the day of deposit compounded every day. Withdraw on 90 days' notice. The smallest bank has many big new ideas. Like no-cost checking and daily interest on regular savings. Come visit us during Customers' Hours—we're just a short distance down the road. Or use the handy coupon to open w . r account by mail, or phone us .it 844-3145 or 753-0392. Earn the most for your money from the bank that does the most for you. Get started. Write now. Dryden. N.Y. 13053 Member. FDIC D The First National Bank of Dryden Enclosed find T. check I ' passbook from another bank in the amount of S Please open [14% Daily Interest Savings Account H 5% PLUS 5 Time Deposit (Minimum $1,000) Name Address City ' Miss Tari Ainslie Wed To Kenneth. C. Wright In Homer Church Sunday Mon., Feb. 10, 1969 CORTLAND STANDARD Page 7 Itali Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Wright LEISURE HOUR CLUB HOLDS GUEST NIGHT HOMER — The Leisure Hour Club met at the home of Mrs. James Russell Friday evening for their guest night program. Mrs. Lane Perkins, club president, welcomed the 32 members and nine guests and introduced a new member, Mrs. A. A. Coburn. Mrs. Archie Petty introduced the speaker, Mrs. Harold Creal of Homer, who is becoming known as a world traveller, since she and her husband have traveled to many lands includ- ing India, Australia and New Zealand. Saturday they were leaving for a safari in Africa. Mrs. Creal described the trip she and Mr. Creal took last summer through the Canadian Rockies and other points of interest in Canada and the United States. Her talk, accom- panied by slides of the beautiful scenery aSng the trip, made a very interesting program. A social hour followed the program, with Mrs. Michael Morgan and Miss Mary Pratt assisting the hostess. Members are asked to note the change ni the schedule for the next meeting. It will be held at the home of Mrs. Sue r—it- age Feb. 21. PREBLE CHURCH FAULT NIGHT SUPPER TUESMY PREBLE — The Women's Service Guild of the Preble Congregational Church will sponsor a family night supper tomorrow evening, starting at 7. The meat, potatoes and cof- fee will be furnished and each family is asked to bring rolls, table service and a dish of food to pass. Dr. William CaWwallader will present a program of his experiences in Mexico, where he lived for two years under the sponsorship of the American Friends Service. Donors Needed For Bloodmobile Here Wednesday HOMER — Because of the cancellation of the bloodmobile last week due to weather condi- tions, the number of donors that are needed to complete the quota has risen to 75. This is because donors cannot resched- ule their activities for this week and other unforeseen problems. The shortage of blood is so acute that within two days at the Cortland Memorial Hospital it was necessary to caU for six emergency donors to meet the demand. Any person who is able to give Wood is urged to go to the Homer Bloodmobile at the American Legion Hall between 10:30 and 4:15 Wednesday and help bring tbe total donations to at least 125 pints. HOMER LIONS CLUB WILL MEET TONIGHT HOMER — Ken Little, pro- gram chairman for the Lions Club, has scheduled an inter- esting program at the regular meeting of the club to be held tonight at 7 at the David Harum Restaurant Members are reminded of the mid-winter conference to be held Feb. 15 at the Midtown Plaza, Syracuse, from 3 to 9 p. m. Women may also attend this meeting. March 1 is the deadline date for the payment of delinquent dues. BEATER MEADOW 4-H CLUB MEETS SATURDAY HOMER The Beaver Meadow 4-H Club met Saturday and the boys who had com- pleted the Demonstration Day projects exhibited them. All other members are to present them at the next meeting which will be held Feb. 22. The 4-H dairyman's judging contest was discussed and each boy was given a picture of the event A recreation period followed the business meeting. HOMER — An antique chip diamond ring borrowed from her godmother. Miss Friendly Virgil, was the "something old" worn by Miss Tari Alane Ainslie Sunday when she be- came the bride of Kenneth Christopher Wright at the Calvary Episcopal Church. Miss Ainslie is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Ainslie, SO Cayuga St, and the bride- groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Wright 16 Kellogg Rd., Cortland. The double ring service was performed at 2 p. m. by the Rev. Edward Tulis Jr., and the church was decorated with vases of cream colored chry- santhemums and bouquets of yellow and white pompons on the altar. Miss Anna Ripley, aunt of the bride, was the organist and played traditional wedding marches and appropriate selec- tions before the ceremony. The bride, given in marriage by her father, selected a chapel length gown of crepe with Venise lace trimming and ac- cents of satin. The bodice was fashioned with a high banded neckline and long sleeves trim- med with lace cuffs. The skirt was A-line and the chapel train was attached from the shoulders. Her veil was a mantilla of il- lusion trimmed with Venise lace and satin and she carried a Delphi daisy bouquet made of white mums to represent a huge daisy. Her jewels were pearl earrings, a gift from her grandmother, and she carried a handkerchief that her mother had carried on her wedding day. _ Miss Marcia Wheeler of Homer was the maid of honor and the bridesmaids were Miss Linda Stafford of Cortland and Miss Dorothy Perkowski of Utica. The attendants wore identical gowns of mint green fashioned of rayon over cotton made in a cage style. A panel of lace trim- med tbe back of the gowns and the neckline and bouffant sleeves. They wore matching shoulder length veils and the bouquets were crescent shaped and made of large mums with tbe maid of honor's tinted a darker green than the other attendants. Ronald Bradford was hest Believe It ortot/ man and tbe ushers were Ralph Wright brother of the bridge- groom, and Michael Maxwell, all of Cortland. For her daughter's wedding, Mrs. Ainslie chose an avocado green brocade dress with matching coat and accessories Her corsage wa s of yellow ros: buds. Mrs. Wright wore a light green two piece lace suit and matching accessories. She also had a corsage of yellow rose- buds. The bride's grandmothers both attended the wedding and were presented with corsages. A reception was held in the church parish hall immediately following the ceremony and the bride's table was decorated with bouquets of flowers and silver candelabras. The four tiered wedding cake was trim- med with yellow roses and green leaves and the top was decorated with a miniature bride and bridegroom standing in front of an a tar. Mrs. Lucille Ripley, aunt of the bride, and Miss Mary Stoker served the cake. Miss Jill Ripley, cousin of toe bride was in charge of the guest book. For their wedding trip to Niagara Falls, the new Mrs. Wright changed to an orange and navy blue plaid suit with a Nehru collar. The young couple will be at home at 15V* Clinton St., Homer after Feb. 15. The bride is a 1968 graduate of Homer Central School and is employed by Marriott Corp. as a cashier. The bridegroom is a 1966 graduate of Cortland High School and is employed at SCM, South Cortland plant as a 4-year tool and die ap- prentice. Pre-nuptial parties for the bride included a shower given by Miss Marcia Wheeler, maid of honor, and one given by Mrs. Franklyn Ripley, aunt of the bride. The bridegroom was enter- tained at the Barberosa Restau- rant by his co-workers and the bridegroom's parents enter- tained at a buffet dinner served at their home following the re- hearsaL Out of town guests were pre- s e n t from Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Ithaca, Fly Creek, Weedsport and Horse- heads. ian (Continued from Page 1) likely Co find an echo in a score of other parties at a most awk- ward time for Moscow. The So- viet party is trying to arrange an international Communist meeting for May to demonstrate that the movement is united and listens to Moscow. All this can lead to a quarrel among the Soviet leadership re- garding who is to blame. Tbe blame could easily fall on Brezhnev. Brezhnev issued his "doc- trine" on Sept. 26, holding that Communists must regard inter, national and national law as "subordinate to the laws of class struggle and social devel- o p m e n t." Communist-ruled states, it held, have only limited sovereignty which ends when Moscow decides any internal de- velopment threatens party au- thority. The Romanians and Yugo. slavs, and now the Italians, re- ject this. Other parties find it embarrassing, since it asserts in effect that any country ruled by Communists must be a So- viet satellite. Signs of frustration in Moscow are plentiful. Pravda fumes about "so-called liberalization" and "false slogans of Socialist humanitarianism." The Soviet press hints that the internation- al meeting in May could bring a restoration of the concept of the Communist International, which before World War H exacted obedience to Moscow from all the world's Red parties. The Soviet party was divided on the invasion of Czechoslova- kia, according to all the signs. The indications are that the leadership remains divided. Should the leaders become in- volved in a test between the tough-liners and moderates to assess the blame for what has happened, it could lead to some spectacular political fireworks. FAMILY PROVIDERS NEW DELHI (AP) - Workers for the government's aircraft plant at Bangalore found a cheap way of providing food for their families. The plant has a cafeteria which sells a meal for 41 paise (about 5.2 cents) and a second helping for 10 paise (1.3 cents). Plant officials found employes were carrying lunch boxes into the canteen, eat- ing the first helping at noon and taking the second helping home in the lunch box. Lunch boxes have been banned. SIX INJURED — State Police at the Homer substation reported that the car seen here through Sunday morning snow flakes, crossed Route 281 to the opposite traffic lane in Preble where it struck an oncoming car. The driver and passenger of the Volkswagen were injured, while four occupants of the second car also sustained injuries. The driver of the VW, George A. Dunn, 20. of Ithaca, was ticketed for driving while intoxicated. Trooper Fran- cis Kodya investigated. (See separate story). (Ivan Kingsley Photo) GOP State Senators t ST. MARY'S CHURCH at Church Point, St. Marv's Say Shore. Ho/a Scctia. /S THE LARGEST WOODEH CHURCH IN ALL CANADA (Continued from Page 1) lawfully possessing noxious ma- terial" — smoke bombs, for in- stance. Democratic opponents of the measure have complained that such terms as "harrassment" and "nuisance" are too vague. They argue that college admin- istrators could use them to in- timidate students. In any event, undergraduate violators would forfeit state scholarships paying between $250 and $1,000 a year and schol- ar incentive awards ranging from $100 to $500. Graduate stu- dents would lose scholarships WORLD WEEK valued at up to $2,500 and schol- ar incentive aid of up to $800, Apart from the Flymi bill and the budget hearings, the legisla- ture faced a week of routine ac- tivity. Brydges and Speaker Perry B. Duryea planned to keep the Senate and Assembly in session through Wednesday anyhow, so that the lawmakers could pur- sue committee work on major bills. Brydges reported that he had had surprisingly little reaction from his colleagues to the pro- posals Rockefeller unveiled last Thursday for even further budg- et economies—in fiscal 1970-71. Basically Rockefeller recom- mended a 10 per cent cutback from the higher levels of state aid that the present formulas would require. "Frankly, I like the. general approach," Brydges said. "But whether we can do it, as a prac- tical matter, is something else." * The Spars. Women's Reserve of the U.S. Coast Guard, were named from a contraction of the Guard's motto. Semper Paratus (always readv). Hiclcel - - - (Continued from Page 1> subject to Senate confirmation. Sen. William Proxmire, D- Wis., a leader in the unsuccess- ful fight against Hickel's confir- mation by tbe Senate, wrote Hickel over the weekend pro- testing the appointment of Watt. "Although I realize that you are entitled to hire those whom you wish to work on your staff," Proxmire wrote, "I think the appointment of a man who is so identified with the private inter- ests can only create a credibili- ty gap between your statements of concern for the public inter- est . . . and your actions as sec- retary of the interior . . ." Last year when the House Public Works Committee was considering new water pollution control standards written by then Secretary of Interior Stew- art L. Udall, Watt opposed them " on the ground that Udall was overstepping his authority. Ne also argued in written testimony that they would be too expen- sive for industry to implement. The standards would have re- - quired a minimum of two stages " of treatment for municipal wastes and "comparable" treat- \ ment for industrial wastes. Watt said the standards would require two stages of treatment . for industrial wastes as well—a • point denied by Interior officials \ —and said that if the federal • government insisted on such ; standards, the federal govern- . ment should help pay for them ; and greater annual depreciation '. allowances for industry con- structing new waste treatment \ facilities. His position prompted a Capi- ; tol Hill source to remark that . Watt "is willing to accept what- ; ever industry has to do if the \ public will pay for i t " Watt also opposed Interior De- ; partment-approved legislation . which would have provided for ; federal-state cooperation in re- ! claiming land mutilated by strip • mining. \ On May 10, 1968, Watt wrote Sen. Henry M. Jackson, D- ; Wash., chairman of the Senate Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, that the reclama- tion legislation was both im- proper and unnecessary. "Local and state governments are constitutionally responsible for regulating land use, not the federal government," he wrote. "The facts indicate that there is no need for the federal govern- ment to preempt the field of land conservation and reclama- tion, and there is reason to be- lieve that the proposed formula for federal-state cooperation, al- though reasonable, would be im- properly administered by the Department of Interior . . . " The 90th Congress took no ac- tion on either the water pollu- tion or reclamation legislation, and both issues have been re- submitted this year. 91st Congress - - (Continued from Page 1) on bills dealing with education, airplane hijacking and election law changes. Still, the calendars for both chambers are bare for the re- turn to work and, with the ex- ception of Senate consideration of the nuclear nonproliferation treaty, there won't be much ma- jor floor work to do for another six weeks or so. The slow opening and the ex- pected volume of proposed bills has congressional leaders re- signed to a long session. They already have announced plans for the customary recesses in addition to something new—a Campaign recers— A critic of the Democratic op- eration recalls: "In the last Congress the campaign commit- tee didn't meet Until October 1967, one year before the elec- tion. Mike Kerwan told some stories about serving under Roosevelt. Then the speaker (John W. McCormack) got up and told some stories about serving under Hoover and Roo sevelt. Everybody had heard the stories before. Then it was moved to have the usual fund- raising dinner with the Senate. That's the last meeting we had." This year the committee is understood to be opening its doors to wider participation by members and looking for ways to raise more money, too. One source insisted the com- mittee would be lucky to raise one-third as much as the Repub- lican budget, but added: "We are going to be doing more than we have ever done before. We hope to sharpen our financial operation to improve our political operation. We'll just have to be patient to see if the dollars roll in." Calligraphy is the art of firv- writing. (other name, if jotnt account) State CS-2W 1 THAT COMPRISES BOTH A MATCH AMD AM HOURGLASS IF ONE FAILS. THE OTHER CAN SE USED EMIN 6IUN 06LJ A PERSIAN COMMANDER WHO TRAITOROUSLY SURRENDERED HIS FORTRESS TO SULTAN AMURATH W OF TURKEY IKJ 1635. WAS REWARDED HANDSOMELY gUT WHEN AMURATH DIED IN 1640 AND HIS SUCCESSOR SUED FOR PEACE, THE PERSIAN KIN6 SWORE THAT UNLESS OGLI WAS PUNISHED THE WAR. WOULD CONTINUE FOR 100 YEARS THE HEW TURKISH SULTAN PROWLY ORDERED 06U ARRESTED - AM> HAD HIM STRANGLED -i J Thomas M. Tryniski 309 South 4th Street Fulton New York 13069 www.fultonhistory.com
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